Stella Creasy Portrait

Stella Creasy

Labour (Co-op) - Walthamstow

First elected: 6th May 2010


Stella Creasy is not a member of any APPGs
3 Former APPG memberships
Deliberative Democracy, Reserve Forces and Cadets, Reserves and Cadets
Pensions (Extension of Automatic Enrolment) (No. 2) Bill
8th Mar 2023 - 15th Mar 2023
Protection from Sex-based Harassment in Public Bill
8th Feb 2023 - 22nd Feb 2023
Equipment Theft (Prevention) Bill
25th Jan 2023 - 1st Feb 2023
Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform Bill)
2nd Nov 2022 - 29th Nov 2022
Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Science and Technology Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Science, Innovation and Technology Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Public Accounts Commission
26th Jan 2011 - 4th Nov 2015
Shadow Minister (Business, Innovation and Skills)
7th Oct 2013 - 18th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
7th Oct 2011 - 7th Oct 2013
Public Accounts Committee
2nd Nov 2010 - 24th Oct 2011


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Motor Vehicles (Driving Licences) (Reform)
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 77 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 81
Speeches
Monday 19th February 2024
Post Office Governance and Horizon Compensation Schemes
Many of us will be concerned about the Department that oversees employment rights being one where thousands of people know …
Written Answers
Wednesday 21st February 2024
Customs: Digital Technology
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to publish his response to the Government's consultation on …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Tuesday 20th October 2020
Equal Pay (Information and Claims) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to make provision for a right for employees to obtain information relating to the pay of a comparator; …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 18th September 2023
8. Miscellaneous
From February 2022, Chair of the Labour Movement for Europe. This is an unpaid role.
EDM signed
Tuesday 26th October 2021
The service of Oliver Denton Lieberman
That this House recognises Oliver Denton Lieberman’s dedication and public service as an office manager during many turbulent years in …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 20th December 2022
Shared Parental Leave and Pay (Bereavement) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to make provision about shared parental leave and pay in certain cases where one or both of a …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Stella Creasy has voted in 790 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Stella Creasy Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
John Glen (Conservative)
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
(28 debate interactions)
Robert Jenrick (Conservative)
(27 debate interactions)
Justin Madders (Labour)
Shadow Minister (Employment Rights and Protections)
(22 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(117 debate contributions)
Home Office
(111 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(46 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Stella Creasy's debates

Walthamstow Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

As Parliament considers the Bill of Rights, the Government must reconsider including abortion rights in this Bill. Rights to abortion must be specifically protected in this legislation, especially as the Government has refused to rule out leaving the European Convention on Human Rights.

We have the second most expensive childcare system in the world. A full time place costs, on average, £14,000 per year, making it completely unaffordable for many families. Parents are forced to leave their jobs or work fewer hours, which has a negative impact on the economy and on child poverty.

I would like the Government to:
• make running conversion therapy in the UK a criminal offence
• forcing people to attend said conversion therapies a criminal offence
• sending people abroad in order to try to convert them a criminal offence
• protect individuals from conversion therapy


Latest EDMs signed by Stella Creasy

26th October 2021
Stella Creasy signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 26th October 2021

The service of Oliver Denton Lieberman

Tabled by: Tulip Siddiq (Labour - Hampstead and Kilburn)
That this House recognises Oliver Denton Lieberman’s dedication and public service as an office manager during many turbulent years in politics; appreciates that he has coordinated the campaign within Parliament to free Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe and supported her family; acknowledges the role he has played in running an efficient office and …
17 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 14
Independent: 2
Scottish National Party: 1
14th January 2021
Stella Creasy signed this EDM on Monday 18th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 112
Scottish National Party: 15
Independent: 7
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Stella Creasy's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Stella Creasy, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Stella Creasy has not been granted any Urgent Questions

2 Adjournment Debates led by Stella Creasy

2 Bills introduced by Stella Creasy


A Bill to make provision for a right for employees to obtain information relating to the pay of a comparator; to reform remedies and time limits relating to equal pay; to provide a right to equal pay where a single source can rectify unequal pay; to amend the statutory statement of particulars to include equal pay; to provide for requirements on certain employers to publish information about the differences in pay between male and female employees and between employees of different ethnic origins; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Tuesday 20th October 2020
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to impose certain limits on consumer credit interest rates and charges; to establish a levy on credit and debit card providers to fund the provision of debt advice services; to give powers to local authorities to restrict the provision of premises for licensed consumer credit agencies within a local area; to make provision regarding the availability of certain financial services products at branches of the Post Office; to make other measures relating to the regulation of, and availability of advice on, consumer credit; and for connected purposes;

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 3rd November 2010

551 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
7 Other Department Questions
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether it is her policy to retain (a) Article 157 of the Consolidated version of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and (b) case law decisions drawing on this Article in her Department's review of retained EU law.

Under UK law men and women must receive equal pay for doing equal work. We will be retaining the effects of Article 157 of the European Union Treaty, in line with case law decisions, to ensure that existing equal pay protections stay in place beyond 31 December. These include the single source test.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, with reference to The Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017 and the Answer of 5 December 2022 to Question 99825 on Equal Pay, if she will publish the report in accordance with Section 16 of that regulation.

We were required to publish a review of the gender pay gap reporting regulations after they had been in force for five years; as is the case for many other business regulations. This was published in April and the Post-Implementation Review can be accessed here:

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2017/172/resources

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
30th Nov 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, with reference to The Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017 and the Answer of 3 November 2022 to Question 73835 on Equal Pay, if she will publish the report in accordance with Section 16 of that regulation by 1 January 2023.

As this is a statutory review it must be approved by the Secretary of State. It is appropriate that the Minister for Women and Equalities, who was only appointed at the end of October, takes time to properly consider the analysis and findings prior to publishing the report.

In line with the Government’s own best practice for post-implementation reviews, the report also needs to be signed off by the Department’s Chief Economist.

Once the review has completed these stages it will be published alongside the regulations.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
28th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, with reference to The Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017, SI 172/2017, on what date the report required by Section 16 of that regulation was due to be published.

We are required to publish a review of the gender pay gap reporting regulations after they’ve been in force for five years; as is the case for many other business regulations.

Given the impact of the pandemic, it is important that we take time to properly consider the evidence we have from the last five years, so that the review accurately reflects the implementation and impact of reporting. The final review will be published in due course.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
7th Sep 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what progress has been made on producing the report reviewing the success of gender pay gap reporting regulations mandated by The Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017.

The last decade has seen the national gender pay gap fall by approximately a quarter; with the gender pay gap reporting regulations helping to motivate employers to improve equality in the workplace.

We are required to carry out a review of the regulations after they’ve been in force for five years; as is the case for many other business regulations. This is being prepared and will be published in due course.

12th Oct 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if the Government will reinstate gender pay gap reporting in 2021.

In recognition of the unprecedented uncertainty and pressure facing employers due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the Government and the Equality and Human Rights Commission suspended enforcement of the gender pay gap reporting deadlines for the 2019/20 reporting year.

Although enforcement was suspended, no changes have been made to the legislation. Employers are still able to report their gender pay gaps for the reporting year 2019/20 but face no enforcement action for doing so late or for not doing so at all.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to publish his response to the Government's consultation on the UK Single Trade Window.

The Cabinet Office will look to publish the government’s response to the UK Single Trade Window: Consultation on Features to Inform Design and Legislation in the coming weeks.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to paragraph 56 of The Border Target Operating Model, published in August 2023, what costs are within the scope of the estimated £330 million per year overall cost of the new model.

The estimated £330 million per year new costs to EU imports covers the costs to industry and traders for both Safety and Security and Sanitary and Phytosanitary aspects of the Border Target Operating Model (BTOM).

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 29 January 2024 to Question 11319 on Import Controls, what the cost to business will be of an individual Safety and Security declaration made using the single trade window scheme; and whether this cost will cover (a) the cost of sanitary and phytosanitary checks and (b) the Common User Charge.

There will be no charge for businesses to submit Safety and Security information through the Single Trade Window.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the number of additional declarations that businesses will need to make following the implementation of the Border Target Operation Model.

The Border Target Operating Model sets out our new approach to Safety and Security controls (applying to all imports and standardising controls applied to Rest of World and EU trade), and Sanitary and Phytosanitary controls (applied to imports of animal products, germinal products, plants and plant products and live animals) at the border. It also outlines how we will reduce the administrative burden of traders providing this information through the UK Single Trade Window.

Future trade flows are of course subject to factors beyond government policy including changes to consumer and trader behaviour.

Our modelling estimates 17.4m additional Safety and Security declarations will be required following implementation of the Border Target Operating Model. We also estimate a total of up to 4.5m consignments that are imported into the UK from the EU will be subject to Sanitary and Phytosanitary requirements. These requirements depend on the risk of the commodity within the consignment as outlined in the published Border Target Operating Model.

These estimates are based on data sourced from a range of government agencies, including Safety and Security declarations for non-EU trade, customs declaration data and transit data. The Government will continue to assess the latest estimates based on more recent data.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the data sources used by his Department to estimate the impact on inflation of non-tariff measures under the the border target operating model as 0.2% over three years.

The Government’s modelling of the inflationary impact of the Border Target Operating Model has been undertaken through a peer-reviewed econometric model. The data input into the model includes a mix of published and unpublished commercially sensitive data sources.

Our estimates on the impact on consumer food price inflation have been developed alongside academics, through a model trusted by organisations across government such as His Majesty’s Treasury. The model can be found here:

https://ore.exeter.ac.uk/repository/bitstream/handle/10871/128070/Final%20Report_Defra_December%202021.pdf?sequence=2

In developing the new Border Target Operating Model, our goal has been to design a modern border with a simplified but effective system of Sanitary and Phytosanitary controls. This is a border that optimises the balance between maintaining, or improving, biosecurity, public health and food safety and sets a proportionate approach to controls.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Concession Contracts Regulations 2016.

The Concessions Contracts Regulations 2016 (along with the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, Utilities Contracts Regulations 2016 and the Defence and Security Public Contracts Regulations 2011) will be replaced by the new public procurement regime being put in place by the Procurement Bill, currently being debated in Parliament.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
14th Dec 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans he has to (a) retain, (b) revoke or (c) replace the Public Contracts Regulations 2015.

Through the Retained EU Law (Reform and Revocation) Bill, the Government is currently reviewing which retained European Union law should be repealed, reformed or preserved. The existing procurement regime, which includes the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, will need to be preserved until the new regime is ready to be implemented. This is laid out in the Procurement Bill and currently being debated in Parliament.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government maintains a comprehensive list of legislation made under (a) Section 2(2) and (b) Paragraph 1A of Schedule 2 to the European Communities Act 1972.

The information requested is not held centrally. All legislation is available on legislation.gov.uk.

4th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the timeframe is for the Government to bring forward legislative proposals to introduce a new electoral sanction of intimidation.

The Government will legislate for a new electoral sanction against intimidation as soon as parliamentary time allows.

The new electoral sanction is one part of the Government’s wider programme of work to address intimidation in public life. More details on this programme are set out in Written Ministerial Statement HCWS833 ‘Update on Tackling Intimidation in Public Life’ made on 09 March 2021.

4th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish an Equality Impact Assessment of the Government’s plans for easing the covid-19 lockdown.

The government has assessed the equalities impacts of the social distancing policy on different groups of people, including those with protected characteristics and has engaged individuals, expert groups, charities and other organisations in the policy development process. This is a key part of the decision making process and the government has discharged its obligations under the Equality Act at each stage of its COVID-19 response.

We are aware of the disproportionate impacts of the policy on some groups. For example, we acknowledge that the order to stay at home can cause anxiety for those who are experiencing or feel at risk of domestic abuse and we’ve seen a rise in calls to the national abuse helpline. That is why the Home Secretary introduced a package of measures to support such victims, including an additional £2m of funding for domestic abuse helplines and online services as well as the ‘#YouAreNotAlone’ communications campaign to reassure victims that support services remain available.

The Government has also recognised that some individuals with learning disabilities or autism have specific exercise requirements that are important to their health and has clarified that such groups are allowed to continue to exercise outdoors more than once a day. It is recognised that the policy will continue to have a disproportionate impact on many disabled individuals.

There is evidence of a disproportionate impact on many other sectors of society. The Government is keeping this under review and will introduce mitigation measures wherever possible and appropriate. However, the overall assessment concluded that the measures the Government has taken have been proportionate to the risks of the coronavirus outbreak.

In line with the practice of successive administrations, the Government does not routinely publish equality impact assessments.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2024 to Question 11775 on Origin Marking: Canada, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of changes to rules of origin arrangements on tariffs for each sector identified as likely to be impacted.

From 1 April, businesses will not be able to count EU material as originating in their exports to Canada under the FTA.

The impact on UK sectors will depend on individual business supply chains and the extent to which they use EU inputs. We are engaging extensively with business to understand the impact and help them prepare.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps she is taking to support businesses impacted by the suspension of trade negotiations with Canada.

The pause in negotiations does not impact our existing trade agreement with Canada, which underpins £25.9bn worth of trade a year. This agreement is comprehensive. It maintains zero tariffs on food and drink and a wide range of industrial goods, guarantees UK services companies access to the Canadian market, and protects Intellectual Property.


We continue to work closely with dairy exporters to monitor the impact on recent changes to market access arrangements on cheese. We are also engaging extensively with businesses who may be impacted by impending changes to the arrangements for rules of origin.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of changes in rules of origin arrangements with Canada as a result of the suspension of trade negotiations with that country on (a) the economy and (b) each sector.

The pause in negotiations does not impact our existing trade agreement with Canada, which underpins £25.9bn worth of trade in the 12 months to September 2023.

However, we are working closely with UK businesses potentially impacted by the changes to rules of origin arrangements in the existing agreement, to help them prepare and adapt. Our analysis to date shows exporters of automotives, plastics, chemicals and processed food are likely to be impacted.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether her Department plans to (a) retain (b) replace or (c) revoke the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008.

The Department intends to repeal these regulations and restate them in the Digital Markets, Competition and Consumers Bill with some amendments, chiefly to enable the Government to strengthen rules against fake reviews.

The Government is committed to a consumer rights framework that protects consumers and drives consumer confidence, while minimising unnecessary costs to business.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether her Department plans to (a) retain, (b) replace or (c) revoke the Working Time Regulations 1998.

We are consulting on proposals to improve how the Working Time Regulations 1998 operate without impacting the rights that really matter to workers. This Government has no intention of abandoning our strong record on workers’ rights, having raised domestic standards over recent years to make them some of the highest in the world.

We will be consulting on proposals to remove retained EU case law that imposes time-consuming and disproportionate requirements on business for working hour records to be kept for almost all members of the workforce, which could save employers around £1bn a year. The consultation also proposes to merge the two separate annual leave entitlements into one pot of statutory annual leave, while maintaining the same amount of statutory annual leave entitlement overall, and to introduce rolled-up holiday pay, so that workers can receive their holiday pay with each payslip.

The consultation can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/retained-eu-employment-law-reforms

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
23rd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she will take steps to ensure that claimants under the Post Office (a) historical shortfall scheme and (b) suspension remuneration review will receive a similar tax exemption to that available to group litigation order compensation scheme claimants through the Post Office Horizon Compensation and Infected Blood Interim Compensation Payment Schemes (Tax Exemptions and Relief) Regulations 2023.

The Historical Shortfall Scheme’s intention is to ensure all victims of the Horizon scandal are returned to the financial position they would have been in had the wrongdoings not occurred.

An issue has been identified on the tax treatment of some postmasters with claims for loss of earnings under the HSS, particularly those with larger claims, where postmasters may be pushed into a higher tax bracket due to receiving compensation in a lump sum as opposed to receiving those earnings over several tax years. The Department for Business and Trade wants to see fair compensation for all victims and is working urgently to address this issue with the Post Office, HMT and HMRC.

The Department for Business and Trade is aiming to ensure that tax treatment is fair across all schemes, including the Suspension Remuneration Review.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether her Department plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Pressure Equipment (Safety) Regulations 2016/1105.

The Department for Business and Trade is reviewing all REUL in line with usual policy development to determine whether to repeal, replace or preserve it.

We will continue to ensure that only safe pressure equipment products are placed on the market in the United Kingdom and that market surveillance authorities have the necessary enforcement powers.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Energy Information Regulations 2011/1524.

The Energy Information Regulations 2011/1524 establish the compliance and enforcement regime for energy labels in the UK. Energy labels provide easy-to-understand information on the energy efficiency of products allowing consumers to identify the least and most efficient products.

The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy is reviewing all REUL in line with usual policy development to determine whether to repeal, replace or preserve it.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke (b) retain, or (c) replace the General Product Safety Regulations 2005.

The General Product Safety Regulations 2005 set out the requirements that must be met to ensure that only safe consumer products are placed on the market. The regulations include a general safety requirement that products placed on the market or supplied by producers and distributors must be safe.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is reviewing all REUL in line with usual policy development to determine whether to repeal, replace or preserve it.

We will continue to ensure that only safe products are placed on the market in the United Kingdom and that market surveillance authorities have the necessary enforcement powers.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Large and Medium Sized Companies and Groups (Accounts and Reports) Regulations 2008.

The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy is reviewing all REUL in line with usual policy development to determine whether to repeal, replace or preserve it.

The Government will, in due course, provide further information regarding its plans for those aspects of company law which are within the scope of the Retained EU Law Bill’s sunsetting provisions.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations 2016.

The Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations 2016 set out the requirements that must be met to ensure safe electrical equipment products are placed on the market. The regulations require manufacturers to show how their products meet the principal elements of the safety objectives.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is reviewing all REUL in line with usual policy development to determine whether to repeal, replace or preserve it.

We will continue to ensure that only safe electrical equipment products are placed on the market in the United Kingdom and that market surveillance authorities have the necessary enforcement powers.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Gas (Meters) Regulations 1983.

The Gas (Meters) Regulations 1983 set out the limits of meter accuracy for gas meters approved under GB national legislation and prescribe the process for the re-examination of all disputed meters.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is reviewing all REUL in line with usual policy development to determine whether to repeal, replace or preserve it.

The Government will continue to ensure that only accurate gas meters are placed on the market in the United Kingdom and that market surveillance authorities have the necessary enforcement powers.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
19th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether they plan to (a) revoke (b) retain or (c) replace the Gas Appliances (Enforcement) & Miscellaneous Amendments Regulations 2018.

The Gas Appliances (Enforcement) and Miscellaneous Amendment Regulations 2018 enable enforcement authorities in the United Kingdom to take action against “economic operators” (manufacturers, importers and distributors) if they do not comply with the obligations in Regulation 2016/426 on appliances burning gaseous fuels.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is reviewing all REUL in line with usual policy development to determine whether to repeal, replace or preserve it.

The Government will continue to ensure that only safe gas appliances are placed on the market in the United Kingdom and that market surveillance authorities have the necessary enforcement powers.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
19th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether they plan to (a) revoke (b) retain or (c) replace the Copyright and Related Rights Regulations 2003.

The Government is reviewing all REUL, including the Copyright and Related Rights Regulations, to decide whether to repeal, replace or preserve it and will communicate more in due course.

12th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans he has to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Electricity (Guarantees of Origin of Electricity Produced from Renewable Energy Sources) Regulations 2003.

The regulations provide the legal basis for the Renewable Energy Guarantees of Origin (REGO) scheme. This scheme allows the UK to account for renewable energy on the electricity grid.

The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy is reviewing all retained EU law in line with usual policy development to determine whether to repeal, replace or preserve it.

It is the Government's intention that the REGO scheme will continue to exist in the UK, which will require Government regulation.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retain EU Law Bill, whether he intends to (a) retain, (b) revoke or (c) replace the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation & Additional Charges) Regulations 2013.

The Government is committed to a consumer rights framework that protects consumers and drives consumer confidence, while minimising unnecessary costs to business.

We will bring forward proposals to address REUL that impacts consumer protection using the powers in the bill or other available legislative instruments in due course.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether he has plans to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Duration of Copyright and Rights in Performance Regulations 1995.

The Government is reviewing all REUL, including the Duration of Copyright and Rights in Performance Regulations, to decide whether to repeal, replace or preserve it and will communicate more in due course.

9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) retain (b) revoke or (c) replace the Part Time Employees (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000.

In leaving the EU we regained the ability to regulate autonomously, and the Government is therefore conducting a comprehensive review of all retained EU employment law to ensure that our regulations are tailored to the needs of the UK economy and help create the conditions for economic growth.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department will update the Retained EU Law dashboard.

The Government plans to update the retained EU law dashboard “in due course”, which will be followed by further updates on a quarterly basis throughout 2023.

The next update will include new functionality that will highlight to users which entries are new to the dashboard or have been updated since the inaugural publication of the dashboard in June 2022. In addition, once the dashboard has been updated, the full data set underpinning the dashboard will be available to download via the Retained EU Law Dashboard gov.uk page.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
14th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans he has to (a) retain, (b) revoke or (c) replace the Artist’s Resale Right Regulations 2006.

The Government is reviewing all REUL, including the Artist Resale Right Regulations, to decide whether to repeal, replace or preserve it and will communicate more in due course.

12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) retain (b) replace and (c) revoke the Paternity and Adoption Leave Regulations 2002.

In leaving the EU we regained the ability to regulate autonomously, and the Government is therefore conducting a comprehensive review of all retained EU employment law to ensure that our regulations are tailored to the needs of the UK economy and help create the conditions for economic growth.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans he has to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Consumer Rights (Payment Surcharges) Regulations 2012.

The Government is committed to a consumer rights framework that protects consumers and drives consumer confidence, while minimising unnecessary costs to business.

We will bring forward proposals to address Retained EU Law that impacts consumer protection using the powers in the bill or other available legislative instruments in due course.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans he has to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Toys (Safety) Regulations 2011.

The Government is committed to ensuring toys sold in the UK are safe.

Leaving the EU gives us an opportunity to make our own decisions regarding products placed on our market, including toys. The Retained EU law (Revocation and Reform) Bill will enable Government, via Parliament, to revoke, replace or retain EU regulation in favour of a more agile, home-grown approach.

We will shortly publish a consultation on the product safety framework to support us in determining the best approach to retained EU law on toy safety.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans they have to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Recognition of Professional Qualifications (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019.

The Recognition of Professional Qualifications (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 includes measures to implement obligations under the EU Withdrawal Agreement, the Separation Agreement with Norway, Iceland, and Liechtenstein (the ‘EEA EFTA States’), and the Swiss Citizens’ Rights Agreement. The Government has committed that the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill will preserve retained EU law that is necessary to maintain the UK’s international obligations, such as those in the agreements with the EU, EEA EFTA States and Switzerland.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans they have to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Fixed-Term Employees (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2002.

In leaving the European Union (EU) we regained the ability to regulate autonomously, and the Government is therefore conducting a comprehensive review of all retained EU employment law to ensure that our regulations are tailored to the needs of the UK economy and help create the conditions for economic growth.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he has plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke and (c) retain the Maternity and Parental Leave etc Regulations 1999.

In leaving the EU we regained the ability to regulate autonomously, and the Government is therefore conducting a comprehensive review of all retained EU employment law to ensure that our regulations are tailored to the needs of the UK economy and help create the conditions for economic growth.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he has plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke and (c) retain the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008.

The Government is committed to a consumer rights framework that protects consumers and drives consumer confidence, while minimising unnecessary costs to business.

We will bring forward proposals to address REUL that impacts consumer protection using the powers in the bill or other available legislative instruments in due course.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
2nd Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Working Time Regulations 1998.

In leaving the EU we regained the ability to regulate autonomously, and the Government is therefore conducting a comprehensive review of all retained EU employment law to ensure that our regulations are tailored to the needs of the UK economy and help create the conditions for economic growth.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
2nd Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 2006.

In leaving the EU we regained the ability to regulate autonomously, and the Government is therefore conducting a comprehensive review of all retained EU employment law to ensure that our regulations are tailored to the needs of the UK economy and help create the conditions for economic growth.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of (a) the number of people living in homes with a communal heating system who are not subject to the domestic energy price cap for their heating and (b) the cost to this group of not being covered by the Government's energy price guarantee this winter.

The Experimental Statistics on Heat Networks published by the Government in 2018 showed that there are approximately 440,000 residential heat network customers in the UK.

Heat network consumers with domestic electricity contracts will receive capped electricity prices through the Energy Price Guarantee, credits of £400 on their electricity bills through the Energy Bills Support Scheme, and reduced heat prices via the Energy Bill Relief Scheme.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many officials in his Department are working on Retained EU Law legislation, as (a) headcount and (b) Full Time Equivalent.

There are approximately 77 FTE staff within BEIS working on Retained EU Law. The Department does not centrally hold the total headcount of all staff working on such legislation.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with regard to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether any pieces of legislation included on the Government's dashboard of Retained EU Law are not covered by Clause 1 of that Bill.

All retained EU law (REUL) listed in the dashboard that falls under the definition of EU-derived subordinate legislation and retained direct EU legislation, is in scope of the sunset established by clause 1 of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

Any REUL listed in the dashboard that is primary legislation is not subject to any sunset in the Bill. REUL not in scope of the sunset will be assimilated into the domestic statute book, by the removal of the special EU law features previously attached to it.

The dashboard presents an authoritative, not comprehensive, catalogue of REUL. Therefore, there may be some legislation that is covered by clause 1 of the Bill that is not yet captured in the dashboard. The Government will continue to identify additional REUL and update the dashboard on a quarterly basis to reflect this.

19th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether any pieces of legislation covered by Clause 1 are not included on the Government's dashboard of Retained EU Law.

All retained EU law (REUL) listed in the dashboard that falls under the definition of EU-derived subordinate legislation and retained direct EU legislation, is in scope of the sunset established by clause 1 of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

Any REUL listed in the dashboard that is primary legislation is not subject to any sunset in the Bill. REUL not in scope of the sunset will be assimilated into the domestic statute book, by the removal of the special EU law features previously attached to it.

The dashboard presents an authoritative, not comprehensive, catalogue of REUL. Therefore, there may be some legislation that is covered by clause 1 of the Bill that is not yet captured in the dashboard. The Government will continue to identify additional REUL and update the dashboard on a quarterly basis to reflect this.

27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the (a) implications for his policies of the judgement in the US case of DZ Reserve et al v Facebook and (b) potential need for the Competition and Markets Authority to investigate Facebook in the UK.

It has not proved possible to respond to the Hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 20 March 2018 to Question 132797, what the timetable is for the publication of his Department's response to the 2016 consultation on tips, gratuities, cover and service charges.

On 2 October 2018, the Government announced it would bring forward legislation ensuring tips left for workers go to them in full. We think tips earned by workers should go to the workers they were intended for, and we remain committed to legislating on this.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish details of individual aid awards under the (a) Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, (b) Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme and (c) Bounce Back Loan Scheme as required on the European Commission’s Transparency Aid Module.

Details of individual aid awards under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the Bounce Back Loan Scheme will be published where required on the European Commission’s Transparency Aid Module in due course.

22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 21 September 2020 to Question 85040, what statutory provisions are in place on the calculation of (a) statutory redundancy pay and (b) pay reductions under Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme furlough agreements.

The provisions relating to calculation of redundancy and notice pay under the Employment Rights Act continue to apply when an individual is on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Employees who are dismissed due to redundancy and who satisfy certain qualifying conditions are statutorily entitled to a lump sum from their employer, based on their age, length of service and contractual weekly earnings, subject to a statutory upper limit, payable at, or soon after, the dismissal date.

The Government wants to ensure that employees do not lose out on their employment rights because they have been furloughed. We therefore introduced legislation on 31 July, which ensures that statutory redundancy pay and statutory notice pay and unfair dismissal compensation are based on an employee’s normal pay, rather than their furlough pay (potentially 80% of their normal wage).

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 9 September 2020 to Question 85040 on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, what the piece of legislation is that is referred to in the Answer that will provide statutory protection against the calculation of statutory redundancy pay being based on reduced pay in a furlough agreement under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

The legislation that I was referring to in my answer of 9 September 2020 to Question 85040 is The Employment Rights Act 1996 (Coronavirus, Calculation of a Week’s Pay) Regulations 2020.

4th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has issued guidance on the implications for the calculation of statutory redundancy pay of being placed on reduced pay in a furlough agreement under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and then made redundant; and if he will make a statement.

Any employee who is dismissed due to redundancy and who satisfies certain qualifying conditions has a statutory entitlement to a lump sum from their employer, based on their age, length of service and contractual weekly earnings, subject to a statutory upper limit, payable at, or soon after, the dismissal date.

The Government introduced new legislation which commenced on 31 July to ensure that furloughed employees who are subsequently made redundant receive statutory redundancy pay based on the employee’s normal pay, rather than their furlough pay (potentially 80% of their normal wage). The Government issued guidance on these changes which can be found on the Acas website at: https://www.acas.org.uk/manage-staff-redundancies/work-out-redundancy-pay.

The Government has always urged employers to do the right thing and not seek to disadvantage furloughed employees who are facing redundancy. We are aware that most companies will do this and we have now underpinned these expectations with additional statutory protections.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what monitoring the Government undertakes to assess whether funding from the (a) Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and (b) Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme has been provided to firms based outside of the UK.

In order to be eligible for finance under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS), a small or medium sized enterprise (SME) must have the core of its business operations based in the UK. An SME which is foreign-owned is in principle eligible to apply for CBILS, provided it is trading in the UK (not just selling into the UK) and uses the CBILS facility to support its business activity in the UK. The same is true for an SME which has UK ownership but is registered abroad.

For firms to be eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), they must have a UK bank account and UK payroll. However, HMRC will continue to monitor claim data, compare against records and review reports of any fraudulent or misleading claims. HMRC will not hesitate to take action against those found to be abusing or misleading the scheme.

20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of requiring (a) retailer advertising and (b) influencer marketing on buy now pay later products to include identification of risks to consumers.

The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 (CPRs) make it a criminal offence for traders to give consumers misleading information. Under the CPRs, traders must provide consumers with the information necessary to make informed decisions and not omit or hide material information which the average consumer needs.

Last year, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) announced new rules to address harms in the Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) market, saving consumers around £40-60 million a year.

The new rules aim to reduce the overall cost of credit for consumers by banning firms from charging backdated interest on repaid sums and requiring firms to provide better information to consumers about BNPL offers, including associated risks. Firms must also give prompts to consumers, to remind them when the offer period is about to end, so that consumers are more likely to repay the credit before they incur interest.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2020 to Question 70388 on Companies: Coronavirus, what steps the Government plans to take to monitor whether companies borrowing through the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Scheme are (a) engaged in trading activity in the UK at the Initial Drawdown Date and (b) using that finance facility to support their trading activity in the UK.

The Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Scheme (CLBILS) guidance makes it clear that the British Business Bank is not responsible for monitoring or verifying the use of any money advanced by accredited lenders to borrowers.

It is the lenders responsibility to ensure that CLBILS facilities comply with the CLBILS eligibility criteria, which include (amongst others):

  • That the relevant Applicant or Applicant’s Group is or will be engaged in Trading Activity in the United Kingdom at the Initial Drawdown Date
  • That the Proposed Scheme Facility will be used for an Eligible Purpose (which may include the refinancing of an existing Borrowing Facility used for an Eligible Purpose) and to support trading in the United Kingdom.

If the facility was not eligible at the offer date then the lender would not be able to claim against the guarantee. The British Business Bank retains the rights to request information from accredited lenders in order to verify whether a facility was eligible on the offer date.

Lenders undergo a review to test a sample of CLBILS facilities to ensure that processes are being followed in accordance with the agreement.

11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many people categorised as clinically extremely vulnerable during the covid-19 outbreak have continued working in their place of work during the outbreak; and what steps he is taking to support that group of people in the workplace.

The Government made clear that vulnerable people who are at increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19) need to be particularly stringent in following social distancing measures. Members of staff who are vulnerable or extremely vulnerable, as well as individuals whom they live with, should be supported by their employers as they follow the required social distancing and shielding measures.

It is critical that employers offer safe workplaces. The Government has published guidance to help ensure workplaces are as safe as possible during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. These guides cover a range of working environments and are available at www.gov.uk/workingsafely.

This guidance does not replace health and safety or equalities legislation, it provides information to employers on how best to meet these responsibilities in the context of COVID-19.

Employees have a legal duty to make sure the workplace is safe for their employees; this includes reasonable adjustments for employees with disabilities and those who are clinically vulnerable.

The safer workplaces guidance provides some suggestions to help employers make their workplaces COVID-19 secure for their employees, visitors and customers.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether car washes are permitted to operate during the covid-19 outbreak.

The guidance on working safely during COVID-19 is aimed at working environments, not whether a specific business can reopen.

The guidance is designed to help employers, workers and the self-employed understand how to work safely, including what employers need to think about to adapt a workplace to manage risk in the context of the coronavirus pandemic.

We know that every organisation is different. Whether hand or automatic car washes, employers can use the guidance to create specific plans for their business in consultation with those who are affected by their operations, including workers and contractors. Plans will depend on the nature of your business, such as the sector, and the details of your workforce and operations.

Whether a business must remain closed varies according to which part of the UK you are operating in. For England the rules are set out on the gov.uk website. The website also includes links to information for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

1st Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what process has been undertaken to consult civil society, including women and equality rights organisations in relation to the effect of covid-19 outbreak on the operation of the Equality Act.

All the legislative protections against discrimination provided by the Equality Act 2010, including those relating to sex and to pregnancy and maternity as protected characteristics, continue to apply during the covid-19 outbreak period, and the scope of the Act remains unchanged.

The Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS), the helpline for anyone who believes that they have been discriminated against in the provision of goods, services and public functions, remains open and can provide free bespoke advice and in-depth support, as can Acas (0800 464 0979) in relation to employment discrimination issues.

The EASS can be contacted via its website - www.equalityadvisoryservice.com, by telephone on 0808 800 0082, or by text phone on 0808 800 0084. The EASS may contact a service provider on a customer’s behalf to discuss the scope for meeting the customer’s concern; it also liaises with the Equality and Human Rights Commission, which has powers to enforce the provisions of the Act.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many pieces of correspondence he has received from MPs on behalf of constituents on matters relating to covid-19 on each date since the outbreak began; and how many responses he has provided to that correspondence in each category of response.

Between 23 March and 18 May 2020, the Department received 3,261 pieces of COVID-19 related correspondence from MPs on behalf of constituents. Of these 3,261, we have responded to 1,827, closed 125 for which a response was not required, and transferred an additional 244 to other Government Departments.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much the average loan issued under the Bounce Back Loan Scheme is.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) has been introduced to help small and medium-sized businesses to borrow between £2000 and £50,000.

As of 10 May, over 268,000 loans have been issued with a total value of over £8.3 billion.

5th May 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what plans she has to support women (a) returning to work and (b) accessing childcare after the covid-19 lockdown.

The Government recognises that many women face barriers to returning to work due to caring responsibilities. We have delivered, and continue to deliver, return to work programmes which provide training, support and employment opportunities across a variety of levels, sectors, and regions.

For example, we have awarded around £1.5 million to sixteen organisations supporting returners in the private sector. This fund provides parents and carers with a training and skills package to enable them to return to the labour market.

We have also launched returner programmes that target key workforces in the public sector, including social workers, health professionals and police investigators. The Return to Practice programme has supported over 300 health professionals to update their skills and knowledge and gain professional registration, so that they can secure employment. The Return to Social Work programme is recruiting up to 200 previously certified social workers into critical roles within local councils to support the Covid-19 pandemic response, providing them with training and placements.

The Government also recognises the importance of childcare to working parents. The closure of schools, nurseries, childminders and other childcare settings were from Friday 20 March, except for children who are vulnerable, and children whose parents are critical to the COVID-19 response was an important step to reducing the number of social interactions and thus flatten the upward curve of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to monitor redundancies by protected characteristics after the end of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

The Government does not routinely monitor redundancy statistics by protected characteristics. However, when employers select employees for redundancy, they must comply with the requirements of the Equality Act 2010 and ensure that they do not unlawfully discriminate. There are also additional considerations that employers must take into account when redundancies affect women who are pregnant or on maternity leave.

The Government continues to gather data, including through interactions with stakeholders, to understand the impacts of COVID-19 on all citizens, including groups with protected characteristics.

24th Feb 2020
Pay
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, further to the Answer of 16 January 2020 to Question 2530, on Pay, if he will publish data on the minimum wage (a) arrears and (b) penalties issued in each constituency in each of the last six financial years.

The Government is committed to cracking down on employers who fail to pay the NMW. HMRC follows up on every worker complaint it receives, even those which are anonymous. The Government publishes a regional breakdown of National Minimum Wage enforcement activity, including arrears and penalties, as part of the annual Enforcement and Compliance Report. The most recent report can be found here.

Caution is required when analysing Minimum Wage enforcement by geography. Enforcement data is reported based on employers’ details, not workers’. This means HMRC may identify arrears for workers who live outside of the immediate area where their employer is based. Similarly, for large employers, arrears and penalties may be attributed to a specific head office location.

13th Jan 2020
Pay
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which employers underpaid the National (a) Living and (b) Minimum Wage in 2018-19.

The Government is committed to ensuring that everyone entitled to the National Living Wage (NLW) and National Minimum Wage (NMW) receives it. This is why we have more than doubled the compliance and enforcement budget for the NMW and NLW to £27.4 million for 2019/20, up from £13.2 million in 2015/16.

In 2018/19, HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) identified a record £24.4 million in minimum wage arrears for over 220,000 workers and issued over £17 million in penalties to non-compliant employers.

The Naming Scheme is the appropriate mechanism to state which employers have underpaid National Minimum Wage or National Living Wage. The Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is reviewing the Naming Scheme; the outcome of that review will be published in due course.

25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether it is her policy to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Return of Cultural Objects Regulations 1994.

The Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill is part of the Government's commitment to taking the necessary steps to put the UK statute book on a sustainable footing following our exit from the EU. The Bill will make it easier to amend, repeal or replace retained EU law, in the best interests of the UK.

Assessments of the impact of amending, repealing or replacing areas of retained EU law are currently in progress and we will announce our plans in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans she has to (a) retain (b) revoke or (c) replace the Open Internet Access (EU Regulation) Regulations 2016.

The Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill is part of the government's commitment to taking the necessary steps to update and improve the UK statute book, following our exit from the EU. The Bill will make it easier to amend, repeal or replace REUL, in the best interests of the UK.

The Open Internet Access Regulations, commonly referred to as the ‘net neutrality’ regulations, were designed to encourage an ‘open internet’ where end-users, and not Internet Service Providers (ISPs), control what they see and do online.

Assessments of the impact of amending, repealing or replacing areas of Retained EU Law are currently in progress. We are reviewing REUL carefully to ensure that we take the best approach for each item of REUL in time for the sunset date.

14th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans he has to (a) retain, (b) revoke or (c) replace the Mobile Roaming (European Communities) Regulations 2007.

The Mobile Roaming (European Communities) Regulations 2007 are scheduled to be revoked by The Trade (Mobile Roaming) Regulations 2023, which were presented for laying before parliament on 15 December 2022.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace Council Regulation (EC) No 116/2009.

Council Regulation (EC) No 116/2009 was revoked by The Export of Objects of Cultural Interest (Control) (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 with effect from the end of the transition period.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans they have to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Electronic Commerce (EC Directive) Regulations 2002.

The Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill (REUL) is part of the government's commitment to taking the necessary steps to put the UK statute book on a sustainable footing, following our exit from the EU. The Bill will make it easier to amend, repeal or replace REUL, in the best interests of the UK.

We are currently assessing the Electronic Commerce (EC Directive) Regulations 2002 alongside other areas of REUL. The government is committed to supporting digital innovation in the UK.

24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the e-Commerce Directive and the Retained EU Law Bill, what assessment she has made of the potential increase of litigation against online services if the e-Commerce Directive were to cease to apply in the UK.

The Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill is part of the government's commitment to taking the necessary steps to put the UK statute book on a sustainable footing, following our exit from the EU. The Bill will make it easier to amend, repeal or replace REUL, in the best interests of the UK.

Assessments of the impact of amending, repealing or replacing areas of Retained EU Law are currently in progress.

8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will set out the process by which her Department is (a) identifying and (b) reviewing retained EU law which may be in scope of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

DCMS’ work on the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill is coordinated by departmental officials and draws on work from a range of staff in teams across DCMS. This work has been made transparent through the Cabinet Office Retained EU Law (REUL) Dashboard. 35 distinct pieces of REUL have been published on this dashboard.

Since the dashboard was published in June, DCMS continues to review it. Government officials across Whitehall are currently working to quality assure this data and any amendments to the data will be reflected in an update of the dashboard.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on the importance of advertising planning notices in local newspapers to (a) the elderly and vulnerable, (b) other local residents and (b) local media organisations.

Local planning authorities are required to publicise certain types of planning applications in local newspapers as set out in Article 15 of the Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2015.

We are mindful of the potential impact that any changes to the requirements might have on transparency and local democracy, as well as the potential effect on local newspaper revenue. Indeed the independent Cairncross Review into the future of journalism found that statutory notices, including planning notices, provide an important strand of revenue for many local publishers and that their withdrawal would do serious damage to parts of the sector. We also recognise the importance of local newspapers to communities and the continued need to reach out to people who cannot digitally access information.

Proposals to reform publicity requirements are being considered through the “Planning for the Future” White Paper which aims to make it simpler, quicker and more accessible for local people to engage with the planning system using digital tools. MHCLG is considering consultation responses and will publish a response in due course, and the impact on transparency and local democracy, as well as on local newspaper revenue will be considered before any decisions are taken.

22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans her Departments has to issue guidance to (a) singers, (b) wind and brass players and (c) other musicians on (i) rehearsals and performances as the covid-19 restrictions are eased and (ii) minimising risks of asymptomatic transmission of covid-19.

DCMS has worked closely with the Entertainment and Events Working Group to develop guidance which will enable performing artists to train, rehearse and perform safely. The guidance will be published in due course and will include guidance on minimising risk of transmission and supporting singers, wind and brass players and other musicians to return to work in COVID-secure ways.

DCMS is also holding targeted talks with leaders in the orchestra, choral and theatre sectors to better understand how the higher risk of activities like singing and playing of wind/brass instruments can practically be mitigated.

7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 6 February 2024 to Question 12562 on Pre-school Education: Pupil Premium what estimate she has made of the number and proportion of children who will become eligible for the 15 hours childcare entitlement in (a) April and (b) September 2024 that will also be eligible for the Early Years Pupil Premium.

The Early Years Pupil Premium (EYPP) gives providers additional funding to support disadvantaged children.

EYPP is currently available for 3 and 4 year olds eligible for the early years’ entitlements.

Parents may also get EYPP if their child is currently being looked after by a local authority in England or Wales, or if their child has left care in England or Wales through adoption, special guardianship order or a child arrangement order.

From April 2024, EYPP will be extended to all eligible 2 year olds, and from September 2024 to all eligible children aged 9 months to 3 years old.

On 19 December 2023, the department published indicative EYPP allocations for local authorities for 2024/25 as part of the wider Dedicated Schools Grant publication, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2024-to-2025.

The published tables include estimated numbers of children aged 9 months up to and including 2 year olds who the department anticipates will take up EYPP in 2024/25. This includes estimated part-time equivalents for EYPP.

Further details on how the department has calculated these estimates are set out in the following document: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dedicated-schools-grant-dsg-2024-to-2025/dsg-technical-note-2024-to-2025.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to to her Answer on 6 February 2024 to Question 12559 on Special Educational Needs: Finance, when her Department will (a) complete and (b) publish their assessment of the Special Educational Needs Inclusion Funds (SENIFs) arrangements.

As confirmed in the government’s response on 20 September 2023 to the consultation on expanding the early education entitlements, the department is conducting a review of the Special Educational Needs Inclusion Funds (SENIF) funding arrangements, so that the department can better support parents, providers and local authorities as the expanded entitlements are rolled out.

At the completion of this review, the department will consider what information is most appropriate and helpful for the sector in their delivery of SENIFs. The department will look to draw examples of best practice together, with a view to sector-wide dissemination.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans she has to extend the eligibility criteria for the early years pupil premium to children aged 9 months to three years who receive the 15 hours childcare entitlement in 2024.

The early years pupil premium is currently available for 3 and 4-year-olds eligible for the early years entitlements.

From April 2024, the early years pupil premium will be extended to all eligible 2-year-olds and from September 2024 to all eligible children aged 9-months to 3-year-old accessing the early years entitlements. This will be payable on a maximum of 15 hours per week, or 570 hours per year.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of providing special educational needs inclusion funding directly to providers based on identified need rather than through the early years national funding formula.

The early years national funding formulae contain an additional needs element, to take account of the number of children with additional needs in an area. This is important to ensure local authority level rates, and therefore allocations, reflect the needs of children in their area.

Local authorities establish Special Educational Needs Inclusion Funds (SENIFs) locally, using the early years block (distributed via the aforementioned formulae) and high needs blocks of their Dedicated Schools Grant allocation. More information on this allocation is available at: https://skillsfunding.service.gov.uk/view-latest-funding/national-funding-allocations/DSG/2024-to-2025. These funds are intended to support local authorities to work with providers to address the needs of individual children with Special Educational Needs who are taking up the entitlements and can be passed on direct to providers by local authorities.

The government’s response on 20 September 2023 to the consultation on expanding the early education entitlements reiterated the department’s commitment, made in the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities and Alternative Provision Improvement Plan of March 2023, to undertake a review of the way local authorities operate their SENIFs.

The department intends to conduct a detailed assessment of the SENIF arrangements that local authorities currently have in place, looking at how SENIFs are being used nationally and how far they are meeting current need. The department will look to draw examples of best practice together, with a view to sector-wide dissemination, and recommend longer term changes that will improve the extent to which SENIFs can meet the needs of children taking up the entitlements.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Education on 23 October 2023, Official Report, column 585, what the budget will be of the childcare staff recruitment campaign in each of the next three financial years.

The campaign budget for the 2023/24 financial year is £6.5 million. The budget for future years is still to be confirmed. The department intends to measure the awareness amongst its target audience of the following: the opportunities available in early years, positive perceptions of careers in the sector and consideration of applying for early years roles. The department also intends to measure visits to a dedicated website where people will be able to find out more about early years, and the number who go on to take action on the site, for example in accessing the Find a Job platform, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/find-a-job.

The departmental campaign strategy is based on in depth analysis of the target audience and has been reviewed by a variety of key early years stakeholders and setting managers and staff.

Overall, the number of paid early years staff has remained stable in recent years. Childcare and Early Years Provider Survey 2022 data shows that between 2021 and 2022, the total number of early years staff increased by 5,900 (or 2 per cent), from 328,500 to 334,400. The survey data is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/childcare-and-early-years-provider-survey/2022.

The Provider Survey publication included estimates for the number of staff that were recruited by group-based and school-based providers in the last twelve months, as well as estimates of the number of number of staff who have left these providers in the last twelve months. However, these estimates do not distinguish between those who have joined or left from other early years providers, and those who joined or left from outside the sector. The department will publish updated estimates for the above in December, as well as new data on the destination of leaving staff members. The estimates of the approximate number of additional staff, required to meet demand from the new entitlements will be published in due course.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Education on 23 October 2023, Official Report, column 585, what discussions her Department had with relevant stakeholders when designing the childcare staff recruitment campaign; and if she will publish (a) summaries of those discussions and (b) other evidence her Department received on the establishment of the recruitment campaign.

The campaign budget for the 2023/24 financial year is £6.5 million. The budget for future years is still to be confirmed. The department intends to measure the awareness amongst its target audience of the following: the opportunities available in early years, positive perceptions of careers in the sector and consideration of applying for early years roles. The department also intends to measure visits to a dedicated website where people will be able to find out more about early years, and the number who go on to take action on the site, for example in accessing the Find a Job platform, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/find-a-job.

The departmental campaign strategy is based on in depth analysis of the target audience and has been reviewed by a variety of key early years stakeholders and setting managers and staff.

Overall, the number of paid early years staff has remained stable in recent years. Childcare and Early Years Provider Survey 2022 data shows that between 2021 and 2022, the total number of early years staff increased by 5,900 (or 2 per cent), from 328,500 to 334,400. The survey data is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/childcare-and-early-years-provider-survey/2022.

The Provider Survey publication included estimates for the number of staff that were recruited by group-based and school-based providers in the last twelve months, as well as estimates of the number of number of staff who have left these providers in the last twelve months. However, these estimates do not distinguish between those who have joined or left from other early years providers, and those who joined or left from outside the sector. The department will publish updated estimates for the above in December, as well as new data on the destination of leaving staff members. The estimates of the approximate number of additional staff, required to meet demand from the new entitlements will be published in due course.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Education to the question from the hon. Member for Walthamstow of 23 October 2023, Official Report, column 585, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of the expansion of subsidised childcare hours on the number of childcare staff required to meet demand.

The campaign budget for the 2023/24 financial year is £6.5 million. The budget for future years is still to be confirmed. The department intends to measure the awareness amongst its target audience of the following: the opportunities available in early years, positive perceptions of careers in the sector and consideration of applying for early years roles. The department also intends to measure visits to a dedicated website where people will be able to find out more about early years, and the number who go on to take action on the site, for example in accessing the Find a Job platform, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/find-a-job.

The departmental campaign strategy is based on in depth analysis of the target audience and has been reviewed by a variety of key early years stakeholders and setting managers and staff.

Overall, the number of paid early years staff has remained stable in recent years. Childcare and Early Years Provider Survey 2022 data shows that between 2021 and 2022, the total number of early years staff increased by 5,900 (or 2 per cent), from 328,500 to 334,400. The survey data is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/childcare-and-early-years-provider-survey/2022.

The Provider Survey publication included estimates for the number of staff that were recruited by group-based and school-based providers in the last twelve months, as well as estimates of the number of number of staff who have left these providers in the last twelve months. However, these estimates do not distinguish between those who have joined or left from other early years providers, and those who joined or left from outside the sector. The department will publish updated estimates for the above in December, as well as new data on the destination of leaving staff members. The estimates of the approximate number of additional staff, required to meet demand from the new entitlements will be published in due course.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Education to the question from the hon. Member for Walthamstow of 23 October 2023, Official Report, column 585, what metrics her Department plans to use to measure the success of the childcare staff recruitment campaign.

The campaign budget for the 2023/24 financial year is £6.5 million. The budget for future years is still to be confirmed. The department intends to measure the awareness amongst its target audience of the following: the opportunities available in early years, positive perceptions of careers in the sector and consideration of applying for early years roles. The department also intends to measure visits to a dedicated website where people will be able to find out more about early years, and the number who go on to take action on the site, for example in accessing the Find a Job platform, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/find-a-job.

The departmental campaign strategy is based on in depth analysis of the target audience and has been reviewed by a variety of key early years stakeholders and setting managers and staff.

Overall, the number of paid early years staff has remained stable in recent years. Childcare and Early Years Provider Survey 2022 data shows that between 2021 and 2022, the total number of early years staff increased by 5,900 (or 2 per cent), from 328,500 to 334,400. The survey data is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/childcare-and-early-years-provider-survey/2022.

The Provider Survey publication included estimates for the number of staff that were recruited by group-based and school-based providers in the last twelve months, as well as estimates of the number of number of staff who have left these providers in the last twelve months. However, these estimates do not distinguish between those who have joined or left from other early years providers, and those who joined or left from outside the sector. The department will publish updated estimates for the above in December, as well as new data on the destination of leaving staff members. The estimates of the approximate number of additional staff, required to meet demand from the new entitlements will be published in due course.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
19th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Government's planned expansion of subsidised childcare announced in March 2023, what estimate she has made of the additional number of staff required as a result of that expansion by (a) April 2024, (b) September 2024 and (c) September 2025.

The department knows that to deliver the expanded early years entitlements, the sector will require additional staff. The phased implementation of the free hours offers will allow the market to develop the necessary capacity. The department continues to monitor sufficiency of childcare provision, including recruitment challenges, through our regular conversations with local authorities, and we are implementing a range of interventions to support the increase required.

In early 2024 we will launch a new, national, multi-channel broadcast recruitment campaign to boost interest in the sector and support the recruitment of talented staff. Alongside this, the department will consider how to introduce new accelerated apprenticeship and degree apprenticeship routes so everyone from junior staff to senior leaders can easily move into a career in the sector.

The department is also committed to delivering flexibility for providers to help them meet the ambition of the Spring Budget investment and has carried out a consultation on a package of possible flexibilities that could be introduced to the early years foundation stage framework.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department spent on the Childcare Grant for undergraduate students in each of the last five years; and how many people have (a) made a claim and (b) been eligible for support under that scheme in each of the last five years.

The information on how much the department has spent on the Childcare Grant for undergraduate students for each of the last five years and how many people have claimed this can be found in the Student Loan Company’s (SLC) ‘Student support for higher education in England 2022’ publication, which can be found in Tables 4C(i) and 4C(ii) at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/student-support-for-higher-education-in-england-2022,. Data for the 2022/23 academic year will be available in November 2023. Data for the 2021/22 academic year is currently provisional, as it has an earlier effective date of 31 October of the relevant academic year, and will be finalised in November 2023.

In the 2019/20 academic year, Childcare Grant payments changed from being paid to new and continuing students based on estimated costs, to being paid to childcare providers directly via a third-party system, based on actual costs incurred. As a result of this change there is a break in the time series when reporting Childcare Grant amounts. Up until the 2019/20 academic year, Childcare Grant has been reported as awards based on a student’s given estimates for the year, which are then finalised a year later in the subsequent publication. From the 2019/20 academic year, actual payments will be reported as with other loan products, in a new table, Table 4C (ii).

The department and SLC do not hold information on the number of people who have been eligible for Childcare Grants over the last five years.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
14th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much her Department spent on the Care to Learn scheme in each of the last five years; and how many people have (a) made a claim and (b) been eligible for support under that scheme in each of the last five years.

Data showing the number of people eligible for support under the Care to Learn scheme and the total payments made for academic year 2022/23 is not yet available.

Eligible students apply for Care to Learn support through their education institution. The department does not routinely gather information about rejected applications from them.

The figures below cover the previous five academic years:

Academic year

Care to Learn Take-up

Total payments

2017/18

2,345

£10,292,914

2018/19

2,003

£8,096,905

2019/20

1,376

£6,090,356

2020/21

1,155

£5,034,029

2021/22

1,052

£4,665,735

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
15th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans that the review of the relationships, sex and health education statutory guidance will (a) begin, (b) invite views from stakeholder organisations, (c) conclude and (d) be implemented in schools.

The Department is in the process of identifying and appointing the members of the independent expert panel, which will inform the wider review of the Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE) guidance. The review started recently and will cover the full scope of the statutory RSHE guidance.

The Department will seek to gather evidence from a wide range of stakeholders over the coming months and to consult publicly on an amended draft in the autumn, to conclude by the end of the year. The amended guidance will be published soon after, in early 2024.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of local authorities which (a) do not have sufficient childcare places in their area for children aged between 0 and 3 years old and (b) do not hold data on sufficiency for this age group.

Under Section 6 of the Childcare Act 2006, local authorities are responsible for ensuring that the provision of childcare is sufficient to meet the requirements of parents in their area. Part B of the Early Education and Childcare statutory guidance for local authorities highlights that local authorities are required to report annually to elected council members on how they are meeting their duty to secure sufficient childcare, and to make this report available and accessible to parents.

The department has regular contact with each local authority in England about their sufficiency of childcare and any issues they are facing.

Where local authorities report sufficiency challenges we discuss what action the local authority is taking to address those issues and where needed, support the local authority with any specific requirements through our childcare sufficiency support contract.

The department monitors take up of the early years entitlements through the annual census and publishes the results at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/education-provision-children-under-5.

The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, sets out how an effective single national SEND and AP system will be delivered. Many of the proposals in the improvement plan will include early years education, including the funding we are providing to train up to 5,000 early years Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinators (SENCOs) to gain an accredited Level 3 Early Years SENCO qualification.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of local authorities which do not have sufficient childcare places in their area for children aged between 0 and 5 years old.

Under Section 6 of the Childcare Act 2006, local authorities are responsible for ensuring that the provision of childcare is sufficient to meet the requirements of parents in their area. Part B of the Early Education and Childcare statutory guidance for local authorities highlights that local authorities are required to report annually to elected council members on how they are meeting their duty to secure sufficient childcare, and to make this report available and accessible to parents.

The department has regular contact with each local authority in England about their sufficiency of childcare and any issues they are facing.

Where local authorities report sufficiency challenges we discuss what action the local authority is taking to address those issues and where needed, support the local authority with any specific requirements through our childcare sufficiency support contract.

The department monitors take up of the early years entitlements through the annual census and publishes the results at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/education-provision-children-under-5.

The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, sets out how an effective single national SEND and AP system will be delivered. Many of the proposals in the improvement plan will include early years education, including the funding we are providing to train up to 5,000 early years Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinators (SENCOs) to gain an accredited Level 3 Early Years SENCO qualification.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of local authorities which do not have sufficient childcare place sin their area for children with disabilities aged between 0 and 17 years old.

Under Section 6 of the Childcare Act 2006, local authorities are responsible for ensuring that the provision of childcare is sufficient to meet the requirements of parents in their area. Part B of the Early Education and Childcare statutory guidance for local authorities highlights that local authorities are required to report annually to elected council members on how they are meeting their duty to secure sufficient childcare, and to make this report available and accessible to parents.

The department has regular contact with each local authority in England about their sufficiency of childcare and any issues they are facing.

Where local authorities report sufficiency challenges we discuss what action the local authority is taking to address those issues and where needed, support the local authority with any specific requirements through our childcare sufficiency support contract.

The department monitors take up of the early years entitlements through the annual census and publishes the results at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/education-provision-children-under-5.

The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, sets out how an effective single national SEND and AP system will be delivered. Many of the proposals in the improvement plan will include early years education, including the funding we are providing to train up to 5,000 early years Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinators (SENCOs) to gain an accredited Level 3 Early Years SENCO qualification.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of local authorities which do not have sufficient childcare places in their area for children aged between 0 and 14.

Under Section 6 of the Childcare Act 2006, local authorities are responsible for ensuring that the provision of childcare is sufficient to meet the requirements of parents in their area. Part B of the Early Education and Childcare statutory guidance for local authorities highlights that local authorities are required to report annually to elected council members on how they are meeting their duty to secure sufficient childcare, and to make this report available and accessible to parents.

The department has regular contact with each local authority in England about their sufficiency of childcare and any issues they are facing.

Where local authorities report sufficiency challenges we discuss what action the local authority is taking to address those issues and where needed, support the local authority with any specific requirements through our childcare sufficiency support contract.

The department monitors take up of the early years entitlements through the annual census and publishes the results at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/education-provision-children-under-5.

The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) and Alternative Provision (AP) Improvement Plan, published on 2 March 2023, sets out how an effective single national SEND and AP system will be delivered. Many of the proposals in the improvement plan will include early years education, including the funding we are providing to train up to 5,000 early years Special Educational Needs Co-Ordinators (SENCOs) to gain an accredited Level 3 Early Years SENCO qualification.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
15th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, (a) what arrangements her Department has in place to help ensure that schools and mulit-academy trusts who have entered PFI contracts for school buildings remain able to afford interest payments on those contracts and (b) what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of those arrangements in the context of rising inflation and interest rates.

All private finance initiative (PFI) schools contracts have been entered into by either local authorities or the Secretary of State for Education. PFI schools contracts include an interest rate hedge which is agreed at the point of contract signature to secure a fixed rate of borrowing until contract expiry. This means that the payments made to the PFI contractor do not fluctuate as interest rates change.

An element of the payment owing to PFI contractors is typically index linked but the impact of rising inflation is not an issue that is unique to PFI contracts.

17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Government consultation on the Lifelong Loan Entitlement launched on 24 February 2022, when she will (a) publish her response to that consultation and (b) implement an Alternative Finance Product.

On 6 May 2022, the department concluded the consultation on the Lifelong Loan Entitlement (LLE) as part of our planned pathway to delivery from 2025. This consultation, and other ongoing sector engagement, is a critical part of delivering a transformation of student finance. The department is carefully considering the contributions and will publish the response in due course.

The department remains committed to delivering an Alternative Student Finance (ASF) product compatible with Islamic finance principles, and work has started to assess how we can ultimately deliver an ASF product alongside the LLE. The department will provide a further update on ASF as part of our response to the LLE consultation.

Robert Halfon
Minister of State (Education)
24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Childcare (Early Years Provision Free of Charge) (Extended Entitlement) Regulations 2016.

The Childcare (Early Years Provision Free of Charge) (Extended Entitlement) Regulations 2016 were amended on 12 November 2021, to ensure that Swiss nationals and nationals from the European Economic Area (EEA) who have a pending application for leave to enter or remain in the UK under the EU Settlement Scheme, or who have an outstanding appeal or applied late, are still eligible to apply for the 30 hours free early education entitlement. Parents with EEA or Swiss nationality who have indefinite leave to remain in the UK are also eligible to apply for 30 hours free early education entitlement.

These regulations were consolidated in December 2022, as the Childcare (Free of Charge for Working Parents) (England) Regulations 2022. This can be accessed here: https://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2022/1134/contents/made.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans she has to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Children (Protection at Work) Regulations 1998.

The department is responsible for a very small number of pieces of Retained EU Law (REUL) and is working closely with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) to support the passage through Parliament of the REUL (Revocation and Reform) Bill and the associated BEIS-led programme of REUL repeal and reform.

The department is in the process of analysing and assessing what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed or amended. In doing so we will ensure that children continue to be safeguarded in employment.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
20th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children with no recourse to public funds are eligible for free school meals in (a) England (b) London and (c) Waltham Forest.

National level data on the number of children eligible for free school meals (FSM) and who attracted pupil premium funding, under what was previously a temporary extension of free school meal eligibility to some no recourse to public funds (NRPF) households, can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2022-to-2023.

Due to the low number of FSM eligible children from NRPF households, the department is unable to provide the breakdown of figures requested, to protect these pupils from being identified.

When FSM eligibility was permanently extended to pupils from all households with NRPF in April 2022, the department ran a claims process which allowed schools to claim additional pupil premium funding for the 2022/23 financial year for pupils that had become eligible. This information will be captured in a subsequent data release.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many registered early years settings have submitted notifications of (a) permanent and (b) temporary partial closures of the setting in the academic year 2021-22.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member for Walthamstow, and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many registered early years settings have submitted notifications of (a) permanent and (b) temporary complete closure of the setting in the academic year 2021-22.

This is a matter for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to the hon. Member for Walthamstow, and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Sutton Trust report entitled A fair start: Equalising access to early education, published 19 August 2021, what assessment he has made of the effect of not being able to access 30 hours of Government funded childcare on the development of children from low-income families.

All 3 and 4 year olds, as well as some disadvantaged 2 year olds, in England are eligible for 15 hours free childcare. This provides them with high-quality early education and helps to prepare them for school.

Working parents of 3 and 4 year olds can access an additional 15 hours (‘30 hours’) free childcare, helping them with the cost of childcare and supporting parents back into work, or to work more hours if they wish to. To be eligible, parents must earn the equivalent of at least 16 hours a week at national minimum/living wage (for parents aged over 23, this is equivalent to just over £7,400 per year), and under £100,000 per year. The government currently has no plans to extend this scheme.

There is no analysis available that compares children who access 30 hours free childcare with those who do not. However, findings from the department’s longitudinal Study of Early Education and Development (SEED) suggests that by age 5, greater use of formal group childcare (average hours per week) between age 2 and the start of school was associated with some negative effects on socio-emotional well-being and development in school year 1. SEED is our best evidence source for early years education.

A range of factors affect a child's development, including their wider learning environment. This could include, for example, their home learning environment.

16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much was (a) budgeted for and (b) spent on government-funded childcare provision for 2 year olds in each of the last 5 financial years.

The government allocates funding for the early years entitlements in line with the number of places that are taken up.

The expenditure figures are as follows:

Early years dedicated schools grant allocation

2017-18
Final

2018-19
Final

2019-20
Final

2020-21
Initial

2021-22
Indicative

3-4 year old universal hours

£2,302.6 million

£2,286.7 million

£2,278.5 million

£2,310.9 million

£2,338.2 million

3-4 year old additional hours

£404.6 million

£743.7 million

£807.0 million

£840.3 million

£850.4 million

2 year old

£469.7 million

£449.1 million

£433.8 million

£434.5 million

£440.8 million

Please note that final allocations for 2020-21 and 2021-22 are not yet available.

16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much was (a) budgeted for and (b) spent on government-funded childcare provision for 3 and 4 year olds in each of the last 5 financial years.

The government allocates funding for the early years entitlements in line with the number of places that are taken up.

The expenditure figures are as follows:

Early years dedicated schools grant allocation

2017-18
Final

2018-19
Final

2019-20
Final

2020-21
Initial

2021-22
Indicative

3-4 year old universal hours

£2,302.6 million

£2,286.7 million

£2,278.5 million

£2,310.9 million

£2,338.2 million

3-4 year old additional hours

£404.6 million

£743.7 million

£807.0 million

£840.3 million

£850.4 million

2 year old

£469.7 million

£449.1 million

£433.8 million

£434.5 million

£440.8 million

Please note that final allocations for 2020-21 and 2021-22 are not yet available.

17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken to implement the findings of the Government consultation into Sharia-compliant financing for education and the November 2015 Government green paper entitled, Fulfilling our potential Teaching Excellence, Social Mobility and Student Choice.

The government took new powers in the Higher Education and Research Act 2017 to make a system of alternative payments possible. The government has been considering the Alternative Student Finance (ASF) product carefully alongside its other priorities and has decided to align a decision on implementation with the outcome of the post-18 review of education and funding. The interim report of the review was published on 21 January 2021, and the review is due to conclude alongside the next multi-year Spending Review. We will provide an update on ASF at that time.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to monitor whether (a) sexual harassment and (b) other types of gender-based violence and abuse are being taught in schools as part of Relationship and Sex Education.

Sexual harassment and gender based violence are covered within the statutory relationships, sex and health education (RSHE) curriculum. Schools are expected to teach these important subjects as part of the statutory curriculum.

Schools are accountable for what they teach. The 2019 Ofsted education inspection framework includes a ‘personal development’ judgement, and inspections will look at how well a school is following the new statutory RSHE requirements.

The Department is awaiting the outcome of Ofsted’s thematic review of sexual abuse in schools and colleges. The review will look specifically at whether schools need further support in teaching about sex and relationships, which will provide some valuable insight and help us to consider how we can further support schools to deliver RSHE subjects effectively and confidently.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the number of laptops that local authorities were required to buy for children who are eligible for (a) free school meals, (a) pupil premium, (c) education, health and care plans and (d) other vulnerabilities following the announcement of an additional funding allocation for laptops by his Department in February 2021.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including making 1.3 million laptops and tablets available for disadvantaged children and young people.

Upon delivery, laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts, local authorities or further education colleges who can lend these to the children and young people who need them most, during the current COVID-19 restrictions.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 25 January 2021 to Question 140063 on Remote Education: Computers, if he will publish weekly data on the number of laptops (a) allocated and (b) delivered to pupils to support remote education by constituency since 1 April 2020.

The Department has allocated and delivered devices to schools, academy trusts and local authorities through our £400 million Get Help with Technology programme. On delivery, devices become the property of the organisation that receives them. Academy trusts and local authorities often have schools in several constituencies and will have passed on devices according to their own assessment of the need of their schools. For this reason, it is not possible to provide the requested data.

As of Monday 1 February 2021, we have delivered over 920,000 laptops to schools, academy trusts and local authorities. We are publishing aggregate data on a weekly basis which shows deliveries at local authority and academy trust level, which can be found at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-5.

19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the number of laptops (a) allocated and (b) delivered to pupils to support remote education by constituency in each week of the last six months; and if he will publish the number of children in receipt of free school meals by constituency in each of the last six months.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, by securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people. As of Monday 18 January, over 800,000 laptops and tablets had been delivered to schools, academy trusts and local authorities.

The Government is providing this significant injection of devices on top of an estimated 2.9 million laptops and tablets already owned by schools before the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.

The number of devices available to each school, academy trust and local authority is determined by the number of children eligible for free school meals. All schools, academy trusts and local authorities have now been given the opportunity to order their full current allocation of devices.

Figures on the number of devices delivered is available at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/laptops-and-tablets-data/2021-week-3.

These figures are broken down by local authority and academy trust. Figures on delivery by constituency are not available.

Data related to the number of pupils claiming free school meals is collected in the termly school census. We routinely publish the statistics from the spring (January) school census in the schools, pupils and their characteristics statistical release. The most recent published figures, from the January 2020 school census, are available at the following link, including data for each school and the constituency they are in:

https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-pupils-and-their-characteristics.

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, a summer census did not take place in the 2019/20 academic year. The Department plans to publish the information relating to October 2020 in due course.

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 13 November 2020 to Question 91878 on Students: Loans, what recent assessment he has made of the equity of charging interest on Plan 1 student loans during maternity leave.

There has been no recent assessment made on the equity of charging interest on Plan 1 student loans during maternity leave.

Student loans have much more favourable terms than commercial loans. Repayments are linked to income, not to interest, or the amount borrowed. Borrowers earning less than the annual repayment threshold of £19,390 for Plan 1 loans repay nothing at all. The interest rate on Plan 1 (pre-2012) income-contingent repayment student loans is the Retail Price Index (currently 2.6%), or the Bank Base Rate +1%, whichever is lower. The current interest rate of 1.1% will remain in place until such time as the Bank Base Rate changes.

The current system protects borrowers, including people on maternity and other forms of parental leave, if they see a reduction in their income. Repayments are made based on a borrower’s monthly or weekly income, not the interest rate or amount borrowed, and no repayments are made for earnings below the repayment thresholds.

Loans are written off after a specified time, with no detriment to the borrower. There are no commercial loans that offer this level of borrower protection. Student loans are subsidised by the taxpayer; the government does not make a profit from the loan scheme.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that the interest charged on Plan 1 student loans during maternity leave does not cause unfair financial hardship on women.

The system for setting interest rates on student loans is set out in The Education (Student Loans) (Repayment) Regulations (2009), as amended. The interest rate on Plan 1 (pre-2012) income-contingent repayment student loans is the Retail Price Index (currently 2.6%), or the Bank of England base rate + 1%, whichever is lower. The current interest rate of 1.1% will remain in place until such time as the Bank of England base rate changes.

The current system protects borrowers, including people on maternity leave and other forms of parental leave, if they see a reduction in their income. Repayments are made based on a borrower’s monthly or weekly income, not the interest rate or amount borrowed, and no repayments are made for earnings below the repayment thresholds. Repayments are calculated as a fixed percentage of earnings above the relevant repayment threshold. The annual repayment threshold for Plan 1 borrowers is currently £19,390, rising to £19,895 from 6 April 2021. Any outstanding debt is written off at the end of the loan term with no detriment to the borrower.

If, at the end of the year, the borrower’s total income is below the annual threshold, they may reclaim any repayments from the Student Loans Company made during that year.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 2 November 2020 to Question 108223 on Sex and Relationship Education: Religion, whether the materials published on the website, A Fertile Heart are permitted to be used in schools according to the Government guidance, Plan your relationships, sex and health curriculum, published on 24 September 2020.

The Department remains committed to supporting all schools in their preparations to deliver the content of Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE) subjects.

It is for schools to decide which resources they choose to support the teaching of RSHE. The Department’sPlan your relationships, sex and health curriculum’ implementation guidance, building on the content of the statutory RSHE guidance, includes clear advice on choosing resources: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

The implementation guidance also advises schools to exercise caution when working with external agencies, including ensuring they have full confidence in any agency’s approach and the resources it uses. The Department has stated that schools should not work with agencies that take extreme positions, and this should also be reflected in the school’s choice of resources.

23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether materials from religious organisations are permitted in schools under the Plan your relationships, sex and health curriculum guidance published by his Department on 24 September 2020.

The Department is committed to supporting all schools to deliver the content of the new subjects of Relationships, Sex and Health Education (RSHE). When teaching the new RSHE subjects, schools should take into account the age of pupils and their religious background.

Our support package, published on 24 September, is aimed at helping all schools increase their confidence and quality of their teaching practice. This package includes teacher training modules, non-statutory implementation guidance and training led by Teaching Schools.

The Department has made clear that it is important that schools take full responsibility for ensuring lessons and materials they intend to use are age appropriate, suitable and politically impartial, particularly when using materials produced by external organisations. We are aware that there are many resources in circulation to support schools to deliver these subjects.

The Department’sPlan your relationships, sex and health curriculum’ implementation guidance includes advice on working with external agencies. It builds on the content of the statutory RSHE guidance and it includes clear advice on choosing resources. It states that schools should assess each resource that they propose to use to ensure it is appropriate for the age and maturity of their pupils and sensitive to their needs, where relevant. This guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/plan-your-relationships-sex-and-health-curriculum.

30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that women do not face unfair financial hardship as a result of the requirement to continue paying student loan repayments during maternity leave.

The repayment of student loans is governed by the Education (Student Loans) (Repayment) Regulations (2009) (as amended).

The current system protects borrowers, including people on maternity and other forms of parental leave, if they see a reduction in their income. Repayments are made based on a borrower’s monthly or weekly income, not the interest rate or amount borrowed, and no repayments are made for earnings below the repayment threshold. Repayments are calculated as a fixed percentage of earnings above the relevant repayment threshold – if income drops, so do the repayments made. Any outstanding debt is written off at the end of the loan term with no detriment to the borrower.

If at the end of the year, the borrower’s total income is below the relevant annual threshold, they may reclaim any repayments from the Student Loans Company made during that year.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) laptops and (b) tablets have been distributed to children in Walthamstow through the Government's scheme to ensure disadvantaged children and young people can remote education during the covid-9 outbreak.

The Government has committed over £100 million to support vulnerable and disadvantaged children in England to access remote education and social care services, including by providing laptops, tablets and 4G wireless routers.

We are providing laptops and tablets to disadvantaged children who would otherwise not have access and are preparing for examinations in Year 10, receiving support from a social worker or are a care leaver. Where care leavers, children with a social worker at secondary school and children in Year 10 do not have internet connections, we are providing 4G wireless routers.

The Department has ordered over 200,000 laptops and tablets and allocated devices to local authorities and academy trusts based on its estimates of the number of eligible children that do not have access to a device. Local authorities and academy trusts are best place to identify and prioritise children and young people who need devices. The Department is working to provide these devices in the shortest possible timeframe; deliveries to schools and local authorities began in May and have continued throughout June.

The Department has published information about how many laptops, tablets and 4G wireless routers we have delivered or dispatched to local authorities and academy trusts as of 14 June, which can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/laptops-tablets-and-4g-wireless-routers-progress-data.

This includes 785 devices to Waltham Forest for children with a social worker and care leavers.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department (a) has made and (b) plans to make of the effectiveness of the free sanitary products in all primary schools scheme (i) while all pupils are not attending school due to the covid-19 outbreak and (ii) over the summer holidays.

On 20 January 2020, the department launched a new scheme which makes free period products available for state-funded primary schools, secondary schools and colleges in England.

This is an important step to ensure that menstruation does not present a barrier to learning and that no-one is held back from reaching their potential.

We are continuing to monitor schools’ engagement with the scheme during the COVID-19 outbreak. All schools and colleges continue to be able to order period products and distribute them to learners according to their own local arrangements.

4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools have opted in to period product provision; and whether his Department has plans to extend the scheme to (a) primary schools, (b) NHS facilities and (c) public spaces.

Through the period product scheme, state-maintained schools and 16 to 19 education organisations in England can access free period products. This includes state-maintained primary and secondary schools, including academies and free schools, state-maintained middle and all through schools, general hospital schools, special schools, academies and free schools, alternative provision organisations, including pupil referral units, and university technical colleges and studio schools. The scheme launched in January 2020 and we continue to monitor uptake closely. We will publish further information in due course.

NHS facilities and other public spaces do not fall within the department’s remit. NHS England announced in March 2019 that it will offer period products to every hospital patient who needs them, including long-term in-patients.

13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to support supply teachers when the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is withdrawn.

As both my right hon. Friends the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have made clear, the government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by Covid-19.

There is comprehensive support available for supply teachers during the Covid-19 outbreak, and the Department has provided detailed guidance to help schools, agencies and staff identify the right support available for each individual, available at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-school-closures/guidance-for-schools-about-temporarily-closing#what-should-schools-do-if-they-have-already-ended-contracts-with-contingent-workers-that-they-directly-employ. This will depend on supply teachers’ individual circumstances and, for some, may include access to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-for-wage-costs-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme#agency-workers-including-those-employed-by-umbrella-companies.

On 12 May, my right hon. Friend the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme would continue until the end of October. This means that any supply teachers who have been furloughed by their employment agency will continue to receive 80% of their salary.

Schools will continue to receive their budgets, which ensures that they are able to continue to pay for staff that they employ directly and meet their other regular financial commitments, including paying their suppliers, such as employment agencies, as per Cabinet Office guidance, available at this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/procurement-policy-note-0220-supplier-relief-due-to-covid-19.

These are rapidly developing circumstances. We will continue to keep the situation under review and to keep Parliament updated accordingly.

13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that supply teachers working for umbrella companies are furloughed at 80 per cent of their average wage during the covid-19 oubreak.

As both my right hon. Friends, the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have made clear, the government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19.

The duration of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme – https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-for-wage-costs-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme#agency-workers-including-those-employed-by-umbrella-companies - has been extended this week by my right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, providing financial reassurance to many people in these unprecedented times.

The scheme is not sector-specific and its terms and conditions must be met by all employers, including umbrella companies.

Employers can claim for any regular payments they are obliged to pay their employees. This includes wages, past overtime, fees and compulsory commission payments. However, discretionary bonus (including tips) and commission payments and non-cash payments should be excluded.

Full guidance on how to calculate 80% of employee’s wages can be found at: www.gov.uk/guidance/work-out-80-of-your-employees-wages-to-claim-through-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme.

12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment his Department has made of the reasons for which employment businesses on the Crown Commercial Services framework (a) and (b) have not furloughed supply teachers.

The Department does not collect data on the employment practices of private businesses. All businesses, including employment businesses, should make assessments of the work available for their employees before making decisions on using the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Businesses supplying services and/or labour to the public sector should also take into consideration the service continuity payments they are receiving and should not furlough staff where payments continue, as per the Cabinet Office Procurement Policy Note 02/20.

Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/procurement-policy-note-0220-supplier-relief-due-to-covid-19.

Further information for schools on supply teachers is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-school-closures/guidance-for-schools-about-temporarily-closing#supply-teachers-and-other-contingent-workers.

12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of (a) schools and (b) employment businesses that have continued paying contingent labour in the public sector during the covid-19 outbreak in line with the Cabinet Office guidance.

The Department has published detailed guidance on the support available for supply teachers and other contingent workers during the Covid-19 pandemic. Schools, agencies, and staff should refer to section 11 of this guidance which sets out the approach we expect schools and agencies to take in paying contingent staff. This guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-school-closures/guidance-for-schools-about-temporarily-closing#supply-teachers-and-other-contingent-workers.

Schools report their overall financial spending on an annual basis. We are considering how and when such data should next be collected in the context of COVID-19.

As confirmed in our guidance on financial support for schools, schools will continue to receive their core funding allocations for the coming year, as usual, regardless of any periods of partial or complete closure. This will ensure that they are able to continue to pay their staff, and meet their other regular financial commitments, as we move through these extraordinary times.

12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of long-term contracts for supply teachers as contingent labour that were cancelled in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department does not collect data specifically on the number of supply teachers or teachers employed by agencies.

The Department has published guidance for schools and the school workforce which sets out that schools should continue to pay staff that they directly hire. Where schools had contracts with directly hired staff that have been terminated earlier than the original terms set out due to COVID-19, these contracts should be reinstated on the terms previously agreed.

Guidance is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-school-closures/guidance-for-schools-about-temporarily-closing#supply-teachers-and-other-contingent-workers.

28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what support the Government is providing to schools that wish to access free school meals vouchers from a retailer not listed on the Government’s National Voucher Scheme.

During this period, we are asking schools to support children who are eligible for and claiming benefits related free school meals, by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children, and we encourage this approach where it is possible. However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education. As of 28 April our supplier, Edenred, reported that over 16,500 schools had placed orders for the scheme and as of Monday 4 May, Edenred has reported that over £47 million worth of voucher codes has been redeemed into supermarket eGift cards by schools and families through the scheme.

Through the national voucher scheme, schools and families could initially access eGift cards for Morrisons, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda, Waitrose and M&S. On Monday 27 April Aldi was added to this list and on Wednesday 29 April McColl’s were also added. We recognise that it may not be convenient or possible for some families to visit one of these supermarkets and we are continuing to work to see if additional supermarkets can be added to this list.

If the national voucher scheme is not suitable for families in their local area, schools can provide alternative vouchers for a local shop or supermarket and can be reimbursed for associated costs.

We are providing additional funding to schools to cover unavoidable additional costs incurred due to the COVID-19 outbreak that cannot be met from their existing resources. This includes free school meal costs which are not covered by the national voucher system in situations where there is no access to appropriate local supermarkets

28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the costs to schools that wish to access free school meals vouchers from retailers not listed on the Government’s National Voucher Scheme will be reimbursed in full.

During this period, we are asking schools to support children who are eligible for and claiming benefits related free school meals, by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. We know that many schools are successfully delivering food parcels or arranging food collections for eligible children, and we encourage this approach where it is possible. However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why on 31 March we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education. As of 28 April our supplier, Edenred, reported that over 16,500 schools had placed orders for the scheme and as of Monday 4 May, Edenred has reported that over £47 million worth of voucher codes has been redeemed into supermarket eGift cards by schools and families through the scheme.

Through the national voucher scheme, schools and families could initially access eGift cards for Morrisons, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda, Waitrose and M&S. On Monday 27 April Aldi was added to this list and on Wednesday 29 April McColl’s were also added. We recognise that it may not be convenient or possible for some families to visit one of these supermarkets and we are continuing to work to see if additional supermarkets can be added to this list.

If the national voucher scheme is not suitable for families in their local area, schools can provide alternative vouchers for a local shop or supermarket and can be reimbursed for associated costs.

We are providing additional funding to schools to cover unavoidable additional costs incurred due to the COVID-19 outbreak that cannot be met from their existing resources. This includes free school meal costs which are not covered by the national voucher system in situations where there is no access to appropriate local supermarkets

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government is taking to support supply teachers who are employed through an agency and are not eligible for furlough via the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

As both my right hon. Friends, the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer, have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19.

Our latest school workforce guidance on COVID-19, including supply teachers, is set out below:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-school-closures/guidance-for-schools-about-temporarily-closing#supply-teachers-and-other-contingent-workers.

Further guidance on financial support for all education institutions is set out below:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care/coronavirus-covid-19-financial-support-for-education-early-years-and-childrens-social-care.

These are rapidly developing circumstances. We continue to keep the situation under review and will keep Parliament updated accordingly.

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether universities that have closed as a result of the covid-19 outbreak will require their students to pay their fees in full.

Fee loans are being paid directly to universities as planned at the start of the third term.

We are working with universities to make sure all reasonable efforts are being made to enable students to continue their studies to the best of their abilities. There are some fantastic and innovative examples of high-quality online learning being delivered by institutions across the UK, and the sector is already working hard to prepare learning materials for the summer and autumn terms.

Students ordinarily should not expect any fee refund if they are receiving adequate online learning and support. However, the government has made it clear that if universities are unable to deliver adequate online teaching then it would be unacceptable for students to be charged for any additional terms of study, which would effectively mean that they were being charged twice.

Whether or not an individual student is entitled to a refund of their fees will depend on specific contractual arrangements between the student and their university.

In the first instance, students should speak to their university. We expect student complaints and appeals processes to be operated flexibly, accessibly and sympathetically by institutions to resolve any concerns. Students who are not satisfied with their institution’s final response can ask the Office of the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education to consider their complaint if their institution is based in England or Wales.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
30th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to Questions (a) 11101, (b) 11102, (c) 11103 and (d) 11104, tabled by the hon. Member for Walthamstow on 23 January 2024; and for what reason his Department has been unable to answer the Questions within the usual time period.

Responses were published on 8 February 2024. Please accept my apologies for the delay. On this occasion, it was not possible to answer these questions within the usual time frame.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of consignments which will be subjected to the Border Target Operation Model sanitary and phyto-sanitary controls in each of the next three years, broken down by each risk category.

Please see summary tables below for figures by risk category; these tables show the volume of goods that would be assigned to each category based on April 2021 to March 2022 customs declaration data.

To note, whilst the consignments below are in scope for the new TOM risk-based approach, some of the consignments are already in scope for SPS controls and so do not represent the net effect of the TOM bringing consignments into scope for controls. Already in scope items include imports from non-EU countries, live animal imports from the EU, and some plant products.

POAO consignments by risk level

Low risk

Medium risk

High risk

Total

EU

1.4m to 2.4m

400k to 1.7m

Under 10k

2.8m to 3.0m

Non-EU

90k to 100k

Source: Defra analysis of April 2021 to March 2022 HMRC customs declaration data.

Figures may not sum due to rounding. *

P&PP consignments by risk level

Article 72 low risk

Article 73

Article 72 high risk

Total

EU

1.4m

780k

190k

2.4m

Non-EU

160k

Under 10k

Under 10k

160k

Source: Defra analysis of April 2021 to March 2022 HMRC customs declaration data.

Figures may not sum due to rounding. *

*All figures are rounded to the nearest 10,000.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the Border Target Operating Model on levels of food supply in (a) 2024, (b) 2025 and (c) 2026.

The resilience and reliability of food supply chains is a key objective of the Government as set out in last year’s Government Food Strategy. In implementing this new control regime for the first time on EU imports, we will carefully monitor the range of potential risks, including those that may impact food supply-chains.

We will work with importers to try to manage those risks in a structured way. We recognise that this new model for importing Sanitary and Phytosanitary goods will require some businesses and their supply-chains to adapt their business models. We do not expect food shortages.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the oral contribution of 19 January 2024 by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on Border Target Operating Model: Health Certificates and SMEs, Official Report column 1216, what the common user charge for imports into the UK will be; and when he plans to apply it.

Defra consulted last year on the proposed Common User Charge (CUC) to recover operating costs at Government-run Border Control Posts. It invited views on the principles, methodology and indicative rates for the Common User Charge to determine fair and reasonable charges.

Defra will use feedback to inform the final policy, which we expect to publish shortly.

Commercial BCP fees are a business decision for the operators of those sites.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State of 19 January 2024 in the debate on Border Target Operating Model: Health Certificates and SMEs, Official Report, column 1214, what his latest estimate is of the date by which the single trade window will be operational.

The Single Trade Window will be delivered through a series of releases, each one adding new features and delivering an improved user experience. As set out in the Border Target Operating Model, the first release of STW functionality will be made available for public use ahead of October 2024. The STW could be fully operational in 2027 but remains subject to future legislative and funding decisions.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 3 May 2023 to Question 183056 on Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017, whether her Department has issued internal guidance on the thresholds for (a) repealing and (b) reforming retained EU law.

Defra’s default approach remains that we will retain EU law unless there is a good reason to either repeal or reform it. Due to the wide scope of policy covered by Defra’s REUL, there can be no one size fits all approach to when REUL should be repealed or reformed across the Department. Defra is committed to maintaining the UK’s high standards and ambitions including on nature recovery and environmental protection.

27th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans her Department has to (a) retain (b) replace or (c) revoke the Bathing Waters Regulations 2013.

Defra is in the process of analysing its retained EU law and determining what should be preserved as part of domestic law, as well as REUL that should be repealed, or amended. We have been clear that we will uphold our environmental protections and the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill will not come at the expense of the protections that are already in place for our bathing waters.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans her Department has to (a) retain (b) replace or (c) revoke the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017.

Defra is carefully considering the retained EU law (REUL) within scope of the sunset clause in the REUL Bill, which will include the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 and the Conservation of Offshore Marine Habitats and Species Regulation 2017 (the Habitats Regulations). Defra’s default approach will be to retain REUL unless there is a good reason to either repeal or reform it. Any use of REUL Bill powers will ensure that our environmental law is fit for purpose and able to drive improved environmental outcomes.

27th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) retain, (b) replace or (c) reproduce regulations relating to (i) food hygiene, (ii) food labelling and (iii) food marketing.

In reviewing retained EU law (REUL), HM Government’s aim is to ensure that food law is fit for purpose and the UK regulatory framework is appropriate and tailored to the needs of UK consumers and business. The UK has world leading standards on food marketing, food safety and quality, backed by a rigorous legislative framework but it is only right that we should evaluate REUL to ensure it continues to meet our needs. While this is an opportunity for review, maintaining the UK’s high food standards remains our priority. HM Government remains committed to delivering informative food labelling and promoting robust food standards nationally and internationally, to protect consumer interests, facilitate international trade, and ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food that they buy.

As the Department responsible for food hygiene, the Food Standards Agency (working with Food Standards Scotland) is participating in the review of all retained EU law within its responsibilities. Neither consumer safety nor the ability of business to trade during this review will be compromised.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if her Department will publish (a) details of the biosecurity controls which the Government implements on high-risk imports, and (b) a list of the goods to which these controls apply.

Biosecurity remains a top priority for the Government, not only to protect consumers, but also to ensure that trading partners and industry have strong assurance of the UK’s standards of food safety. The Target Operating Model (TOM), to be published later this year, will set out how GB’s new Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) regime for imports will operate in full.

We have already implemented some controls on the highest risk goods entering from countries other than the EU, for example plants for planting and live animals, which must have health certificates, and which are subject to inspection. In addition, all regulated SPS goods must be electronically pre-notified before arrival into GB. We still operate the same import health controls on non-EU goods entering GB that applied whilst we were in the EU, except for certain fruit like citrus and mangoes which are not produced in GB, and which present a negligible pest/disease risk. Full details of current import controls and the commodities to which they apply are published on GOV.UK.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace Regulation 29/2012.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, including in relation to Regulation 29/2012.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Welfare of Farmed Animals (England) Regulations 2007.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Welfare of Farmed Animals (England) Regulations 2007.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether his Department plans to (a) restate, (b) reproduce or (c) replace the Plant Varieties Act 1997.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, including in relation to the Plant Varieties Act 1997.

31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2016.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2016.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace The Urban Waste Water Treatment (England and Wales) Regulations 1994.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Urban Waste Water Treatment (England and Wales) Regulations 1994.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Sea Fishing (Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing) Order 2009.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Sea Fishing (Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing) Order 2009.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Spirit Drinks Regulations 2008.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Spirit Drinks Regulations 2008.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Air Quality Standards Regulations 2010 fall within the scope of Clause 1 of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

As EU-derived subordinate legislation, the Air Quality Standards Regulations 2010 fall within the scope of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill. Defra is in the process of analysing its retained EU law and determining what should be preserved as assimilated domestic law, as well as what should be revoked, replaced or amended.

In reviewing retained EU law, Defra’s aim is to ensure that environmental law, including air quality law, is fit for purpose and able to drive improved outcomes, whilst also ensuring regulators can deliver efficiently. This will ensure the UK regulatory framework is appropriate and tailored to the UK.

Any changes to environmental regulation will take into account our goals set out in the 25 Year Environment Plan and the Environmental Improvement Plan, as well as our international commitments.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Cocoa and Chocolate Products (England) Regulations 2003.

We remain committed to maintaining our world leading standards of food safety and quality. Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to The Cocoa and Chocolate (England) Regulations 2003.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Environmental (Forestry) (England and Wales) Regulations 1999.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Environmental (Forestry) (England and Wales) Regulations 1999.

Defra has secured a clause in the Levelling Up and Regeneration Bill to unlock the laws governing EIAs which are currently governed by retained EU law, including the Forestry EIA.

23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Specified Sugar Products (England) Regulations 2003.

We remain committed to maintaining our world leading standards of food safety and quality. Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be re-pealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to The Specified Sugar Products (England) Regulations 2003.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Diseases of Poultry (England) Order 2003.

In reviewing REUL, Defra is committed to ensuring our laws deliver improved outcomes and the highest standards in a way that is tailored to the needs of UK consumers and business. The UK has world leading standards backed by a rigorous legislative framework and it is only right that we should evaluate REUL to ensure it continues to meet our needs. Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including, if appropriate, in relation to the Diseases of Poultry (England) Order 2003 (2013: 1078).

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans she has to (a) retain (b) revoke or (c) replace the Diseases of Swine Regulations 2014.

In reviewing REUL, Defra is committed to ensuring our laws deliver improved out-comes and the highest standards in a way that is tailored to the needs of UK con-sumers and business. The UK has world leading standards backed by a rigorous leg-islative framework and it is only right that we should evaluate REUL to ensure it con-tinues to meet our needs. Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the pow-ers in the Bill, including, if appropriate, in relation to the Diseases of Swine Regula-tions 2014 (2014:1894).

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans she has to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Scotch Whisky Regulations 2009.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Scotch Whisky Regulations 2009.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retain EU Law Bill, whether they intend to (a) retain (b) revoke or (c) replace the Controlled Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2012.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Controlled Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2012.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether she has plans to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Regulation (EU) No 1308/2013.

In reviewing REUL, Defra is committed to ensuring our laws deliver improved outcomes and the highest standards in a way that is tailored to the needs of UK consumers and business. The UK has world leading standards backed by a rigorous legislative framework and it is only right that we should evaluate REUL to ensure it continues to meet our needs. Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including, if appropriate, in relation to Regulation (EC) No 1308/2013.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) retain (b) revoke or (c) replace the REACH Enforcement Regulations 2008.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to UK REACH.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans he has to (a) retain, (b) revoke or (c) replace the Import of Seal Skins Regulations 1996.

In reviewing REUL, Defra is committed to ensuring our laws deliver improved outcomes and the highest standards in a way that is tailored to the needs of UK consumers and business. The UK has world leading standards backed by a rigorous legislative framework and it is only right that we should evaluate REUL to ensure it continues to meet our needs. Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including, if appropriate, in relation to commission Regulation (EC) No 98/2002.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace Council Regulation (EC) No 1005/2008.

The UK is committed to being a world leader in tackling IUU Fishing. HM Government is in the process of analysing all retained EU law. This analysis will enable us to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law and what should be repealed or amended.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace Commission Regulation (EC) No 98/2002.

In reviewing REUL, Defra is committed to ensuring our laws deliver improved outcomes and the highest standards in a way that is tailored to the needs of UK consumers and business. The UK has world leading standards backed by a rigorous legislative framework and it is only right that we should evaluate REUL to ensure it continues to meet our needs. Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including, if appropriate, in relation to commission Regulation (EC) No 98/2002.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) retain, (b) replace and (c) revoke the Avian Influenza (Vaccination) (England) Regulations 2006.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Avian Influenza (Vaccination) (England) Regulations 2006.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans she has to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Food Information (Amendment) (England) Regulation 2019.

The Food Information (Amendment) (England) Regulation 2019 has been revoked and replaced by the Food Information (Amendment) (England) Regulation 2022.


Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Food Information (Amendment) (England) Regulation 2022. We remain committed to maintaining our world leading standards of food safety and quality.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans they have to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Commission Decision 2003/459/EC.

In reviewing REUL, Defra is committed to ensuring our laws deliver improved outcomes and the highest standards in a way that is tailored to the needs of UK consumers and business. The UK has world leading standards backed by a rigorous legislative framework and it is only right that we should evaluate REUL to ensure it continues to meet our needs. Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including, if appropriate, in relation to commission Regulation (EC) No 98/2002.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has plans to (a) reform, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Food Information Regulations 2014.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its retained EU law to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Food Information Regulations 2014. We remain committed to maintaining our world leading standards of food safety and quality.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Bathing Waters Regulations 2013.

Defra is in the process of analysing and assessing its REUL stock to determine what should be preserved as part of domestic law, and what should be repealed, or amended. This work will determine how we use the powers in the Bill, including in relation to the Bathing Water Regulations 2013.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether she plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Invasive Alien Species (Enforcement and Permitting) Order (2019).

Defra is in the process of analysing its REUL stock and determining what should be preserved as part of domestic law, as well as REUL that should be repealed, or amended. In reviewing retained EU law, Defra’s aim is to ensure that UK law is fit for purpose and able to drive improved outcomes, whilst also ensuring regulators can deliver efficiently. This will ensure our regulatory framework is appropriate and tailored to the UK. Defra take biosecurity very seriously and is committed to maintaining the UK’s high standards and ambitions.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has plans to (a) reform, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017.

My department is carefully considering our retained EU law, including the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 (the Habitats Regulations). Defra’s aim is to ensure that environmental law is fit for purpose, able to drive improved environmental outcomes whilst providing a UK regulatory framework that is appropriate and tailored to the UK.

30th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Avian Influenza and Influenza of Avian Origin in Mammals (England) (No.2) Order 2006.

The plan is to retain the Avian Influenza and Influenza of Avian Origin in Mammals (England) (No.2) Order 2006 (as amended).

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 is within the scope of section 1 of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2017 falls within scope of section 1 of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will set out the process by which his Department is (a) identifying and (b) reviewing retained EU law which may be in scope of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

The UK's REUL, set out on the Retained EU law dashboard, has been collected as part of a cross-government collaborative exercise. It provides an iterative record, which will be updated at regular intervals, of where REUL sits across over 300 poli-cy areas and 21 sectors of the economy.

Defra is undertaking a department-wide programme to coordinate analysis of its REUL stock and determining what should be preserved as part of domestic law, as well as REUL that should be repealed, or amended.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 20 October 2022 to Question 67897 om Avian Flu: EU Law, whether the Avian Influenza and Influenza of Avian Origin in Mammals (England) (No.2) Order 2006 which was was made, or operated before IP completion day, for a purpose mentioned in section 2(2)(a) of the European Communities Act.

I refer the hon. Member to the corrected answer to PQ 67897.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when his Department plans to reply to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Walthamstow and the hon. Member for Bristol East of 25 April 2022.

A reply was sent to the hon. Member on 15 November 2022, with apologies for the extended delay in responding.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether clause 1 of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill will apply to the Avian Influenza and Influenza of Avian Origin in Mammals (England) (No.2) Order 2006.

The Avian Influenza and Influenza of Avian Origin in Mammals (England) (No.2) Order 2006 (as amended) S.I. 2702/2006 falls within the scope of Clause 1 of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Flood Re scheme, what his planned timetable is for members of the public being able to apply for Build Back Better funding to repair their properties after a flooding event.

From April 2022 changes to the Flood Re scheme allow insurers who cede policies to the scheme to pay claims which include an amount of resilient repair (build back better) up to a value of £10,000 over and above the cost of like-for-like reinstatement of actual flood damage. The first five insurers, covering over 50 per cent of the insurance market, have committed to participate in Build Back Better and will be ready to offer it to their customers during 2022 and early 2023. We expect more insurers to follow.

Following a flood, customers should contact their insurer as soon as possible to start the claims and reinstatement process.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether his Department plans to (a) retain, (b) replace or (c) revoke Regulation (EC) 1371/2007.

The Government is committed to ensuring that all rail passengers are protected by effective and comprehensive passenger rights.

In this case, the Department for Transport intends (EC) 1371/2007 to remain in UK statute book after 2023.

1st Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke (b) retain or (c) replace the Motor Vehicles (Wearing of Seat Belts by Children in Front Seats) Regulations 1993.

Individual departments are in the process of assessing their REUL and developing proposals for whether they intend to revoke or reform each piece of legislation or preserve it from the sunset.

In respect to the use of seat belts, the legislation underpinning their use is an essential element of our law and has a positive impact on reducing fatal and serious injury on our roads. As such, we do not have any plans to change the requirements for drivers and passengers to wear seat belts.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
26th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Merchant Shipping (Anti-Fouling Systems) Regulations 2009.

The Department is currently reviewing all transport related Retained EU Law. We will set out our approach to individual pieces of Retained EU Law, including the Merchant Shipping (Anti-Fouling Systems) Regulations 2009, in due course.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether it is his policy to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the judgement in Motor Insurers’ Bureau v Lewis 2019, reference EWCA Civ 909.

The Department is currently reviewing all transport-related Retained EU Law. It will set out its approach to individual pieces of Retained EU Law in due course.

20th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans he has to (a) retain (b) revoke or (c) replace the Motor Vehicles (Compulsory Insurance) (No 2) Regulations 1973.

The Department is currently reviewing all transport-related Retained EU Law. It will set out its approach to individual pieces of Retained EU Law, including the Motor Vehicles (compulsory insurance) (No 2) Regulations 1973, in due course.

13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace Regulation (EC) No 661/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council.

Many pieces of Retained EU Law give effect to international obligations, such as those set by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe’s World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations. Whilst there will be opportunities to review and amend individual pieces of Retained EU Law, the Department will ensure that the UK’s regulatory landscape fully adheres to international obligations and standards.

5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke and (c) retain Regulation (EC) 1371/2007.

The Department is currently in the process of reviewing its stock of Retained EU Law. This workstream will be dynamic as we carefully consider all the options and opportunities available.

2nd Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether plans he plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Civil Aviation (Denied Boarding, Compensation and Assistance) Regulations 2005.

The Department is currently in the process of reviewing its stock of Retained EU Law. This workstream will be dynamic as we carefully consider all the options and opportunities available.

8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will set out the process by which his Department is (a) identifying and (b) reviewing retained EU law which may be in scope of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill.

The catalogue of REUL is available on the Retained EU law dashboard which has been collected as part of a cross-government collaborative exercise. This can be accessed by visiting the relevant page on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/retained-eu-law-dashboard

26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the revocation of Section 85 of the Civil Aviation Act 1982 in 2004, whether the framework governing aircraft safety in the UK (a) is contained in secondary instruments or other regulations and (b) constitutes retained EU law.

The majority of aviation safety requirements are contained in retained EU law. However some aviation activities, mainly related to very light aircraft and smaller airports, are excluded from the scope of the retained EU law. These activities are regulated under the Air Navigation Order 2016.

Richard Holden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many officials in her Department are working on Retained EU Law legislation, as (a) headcount and (b) Full Time Equivalent.

The information requested could only be provided at a disproportionate cost.

24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of establishing an air bridge between the Netherlands and the UK.

The Government has announced that it has assessed the health measures at the UK border and as a result passengers will be exempted from self-isolation requirements in certain circumstances on arrival in the UK. This will apply to international rail, maritime, and aviation.

The Government will announce further details including a full list of the countries and territories from which arriving passengers will be exempted from self-isolation requirements later this week.

28th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to paragraph 3.10 of the Autumn Statement 2023, CP 977, published on 22 November 2023, if he will take steps to ensure self-employed parents remain able to verify their eligibility for maternity allowance.

Self-employed parents will continue to be able to claim Maternity Allowance. We are working to reflect the changes announced in the Autumn Statement in the claims process for Maternity Allowance announced and details will be published in due course.

Paul Maynard
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 28 February 2023 to Question 151284 on Flexible Support Fund: Universal Credit, on how many occasions in each of the last five years have Work Coaches awarded that funding; and what the value of the funding awarded was in each of the last five years.

Information relating to the volume of awards from the Flexible Support Fund is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Information relating to expenditure on the Flexible Support Fund for the last 5 audited years is available within the answers provided to PQ 155126 & PQ 155127.

PQ 155126

PQ 155127

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many applications have been made for the Flexible Support Fund in Universal Credit Full Service in each of the last five years; how many of those applications have been granted; how much funding has been applied for in those years; and how much funding was awarded for childcare in that period between commencing employment and first receipt of wages.

The Flexible Support Fund (FSF) is a discretionary fund and awards are made based on Work Coach assessment of customer needs rather than applications.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether it is his policy to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Barber judgement in Walker v Innospec, reference UKSC 47.

This Government has repeatedly affirmed its support for new pensions rights being built up equally for men and women, and has clearly indicated that it accepts the judgment of the Supreme Court in Walker v Innospec.

We are now considering how best to seamlessly implement the measures in the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill whilst minimising the impact on the pension industry and members of occupational pension schemes. We will seek to ensure there is no unnecessary disruption of the effective operation of the private pensions system.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether it is his policy to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Barber judgement, reference C262/88.

This Government has repeatedly affirmed its support for new pensions rights being built up equally for men and women, and has clearly indicated that it accepts the judgment of the Supreme Court in Walker v Innospec.

We are now considering how best to seamlessly implement the measures in the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill whilst minimising the impact on the pension industry and members of occupational pension schemes. We will seek to ensure there is no unnecessary disruption of the effective operation of the private pensions system.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
19th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether they plan to (a) revoke (b) retain or (c) replace the Occupational Pension Schemes (Administration and Disclosure) (Amendment) Regulations 2018.

We will come forward with our plans to implement the measures in the Retained EU Law Bill in due course.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether he has plans to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Confined Spaces Regulations 1997.

The Confined Spaces Regulations 1997 define the risks of working in confined spaces and require dutyholders to assess those risks and put precautions in place for work to be carried out safely.

The Regulations implement provisions of Council Directive 92/57/EEC - Temporary or Mobile Construction Sites and are subject to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill 2022 (REUL Bill) currently passing through Parliament.

With the introduction of the REUL Bill, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) remains focused on ensuring that regulatory frameworks maintain the United Kingdom’s high standards of health and safety protection and continue to reduce burdens for business. HSE’s approach aligns closely with the Government’s pledge to do more for business to help promote growth by removing disproportionate burdens and simplifying the regulatory landscape. Our standards of health and safety protections are among the highest in the world. HSE will continue to review its retained EU Law to seek opportunities to reduce business burdens and promote growth without reducing health and safety standards.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the report published on 6 December 2022 by the Joint Committee on Human Rights into the draft Bereavement Benefits (Remedial) Order 2022, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of (a) the Committee's disappointment that it does not take effect from the date of the original High Court decision from 2016 in the case of Siobhan McLaughlin and (b) the Committee's recommendation that the Government consider offering payments to cover claimants who will not receive benefits as a result of the cut-off date in the remedial order.

The Department welcomes the JCHR report on the draft Bereavement Benefits (Remedial) Order 2022 and the Committee’s recommendation that the draft Order be approved. The draft Remedial Order proposes 30 August 2018 as the start date because that was when the incompatibility for Widowed Parents Allowance was accepted as final in the Supreme Court. It is not routine for Social Security changes to be made retrospectively, and to use an earlier date, or make additional payments via a new scheme, would bring extra administrative complexity and costs to the taxpayer.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans they have to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Bauer [C-168/18] and Hampshire [C-17/17] judgements.

The Government is considering how best to seamlessly implement the measures in the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, and their impact on the Bauer and Hampshire judgments, whilst minimising the impact on the pension industry and members of occupational pension schemes.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans he has to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, as amended, make explicit the implicit requirements to manage workplace health and safety in the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. The Regulations outline employers’ duties to manage health and safety risks including risk assessment, risk control, health and safety arrangements, health surveillance, competent health and safety advice, procedures for serious and imminent danger and information for employees.

The Regulations implement a number of provisions of EU Directives and are subject to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill 2022 (REUL Bill) currently passing through Parliament.

With the introduction of the REUL Bill, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) remains focused on ensuring that regulatory frameworks maintain the United Kingdom’s high standards of health and safety protection and continue to reduce burdens for business. HSE’s approach aligns closely with the Government’s pledge to do more for business to help promote growth by removing disproportionate burdens and simplifying the regulatory landscape. Our standards of health and safety protections are among the highest in the world. HSE will continue to review its retained EU Law to seek opportunities to reduce business burdens and promote growth without reducing health and safety standards.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether his Department has plans to (a) reform, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Health and Safety (Sharp Instruments in Healthcare) Regulations 2013.

The Health and Safety (Sharp Instruments in Healthcare) Regulations 2013 are concerned with the control of injury and infection risks to healthcare workers from needles, scalpels and other medical sharps.

As the regulations implement aspects of the European Council Directive 2010/32/EU (the Sharps Directive), not specifically addressed in existing GB health and safety legislation, they are subject to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill 2022 (REUL Bill) currently passing through Parliament. With the introduction of the REUL Bill, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) remains focused on ensuring that regulatory frameworks maintain the UK’s high standards of health and safety protection and continue to reduce burdens for business. HSE’s approach aligns closely with the Government’s pledge to do more for business to help promote growth by removing disproportionate burdens and simplifying the regulatory landscape. Our standards of health and safety protections are among the highest in the world. HSE will continue to review its retained EU legislation to seek opportunities to reduce business burdens and promote growth without reducing health and safety standards.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether statutory parental pay will be uplifted in line with inflation from April 2023.

The Secretary of State has completed his annual review of pensions and benefits. Subject to parliamentary approval, all statutory parental payments, including statutory maternity pay, will increase by September's CPI figure of 10.1% from April 2023. the new rate for statutory maternity pay will be £172.48.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many officials in her Department are working on Retained EU Law legislation, as (a) headcount and (b) Full Time Equivalent.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave to PQ 45646 on 23 September.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
8th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of Statutory Maternity Pay rates in light of current levels of inflation.

The standard rate of SMP is reviewed annually, alongside state benefits, and is generally increased in line with the Consumer Prices Index (CPI). From April 2022 the standard rate of SMP increased to £156.66, in line with the September 2021 CPI rate of 3.1%.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
8th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the changes to the number of women claiming Statutory Maternity Pay returning to work within 39 weeks of giving birth in each of the last three years.

No assessment has been made of the changes to the number of women claiming Statutory Maternity Pay returning to work within 39 weeks of giving birth in each of the last three years.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of people who have been affected by the underpayment of benefits after transitioning from incapacity benefit to employment and support allowance in Walthamstow constituency.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 19th January to question number 104377.

6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to update health and safety guidance for employers to (a) reflect recent case law and (b) clarify that employers must carry out an individual risk assessment when notified that a woman is (i) pregnant, (ii) has given birth in the last six months or (iii) is breastfeeding.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has noted new case law requiring employers to carry out individual risk assessments when notified a worker is pregnant, has given birth in the last 6 months or is breastfeeding. HSE is in the process of amending its guidance accordingly and will work with stakeholders and interested parties to communicate and promote the amended guidance to support employers in carrying out individual risk assessments.

6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many requests for advice from workers and employers on health and safety for new and expectant mothers were made to the Health and Safety Executive in each of the last five years; and in how many of those cases enforcement action was taken.

The Health and Safety Executive's (HSE) Concerns and Advice Team respond to questions and concerns from employers and members of the public. Over the last five financial years and current year to date, the number of enquiries related to the terms 'pregnant', 'pregnancy' and 'new mother' are:

Financial Year

Pregnancy/New mother Related

Total Concerns Received

% of total

16/17

167

22,497

0.74%

17/18

156

26,507

0.59%

18/19

146

29,476

0.50%

19/20

173

32,490

0.53%

20/21

282

46,103

0.61%

21/YTD

93

18,226

0.51%

There has been no enforcement action taken over this period related to the same terms.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the authorisation of regulations defining safe accommodation under Part 4 of the Domestic Abuse Act 2021, what her planned timeframe is for delivering an exemption from the spare room subsidy to victims of domestic abuse with sanctuary scheme properties.

The Domestic Abuse Support (Relevant Accommodation and Housing Benefit and Universal Credit Sanctuary Schemes) (Amendment) Regulations 2021 were laid on 9 September 2021 and the sanctuary scheme exemption from the removal of the spare room subsidy will come in to force on 1 October 2021.

5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent steps she has taken to implement the ruling of the Supreme Court of 30 August 2018, [2018] UKSC 48, on extending bereavement support payments to unmarried couples.

We intend to take forward a Remedial Order to extend eligibility for Widowed Parent’s Allowance and Bereavement Support Payment to cohabitees with children. We are working on the detail of, and implementation plans for, these changes. We intend to lay the Order before the House in due course.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people that are not eligible for bereavement support payment as a result of not being married contacted Tell Us Once service during the covid-19 outbreak.

Tell Us Once (TUO) does not collect this information. TUO is purely a notification service and asks a citizen if they wish to notify a range of partner organisations including the Department for Work and Pensions. There is no distinct correlation between the notification issued and Bereavement Support Payment. In addition, Tell Us Once does not form any part of any claim to benefits.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many families have been newly affected by the two-child limit on universal credit as a result of making a new claim for that benefit since the beginning of the covid-19 lockdown.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of temporarily suspending the two-child limit on the child element of universal credit and tax credit in recognition of the economic effect of the covid-19 outbreak on families with children.

There are no plans to suspend the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children.

13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many individual pieces of correspondence her Department has (a) received from hon. Members on behalf of constituents on matters relating to covid-19 on each date since the outbreak began and (b) provided in response to that correspondence in each category of response.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate costs.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the effect on the backlog of universal credit mandatory reconsideration of staff redeployment to work on new applications for that benefit; and what estimate she has made of the number of universal credit mandatory reconsideration's that have been delayed during the covid-19 outbreak.

DWP is continuing to process Mandatory Reconsiderations during the current Covid-19 pandemic and is aiming to avoid delay where possible.

In relation to the number of Universal Credit Mandatory Reconsiderations that have been delayed during the covid-19 pandemic, the information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish data on new claims for universal credit since the covid-19 social distancing guidelines were introduced, at a constituency level.

The Department publishes Management Information each week on the numbers of declarations to Universal Credit since the 1 March. This information is available here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-credit-declarations-claims-and-advances-management-information.

Data at Constituency Level is not available.

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what support her Department is providing to non-EEA nationals who (a) are working reduced hours and (b) have lost their jobs due to the covid-19 outbreak and are unable to claim universal credit.

Those unable to access DWP income-related benefits, such as Universal Credit, may be eligible to access DWP contributions-based benefits such as New style Employment and Support Allowance (ESA), providing they meet eligibility criteria.

The Chancellor has announced the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help firms continue to keep people in employment. Employers can put workers on temporary leave and the government will pay them cash grants of 80% of their wages up to a cap of £2,500, providing they keep the worker employed.

The Chancellor has also confirmed that, depending on their status, workers on zero hour contracts may be eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and we would urge people to explore this avenue too.

12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will bring forward proposals to amend Regulation B13 of the Housing Benefit Regulations 2006 to create an exemption for people who live in Sanctuary Schemes after the decision of the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights in A v the United Kingdom.

We are carefully considering next steps in response to the European Court of Human Rights decision.

In the meantime, for people in particular circumstances who may require more support, Discretionary Housing Payments (DHPs) are available.

Since 2011 we have provided over £1billion in DHP funding, enabling local authorities to protect the most vulnerable claimants and supporting households to adapt to housing support reforms, including the Removal of the Spare Room Subsidy policy. In addition, we recently announced an extra £40 million in DHPs for 2020/21.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what support is available during the three month wait for eligibility for limited capability for work and work-related activity for a person who was eligible for employment and support allowance but who was in a couple and not the main claimant, in the event of their separation.

Where a person makes a new claim for New Style Employment and Support Allowance (NS ESA) and satisfies the contribution conditions, they receive a basic rate of benefit at £73.10 a week (for a single person over 25) during the 13-week assessment phase while capability for work is established.

Where Universal Credit (UC) is claimed on health grounds, there is a 3-month relevant period which mirrors the 13-week assessment phase in ESA. Entitlement to UC is calculated on various factors including housing, childcare and the child element; however, the standard allowance per assessment period is £317.82 (for a single person over 25).

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent steps she has taken to implement the ruling of the Supreme Court of 30 August 2018, [2018] UKSC 48, on extending bereavement support payments to unmarried couples.

We recognise that we currently have incompatible legislation on the statute books relating to Widowed Parent's Allowance. My department is currently working on possible options to remedy this. As previously stated there are complex issues we have needed to actively consider which takes time. We will report back to Parliament as soon as we have agreed approach.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 17 February 2020 to Question 14677, on Local Housing Allowance, whether he plans to allocate additional funding to support claimants that are at risk of becoming homeless as a result of being unable to afford the difference between the amount they receive in local housing allowance and their rent in (a) Walthamstow constituency, (b) other London boroughs and (c) England.

We recently announced an extra £40 million in Discretionary Housing Payments for 2020/21, helping to tackle the most acute affordability pressures in the private rented sector.

Since 2011 we have provided over £1billion in Discretionary Housing Payment funding, enabling local authorities to protect the most vulnerable claimants.

13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people received support for upfront childcare costs under the Flexible Support Fund; and what proportion of the Flexible Support Fund is used to pay for childcare.

The information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what support is in place for parents (a) who are in work to cover the cost of childcare costs during school holidays and (b) who have accessed the Flexible Support Fund in the month following that claim and who are not able to recoup the costs of childcare for that period via universal credit.

The Universal Credit childcare policy aligns with the wider government childcare offer, which includes free childcare hours and tax free childcare. Claimants can utilise both the free childcare entitlement and Universal Credit childcare costs in conjunction with each other. This offer means that reasonable childcare costs should not form a barrier to work, even during school holidays. The Government is committed to supporting working parents and, as part of this, Universal Credit pays up to 85% of childcare costs, compared to 70% in legacy benefits.

Universal Credit claimants are able to upload digital copies of their childcare cost receipts or invoices through their online Universal Credit account. In October 2019, the Department introduced changes to give parents longer to report their childcare costs. Childcare costs can be claimed in the same assessment period they were paid, or by the end of the following assessment period.

Beyond the Universal Credit childcare element, claimants can be considered for two additional methods of funding childcare costs: the Flexible Support Fund (FSF) and Budgeting Advances.

The FSF can pay up to 100% of the upfront childcare costs (subject to payment limits) that the claimant incurs before starting work and receiving their first wage. Through FSF, Work Coaches can support claimants with barriers that may prevent them from moving into employment, such as childcare or travel costs. Each case is considered carefully on its own merits with financial help available in advance to eligible claimants.

A budgeting advance is available for one-off urgent financial events for eligible UC claimants, such as upfront childcare, and is repayable over a period of up to 12 monthly instalments.

12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate her Department has made of the number of universal credit credit claimants whose childcare costs exceed the upper threshold for (a) one child and (b) two or more children.

Childcare costs should not be a barrier to getting into work; this Government is committed to helping parents into work. Universal Credit pays up to 85% of childcare costs, compared to 70% in legacy benefits and can be claimed up to a month before starting a job. In cases where people need to pay for childcare upfront, prior to starting work, Work Coaches can use the Flexible Support Fund to meet these costs until their first wage is received.

For all Universal Credit monthly payments made in 2019, around 520,000 included a childcare element:

a. For childcare costs claimed for one child in childcare, 5% of the time, childcare claims exceeded the maximum award of £646.35 (28,000 times).

b. For childcare costs claimed for two or more children in childcare, 1% of the time, childcare claims exceeded the maximum award of £1108.04 (6,000 times).

Notes:

  • (a) and (b) are exclusive categories and (b) is not a subset of (a)
  • Payment figures are rounded to the nearest thousand.
  • Percentages rounded to the nearest percent.
  • Households are counted each time they have received a childcare element in 2019.
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she has made an assessment of the effect of the limits on childcare costs claimable through universal credit on (a) women and (b) maternal employment rates.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost to the Department.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of uprating local housing allowance in line with inflation in areas where private rents have risen above CPI.

From April 2020 Local Housing Allowance rates will be uprated by inflation – an increase of 1.7% in line with wider benefit uprating. This means around 900,000 people across the UK could see their Housing support payments rise from April.

4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether funding is available to existing universal credit claimants to pay for childcare so that they are not required to pay up front and claim the money back.

The Universal Credit childcare policy aligns with the wider government childcare offer, which includes free childcare hours and tax free childcare. Claimants can utilise both the free childcare entitlement and Universal Credit childcare costs in conjunction with each other. This offer means that reasonable childcare costs should not form a barrier to work. The Government is committed to supporting parents with moving into work and, as part of this, Universal Credit pays up to 85% of childcare costs, compared to 70% in legacy benefits.

The Flexible Support Fund (FSF) can pay up to 100% of the upfront childcare costs (subject to payment limits) that the claimant incurs before starting work and receiving their first wage. Through FSF, work coaches can support claimants with barriers that may prevent them from moving into employment, such as childcare or travel costs. Each case is considered carefully on its own merits with financial help available in advance to eligible claimants.

Universal Credit claimants are able to upload digital copies of their childcare cost receipts or invoices through their online Universal Credit account. In October 2019, the Department introduced changes to give parents longer to report their childcare costs. Childcare costs can be claimed in the same assessment period they were paid, or by the end of the following assessment period.

31st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Work and Pensions Select Committee report on Bereaved Support Payments, published on 22 October 2019, what the expected publication date is of the Government response to that report.

We will submit our response to the Work and Pensions Select Committee report on Bereavement Support Payment once the committee is fully up and running. Any decision on publication will be for the Committee to make.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were (a) seen and (b) treated by NHS commissioned Sexual Assault Referral Centres run by G4S Health Services in each financial year since 2018-19.

The following table shows the number of patients seen by National Health Service-commissioned sexual assault referral centres (SARCs) run by G4S Health Services in each financial year since 2018/19:

Year

Number of patients seen

2018/19

1,728

2019/20

1,256

2020/21

1,479

2021/22

1,439

2022/23

1,625

Source: NHS England

Notes:

  1. The numbers of patients ‘seen’ and the numbers of patients ‘treated’ are the same, as all SARC attendances receive a form of treatment.
  2. Data was submitted manually prior to 2022/23. This required providers to record aggregated numbers against indicators and can be unreliable.
  3. The 2019/20 data is reported up to December 2019. Due to COVID-19, data between January and March 2020 was not collected or reported.
Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were (a) seen and (b) treated by NHS commissioned Sexual Assault Referral Centres run by Mountain Healthcare in each financial year since 2018-19.

The following table shows the number of patients were seen by National Health Service-commissioned sexual assault referral centres (SARCs) run by Mountain Healthcare in each financial year since 2018/19:

Year

Number of patients seen

2018/19

4,689

2019/20

3,240

2020/21

2,080

2021/22

3,742

2022/23

10,822

Source: NHS England

Notes:

  1. The numbers of patients ‘seen’ and the numbers of patients ‘treated’ are the same, as all SARC attendances receive a form of treatment.
  2. Data was submitted manually prior to 2022/23. This required providers to record aggregated numbers against indicators and can be unreliable.
  3. The 2019/20 data is reported to December 2019. Due to COVID-19, the data between January and March 2020 was not collected or reported.
Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
12th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were (a) seen and (b) treated by NHS commissioned Sexual Assault Referral Centres in each financial year since 2018-19.

The following table shows the numbers of patients seen by National Health Service-commissioned sexual assault referral centres (SARCs) in each financial year since 2018/19:

Year

Number of patients seen by SARCs

2018/19

11,993

2019/20

9,451

2020/21

7,960

2021/22

10,333

2022/23

21,836


Source: NHS England

Notes:

  1. The numbers of patients ‘seen’ and the numbers of patients ‘treated’ are the same, as all SARC attendances receive a form of treatment.
  2. Data was submitted manually prior to 2022/23. This required providers to record aggregated numbers against indicators and can be unreliable.
  3. The 2019/20 data is data reported up to December 2019. Due to COVID-19, data for January to March 2020 was not collected or reported.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
24th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much NHS England paid for the provision of sexual assault referral services to (a) Mountain Healthcare Ltd and (b) G4S Health UK Ltd between (i) October 2020 to September 2021 and (ii) October 2021 to September 2022.

The information is not held in the format requested as NHS England's financial accounting and reporting is from April to March. The following table shows the amounts paid to both Mountain Healthcare Ltd and G4S Health UK Ltd over the past three financial years, for the provision of sexual assault referral services:

Financial Year

Amount paid to Mountain Healthcare Ltd (£)

Amount paid to G4S Health UK Ltd (£)

2020/21

4,431,000

4,406,000

2021/22

8,073,000

4,124,000

2022/23

10,911,000

5,076,000

Source: NHS England

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
24th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much NHS England paid for the provision of sexual assault referral services in the financial years (a) 2020-21, (b) 2021-22 and (c) 2022-23.

The following table shows the amounts paid by NHS England for the provision of Sexual Assault and Abuse Services over the past three financial years:

Financial Year

Amount (£)

2020/21

38,998,000

2021/22

42,331,000

2022/23

48,090,000

Source: NHS England

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what stocks NHS England has of (a) covid-19 boosters, (b) covid-19 rapid tests, (c) N95 masks and (d) flu vaccines as of October 2023, in the context of preparations for winter 2023-24.

COVID-19 vaccines are purchased by the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA). NHS England manages the distribution of stock to the front-line. At the beginning of the autumn/winter campaign, NHS England had access to 14.5 million doses of applicable vaccines, to meet the needs of the eligible cohorts as advised by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation. NHS England also has stocks of 1,509,200 COVID-19 rapid tests and 114,061,080 FFP3 respirators.

NHS England does not centrally procure or stock any adult flu vaccines. General practitioners and other providers are responsible for ordering adult flu vaccine directly from suppliers, which are used to deliver the national flu programme to the other eligible groups.

Children’s flu vaccines are centrally procured and distributed by UKHSA. We are unable to provide specific stack levels as this information is commercially sensitive but there are adequate stocks of the live attenuated vaccine.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
14th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much his Department spent on Parental Support from the NHS Learning Support Fund in each of the last five years; and how many people have (a) made a claim and (b) been eligible for support under that scheme in each of the last five years.

The following table shows for the years 2018/19 to 2022/23 the number of students who received an element of funding from the NHS Learning Support Fund, together with the number of students who received available childcare component and its corresponding expenditure:

Financial Year

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

Students who Received an Element of Funding

14,067

26,382

110,923

130,213

133,658

Students in Receipt of Child Dependants Allowance (CDA) or Parental Support (PS)

8,014

14,013

36,192

34,034

35,649

CDA and PS Expenditure (£)

5,908,671

11,700,520

35,068,824

49,751,801

52,565,170

Source: NHS Business Services Authority

14th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much his Department spent on the Childcare Allowance and Parents’ Learning Allowance of the Social Work Bursary in each of the last five years; and how many people have (a) made a claim and (b) been eligible for support under that scheme in each of the last five years.

Suggested reply

The following table shows the breakdown of funding offered to parents across the Social Work Bursary scheme:

Financial Year

Number of students in receipt of Parent Learning Allowance

Parent Learning Allowance Expenditure (£)

Number of students in receipt of Childcare Allowance

Childcare Allowance Expenditure (£)

2018/19

1,239

1,236,341

567

2,114,319

2019/20

1,256*

1,211,047

630*

2,124,705

2020/21

1,175

1,183,842

573

2,252,088

2021/22

1,083

1,061,297

458

1,941,897

2022/23

958

911,748

389

1,484,316

Source: NHS Business Services Authority (NHS BSA)

Note: NHS BSA cannot give a count of applications that were deemed ineligible for the parent learning allowance or childcare allowance, as they do not directly record this in their systems. The information for the 2019/20 financial year contains data from two different IT systems with no unique identifiers, so there is a possibility of duplication in the count of students funded.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much his Department spent on the (a) Childcare Allowance (b) Parent Learning Allowance and (c) Dependent's Allowance of the NHS Bursary; and how many people have (i) made a claim and (ii) been eligible for support under that scheme in each of the last five years.

Prior to 2017, the NHS Bursary was available to nursing, midwifery and allied health professions students as well as medical and dental students. Nursing, midwifery and allied health professions students starting courses after 2017 were transitioned on to the Student Finance loans system and the NHS Learning Support Fund.

The following table shows for the years 2018/19 to 2022/23 the number of students who received an element of NHS Bursary, together with the number of students who received available childcare components and their corresponding expenditure.

Financial Year

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23*

Number of Students who Received an Element of Funding

67,748

43,470

20,147

17,289

18,076

Number of Students in Receipt of Dependants Allowance

9,178

5,050

1,096

357

247

Dependants Allowance Expenditure (£)

19,053,850

8,344,526

1,599,887

539,752

363,775

Number of Students in Receipt of Parent Learning Allowance

9,141

5,033

1,077

332

179

Parent Learning Allowance Expenditure (£)

7,846,287

3,417,731

653,253

211,489

103,489

Number of Students in Receipt of Childcare Allowance

5,031

2,557

576

144

83

Childcare Allowance Expenditure (£)

16,659,222

7,028,750

1,313,955

399,834

238,972

Source: NHS Business Services Authority

Note: The NHS Business Services Authority moved to a new system in 2022/23. The student count is from two different IT systems with no unique identifier, with potential for duplication in the count. Financial values are unaffected.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will issue guidance to Integrated Care Boards on transparency around commissioning decisions including (a) which commissioning decisions and details thereof should be published and (b) which commissioning decisions and details thereof should be considered commercially sensitive for purposes of freedom of Information requests.

The Department and NHS England are working to reform the rules on procurement for healthcare services, otherwise known as the ‘Provider Selection Regime’, including for transparency surrounding decisions, and will provide an update on this in due course. Right now, integrated care boards (ICBs) must follow the current rules on transparency in procurement as set out in the Procurement, Patient Choice, and Competition Regulations (PPCCR) 2013 (No. 2) and the Public Contract Regulations (PCR) 2015.

ICBs are responsible for ensuring that commercially sensitive information is handled appropriately and in line with the law.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the oral statement of 25 May 2023, Official Report, column 477, when his Department will confirm how much funding will be provided for the rebuilding of Whipps Cross Hospital; and when the funding will be available to Barts Health NHS Trust.

We are committed to delivering the Whipps Cross New Hospital Programme scheme by 2030 and we are working with all Trusts to progress their new hospital builds with the certainty of the Programme now expected to be backed by over £20 billion. All schemes in the Programme, including Barts Health NHS Trust, have now received the details of of individual indicative funding envelopes to work towards in the progression of their schemes.

The disclosure of individual funding allocations is commercially sensitive information and could undermine future negotiating positions for the scheme, and should therefore not be released into the public domain. As per usual process, the availability of the funding for the full scheme is subject to the Final Business Case being reviewed and agreed.

Up to the end of financial year 2022/2023, Barts Health NHS Trust has received £18.9m to support the development of the business case as well as a range of preparatory activity to prepare the site ahead of main construction, such as demolition works.

27th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of NHS flexible working practices on levels of GP recruitment and retention.

The Government actively encourages better flexible working such as job-sharing and part-time hours. To support retention, the National GP Retention scheme is a package of financial and educational support to help doctors who might otherwise leave the profession remain in clinical practice.

However, as self-employed contractors to the National Health Service to provide primary medical services, it is largely up to general practices how they distribute pay and benefits to their staff. Employers have the flexibility to set terms and conditions, including to aid recruitment and retention.

27th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an estimate of the number of GPs that have left their practice (a) immediately following and (b) in the year following a period of parental leave in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

15th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, (a) what arrangements her Department has in place to help ensure that hospital trusts who have entered PFI contracts for buildings remain able to afford interest payments on those contracts and (b) what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of those arrangements in the context of rising inflation and interest rates.

The Department and NHS England are in regular discussions with National Health Service trusts over their financial affairs and this would include the impact of inflation on trusts’ contracts.

This Government has taken decisive action in response to the inflationary pressures on the NHS. On top of the additional funding of £3.3 billion from the 2022 Autumn Statement in each of the next two years NHS England has provided an additional £1.5 billion in funding to the NHS in 2022/23. This has been added to system allocations and is covering a range of pressures reported by systems including energy costs, higher costs of consumables, and the cost of PFI contracts that are tied to the retail price index.

The payments due under NHS PFI contracts are not subject to changes in interest rates. In 2023/24 the funding issued to the NHS, and reflected in the NHS payment scheme cost uplift factor, takes account of inflationary pressures in 2022/23 as well as further growth to account for expected non-pay inflation and energy price increases in 2023/24.

17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to certificates which exempt the holder from prescription charges, how many (a) Medical Exemption Certificates (b) NHS tax credit exemption certificates and (c) Maternity Exemption Certificates were held in each of the last five years.

The following table shows the number of certificates issued in each requested category, in each of the last five years. This information has been provided by the NHS Business Services Authority. Data on certificates held at any one point in time changes as certificates expire, eligibility changes and individuals choose or choose not to apply for a medical or maternity exemption certificate.

Certificate Issued Year

Maternity Certificate

Medical Certificate

Tax Credit Certificate

Grand Total

2018

474,982

463,022

3,793,684

4,731,688

2019

483,299

457,021

3,437,594

4,377,914

2020

444,670

366,960

2,555,064

3,366,694

2021

463,214

387,787

1,977,486

2,828,487

2022

471,603

397,552

1,540,848

2,410,003

Grand total

2,337,768

2,072,342

13,304,676

17,714,786

9th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Meat (Official Controls Charges) (England) Regulations 2009.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 102910.

7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Medical Devices Regulations 2002.

Through the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, the Government is currently reviewing which retained European Union (EU) law should be repealed, reformed or preserved. The Government continues to work with a range of stakeholders to ensure that any such reforms maintain current standards in patient safety and public health. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is participating in the review of all retained EU law within its responsibilities.

In parallel, we are progressing reforms to the Medical Devices Regulations 2002 under the Medicines and Medical Devices Act 2021. These are outlined in the government response to the consultation on the future regulation of medical devices in the United Kingdom published in June last year.

6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Maternity Exemption Certificates for prescription charges, how many (a) enquiry letters were issued to patients who claimed they held a valid maternity exemption certificate and (b) Penalty Charge Notices were issued to these patients in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the total number of Enquiry letters and total number of penalty charge notices (PCN) that have been issued in regard to a Maternity Exemption Certificate. More than one PCN or Enquiry letter may have been issued to an individual patient.

Please note, prior to February 2020 there were no Enquiry letters issued as this was not part of the exemption enquiry process at that point.

Year

Enquiry letter issued

PCN issued

2018

N/A

92,208

2019

N/A

92,440

2020

2,066

13,359

2021

109

85

2022

38,191

30,625

6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to NHS tax credit exemption certificates for prescription charges, how many (a) enquiry letters were issued to patients who claimed they held a valid NHS tax credit exemption certificates and (b) Penalty Charge Notices were issued to these patients in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the total number of Enquiry letters and total number of penalty charge notices (PCNs) that have been issued in regard to an NHS Tax Credit Exemption Certificate. More than one PCN or Enquiry letter may have been issued to an individual patient.

Please note, prior to February 2020 there were no Enquiry letters issued as this was not part of the exemption enquiry process at that point.

Year

Enquiry letter issued

PCN issued

2018

N/A

421,970

2019

N/A

423,462

2020

23,393

43,602

2021

583

461

2022

130,455

103,271

6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Medical Exemption Certificates for prescription charges, how many (a) enquiry letters were issued to patients who claimed they held a valid medical exemption certificate and (b) Penalty Charge Notices were issued to these patients in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the total number of Enquiry letters and total number of penalty charge notices (PCNs) that have been issued in regard to a Medical Exemption Certificate. More than one PCN or Enquiry letter may have been issued to an individual patient.

Please note, prior to February 2020 there were no Enquiry letters issued as this was not part of the exemption enquiry process at that point.

Year

Enquiry letter issued

PCN issued

2018

N/A

27,345

2019

N/A

24,384

2020

284

2,029

2021

20

10

2022

8,983

6,608

31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace The Blood Safety and Quality Regulations 2005.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 14 December 2022 to Question 107094.

30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Quality and Safety of Organs Intended for Transplantation Regulations 2012.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 12 December 2022 to Question 105306.

26th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Processed Cereal-based Foods and Baby Foods for Infants and Young Children (England) Regulations 2003.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 105306.

24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace the Food Irradiation (England) Regulations 2009.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 102910.

19th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether they plan to (a) revoke (b) retain or (c) replace the Materials and Articles in Contact with Food (England) Regulations 2012.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 102910.

12th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans they have to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 2016/127.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 105306.

11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons his Department has not made a decision on the scheme-specific business case for the redevelopment of Whipps Cross Hospital.

Whipps Cross Hospital is one of the Pathfinder schemes within the New Hospital Programme, these will be the first of the larger and more complex schemes to be taken forward. Decisions on specific business cases for schemes which are expected to be funded after 2025 are dependent on the approval of the programme wide business case.

The New Hospital Programme continues to work closely with Barts Health NHS Trust to develop their new hospital scheme at Whipps Cross Hospital in line with the national programme approach to standardisation which will reduce end to end delivery timescales for individual schemes. The national approach will ensure efficient delivery of the new hospitals and provide value for money so that patients and staff have access to world class facilities.

9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) retain, (b) revoke or (c) replace the Contaminants in Food (England) Regulations 2013.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 102910.

14th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans he has to (a) retain, (b) revoke or (c) replace the Tobacco and Related Products Regulations 2016.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 105306.

13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) retain or (c) replace Regulation (EC) No 726/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council.

Regulation (EC) No 726/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council has already been revoked by Schedule 9 of SI 2019/775 insofar as it applied to medicinal products for human use.

12th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans has to (a) retain, (b) replace and (c) revoke the General Food Regulations 2004.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 102910.

9th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans he has to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Animal Feed (Composition, Marketing and Use) (England) Regulations 2015.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 102910.

9th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans he has to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006.

Through the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, the Government is considering which retained European Union legislation should be repealed, reformed or preserved. Any such reforms will not alter the United Kingdom’s high standards. The Government will continue to work with a range of organisations and stakeholders to ensure that patient safety and public health are maintained.

8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what plans they have to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Food Hygiene (England) Regulations 2006.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 8 December 2022 to Question 102910.

7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, what plans the Government has to (a) replace, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Standardised Packaging of Tobacco Products Regulations 2015.

Through the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, the Government is currently reviewing which retained European Union law should be repealed, reformed or preserved. The Government continues to work with a range of stakeholders to ensure that any such reforms maintain current standards in public health.

6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has plans to (a) reform, (b) revoke or (c) retain the Human Medicines Regulations 2012.

Reforms to the Human Medicines Regulations 2012 are progressing under the Medicines and Medical Devices Act 2021. The Act supports the United Kingdom’s ambitions for the Life Sciences sector through regulations to increase innovation and support the development of new medical technologies. This includes placing the Early Access to Medicines Scheme on a statutory basis, supporting the continued safe deployment of COVID-19 and flu vaccines, and consulting on proposals for a new regulatory framework to enable innovative medicines to be manufactured and delivered at the point of care.

Through the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, the Government is currently reviewing which retained European Union law should be repealed, reformed or preserved. The Government continues to work with a range of stakeholders to ensure that any such reforms maintain current standards in patient safety and public health. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency is participating in the review of all retained EU law within its responsibilities.

5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he has plans to (a) replace, (b) revoke and (c) retain the Food Safety and Hygiene (England) Regulations 2013.

Through the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, the Government is considering which retained European Union legislation should be repealed, reformed or preserved. Any such reforms will not alter the United Kingdom’s high standards. The Government will continue to work with a range of organisations and stakeholders to ensure that patient safety and public health are maintained.

The independent Food Standards Agency, working with Food Standards Scotland, is participating in the review of all retained EU law within its responsibilities. Consumer safety or the ability of business to trade during this review will not be compromised.

8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) fines have been issued and (b) individuals have been fined or required to repay the value of a prescription after the fact, due to an individual failing to pay for a prescription without a valid maternity exemption certificate in each of the last five years.

The following table shows the number of patients who declared they held a valid Maternity Exemption Certificate and who were issued with at least one penalty charge notice (PCN) and the number of PCNs issued in each of the last five years.

Number of patients declaring a valid maternity exemption certificate and were issued with at least one PCN

Number of PCNs issued against maternity exemption declarations

2018

73,918

92,208

2019

73,915

92,440

2020

12,614

13,359

2021

85

85

2022

20,257

22,344

Total

180,789

220,436

Source: the NHS Business Services Authority

PCNs are sometimes issued to patients who were entitled to claim free prescriptions due to data mismatches. This may be for reasons such as the patient has moved and not updated their address with their general practitioner or changed their name and not updated the exemption certificate. The patient is sent an enquiry letter asking to confirm their entitlement and any data updates can be undertaken at this stage and the case closed if appropriate. If the patient does not respond to the enquiry letter within 28 days, they will automatically be sent a penalty charge notice.

21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many officials in her Department are working on Retained EU Law legislation, as (a) headcount and (b) Full Time Equivalent.

The Department has a central coordinating team working on the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, which currently has two full time officials and support from an additional three officials alongside their other business activities. This is equates to approximately three full time equivalent officials. The central team is supported by advice from Departmental officials where there are Retained EU Law implications. These officials provide support as part of their normal business activities and do not have specific headcount or full time equivalent staff allocated to this work.

22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether she plans to expand the availability of Evusheld as a prophylactic through clinical trials.

Following engagement with AstraZeneca, we have encouraged the company to continue discussions with the Antivirals and Therapeutics Taskforce (ATTF) and the Chief Scientific Adviser on options for evaluating the clinical effectiveness of Evusheld. Clinical advisers have recommended a United Kingdom clinical trial to generate sufficient data to understand Evusheld’s effectiveness against current and future variants. The ATTF are currently considering options for such a trial.

21st Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether a process has been established to evaluate future prophylactic treatments for covid-19.

The PROTECT-V clinical trial tests several treatments intended to reduce the risk of confirmed symptomatic COVID-19 infections in vulnerable renal and immunosuppressed patients and the associated risk of hospitalisation and death. The study focuses on prophylactic drugs administered over a six-month period to test the effectiveness at reducing the spread of the virus among those who may be exposed at regular hospital check-ups or dialysis appointments.

21st Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the decision-making process was ahead of the decision not to procure Evusheld including what (a) discussions took place and (b) evidence was used to inform the decision; and for what reason the Government decided not to procure Evusheld.

The Government has decided not to procure Evusheld for prevention through emergency routes at this time. This is a decision based on independent clinical advice by the multi-agency RAPID C-19 and a national expert policy working group. These groups considered a range of evidence, including clinical trial data, in vitro analysis and emerging observational studies and concluded there is currently insufficient evidence of benefit to recommend deployment. The Chief Medical Officer for England is content that the correct process for providing clinical advice has been followed and this should now be referred to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for further evaluation.

The Department wrote to patient groups on 5 September 2022 with information on this decision and evidence considered. The letter summarised the evidence considered by RAPID C-19 that contributed to the decision not to procure and deploy Evusheld and detailed the next steps the Government will take.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the commitment in the Women’s Health Strategy for England, published on 19 July 2022, to certify pregnancy losses occurring before 24 weeks, in what ways that certification will differ from informal certification practices already provided in some hospitals.

There is currently no formal process for parents to register the loss when a pregnancy ends before 24 weeks gestations. While some trusts have local arrangements, such as a book of remembrance or a certificate of loss, this is not consistent and is not available for the estimated 250,000 losses which take place outside medical settings. The introduction of pregnancy loss certificates in England will allow a non-statutory, voluntary scheme to enable parents who have experienced a pre-24 weeks pregnancy loss to record and receive a certificate to provide recognition of their baby’s potential life.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
15th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of existing measures for preventing the monkeypox virus becoming endemic.

The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) is working with the National Health Service and the public health agencies in each nation to prevent the onward transmission of the monkeypox virus. The public health response is kept under review to prevent the virus from becoming endemic.

Monkeypox is not a novel virus and the West African subtype which is currently present in the United Kingdom is less transmissible and largely contained within a single sub-population. We have sufficient testing capacity to meet demand and we are deploying vaccines and therapeutics which offer estimated high levels of protection against and treatment for monkeypox.

15th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to help ensure everyone at risk of exposure to Monkeypox is able to access a vaccine.

On 21 June 2022 the UK Health Security Agency published a targeted vaccine strategy which recommends that gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men at higher risk of exposure to monkeypox should be offered a smallpox vaccine. Vaccines are also offered to those most likely to be exposed to monkeypox, including healthcare workers and close contacts of infected persons. The local National Health Service will contact members of the public at risk of exposure to offer a vaccination in due course.

21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome in each year from 2016 to 2021.

This information is not held in the format requested.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
21st Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what research projects his Department has funded into neuroleptic malignant syndrome since 2016.

There have been no research projects into neuroleptic malignant syndrome funded by the Department since 2016. The Department funds research into rare diseases through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The NIHR is the nation’s largest funder of health and care research, spending over £1 billion on research every year, with research proposals in all areas competing for the funding available. Applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made based on the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality.


Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 9 February 2022 to Question 118533, and with reference to the Answer of 6 February 2014 to Question 186278, if he will publish the count of finished admission episodes for NHS providers where the source of admission was a non-NHS run hospital for the years 2016-17 to 2021-22.

The following table shows a count of finished admission episodes (FAEs) to National Health Service hospitals, where the source of admission was from a non-NHS hospital provider, in each month between April 2016 to March 2021, the last month for which finalised data is available.

Year

Month

FAEs

2016

April

629

2016

May

592

2016

June

579

2016

July

648

2016

August

657

2016

September

738

2016

October

775

2016

November

581

2016

December

544

2017

January

494

2017

February

497

2017

March

613

2017

April

454

2017

May

579

2017

June

643

2017

July

668

2017

August

657

2017

September

714

2017

October

721

2017

November

755

2017

December

643

2018

January

840

2018

February

609

2018

March

669

2018

April

732

2018

May

781

2018

June

813

2018

July

971

2018

August

792

2018

September

1004

2018

October

1009

2018

November

854

2018

December

726

2019

January

699

2019

February

525

2019

March

507

2019

April

389

2019

May

408

2019

June

388

2019

July

416

2019

August

437

2019

September

494

2019

October

664

2019

November

566

2019

December

411

2020

January

412

2020

February

431

2020

March

353

2020

April

377

2020

May

371

2020

June

448

2020

July

674

2020

August

760

2020

September

668

2020

October

602

2020

November

570

2020

December

482

2021

January

321

2021

February

429

2021

March

582

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), NHS Digital

Notes:

  1. A FAE is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are usually counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. However, for the purposes of this analysis, we have recorded episodes by the month and year in which the admission started. This may lead to a shortfall in the most recent provisional months, as some patients admitted in these months, may still be in hospital at the time the data was collected and therefore not be included in the final figures. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.
  2. 'NHS hospitals' was defined by 'Care trust', 'NHS foundation trust' and 'NHS trust'.
  3. A code which identifies where the patient was immediately prior to admission. Most patients are admitted from home, but there are some significant exceptions. In particular, this field differentiates between patients admitted from home and patients transferred from another hospital provider or institution. For the purposes of this tabulation, records have been limited to those with an ADMISORC (Admission Source) of 87 - Non-NHS run hospital.
  4. HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. Changes to the figures over time should be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and so no longer include in admitted patient HES data. Conversely, apparent increases in activity may be due to improved recording of diagnosis or procedure information. It should be noted that HES include activity ending in the year in question and run from April to March, for example, 2012-13 includes activity ending between 1 April 2012 and 31 March 2013

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department holds any list of patients who have been identified as immunocompromised and are eligible for new covid-19 treatments first announced in December 2021; and whether such a list includes the addresses of those patients.

The Department commissioned an independent expert group to identify clinically eligible patient cohorts most likely to progress towards developing severe COVID-19. These cohorts form part of an evidence-based clinical policy for the treatment of COVID-19, agreed by the United Kingdom Chief Medical Officers. The treatments available include the monoclonal antibody therapy sotrovimab, as well as the oral antiviral treatments molnupiravir and nirmatrelvir + ritonavir.

The Department does not hold a list of these patients, nor any identifiable personal information.

15th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 PCR tests the NHS has sent to patients in the E17 postcode area as part of the programme to identify positive cases among people at highest risk from covid-19.

As of 8 March 2022, 1,970 people in the E17 postcode were identified as at highest risk from COVID-19, based on the COVID-19 Treatment Methodology. As of 17 March, 2,315 priority polymerase chain reaction test kits have been sent to patients who may be suitable for COVID-19 treatments in this postcode. This includes replenishment kits sent automatically or ordered by the patient via 119. These figures have been rounded to the nearest five in accordance with disclosure rules.

15th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients with an E17 postcode have a condition marked in their NHS record which is included in the list of conditions that the NHS classify as putting people at highest risk from covid-19.

As of 8 March 2022, 1,970 people in the E17 postcode were identified as at highest risk from COVID-19, based on the COVID-19 Treatment Methodology. As of 17 March, 2,315 priority polymerase chain reaction test kits have been sent to patients who may be suitable for COVID-19 treatments in this postcode. This includes replenishment kits sent automatically or ordered by the patient via 119. These figures have been rounded to the nearest five in accordance with disclosure rules.

2nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he will respond Question 118533 tabled on 31 January 2022 by the hon. Member for Walthamstow on Hospital: Admissions.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer to Question 118533.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
2nd Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he will respond Question 114728 tabled on 31 January 2022 by the hon. Member for Walthamstow on Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer to Question 114728.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
4th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients have been admitted to NHS hospitals from private hospitals in each of the last 30 months.

The information is not held in the format requested.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients have been diagnosed with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome in each of the last 10 years; and how many and what proportion of those patients had previously received a prescription for anti-psychotic medication.

This information is not held in the format requested.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
26th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 26 January 2022 to Question 108519 on Coronavirus: Greater London, how many patients identified through national databases living in the (a) E17, (b) E11, (c) E10, (d) E4 and (e) E5 postcodes have been sent a letter confirming their eligibility for new covid-19 treatments as of 26 January 2022.

The information is not held centrally in the format requested.

25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people (a) are eligible for and (b) have received a fourth dose of a covid-19 vaccination in (i) Waltham Forest (ii) Walthamstow (iii) Chingford and Wood Green and (iv) Leyton and Wanstead.

The information requested on the number of people eligible for a fourth dose is not held centrally. It is not possible to identify all severely immunosuppressed individuals from nationally collected data and the timing of a fourth booster dose is dependent on a clinician’s understanding of an individual’s immune status and any planned treatment. Data on the number of people who have received a fourth dose of COVID-19 vaccine is not currently available in the format requested.

20th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the letter with teh subject, Important information about new treatments for coronavirus, sent by NHS England on 14 December 2021, how many individuals living in the (a) E17, (b) E11, (c) E10, (d) E4 and (e) E5 postcodes were sent that letter confirming their eligibility for new treatments.

The information requested is not held centrally.

The majority of the 1.3 million individuals pre-identified as potentially eligible for new COVID-19 treatments in England have received a letter or email from NHS England and NHS Improvement informing them of their eligibility. However, some potentially eligible patients are not centrally identifiable using national databases, such as those who are newly diagnosed and some cancer patients. Those patients are being contacted directly by their consultants.

12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the details of the ministerial direction he has issued regarding the New Covid Surge Deal With the Independent Health Sector including providing (a) the costs of arrangements including how much the NHS will pay per patient, (b) what budget the money will come from and whether Trust budgets or NHSE and (c) whether the deal specifies if the private sector will be required to prioritise NHS patients over private patients.

The letter issuing the Direction was published on GOV.UK on 12 January 2022.

NHS England estimates a cost of £75 to £90 million per month whilst the ‘surge arrangements’ within the contract are not activated. If surge arrangements are activated, NHS England estimates the maximum cost of the arrangements to be £175 million per month. However, this is based on surge arrangements being activated nationally, which is considered to be unlikely. While prices are based on the National Health Service national tariff, it is not possible to provide the cost per patient as this is dependent on the type of activity completed, the minimum income guarantee when surge arrangements are not activated and the not-for-profit cost recovery model when they are.

Funding will be provided from the overall NHS budget and local systems will not face higher costs as a result of these new arrangements. If surge arrangements are activated, the NHS will have access to 100% of the facilities, staffing and resources of the independent sector provider in the affected system. When surge arrangements are not activated, the independent sector providers may continue to perform private work as usual.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 patients have been treated with (a) ronapreve, (b) sotrovimab and (c) molnupiravir each week since 1 December 2021.

The information is not currently available in the format requested. However, Ronapreve is available to treat patients in hospital who have confirmed COVID-19 and have either been hospitalised for the management of symptoms or are at high-risk of progression to severe illness. To 5 January 2022, 78 patients had been treated through the COVID Medicines Delivery Units (CMDUs).

Since the deployment of Sotrovimab on 20 December 2021 to 5 January 2022, 1,961 patients had been treated through CMDUs. Since the deployment of molnupiravir on 16 December 2021 to 5 January 2022, 2,883 patients had been treated through the CMDUs. To 11 January 2022, 3,012 people have enrolled on the PANORAMIC national study which has a molnupiravir treatment ratio of 1:1.

7th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been treated with (a) Ronapreve, (b) Sotrovimab or (c) molnupiravir for covid-19 in each week since the start of December 2021.

Ronapreve is available to treat patients in hospital who have confirmed COVID-19 and have either been hospitalised for the management of symptoms or are at high-risk of progression to severe illness. To 5 January 2022, 78 patients had been treated through the COVID Medicines Delivery Units (CMDUs).

The deployment of Sotrovimab began on 20 December 2021. To 5 January 2022, 1,961 patients had been treated through the CMDUs. The deployment of molnupiravir began on 16 December 2021. To 5 January 2022, 2,883 patients had been treated through the CMDUs. To 10 January 2022, 2,875 people enrolled on the PANORAMIC national study which has a molnupiravir treatment ratio of 1:1.

13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment he has made of the proportion of third primary covid-19 vaccine doses administered to immunocompromised and immunosuppressed people in (a) Waltham Forest and (b) England.

The information is not held centrally in the format requested. However, the latest available data as of 20 December 2021 shows that 87.7% of individuals in England identified as severely immunosuppressed have received a third primary dose.

No specific comparative assessment been made.

13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of immunocompromised or immunosuppressed people have received their (a) second and (b) third primary dose of the covid-19 vaccine in each (a) region of England and (b) local authority as of 13 December 2021.

The information is not held centrally in the format requested. However, the latest available data as of 20 December 2021 shows that 87.7% of individuals in England identified as severely immunosuppressed have received a third primary dose.

No specific comparative assessment been made.

10th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which hospital trusts are providing covid-19 vaccinations at antenatal clinics; and from what date each of those clinics began providing those vaccinations.

The information requested is not held centrally. There are also a number of ways pregnant women can receive these vaccinations on a walk-in basis. NHS England is working with vaccination leads to increase the availability of walk-in vaccination clinics for pregnant women within or on the same site as maternity services.

2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment he has made of the impact of reducing the number of mass covid-19 vaccination centres on the uptake of the covid-19 vaccines among (a) young people and (b) ethnic minority communities.

No comparative assessment has been made. The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement keep the COVID-19 vaccine programme under review to ensure there is sufficient capacity to support the offer.

2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the geographic variation in covid-19 vaccine uptake among 12-16 year olds.

We have made no specific assessment. However, the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement regularly monitor data at national and regional level to observe trends and analyse uptake rates, including by age.

1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much each NHS trust spent on the purchase of healthcare from non-NHS bodies in financial year 2020-21.

We are unable to provide the information requested due to the National Audit Office’s ongoing audit process.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
30th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the (a) private organisations that have received funding from NHS bodies to provide healthcare services in the financial year 2020-21 and (b) value of those contracts.

We are unable to provide the information requested due to the National Audit Office’s ongoing audit process.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
30th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much was spent by (a) NHS providers and (b) NHS England Group on the purchase of healthcare from non-NHS bodies in financial year 2020-21.

We are unable to provide the information requested due to the National Audit Office’s ongoing audit process.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Question 44335, tabled on 7 September 2021, and Question 60402, tabled on 21 October 2021, on Coronavirus: Vaccination, by the hon. Member for Walthamstow, for what reason his Department has not been able to provide a substantive response to those Questions within the required timeframes; and when he plans to provide a substantive response to those Questions.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer to Question 44335.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that individuals who have received both doses of an MHRA-approved covid-19 vaccine outside the UK are subject to the same self-isolation requirements following a close contact with a confirmed positive case as those who received vaccines in the UK.

An individual identified as a close contact of a positive COVID-19 case is exempt from self-isolation if they have received both doses of a Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency-approved vaccine administered in the United Kingdom. The current system for validating the vaccination status of close contacts relies on checking against records in the National Immunisation Management System, which does not record vaccinations administered overseas. We are exploring options to extend the existing exemption to contacts who have completed an approved vaccination programme overseas.

21st Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to answer Question 44335 on Coronavirus: Vaccination, tabled by the hon. Member for Walthamstow on 7 September 2021.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer to Question 44335.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, by what date he estimates (a) 25, (b) 50 and (c) 75 per cent of people eligible for covid-19 booster vaccinations as at 18 October 2021 to have received that vaccination.

No specific estimate has been made. However, over 22 million people in the United Kingdom have now received a COVID-19 booster vaccination or third dose. We have confirmed all eligible adults in England aged 18 years old and over will be offered a booster vaccination by the end of January.

The number of people in the UK who have received a COVID-19 booster vaccination or third dose is available at the following link:

https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the number of (a) people invited to receive a covid-19 booster vaccination and (b) covid-19 booster vaccinations issued by local authorities on a weekly basis.

Individuals become eligible for a COVID-19 booster vaccination 6 six months after their second jab, and therefore the number of people eligible changes on a daily basis.

More than 13 million invites have already been sent to eligible people in England so far asking them to book their booster online through the National Booking Service which can be found at the following link:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/book-coronavirus-vaccination/book-or-manage-a-booster-dose-of-the-coronavirus-covid-19-vaccine/.

NHS England will be inviting another 3 million people who will become eligible for their booster from week commencing 15 November 2021.

If an individual has not been contacted by the NHS within a week of reaching six months since their second jab they can call 119 or use the online National Booking Service to book a COVID-19 vaccination booster, or go to various walk-in sites across the country.

Data on the number of COVID-19 boosters issued by local authorities on a weekly basis is not available. But data on the number of boosters administered broken down by NHS Region of Residence is published on a daily basis. Please note that these figures also include some third primary doses. This data is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-vaccinations/

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been invited to receive a booster vaccination for covid-19; and how many booster vaccinations for covid-19 have been administered as at 18 October 2021.

More than 13 million invites have already been sent to eligible people in England so far asking them to book their COVID-19 booster vaccination online through the National Booking Service. NHS England will be inviting another 3 three million people who will become eligible for their booster from week commencing 15 November 2021. Individuals become eligible for a booster 6 six months after their second jab.

If an individual has not been contacted by the NHS within a week of reaching six months since their second jab they can call 119 or use the online National Booking Service to book a COVID-19 vaccination booster, or go to various walk-in sites across the country.

As at 8 November 2021, a cumulative total of 8,838,609 COVID-19 booster vaccines and third doses have been administered in England. This information is available at the following link: https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/details/vaccinations.

As at 8 November 2021, a cumulative total of 10,580,122 booster vaccines and third doses have been administered in the UK. This information is available at the following link: https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/details/vaccinations.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to enable individuals who have received covid-19 vaccinations outside the UK to access the NHS vaccine pass; and what his timetable is for the implementation of this change.

Currently, United Kingdom residents vaccinated in the United States of America, the European Union, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Switzerland, Australia and Canada with the Pfizer, AstraZeneca, Moderna and Janssen vaccines can be certified using the NHS COVID Pass. A National Immunisation Management Service record is required, which can be obtained by calling 119 and will include attending a regional vaccination centre.

The service currently has seven sites capable of reviewing vaccination evidence with further expansion of the service planned in due course.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to reduce waiting times for people seeking a diagnosis for (a) Crohn’s disease, (b) colitis and (c) other inflammatory bowel conditions.

We have invested £325 million in National Health Service diagnostic equipment to improve clinical outcomes, while £1 billion is dedicated to tackling wider elective backlogs across the NHS.

Additional diagnostic capacity is also being delivered through the creation of new community diagnostic hubs, which allow for the separation of urgent and elective diagnostic tests. These hubs provide screening and testing more quickly and effectively, supporting healthcare professionals to diagnose diseases and conditions such as Crohn’s disease, colitis and other inflammatory bowel conditions.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will provide ring-fenced funding for mental health services targeted at care leavers as part of the NHS Long Term Plan.

The funding and provision of health services, including mental health services, are the responsibility of local clinical commissioning groups as they have the flexibility to allocate funding according to local need. We do not currently have any plans to ringfence funding for mental health services targeted at care leavers.

The NHS Long Term Plan commits to the development of a comprehensive mental health offer for children and young people, including care leavers. We are working to ensure that by 2023-24 an extra 345,000 children and young people will be able to access support via National Health Service-funded mental health services and school or college based mental health support teams.

13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) steps his Department is taking to support local authorities in signposting care leavers to appropriate mental health support and (b) assessment he has made of the effectiveness of existing signposting.

We are currently working with local authorities and National Health Service trusts to develop and modernise arrangements for care leavers including signposting to appropriate mental health provisions.

In March 2021, we published the Mental Health Recovery Action Plan to ensure approximately 22,500 more children and young people can access community health services.

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 27 May 2021 to Question 1312 on Coronavirus: Vaccination, what information has NHS England provided to the local authority Director of Public Health on the number of (a) covid-19 vaccinations that have been administered and (b) people eligible for those vaccinations, by ethnicity, for each of the wards in Waltham Forest where that information is available for the last five months.

From 15 January to 23 April, Public Health England (PHE) facilitated access for Directors of Public Health to local level data provided by NHS England and NHS Improvement via its secure platform. Since 23 April 2021, these data have been provided directly by PHE.

PHE provides daily COVID-19 vaccine data to Directors of Public Health in England, including for Waltham Forest. These data include breakdowns to lower super output area (LSOA) level by age, sex and ethnicity. LSOA data can be aggregated to ward level.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) covid-19 vaccinations have been administered and (b) people are eligible for those vaccinations, by ethnicity, in each of the wards in Waltham Forest where that data is available over the last five months.

Data on vaccinations and population eligibility, including by ethnicity, is not held at ward level. NHS England and Improvement publish weekly vaccination data by ethnicity and region which is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-vaccinations/

The data published by NHS England is regularly reviewed.

27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many cases relating to racial discrimination by the NHS under the Equality Act 2010 have found in favour of the complainant since 2010.

The information requested is not held.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will provide the data on the number of (a) covid-19 vaccinations that have been administered and (b) people eligible for those vaccinations, by ethnicity, for each of the wards in Waltham Forest where available over the last five months.

Data on vaccinations and population eligibility, including by ethnicity, is not centrally held at ward level.

NHS England publish weekly data for vaccinations in England, including vaccinations by ethnicity, at constituency and national level. This data can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/covid-19-vaccinations/

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the new advice on covid-19 vaccination for pregnant women from Public Health England issued on 16 April 2021, what steps he is taking to issue updated guidance for pregnant employees; and when that guidance will be available.

We do not currently have plans to issue updated guidance for pregnant employees. Advice for pregnant employees was published by the Government, in partnership with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, the Royal College of Midwives and the Health and Safety Executive on 23 December 2020.

The guidance sets out that if a woman is pregnant and has let their employer know in writing, the employer should carry out a risk assessment. Pregnant women of any gestation should not be required to continue working if this is not supported by the risk assessment.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of patients who have been prescribed anti-psychotic drugs who go on to develop Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS); and what information he holds on the number of people whose autotopsy revealed NMS as a cause of death and who had not received a diagnosis for that disorder.

The information requested is not held.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many of the written answers he provided to the Hon Member for Walthamstow in the past 12 months were written by consultants as opposed to civil servants; and which Minister approved those answers.

All written answers provided to the hon. Member in the past twelve months were written by civil servants. Answers are approved by the Minister responding.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress has been made on the provision of the £10, 000 payment incentive intended to support the 2018-19 cohort of pre-registration postgraduate students studying health, learning disability and district nursing announced in May 2018; and what steps he is taking to ensure that students are aware that that funding is available to them.

Health Education England is finalising operational policy requirements. This includes the most appropriate arrangements for making payments to eligible students and the most effective way to communicate the process to students and other stakeholders. Further information will be announced as soon as possible.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many operations have been cancelled or delayed as a result of the covid-19 outbreak, by (a) priority categorisation and (b) Trust.

The data requested is not available. The collection of data on cancelled operations has been paused due the need to release capacity across the National Health Service to support the COVID-19 response.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 26 January 2021 to Question 96883 on Coronavirus: Screening, what comprehensive service descriptions are used in relation to Deloitte's contract for covid-19 testing; and pursuant to the Answer of 18 November 2020 to Question 62429 on Deloitte: Coronavirus, what process (a) was used to define and (b) is in place to monitor performance against those descriptions.

The contract, containing the service descriptions, is available at the following link:

https://atamis-1928.cloudforce.com/sfc/p/0O000000rwim/a/4J000000kIGD/m4SEJjmpk3ft_PstlpwG73t_meFmGr0xrGic0e6s7VU

These include increasing our capacity to deliver the programme, supporting the national testing, meeting our end to end supply needs and determining our logistics.

Overall performance is monitored via a robust fortnightly cycle of contract management and performance reporting against agreed milestones. This includes review and approvals for each workstream, with additional governance aligned to Government standards and best practice.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data the Government is collecting which explicitly monitors transmission of covid-19 between (a) children aged 0 to 5 years in education settings and (b) (i) parents, (ii) staff and (iii) other adults who visit those settings; and if he will publish that data in full.

Public Health England (PHE) does not routinely collect data for COVID-19 transmission rates in education settings between school-aged children and/or adults.

PHE does report on COVID-19 infection rates, by educational aged cohorts in the national flu and COVID-19 surveillance graphs that accompany the National flu and COVID-19 weekly surveillance report. This includes reception, nursery and pre-school aged cohorts. The most recent report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/national-flu-and-covid-19-surveillance-reports

It should be noted that this data includes all cases regardless of whether or not they attended an educational setting or if the educational setting was open during the reporting period.

17th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Test and Trace Support Payments have been (a) awarded and (b) refused in each (i) geographic region and (ii) employment sector.

We are working closely with all 314 lower tier and unitary local authorities to collate information on how the Test and Trace Support Payment scheme is progressing, and will release information on the number of applications, number of successful applications and amounts paid out in due course.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation: advice on priority groups for COVID-19 vaccination, published on 2 December 2020, whether the capacity of clinically extremely vulnerable patients to shield has been included in the modelling determining the priority level for that group of people to receive the vaccine.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) reviewed evidence, including from OpenSAFELY, QCOVID, and mathematical modelling from the University of Warwick, when determining the priority groups for COVID-19 vaccine. Current evidence indicates that the single greatest risk for mortality from COVID-19 is increasing age and that the risk increases rapidly with age. The modelling work by Warwick University is available at the following link:

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.09.22.20194183v2

Many of those who are clinically extremely vulnerable are in the oldest age groups and will be among the first to receive the vaccine. The JCVI recognises that individuals considered extremely clinically vulnerable have been shielding for much of the pandemic and this meant that available data are likely to underestimate the risk in this group. Considering data from the first wave of COVID-19 in the United Kingdom, the overall risk of mortality for clinically extremely vulnerable younger adults was estimated to be roughly the same as the risk to persons aged 70–74 years old. The prioritisation is based on the absolute risk of mortality, which evidence indicates is higher in those over 75 years of age, than in those considered clinically extremely vulnerable.

The capacity of clinically extremely vulnerable patients to shield and the effect on the families of clinically extremely vulnerable patients were not included in the mathematical modelling considered by the JCVI. This was however considered in the decision to prioritise clinically extremely vulnerable individuals alongside those aged 70-74 years of age. Clinically extremely vulnerable individuals are in the third priority group for vaccination, as advised by the JCVI.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation: advice on priority groups for COVID-19 vaccination, published on 2 December 2020, whether the effect on the families of clinically extremely vulnerable patients has been included in the modelling determining the priority level of that group of people to receive the vaccine.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) reviewed evidence, including from OpenSAFELY, QCOVID, and mathematical modelling from the University of Warwick, when determining the priority groups for COVID-19 vaccine. Current evidence indicates that the single greatest risk for mortality from COVID-19 is increasing age and that the risk increases rapidly with age. The modelling work by Warwick University is available at the following link: https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.09.22.20194183v2 Many of those who are clinically extremely vulnerable are in the oldest age groups and will be among the first to receive the vaccine. The JCVI recognises that individuals considered extremely clinically vulnerable have been shielding for much of the pandemic and this meant that available data are likely to underestimate the risk in this group. Considering data from the first wave of COVID-19 in the United Kingdom, the overall risk of mortality for clinically extremely vulnerable younger adults was estimated to be roughly the same as the risk to persons aged 70–74 years old. The prioritisation is based on the absolute risk of mortality, which evidence indicates is higher in those over 75 years of age, than in those considered clinically extremely vulnerable. The capacity of clinically extremely vulnerable patients to shield and the effect on the families of clinically extremely vulnerable patients were not included in the mathematical modelling considered by the JCVI. This was however considered in the decision to prioritise clinically extremely vulnerable individuals alongside those aged 70-74 years of age. Clinically extremely vulnerable individuals are in the third priority group for vaccination, as advised by the JCVI.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to answer Questions 100386, 100385 and 100384, tabled on 7 October 2020 and Questions 96885, 96884, 96883, 96882 tabled on 29 September 2020 by the hon. Member for Walthamstow.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that hon. Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s questions will be answered as soon as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance is available for pregnant women in their third trimester on attending work during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown.

The Health and Safety Executive provides specific advice for new and expectant mothers and have recently updated their guidance to protect vulnerable workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Their guidance was updated on 5 November.

23rd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to Questions (a) 100997, (b) 100996, (c) 100995, and (d) 100994 tabled by the hon. Member for Walthamstow on 8 October 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers to Questions 100997, 100996, 100995 and 100994.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) covid-19 test QR codes have been scanned at covid-19 test centres and (b) test results have been issued per day since August 1 2020.

We do not publish data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the payments to each of the private hospital companies under the arrangements announced on 21 March 2020 were made after the costs had first been verified by external auditors on an open book accountancy basis.

National Health Service patients are benefitting from an unprecedented partnership with private hospitals as we battle the COVID-19 outbreak. The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked with the independent sector to secure all appropriate inpatient capacity and other resource across England.

Information on the number of NHS patients treated by each private hospital under the arrangements announced on 21 March 2020 for the provision of healthcare services and facilities to support the COVID-19 response is not available. However, latest collected information shows that over 215,000 patient contacts nationally had taken place under the contract


Recoverable costs payable to each independent sector hospital provider are paid on account, with reconciliation adjustments made on a monthly basis to reflect actual recoverable costs incurred by the provider as verified by KPMG on NHS England’s behalf on an open book basis and in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards accounting principles.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the number of NHS patients treated by each private hospital under the arrangements announced on 21 March 2020 for the provision of healthcare services and facilities to support the covid-19 response.

National Health Service patients are benefitting from an unprecedented partnership with private hospitals as we battle the COVID-19 outbreak. The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked with the independent sector to secure all appropriate inpatient capacity and other resource across England.

Information on the number of NHS patients treated by each private hospital under the arrangements announced on 21 March 2020 for the provision of healthcare services and facilities to support the COVID-19 response is not available. However, latest collected information shows that over 215,000 patient contacts nationally had taken place under the contract


Recoverable costs payable to each independent sector hospital provider are paid on account, with reconciliation adjustments made on a monthly basis to reflect actual recoverable costs incurred by the provider as verified by KPMG on NHS England’s behalf on an open book basis and in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards accounting principles.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the amounts paid to each of the private hospital companies under the arrangements announced on 21 March 2020 for the provision of healthcare services and facilities to support the covid-19 response.

A Contract Award Notice in respect of each of the 26 individual contracts entered into by NHS England with independent sector hospital providers has been published on 16 October 2020 by the Official Journal of the European Union. The Notice can be viewed at the following link:

https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:492193-2020:TEXT:EN:HTML

Under the agreement, latest figures show that from 30 March until 30 August 2020 over 967,000 National Health Service patient appointments have taken place within independent facilities. We cannot provide a breakdown of the amounts paid to each independent sector Provider, however, the total for this period is estimated at £1 billion.

As part of preparing for winter, the Government has provided an additional £3 billion to the NHS. This includes additional funding to the NHS to allow them to continue to use additional hospital capacity from the independent sector, and to maintain the Nightingale hospitals, in their current state, until the end of March 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the contracts between NHS England and the private hospital companies which he announced on 21 March 2020 for the provision of healthcare services and facilities to support the covid-19 response.

A Contract Award Notice in respect of each of the 26 individual contracts entered into by NHS England with independent sector hospital providers has been published on 16 October 2020 by the Official Journal of the European Union. The Notice can be viewed at the following link:

https://ted.europa.eu/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:492193-2020:TEXT:EN:HTML

Under the agreement, latest figures show that from 30 March until 30 August 2020 over 967,000 National Health Service patient appointments have taken place within independent facilities. We cannot provide a breakdown of the amounts paid to each independent sector Provider, however, the total for this period is estimated at £1 billion.

As part of preparing for winter, the Government has provided an additional £3 billion to the NHS. This includes additional funding to the NHS to allow them to continue to use additional hospital capacity from the independent sector, and to maintain the Nightingale hospitals, in their current state, until the end of March 2021.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether any issues have been identified in respect of Deloitte's contract to manage the provision of a test and trace service at a performance meeting; and whether any remedial plans have been agreed.

To date there have been no issues with regard to Deloitte’s performance as per their contractual standards and therefore no remedial plans have been agreed.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether any issues have been identified at a performance meeting in respect of the Government's contract with Randox Labs in its role in providing a test and trace service; and whether any remedial plans have been agreed.

Randox is operating in accordance with its contract. Performance is constantly monitored against set criteria to ensure that the supplier is meeting expectations. Due to the commercially sensitive nature of these agreements the Department cannot provide specific details in accordance with the key performance indicators within their contract.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether any issues have been identified at a performance meeting in respect of the Government's contract with Lighthouse Labs and its role in the test and trace service; and whether any remedial plans have been agreed.

Lighthouse Labs are operating in accordance with their contracts. Performance is constantly monitored against set criteria to ensure that the supplier is meeting expectations. Due to the commercially sensitive nature of these agreements the Department cannot provide specific details.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether any issues have been identified as a result of the performance meeting on Serco's management of the test and trace service; and whether any remedial plans have been agreed.

No issues have been identified with regard to Serco’s performance as per their contractual standards and therefore no remedial plans have been agreed.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 23 September 2020 to Question 89688 on Coronavirus: Screening, what the performance standards are that Deloitte is expected to meet under the terms of its contract relating to its involvement in the provision of covid-19 testing.

All arrangements for Deloitte’s support to Test and Trace are subject to Crown Commercial Services terms. Each workstream has a comprehensive service description and is subject to regular performance monitoring and management to ensure they are delivering in line with the programme’s objectives.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 23 September 2020 to Question 89690 on Coronavirus: Screening, what the performance standards are that Lighthouse Labs is expected to meet under the terms of its contract relating to its involvement in the provision of covid-19 testing.

All our contracts with Lighthouse Laboratories are constantly monitored against set criteria to ensure that the supplier is meeting expectations. We are unable to provide specific details of these contracts as they are commercially sensitive.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 23 September 2020 to Question 89689 on Coronavirus: Screening, what the performance standards are that Randox is expected to meet under the terms of its contract for covid-19 testing.

Performance and quality assurance standards and processes are included in the Government contracts with Randox. These are constantly monitored against to ensure that the supplier is meeting expectations. Due to the commercially sensitive nature of these agreements, the Department cannot provide specific details.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 23 September 2020 to Question 89687 on Coronavirus: Screening, what the performance standards are that Serco are expected to meet under the terms of its contract relating to its involvement in the provision of covid-19 testing.

Performance and quality assurance standards and processes are included in the Government contracts with Serco. These are commercially sensitive. The contracts have break clauses in them, meaning if the company does not meet required service levels, the contract may be cancelled and money reclaimed.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, by what date he is planning for the full implementation by maternity services of the guidance on visitor restrictions issued on 8 September 2020.

On 5 June 2020, NHS England and NHS Improvement revised their guidance on how National Health Service organisations may choose to facilitate visiting across healthcare inpatient settings during the COVID-19 pandemic. The national suspension on visiting imposed under previous guidance was lifted with immediate effect.

Visiting is now subject to local discretion by trusts and other NHS bodies, and will take into account local prevalence. The number of visitors at the bedside is limited to one close family contact or somebody important to the patient. However, where it is possible to maintain social distancing throughout the visit, a second additional visitor can be permitted in certain circumstances including those individuals receiving end-of-life care.

The maternity visiting guidance has been published by NHS England and NHS Improvement. It has been designed to assist NHS trusts to reintroduce access for partners, visitors and other supporters of pregnant women in English maternity services. It applies to inpatient and outpatient settings.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/09/par001599-framework-for-the-reintroduction-of-visitors-throughout-maternity-services-sep-2020.pdf

17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the proportion of visiting restrictions that can be lifted in maternity services without services becoming covid-19-insecure.

Risk assessments on the safety of maternity services which would include an assessment of visiting restrictions as part of COVID-19 infection control, are conducted locally by trusts. NHS England and NHS Improvement therefore do not hold this data.

On 8 September, NHS England and NHS Improvement published a Framework to assist all National Health Service trusts to reintroduce access for partners, visitors and other supporters of pregnant women in maternity services in England, developed in partnership with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, Royal College of Midwives and the Society and College of Radiographers.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/09/par001599-framework-for-the-reintroduction-of-visitors-throughout-maternity-services-sep-2020.pdf

NHS England and NHS Improvement expect trusts to use this Framework and consider how access for partners, visitors and other supporters of pregnant women can be safely reintroduced to maternity services as a priority. The Framework recommends a stepwise approach for NHS trusts to take, following a meaningful and documented risk assessment, so any necessary changes can be made before relaxing current stringent approaches.

17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to encourage NHS Trusts to implement as soon as possible the 8 September 2020 guidance on visitor restrictions.

The Department expects trusts to use the Framework to assist National Health Service trusts to reintroduce access for partners, visitors and other supporters of pregnant women in English maternity services and consider as a priority how access for partners, visitors and other supporters of pregnant women can be reintroduced as soon as possible whilst maintaining the safety of all service users, staff and visitors. This is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/09/par001599-framework-for-the-reintroduction-of-visitors-throughout-maternity-services-sep-2020.pdf

The Chief Midwifery Officer, Chief Allied Health Professions Officer (England), and the National Clinical Director for Maternity and Women's Health wrote to all NHS Directors of Nursing and Heads of Midwifery in England on 19 September to thank the majority of services that have quickly implemented this guidance and relaxed visiting restrictions and to inform those that are still working through the guidance that this must happen now so that partners are able to attend maternity units for appointments and births. The letter is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/09/letter-to-directors-of-nursing-and-heads-of-midwifery-19-september-2020.pdf

14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the contract with Serco for managing access to covid-19 testing, what penalties can be imposed under that contract in the event that people cannot secure a test; and who is responsible for monitoring the performance of that contract.

Serco is contracted to operate a proportion of the test locations. It is not responsible for the scheduling of access to COVID-19 tests.

Contractual penalties are generally unenforceable under English law and are therefore not included in this contract.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the contract with Deloitte for managing access to covid-19 testing, what penalties can be imposed under that contract in the event that people cannot secure a test; and who is responsible for monitoring the performance of that contract.

The contract with Deloitte does not include managing access to COVID-19 testing.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the contract with Randox for managing access to covid-19 testing, what penalties can be imposed under that contract in the event that people cannot secure a test; and who is responsible for monitoring the performance of that contract.

The contract with Randox relates to the performance of laboratory testing following receipt of test samples. It does not relate to the public being able to secure a test.

Contractual penalties are generally unenforceable under English law and are therefore not included in this contract.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the contract with Lighthouse Labs for managing access to covid-19 testing, what penalties can be imposed under that contract in the event that people cannot secure a test; and who is responsible for monitoring the performance of that contract.

The contract with the Lighthouse Labs relates to the performance of laboratory testing following receipt of test samples. It does not relate to the public being able to secure a test.

Contractual penalties are generally unenforceable under English law and are therefore not included in this contract.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the cap since 13 September 2020 has been on the number of tests that can be done at (a) drive in test centres and (b) walk through test centres; and who is responsible for setting that cap.

The cap for the number of tests available at drive through sites is set on a daily basis and therefore the number of tests available on any given day does vary.

We are expanding capacity continually, having already surpassed our testing capacity target of 500,000 tests a day by the end of October.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many tests have been taken at each covid-19 testing centre in London on each day since 31 August 2020.

The Government does not publish data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when wearing face coverings to attend (a) phlebotomy appointments, (b) GP surgeries, (c) outpatient clinics, (d) accident and emergency departments and (e) hospital wards will be made compulsory.

The Government’s advice is to wear a face covering in enclosed spaces where social distancing may be difficult and where people come into contact with people they do not normally meet. On 15 June the Government announced that members of the public should wear a face covering when visiting the hospital.

Each of these healthcare settings will have different risks and mitigations in place, and patients should follow the advice provided by health professionals appropriate to each setting. In addition, the Government is running a major proactive communications campaign on face coverings to alert the public where they are now required to wear face coverings and educate the public on how to correctly wear one.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2020 to Question 48980 on Deloitte, if he will set out the total sum of monies paid by his Department to Deloitte for each month of 2020.

We do not currently hold data in the requested format. However, information on Deloitte's contract with the Department will be published in due course at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department's contract with Randox Laboratories requires the notification to Public Health England of positive covid-19 tests in line with the Health Protection (Notification) Regulations 2010; and how many positive covid-19 tests were notified by that company under those regulations in each month in 2020.

COVID-19 is a notifiable disease. As such, under the Health Protection (Notification) Regulations 2010, all laboratories are legally required to notify positive incidences to Public Health England.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS trusts are now enabling partners to attend (a) scans, (b) hospital appointments and (c) the birth of a child as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased.

The data requested are not collected centrally.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance he has issued to NHS trusts on enabling partners to attend (a) scans, (b) hospital appointments and (b) the birth of a child during the covid-19 outbreak.

The National Health Service is making arrangements to ensure that women are supported and cared for safely through pregnancy, birth and the period afterwards during this pandemic.

Decisions on partners attending scans and appointments is subject to local discretion by trusts and other NHS bodies. Local maternity teams will be able to advise women on their policy on partners attending antenatal appointments including scans.

Guidance produced by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists is clear that women should be encouraged to have one birth partner, who has no symptoms of COVID-19, present with them during any type of labour and birth, unless the birth occurs under general anaesthetic.

29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) home birth services and (b) midwifery units temporarily closed between 1 March 2020 to date due to the covid-19 outbreak; for how long each such service was closed; and how many of those services have since reopened.

This information is not currently held in the format requested.

25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) guidance and (b) support is for people who have been advised to shield due to being classed as extremely clinically vulnerable during the covid-19 outbreak and missed the 10 June 2020 cut-off for applying to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Only clinically extremely vulnerable people have been advised to shield. For this cohort, the information requested is not available as the data does not include the date when a person was added to the shielded patient list.

Guidance detailing the support arrangements in place for those who are shielding is set out at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

We have set out an unprecedented package of financial support to help the country through the COVID-19 pandemic, and the clinically extremely vulnerable are able to access these where eligible.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been diagnosed as clinically vulnerable or extremely clinically vulnerable and advised to shield after the 10 June 2020 cut-off date for applying to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Only clinically extremely vulnerable people have been advised to shield. For this cohort, the information requested is not available as the data does not include the date when a person was added to the shielded patient list.

Guidance detailing the support arrangements in place for those who are shielding is set out at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

We have set out an unprecedented package of financial support to help the country through the COVID-19 pandemic, and the clinically extremely vulnerable are able to access these where eligible.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 12 June 2020 to Question 51929 on Coronavirus: Patients, what the process is for the management of the shielding list; whether the list is managed at (a) Government and (b) local authority level; and what criteria is used to remove people from that list.

The shielded patent list for England is a national database managed by NHS Digital. No deductions from the list have been made nationally.

The decision to remove an individual patient from the list is normally made by that patient’s general practitioner or hospital doctor based on their clinical judgement and the criteria set out in the advice to clinically extremely vulnerable people at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

Government advice is clear that the patient’s general practictioner or hospital doctor should discuss with the patient the decision to remove them from the list before they are removed.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2020 to Question 48980 on Deloitte: Coronavirus, whether his office was involved in the negotiation of the contract with Deloitte to perform covid-19 testing.

The process of contract negotiation is not a process that routinely involves the Secretary of State or his office directly. Officials working on his behalf will act on his authority to negotiate a contract that best meets the needs of the service being proposed.

A summary of Deloitte's contract with the Department will be published in due course.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2020 to Question 48980 on Deloitte: Coronavirus, to whom Deloitte is required to report positive cases of covid-19; and within what timeframe those positive cases are required to be so reported.

Deloitte is contracted to provide professional services support to the Department and the National Testing Programme. Deloitte’s role has included setting up testing facilities; coordinating the set-up of home and satellite delivery channels; and designing the digital platform that enables people to book a test and register their kit. Deloitte makes this digital information available to the National Pathology Exchange.

Once results are generated in the labs, the results information also flows to the National Pathology Exchange where the result is matched to the individual’s demographic information. These results are passed to Public Health England every 30 minutes through a data flow. As such, Deloitte does not have a role in the generation of results or the handling of positive case data.

18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the level of need for period product provision in NHS facilities.

The Department is not aware of any assessment of the level of need for period product provision in National Health Service facilities having been undertaken.

However, NHS England announced in March 2019 that providers of NHS-funded inpatient hospital services will offer period products to every hospital in-patient who needs them (including for long-term inpatients)

This is under the terms of the NHS Standard Contract.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department has issued on covid-19 testing for people who have relatives in care homes; and when people will be able to visit those homes.

Anyone with suspected COVID-19 symptoms can access testing by using the self-referral portal. More information is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus

While we have recommended that care homes limit non-essential visits, we are clear that visits at the end of life are important both for the individual and their loved ones and should continue with appropriate infection control precautions.

We are aware that limiting visits in care homes is difficult for many families and residents who want to see their loved ones.

We are reviewing our policy on visitors and are looking to update our guidance shortly and continuing to explore how we support the sector.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of the level debt of each NHS Trust after the NHS debt write-off announced by his Department on 9 April 2020.

The level of National Health Service provider debt from Departmental loans will fall to £3 billion after the announced debt write-off. The remaining debt are loans which were taken out at the option of the providers, were subject to affordability assessment and are being repaid. The loan write-off will be transacted in 2020-21 through converting the loans to equity (Public Dividend Capital).

This figure does not include debt taken from sources external to the Departmental group such as commercial debt and private finance initiatives.

Data on total debt is currently not held by NHS England and NHS Improvement in the requested format.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his announcement on 21 May 2020 that the immigration health surcharge would be removed for NHS staff and care workers, when that surcharge will be removed; whether workers who become exempt from that surcharge will be refunded; and whether the removal of that surcharge for those workers will be permanent.

Department of Health and Social Care and Home Office officials are working to implement the Prime Minister’s announcement of 21 May and further details will be published shortly.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been removed from the covid-19 shielded patients list and notified of that removal by text message.

General practitioners and hospital specialists have been asked to review their shielded patient lists based on clinical judgement and an assessment of everyone’s needs. They have also been provided with guidance to support these decisions, which should be made following discussion with the patient and taking into account their individual clinical circumstances.

Information on the number of patients removed from shielded patient lists is not held centrally.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when residents of care homes in England will be able to receive visitors; and what testing plan for visitors will be put in place to ensure the safety of residents and staff during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department, Public Health England, the Care Quality Commission and the National Health Service have published guidance on the care of residents in care homes. This includes guidance on visiting.

While we have recommended that family and friends should be advised not to visit care homes, we are clear that there may be exceptional situations where visits are appropriate. During these visits, appropriate infection control precautions should be followed.

We know how difficult it is for residents and their families to have their visits restricted and we will continue to review our guidance in line with the latest scientific advice and engage with stakeholders to ensure we address the majority of?their concerns.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the contract with Deloitte for covid-19 testing requires that company to report positive cases to Public Health England and to local authorities.

As an existing professional services provider to the public sector, Deloitte’s expertise is being used to supplement in-house resource to deliver significant programmes of work, which currently includes the national response to COVID-19. The contract with Deloitte does not require the company to report positive cases to Public Health England and local authorities.

15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many pieces of correspondence he has received from MPs on behalf of constituents on matters relating to covid-19 on each date since the outbreak began; and how many responses he has provided to that correspondence in each category of response.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether a 14 day quarantine period will be required for people travelling to the UK for medical procedures.

As the level of infection in the United Kingdom reduces, it will be important to manage the risk of transmissions being reintroduced from abroad. As set out in the COVID-19 recovery strategy, we will introduce a series of measures and restrictions at the UK border, including requiring international arrivals to provide contact information and self-isolate. Further details and guidance for self-isolation measures for incoming travelers will be set out shortly, including the list of exemptions. More information is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/our-plan-to-rebuild-the-uk-governments-covid-19-recovery-strategy/our-plan-to-rebuild-the-uk-governments-covid-19-recovery-strategy#our-roadmap-to-lift-restrictions-step-by-step

12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what advice his Department has provided for splenectomy patients on shielding in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

Splenectomy patients are considered clinically extremely vulnerable and have been included on the shielded patient list. Guidance for patients on shielding can be found at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the number of civilians killed in the Ethiopian and Eritrean offensive in the Tigray region since September 1 2022.

Information on casualties from the conflict in northern Ethiopia is scarce. Since the resumption of fighting on 24 August it is likely that there have been thousands of casualties.

The UK welcomes the peace agreement and cessation of hostilities announced on 2 November between the Ethiopian Government and the Tigray People's Liberation Front (TPLF), and their commitment to scale-up the delivery of life-saving aid to Tigray. The UK calls upon the Eritrean Government to support the agreement by withdrawing its troops from Ethiopia.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Statement on freedom of religion or belief and gender equality, what (a) meetings, (b) discussions or (c) correspondence she had with Ministerial colleagues on the decision to remove reference to reproductive healthcare from the statement.

The UK is committed to defending and promoting universal and comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and will continue working with other countries to protect gender equality in international agreements. In our capacity as Chair of the event, we amended the statement we made at the Freedom of Religion or Belief Conference to make the final statement more inclusive of all perspectives and views to allow for a constructive exchange of views on all issues. The UK continues to fund support and lead on issues of gender including on SRHR, through initiatives related to Women, Peace and Security and Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Statement on freedom of religion or belief and gender equality, whether her Department carried out a public consultation prior to removing reference to reproductive healthcare from the statement.

The UK is committed to defending and promoting universal and comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and will continue working with other countries to protect gender equality in international agreements. In our capacity as Chair of the event, we amended the statement we made at the Freedom of Religion or Belief Conference to make the final statement more inclusive of all perspectives and views to allow for a constructive exchange of views on all issues. The UK continues to fund support and lead on issues of gender including on SRHR, through initiatives related to Women, Peace and Security and Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict.

6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will publish the legal advice provided to her Department relating to her proposals on the Northern Ireland Protocol and the compatibility with the provisions in section 38 of the EU (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020 and Article 4 of the Withdrawal Agreement.

It is a longstanding convention for governments of all parties not to comment on the fact or contents of government legal advice. As the Foreign Secretary set out in the house on 17 May, we are very clear that this is legal in international law. We believe bringing forward further legislation on this issue to be urgent and essential to protecting the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
16th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential effect on the human rights of women throughout the world of any change to the Roe vs Wade ruling on abortion.

I understand this is a leaked document rather than an official decision, but this is a matter for the US courts. It would not be appropriate for a foreign government to lobby the independent court process. In general, the UK supports women's reproductive rights globally, including the right to access safe and legal abortion.

14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what mechanisms her Department has in place to monitor the number of UK citizens overstaying the term of their visa when visiting an EU country.

The EU has legislated such that British citizens do not need a visa when travelling to and within the Schengen Area for short stays of up to 90 days in any 180-day period. This applies to all British citizens travelling to and within the Schengen Area for activities including attending cultural or sports events and tourism.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office does not hold information centrally on the numbers of British citizens who have applied for or been granted Schengen visas or how many have overstayed the term of their visa when visiting a Schengen State.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment she has made of the progress of the UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances in Sri Lanka.

A very high number of cases relating to Sri Lanka remain under consideration by the UN Working Group on Enforced or Involuntary Disappearances, including at the Working Group's most recent session in September 2021. We note the Working Group's concerns about Sri Lanka raised in its report of 4 August 2021, including the need for the Sri Lankan authorities to stop rolling back the progress made in recent years in ensuring accountability for past crimes and justice for victims.

UN Human Rights Council resolution 46/1, led by the UK along with our partners in the Core Group on Sri Lanka, stresses the importance of the Government of Sri Lanka maintaining support for the Office on Missing Persons and the Office for Reparations, safeguarding their independent and effective functioning, and resolving the many cases of enforced disappearances so that the families of disappeared persons can know their fate and whereabouts. We will continue to engage with the Government of Sri Lanka on this important issue.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to support the Tamil population of Sri Lanka.

The UK Government has long called for the rights of Sri Lankans from all communities to be respected. The Minister for South Asia, Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, has raised the importance of inclusive engagement with all communities in Sri Lanka in his discussions with Sri Lankan Foreign Minister G.L. Peiris, most recently on 24 September. We continue to urge the Government of Sri Lanka to uphold the rights of all of Sri Lanka's communities.

In March 2021 the UN Human Rights Council adopted a new UK-led resolution, 46/1, on promoting reconciliation, accountability and human rights in Sri Lanka. The resolution provides a continued framework for international engagement on human rights in Sri Lanka. It calls on the Government of Sri Lanka to make progress on accountability and human rights, and stresses the importance of a comprehensive accountability process for all violations and abuses committed in Sri Lanka. It also calls on the Government of Sri Lanka to fulfil its commitments on the devolution of political authority, which is integral to reconciliation and the full enjoyment of human rights by all members of its population. It encourages the Government to respect local governance, including through the holding of elections for provincial councils, and to ensure that all provincial councils, including the Northern and Eastern Provincial Councils, are able to operate effectively, in accordance with the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution of Sri Lanka. Through UK-funded programmes, we have supported a number of activities to benefit those in the north and east of the country, including demining, resettlement of internally displaced persons and interfaith dialogue.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions she has had with his Sri Lankan counterpart on engagement between the Government of that country and Tamil leaders.

The UK Government has long called for the rights of Sri Lankans from all communities to be respected. The Minister for South Asia, Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, has raised the importance of inclusive engagement with all communities in Sri Lanka in his discussions with Sri Lankan Foreign Minister G.L. Peiris, most recently on 24 September. We continue to urge the Government of Sri Lanka to uphold the rights of all of Sri Lanka's communities.

In March 2021 the UN Human Rights Council adopted a new UK-led resolution, 46/1, on promoting reconciliation, accountability and human rights in Sri Lanka. The resolution provides a continued framework for international engagement on human rights in Sri Lanka. It calls on the Government of Sri Lanka to make progress on accountability and human rights, and stresses the importance of a comprehensive accountability process for all violations and abuses committed in Sri Lanka. It also calls on the Government of Sri Lanka to fulfil its commitments on the devolution of political authority, which is integral to reconciliation and the full enjoyment of human rights by all members of its population. It encourages the Government to respect local governance, including through the holding of elections for provincial councils, and to ensure that all provincial councils, including the Northern and Eastern Provincial Councils, are able to operate effectively, in accordance with the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution of Sri Lanka. Through UK-funded programmes, we have supported a number of activities to benefit those in the north and east of the country, including demining, resettlement of internally displaced persons and interfaith dialogue.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to support people affected by flooding in Jamaica.

The UK works with regional organisations and Governments of the Commonwealth Caribbean, including Jamaica to strengthen disaster preparedness, help with recovery and build resilience. This includes access to rapid funding for disaster surge response through the Caribbean Disaster and Emergency Management Agency; the Caribbean Catastrophic Risk Insurance Facility, an insurance mechanism which makes pay-outs to Caribbean Governments impacted by a disaster; and the UK financed Global Risk Financing Facility which provided £14.85 million to help Jamaica strengthen financial resilience to tropical cyclones, excess rainfall, and earthquake disasters and will enable early action after disasters.

While there has been no request to the UK Government for humanitarian support in Jamaica related to flooding, these funds are available for the Government of Jamaica to draw on if that is required.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he has made to his Polish counterpart on the restrictions on the reproductive rights of Polish citizens.

We are closely monitoring developments in Poland following a ruling on 22 October by its Constitutional Tribunal, that laws permitting abortion in certain cases are unconstitutional, and the large-scale protests across Poland that this has prompted. It is for each country to establish its own laws on abortion. However, the UK firmly believes that supporting the comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls, through evidence-based public health interventions, saves lives and supports prosperity. Evidence shows that restricting access to safe abortion does not make abortions less common: it only makes them less safe. The FCDO is a leading voice on gender issues, including sexual and reproductive health and rights, in multilateral fora such as the Council of Europe and the United Nations. The British Embassy in Warsaw is active on this agenda and in September ran a workshop for British and Polish NGOs active on women's rights.

29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what plans his Department has in place to respond to the results of US presidential elections in the event that they are contested.

We will not speculate on the outcome of the US election, which is a matter for the US people.

20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many payments the Government has made under the emergency repatriation loans scheme since that scheme was established.

British nationals and UK residents who are overseas and wish to return to the UK, but cannot afford travel costs and have no other options for getting funds to return home, may apply for an emergency loan from the government as a last resort. Only basic costs can be included in a loan, usually the cheapest one-way ticket to the UK. The FCO usually issues around 250 emergency repatriation loans per year. As of 22 April we estimate that over 750 loans have been issued this year. Some loans are still being processed. Since 7 April 2020, the FCO has been working with Corporate Travel Management (CTM), which is authorised to administer such loans on behalf of the FCO, to extend the FCO's capacity to consider loan requests from British nationals.

The welfare of British nationals remains our top priority, and we remain committed to ensuring that British travellers around the globe are able to return home.

16th Feb 2024
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when his Department plans to publish the response to the consultation on proposed draft legislation to bring buy-now pay-later products into regulation; and, with reference to Part J of the Government's publication entitled Consultation principles: guidance updated 19 March 2018, for what reasons has the Department not responded within the 12 week timeframe.

The Government received a large number of substantive and detailed responses to its consultation on draft legislation to bring Buy-Now Pay-Later (BNPL) into regulation. These responses have required careful consideration to ensure that the Government’s approach to regulation is proportionate and delivers on the Government’s intention to protect BNPL borrowers without unduly restricting access to these useful interest-free products.

The Government expects to publish a response to the consultation, which will set out next steps, in due course.

Bim Afolami
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jul 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many claimants made claims under the Tax Free Childcare Scheme in each financial year since 2017; and how much funding was claimed under the scheme for children aged (a) under one year old, (b) one year old, (c) two years old and (d) three to four years old in each financial year since 2017.

Statistics relating to Tax-Free Childcare account use are published quarterly in “Tax-Free Childcare Statistics” on the gov.uk website. The latest publication, containing information up to March 2023 is here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tax-free-childcare-quarterly-statistics

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
4th Jul 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an estimate of the number of (a) customers using buy now pay later products, (b) buy now pay later loans taken out and (c) the number of defaults for buy now pay later (i) products and (ii) loans, between January and June 2023 broken down by month.

HM Treasury regularly monitors changes in the consumer credit market as part of its normal process of policy development.

However, it does not hold precise information on the number of customers using Buy-Now Pay-Later (BNPL) products, the number of BNPL agreements taken out, and the number of defaults on those agreements between January and June 2023. Instead, HM Treasury draws on the research of various stakeholders, including consumer groups and the wider financial services industry, to inform policy development.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jun 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his comments on returning to offices at the British Chamber of Commerce Conference on 17 May 2023, what assessment he has made of the benefits to (a) employees, (b) companies and (c) the economy of a return to office working.

I agree with the Chancellor of the Exchequer that there are social, creative, and developmental benefits to working from an office on a regular basis. The Government will continue to work with relevant stakeholders representing both employers and employees on this issue of remote working.

It is also important to acknowledge that flexible working – including but not limited to remote working - can help employees balance work commitments and personal circumstances, such as parenting, caring, managing a health condition, or transitioning from full-time work later in life, but the Government’s view remains that there is no one size fits all policy.

Decisions on whether a job can be done flexibly should be taken between employers and employees.

Gareth Davies
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd May 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the consultation entitled Regulation of Buy-Now Pay Later: consultation on draft legislation, when he plans to (a) publish the outcome of that consultation and (b) lay any legislation required before Parliament.

The Government is working at pace to bring Buy-Now Pay-Later (BNPL) products into regulation. On 14 February 2023, the Government published a consultation on the draft legislation that will bring BNPL products into FCA regulation in a proportionate way. This consultation closed on 11 April. The Government is now carefully considering stakeholder feedback and is finalising policy positions.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether they intend to (a) retain, (b) revoke or (c) replace the Excise Duties (Deferred Payment) Regulations 1992.

Tax matters, including the Excise Duties (Deferred Payment) Regulations 1992, are matters for HM Treasury and are kept under constant review, with any announcements made at fiscal events.

All required legislation relating to excise duties and Retained EU Law will be made via the Finance Bill (or subordinate tax legislation) which is usual and appropriate for tax provisions.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Customs (Import Duty) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 are within the scope of (a) Clause 1 or (b) any other section of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reformation) Bill.

The Customs (Import Duty) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 are part of the new domestic customs legislation that gives effect to the UK’s new standalone customs regime. The regulations are not retained EU law and therefore not within the scope of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reformation) Bill.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
10th Jan 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether he plans to (a) revoke, (b) replace or (c) retain the Beer Regulations 1993.

Tax matters, including the Beer Regulations 1993, are matters for HM Treasury and are kept under constant review, with any announcements made at fiscal events.

Now that the UK has left the EU and is free to set its own excise rules, the Government is undertaking the biggest reform of alcohol duties for over 140 years. The new simplified alcohol duty system, based on the principle of taxing alcohol by strength, will be implemented from 1 August 2023. We are introducing Draught Relief, reducing the duty on draught beer and cider by 5%, a measure not possible when we were members of the EU. This will directly support community pubs as over 75% of their sales come from beer and cider.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
12th Dec 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Retained EU Law Bill, whether he plans to (a) retain, (b) replace and (c) revoke the Deposit Guarantee Scheme Regulations 2015.

Retained EU law in financial services is not repealed automatically by the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill. Instead, the Financial Services and Markets Bill repeals retained EU law in financial services so that it can be replaced with an approach to regulation designed for the UK. This includes the Deposit Guarantee Scheme Regulations 2015, which are listed in Schedule 1 of the Bill.

As part of the Edinburgh Reforms, the government published “Building a Smarter Financial Services Framework for the UK “, which sets out its approach to repealing and replacing retained EU law in financial services using the powers in the Financial Services and Markets Bill. This includes identifying the first two “tranches” of reforms.

The Deposit Guarantee Scheme Regulations 2015 will not form part of the first two tranches of reforms, and the government will set out plans regarding these regulations in due course.

Much of the UK’s deposit protection framework is already delegated to the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA), and sits in PRA rules. These rules are not repealed by the Financial Services and Markets Bill. The rules include, among other things, the depositor coverage limit, which is currently set at £85,000 per eligible person, per bank.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
7th Nov 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value of tax relief granted under (a) Part 15 of the Corporation Tax 2009, (b) Part 15A of the Corporation Tax 2009 and (c) Part 15B of the Corporation Tax 2009 was in each of the last five financial years.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
21st Oct 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many officials in (a) his Department and (b) HMRC are working on Retained EU Law legislation, as (i) headcount and (ii) Full Time Equivalent.

HMT and HMRC hold a large body of Retained EU Law (REUL), primarily in relation to Financial Services and tax (including excise, customs and VAT). A number of officials from both HMT and HMRC work on REUL legislation. This work is carried out as part of officials’ normal business activities, and we do not record the amount of staff time spent specifically on this work.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
15th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to publish the Government's response to its consultation on the Regulation of Buy-Now Pay-Later.

The Government published a consultation on policy proposals for the regulation of Buy-Now Pay-Later (BNPL) on 21 October 2021, which closed on 6 January 2022. The Government is now reviewing responses to this consultation and considering next steps, and intends to publish a consultation response in the spring.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the impact of increasing living costs on the number of people using buy now pay later services.

HM Treasury regularly monitors changes in the consumer credit market, including the impact of economic developments, as part of its normal process of policy development.

However, it does not hold information regarding the impact of increasing living costs on the number of people using Buy-Now Pay-Later (BNPL), or the prevalence of the use of BNPL products to purchase essential items. Instead, HMT draws on the research of various stakeholders, including consumer groups and the wider financial services industry, to inform policy development.

The Woolard Review into the unsecured credit market found several potential risks of consumer detriment from interest-free BNPL products. The Government recognises those risks, but also notes that as an interest-free product, BNPL can often be lower-risk than other forms of borrowing and a useful tool to help consumers manage their finances. That is why on 2 February 2021, the Government announced its intention to regulate BNPL products in a proportionate manner.

The Government published a consultation on policy proposals for the regulation of BNPL on 21 October 2021, which closed on 6 January 2022. The Government is now reviewing responses to this consultation and considering next steps and intends to publish a consultation response in the spring.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment the Government has made of the prevalence of the use of buy now pay later products to purchase (a) toiletries, (b) food and (c) other essential items.

HM Treasury regularly monitors changes in the consumer credit market, including the impact of economic developments, as part of its normal process of policy development.

However, it does not hold information regarding the impact of increasing living costs on the number of people using Buy-Now Pay-Later (BNPL), or the prevalence of the use of BNPL products to purchase essential items. Instead, HMT draws on the research of various stakeholders, including consumer groups and the wider financial services industry, to inform policy development.

The Woolard Review into the unsecured credit market found several potential risks of consumer detriment from interest-free BNPL products. The Government recognises those risks, but also notes that as an interest-free product, BNPL can often be lower-risk than other forms of borrowing and a useful tool to help consumers manage their finances. That is why on 2 February 2021, the Government announced its intention to regulate BNPL products in a proportionate manner.

The Government published a consultation on policy proposals for the regulation of BNPL on 21 October 2021, which closed on 6 January 2022. The Government is now reviewing responses to this consultation and considering next steps and intends to publish a consultation response in the spring.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much the Government has spent on promoting the tax-free childcare scheme in each of the last four financial years.

The government is committed to supporting families with their childcare costs. 316,000 families used Tax-Free Childcare for 371,000 children and spent £35.0 million on top-up for families in September 2021; compared to 227,000 families who used Tax-Free Childcare for 263,000 children and spent £26.5m in September 2020.

The government has spent the following on marketing and research in the current and three previous financial years.

2018/19 – £1,113,270

2019/20 – £241,580

2020/21 – £197,338

2021/22 – £151,205 (full year forecast and not all costs are committed)

In 2018/19 marketing spend involved a national campaign as part of the phased rollout of the scheme.

13th Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many and what proportion of eligible families with children under five (a) have an open Tax Free Childcare account and (b) used their Tax Free Childcare account in 2020-21.

The total eligible population is 1.3m families. This estimate is not broken down by family characteristics. The total number of eligible children in those families is 1.7m for 2020-21.

The table below shows the total number of children with open and used Tax-Free Childcare accounts for 0-4 year olds in 2020-21:

Month/Year

Total Open Accounts (0-4 year olds)

Total Used Accounts (0-4 year olds)

Apr-20

447,725

87,055

May-20

442,905

62,575

Jun-20

446,180

117,490

Jul-20

460,955

157,200

Aug-20

470,145

159,840

Sep-20

465,120

225,020

Oct-20

464,860

232,435

Nov-20

474,150

240,935

Dec-20

477,185

245,065

Jan-21

490,315

230,370

Feb-21

503,135

230,450

Mar-21

525,770

283,095

16th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the tax-free childcare scheme, how many (a) active accounts and (b) children eligible there were for that scheme on 31 March in each of the last 5 years.

Tax-Free Childcare began to be rolled out from April 2017.

The figures for Open and Used accounts for Tax-Free Childcare are published in Official Statistics (latest release November 2021 for figures up to September 2021).

The estimated figures for eligible children from 2017-18 onwards, as well as the annual Open and Used account figures can be found in the table below.

Number of (000s)

Financial Year

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

2020-21

Children with Open Accounts

314

537

768

901

Children with Used Accounts

72

203

396

462

Eligible Children

1,800

1,900

1,900

1,700

16th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 16 November 2021 to Question 72406, how many and what proportion of user accounts for the tax-free childcare scheme that have not had their details reconfirmed in the last three months relate to children under the age of 12.

There were 125,800 accounts that had reached the end of an eligibility period but had not reconfirmed details between 1st August and 31st October 2021. Of these, 125,300 or over 99% relate to children aged under 12 on 31st October.

There can be many reasons why a family might not reconfirm their account in a 3-month period. For example, there may have been changes to their childcare arrangements or their working arrangements which mean they are no longer eligible for TFC or don’t need it. They may still reactivate and use their TFC account in a future period.

9th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the tax-free childcare scheme, how many user accounts have been closed as a result of inactivity in each of the last five years; and what proportion of those accounts concerned families where the children being claimed for were over the age of 11.

No Tax Free Childcare accounts have been closed due to inactivity over the past 5 years.

Accounts are only closed when a customer requests it or where remediation has occurred, for example to remove duplicate accounts.

23rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish the (a) forecasted expenditure and (b) actual expenditure for the tax-free childcare scheme for financial year 2020-21.

At the Spring 2020 budget, the forecast expenditure for Tax-Free Childcare in 2020/21 was £0.34bn. Tax-Free Childcare expenditure in 2020/21 was £0.24bn.
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the total level of debt owed to buy now pay later firms at the end of (a) February 2021 and (b) August 2021.

HM Treasury does not hold information on the number of people accessing financial products through Buy-Now-Pay-Later firms, the number of people referred to debt collection agencies by Buy-Now-Pay-Later firms, or the total level of debt owed to Buy-Now-Pay-Later firms.

On 2 February, the Government announced its intention to regulate Buy-Now-Pay-Later products. On 17 March, the Government tabled an amendment to the Financial Services Bill (now Act) to allow the Government to bring Buy-Now-Pay-Later products into the scope of FCA regulation in a proportionate way. Treasury and FCA are now working closely to publish a consultation document soon.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people referred to debt collection agencies by buy now pay later firms in each of the last 12 months.

HM Treasury does not hold information on the number of people accessing financial products through Buy-Now-Pay-Later firms, the number of people referred to debt collection agencies by Buy-Now-Pay-Later firms, or the total level of debt owed to Buy-Now-Pay-Later firms.

On 2 February, the Government announced its intention to regulate Buy-Now-Pay-Later products. On 17 March, the Government tabled an amendment to the Financial Services Bill (now Act) to allow the Government to bring Buy-Now-Pay-Later products into the scope of FCA regulation in a proportionate way. Treasury and FCA are now working closely to publish a consultation document soon.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people accessing financial products through buy now pay later firms in each of the last 12 months.

HM Treasury does not hold information on the number of people accessing financial products through Buy-Now-Pay-Later firms, the number of people referred to debt collection agencies by Buy-Now-Pay-Later firms, or the total level of debt owed to Buy-Now-Pay-Later firms.

On 2 February, the Government announced its intention to regulate Buy-Now-Pay-Later products. On 17 March, the Government tabled an amendment to the Financial Services Bill (now Act) to allow the Government to bring Buy-Now-Pay-Later products into the scope of FCA regulation in a proportionate way. Treasury and FCA are now working closely to publish a consultation document soon.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
18th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions his Department has had with the Competition and Markets Authority on the regulation of buy now pay later companies.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at: HMT ministers' meetings, hospitality, gifts and overseas travel - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
18th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to protect consumers that purchase pre-paid funeral plans.

I refer the Hon Member to the answer that I gave on 20 May to the Hon Member for South Holland and The Deepings to PQs UIN: 2183, 2184 and 2185.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will publish a list of the meetings (a) in-person, (b) online and (c) by phone and other correspondence that (i) Ministers and (ii) in his Department officials have had with buy now, pay later companies in 2021 to date; and what the names were of those companies.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-giftsand-overseas-travel

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people who made student loan repayments were receiving maternity pay in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

15th Sep 2020
What steps his Department is taking to help ensure that buy now pay later lenders comply with guidance set out by the (a) Financial Conduct Authority and (b) Advertising Standards Agency.

Where a buy now pay later lender is offering a regulated credit agreement, it must be authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Where an authorised firm breaches FCA rules and guidance, the FCA is able to take action against them.

Where a firm breaks the UK Advertising Codes, the Advertising Standards Authority is able to ban those advertisements.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of furlough agreements that purport to oblige employees (a) to pay back the contributions that the employer makes to their furlough and (b) who choose not to return to work to be liable to their employers for those contributions.

The scheme rules make it clear that employers must pass on 100 per cent of the grant to their furloughed employees and employees must receive at least 80 per cent of their reference pay. HMRC have powers to check and recover any amounts claimed where the employee has not been paid accordingly. If workers are concerned they are not receiving their entitlement, they should report their employer to HMRC via the online fraud reporting tool, or call HMRC’s fraud hotline. The Government will retain the right to retrospectively audit all aspects of the scheme with scope to claw back fraudulent or erroneous claims.

2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 1 September 2020 to Question 76681, how many (a) high cost credit, (b) log book loan, (c) BNPL, (d) credit card, (d) personal loan, and (e) credit companies have been prosecuted under the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008.

This question has been passed on to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). The FCA will reply to directly to the honourable Member by letter. A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on what dates (a) he and (b) Ministers in his Department held discussions with representatives from (i) childcare, (ii) afterschool clubs and (iii) childminding providers on the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on their industry.

The department regularly meets a range of stakeholders, which includes discussion of the impacts of COVID-19 on businesses, including the childcare sector.

Since 1 June, early years settings have been able to welcome back children of all ages. All providers of wraparound childcare, and other out-of-school settings, are able to operate for both indoor and outdoor provision, provided they have safety measures in place.

The Government has announced unprecedented support for businesses, including the early years sector, to protect against the current economic emergency. For childcare providers, this includes business rates relief for nurseries, a range of loans and grants, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, and continued early years entitlement funding.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending the VAT reduction for the hospitality and leisure sectors to yoga and fitness studios and gyms.

In light of the Covid-19 outbreak, the Chancellor has introduced a range of measures to help individuals and businesses through the crisis, including grants, loans and relief from business rates at a cost of more than £300 billion.

The temporary reduced rate of VAT will support the tourism and hospitality sectors and will help over 150,000 businesses and protect over 2.4 million jobs. Expanding the scope of the temporary VAT reduction would come at a considerable cost to the Exchequer. However, the Government keeps all taxes under review.
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the Financial Conduct Authority issuing guidance on communicating the (a) potential effect on credit score, (b) potential sale of debts to collection agencies and (c) other risks of buy now pay later products to people considering using those products.

On 12 November 2019, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) introduced new rules for the buy now pay later market following its high-cost credit review. The rules prevent firms from charging backdated interest on the amount repaid by the customer during the offer period, requires that promotions contain balanced and appropriate information, and means that firms must give customers prompts to remind them when offers are due to end.

The FCA continues to monitor the buy now pay later market to identify areas that may cause consumers harm and will issue further guidance whenever it deems it necessary.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many companies incorporated outside the UK have received assistance through the (a) Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, (b) ability to defer VAT, (c) Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Scheme and (d) Covid-19 Corporate Financing Facility.

The Government has published aggregate application and approval figures on the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) since 10 May but does not hold specific information relating to individual companies who have accessed these schemes. HMRC publishes weekly management information on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and monthly management information on VAT deferrals. On 11 June HMRC published the Official Statistics for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme which included a breakdown of recipients by sector, but not individual organisations or companies. The Bank of England is responsible for publishing data on the Covid-19 Corporate Financing Facility (CCFF), including a list of organisations or companies who have made applications.

The Government does not collect data on how many companies incorporated outside of the UK have received assistance through CJRS, VAT deferral, CLBILS or CCFF. However, as laid out in the guarantee agreement, all firms borrowing through CLBILS must be engaged in trading activity in the UK at the Initial Drawdown Date and the finance facility must be used to support their trading activity in the UK. Compensation from the CJRS goes directly to the pockets of UK based workers and any VAT deferred must be repaid to HMRC by the end of the financial year.

All firms applying to the CCFF must meet a test applied by the Bank of England to show that they make a material contribution to the UK economy, including when incorporated overseas. Since 4 June the Bank of England have been publishing the names of companies with commercial paper currently outstanding through the CCFF. This is a unique level of transparency, equivalent schemes in the Eurozone and United States do not publish the names of scheme users.

Government support is aimed at businesses in genuine need. Our current measures are well-targeted at such businesses, bearing in mind the need to act very quickly to deliver this unprecedented package. We expect everyone to act responsibly and in the spirit of the package, and only claim and use support as intended.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many applications for assistance under the (a) Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, (b) ability to defer VAT, (c) Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Scheme and (d) Covid-19 Corporate Financing Facility have been rejected as a result of the a