Lucy Powell Portrait

Lucy Powell

Labour (Co-op) - Manchester Central

29,089 (55.6%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 15th November 2012

Shadow Leader of the House of Commons

(since September 2023)

Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
29th Nov 2021 - 4th Sep 2023
Shadow Secretary of State for Housing
19th Sep 2021 - 29th Nov 2021
Shadow Secretary of State for Housing
9th May 2021 - 19th Sep 2021
Shadow Minister (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Apr 2020 - 9th May 2021
Education Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Education Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow Secretary of State for Education
14th Sep 2015 - 26th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office
5th Nov 2014 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Education)
7th Oct 2013 - 5th Nov 2014
Transport Committee
26th Nov 2012 - 4th Nov 2013


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lucy Powell has voted in 629 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lucy Powell Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(45 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(29 debate interactions)
Rosie Winterton (Labour)
(18 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Legislation Debates
United Kingdom Internal Market Act 2020
(4,227 words contributed)
Online Safety Act 2023
(4,095 words contributed)
Building Safety Act 2022
(3,005 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lucy Powell's debates

Manchester Central Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Being the first to close and still no clue as to when we can open, this seasonal industry is losing its summer profits that allows them to get through the first quarter of next year.

Even if we are allowed to open in December, 1 months profit won't be enough to keep us open in 2021. We need help

The UK hospitality industry. Responsible for around 3m jobs, generating £130bn in activity, resulting in £38bn in taxation. Yet, unlike the Arts or Sports, we do not have a dedicated Minister.

We are asking that a Minister for Hospitality be created for the current, and successive governments.

Weddings take months and even years of intricate planning. Myself and many others believe the maximum number of guests authorised at wedding ceremonies should be increased. The number of guests permitted at weddings should be calculated according to venue capacity.

Extend funding to nightclubs, dance music events and festivals as part of the £1.57bn support package announced by the government for Britain's arts and culture sector to survive the hit from the pandemic. #LetUSDance


Latest EDMs signed by Lucy Powell

22nd February 2022
Lucy Powell signed this EDM on Friday 25th February 2022

Jamal Edwards MBE

Tabled by: Rupa Huq (Labour - Ealing Central and Acton)
That this House remembers the life and achievements of Jamal Edwards MBE, a musical pioneer, entrepreneur, author and philanthropist born in Luton, raised in Acton, who never forgot his roots; recognises that Jamal’s work had a tremendous impact on music in the UK, notably launching SBTV, a ground-breaking platform that …
38 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Mar 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 26
Scottish National Party: 4
Independent: 3
Conservative: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
26th January 2022
Lucy Powell signed this EDM on Wednesday 26th January 2022

Greater Manchester Clean Air Zone

Tabled by: Tony Lloyd (Labour - Rochdale)
That this House notes that some 1,200 deaths a year are attributable to poor air quality in Greater Manchester; believes that, on that basis, movement towards establishing a Clean Air Zone (CAZ) in Greater Manchester is vital; stresses that a CAZ must be properly resourced to prevent it simply becoming …
15 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 14
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Lucy Powell's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lucy Powell, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


2 Urgent Questions tabled by Lucy Powell

Monday 20th February 2023
Monday 9th January 2023

Lucy Powell has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Lucy Powell


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make administrators and moderators of certain online forums responsible for content published on those forums; to require such administrators and moderators to remove certain content; to require platforms to publish information about such forums; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 11th September 2018
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
7 Other Department Questions
8th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, with reference to the Government's publication A pro-innovation approach to AI regulation, published on 29 March 2023, how much and what proportion of the budget of each regulator in their Department was spent on regulation of artificial intelligence in the latest period for which information is available; how many staff in each regulator worked (a) wholly and (b) partly on those issues in the latest period for which information is available; and whether those regulators plan to increase resources for their work on artificial intelligence.

Cabinet Office’s Equality Hub sponsors the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC).

At the EHRC, between 20-25 people are spending part of their time considering how AI affects their area of focus. Excluding staffing costs, in the 2022-23, EHRC direct expenditure related to AI work was approximately £160k.


AI is a priority for the Equality and Human Rights Commission and is included in their strategic plan 2022 – 2025. The Commission is receiving a flat-cash settlement for 2023-2024, which, along with the wider public sector, means they will need to prioritise and will have limited flexibility within the year to increase resources available for work on AI.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
27th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether it remains her Department's policy to conduct a review on the future funding of the BBC.

The Government is committed to the licence fee for the rest of the current Charter. However, the BBC's funding model faces major challenges due to changes in the way people consume media. It is therefore necessary to look at ways to ensure the BBC’s funding model is sustainable in the long-term.

The Government wants to see the BBC continue to succeed, which is why we need to consider the most fair and appropriate funding mechanism to be introduced at the end of the current Charter period.

The Department is considering all possible future funding options to ensure the BBC’s long-term sustainability in a rapidly changing, digital world.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will publish the details of the contract agreed with Social Investment Business to run applications to the Youth Investment Fund, including the amount of any payment to Social Investment Business for this service.

The Youth Investment Fund will fund the construction or redevelopment of up to 300 youth facilities - such as small youth facilities, youth centres and activity centres - targeting investment in left-behind areas, where young people have the greatest need and lowest provision.

The fund is designed to target support towards both upper tier local authority areas and more isolated pockets of need at district ward level. These smaller areas of need are often overlooked because they are masked by other relatively less deprived areas. All eligible areas have been identified and ranked by a combination of youth need and low provision, with detailed methodology underpinning their selection using high quality, robust and publicly available data. The methodology used has been published on GOV.UK.

The main phase of the Youth Investment Fund, which opened on 1 August 2022, has received nearly 500 applications to date.

Following a competitive application process, Social Investment Business were appointed as the intermediary grant maker to deliver the Youth Investment Fund on behalf of DCMS. The grant awarded to Social Investment Business is in line with the typical costs and scope outlined in the IGM specification of requirements published on GOV.UK.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many applications to the Youth Investment Fund have been received as of 17 February 2022.

The Youth Investment Fund will fund the construction or redevelopment of up to 300 youth facilities - such as small youth facilities, youth centres and activity centres - targeting investment in left-behind areas, where young people have the greatest need and lowest provision.

The fund is designed to target support towards both upper tier local authority areas and more isolated pockets of need at district ward level. These smaller areas of need are often overlooked because they are masked by other relatively less deprived areas. All eligible areas have been identified and ranked by a combination of youth need and low provision, with detailed methodology underpinning their selection using high quality, robust and publicly available data. The methodology used has been published on GOV.UK.

The main phase of the Youth Investment Fund, which opened on 1 August 2022, has received nearly 500 applications to date.

Following a competitive application process, Social Investment Business were appointed as the intermediary grant maker to deliver the Youth Investment Fund on behalf of DCMS. The grant awarded to Social Investment Business is in line with the typical costs and scope outlined in the IGM specification of requirements published on GOV.UK.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, for what reason the Government has set up a second list of areas eligible for the Youth Investment Fund, comprising wards in upper tier local authorities.

The Youth Investment Fund will fund the construction or redevelopment of up to 300 youth facilities - such as small youth facilities, youth centres and activity centres - targeting investment in left-behind areas, where young people have the greatest need and lowest provision.

The fund is designed to target support towards both upper tier local authority areas and more isolated pockets of need at district ward level. These smaller areas of need are often overlooked because they are masked by other relatively less deprived areas. All eligible areas have been identified and ranked by a combination of youth need and low provision, with detailed methodology underpinning their selection using high quality, robust and publicly available data. The methodology used has been published on GOV.UK.

The main phase of the Youth Investment Fund, which opened on 1 August 2022, has received nearly 500 applications to date.

Following a competitive application process, Social Investment Business were appointed as the intermediary grant maker to deliver the Youth Investment Fund on behalf of DCMS. The grant awarded to Social Investment Business is in line with the typical costs and scope outlined in the IGM specification of requirements published on GOV.UK.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has any continued responsibilities for the (a) Olympic Delivery Authority and (b) Stratford Village Development Partnership.

The Olympic Delivery Authority was dissolved by Act of Parliament on 2 December 2014 and the Secretary of State for the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport became responsible for all outstanding obligations and liabilities of the Olympic Delivery Authority. No legal responsibilities for the Stratford Village Development Partnership are held by the Department.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
8th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Government's publication A pro-innovation approach to AI regulation, published on 29 March 2023, how much and what proportion of the budget of each regulator in their Department was spent on regulation of artificial intelligence in the latest period for which information is available; how many staff in each regulator worked (a) wholly and (b) partly on those issues in the latest period for which information is available; and whether those regulators plan to increase resources for their work on artificial intelligence.

The AI White Paper emphasised the importance of ensuring that UK regulators and public bodies have the capacity, expertise, and capabilities to implement government’s pro-innovation approach whilst recognising and understanding the risks. This is particularly true for those regulators for which AI falls squarely within their regulatory remit, but also applies to a much wider range of public and regulatory bodies considering the implications AI has across the economy.

The Cabinet Office ALBs include 3 bodies that are either formally or informally classified as regulators:

  1. The Civil Service Commission: The CSC are often referred to as a ‘regulator’ of recruitment into the Civil Service but undertake assurance/compliance work in respect of civil service recruitment only and are out of scope.

  1. The UK Statistics Authority includes the Office of Statistics Regulation who set the statutory Code of Practice for Statistics and assess compliance with the Code. The Office for Statistics Regulation (OSR) utilises a regulator on a 0.33 FTE basis for their work providing guidance on how the principles in the Code of Practice for Statistics can help in designing, developing and using models to improve their trustworthiness, quality and value. Their guidance covers both traditional statistical techniques, such as linear regressions, and newer techniques, like machine learning, when they are used to create outputs that inform decision making or public policy. The OSR also regularly engages with other regulators on this topic through the attendance of workshops and working groups to ensure they remain aware and responsive to any developments in this space. The OSR does not plan to increase the time allocated to these issues. The promotion of the Code of Practice for Statistics into new areas of statistical analysis and data use has been a long-standing area of focus for the next year, and will continue to be, including in relation to AI (e.g. large language models).

  1. The Equalities and Human Rights Commission: the Equalities Hub have provided a separate response on this PQ (188555) via the Rt Hon Kemi Badenoch MP, Minister for Equalities.

As part of the AI regulation White Paper consultation, we are engaging closely with regulators across the wider landscape and their sponsoring government departments to understand the organisational capacity they need to regulate AI effectively, across technical, regulatory, and market-specific expertise. This will inform our work to develop policy options with a view to addressing any gaps that emerge.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many officials in his Department are working in the Counter Disinformation Unit.

Addressing the challenges of disinformation and misinformation is a whole of Government effort, and the Cabinet Office works closely with all relevant Departments including the Counter Disinformation Unit (CDU) in the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS).

The CDU is a standing unit which draws on a range of expertise from across government, social media platforms and disinformation specialists in academia and civil society to lead the fight against misinformation and disinformation.

It would not be appropriate to comment on operational details such as staffing levels publicly as doing so would give malign actors insight into our capabilities. However, staffing requirements are continually reviewed to ensure appropriate levels of resourcing, including surge capacity where needed.

7th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Government advertising spend has been in regional newspapers in each of the last five years, by newspaper.

The Evening Standard is classified as a regional title. However, due to the coverage and reach that the publication has with the general public and businesses, it is sometimes added to national titles if an upweight is required in the London area.

Spend data for the whole of government is not held centrally by the Cabinet Office. However, the Cabinet Office publishes expenditure for its own department, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling monthly basis on GOV.UK as part of routine government transparency arrangements.

7th Mar 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the UK Communications Agency classified the Evening Standard as a regional or national newspaper for the purposes of advertising spend in (a) 2018, (b) 2019, (c) 2020, (d) 2021 and (e) 2022.

The Evening Standard is classified as a regional title. However, due to the coverage and reach that the publication has with the general public and businesses, it is sometimes added to national titles if an upweight is required in the London area.

Spend data for the whole of government is not held centrally by the Cabinet Office. However, the Cabinet Office publishes expenditure for its own department, including on public information campaigns, on a rolling monthly basis on GOV.UK as part of routine government transparency arrangements.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the level of UK-produced steel procured by the Prime Minister's office and associated departmental public bodies and agencies in (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21.

There have been no estimates made of the level of UK produced steel procured by GPA on behalf of the Cabinet Office Estates in 2019-20 or 2020-21. At present most steel GPA sources is part of the construction base build of properties under leases and outside of the scope of the procurement rules.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
29th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many vouchers issued under the help to grow digital scheme were successfully claimed for (a) accounting, (b) e-commerce and (c) customer relationship software.

The number of claimed vouchers issued for each software type were as follows:

a) Accountancy – 191 Vouchers.

b) E-commerce – 203 Vouchers.

c) Customer Relationship Management – 436 Vouchers.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
29th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department conducted any impact assessments on the design of the Help to Grow: Digital scheme.

The Department conducted a Public Sector Equality Duty impact assessment during the development of the programme. A business impact assessment was not required as the scheme was not enacted through legislation or regulation however options were assessed as part of the development of the business case. An evaluation is being undertaken to understand lessons to be learned from the design of the Help to Grow: Digital scheme following its closure. These findings will be applied to future policies, including within digital adoption.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
29th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she made an assessment of alternatives to the Help to Grow: Digital Scheme before announcing the closure of that scheme on 15 December 2022.

The Department considered alternative options to deliver the Help to Grow: Digital scheme before announcing its closure however we could not justify its continued cost to the taxpayer due to the lower than expected take up. The decision to close the scheme enabled the Government to refocus efforts towards other support mechanisms for small businesses, ensuring businesses get the backing they need in the most efficient and productive way possible. The Help to Grow: Management scheme remains in place and includes a module to assist in understanding digital adoption.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how much funding was allocated to the Help to Grow: Digital scheme; and how much was spent.

Help To Grow Digital (HTGD) had an initial budget allocation for each of the HTGD scheme years which were as follows: 21/22 - £20m, 22/23 - £72m, 23/24 - £107m and 24/25 £97m* (* - subject to Spending Review).

When the scheme finally closed on 31st March 2023, the total RDEL Programme spend was c£31.4m.

The decision to close the scheme enabled the Government to refocus efforts towards other support mechanisms for small businesses, ensuring businesses get the backing they need in the most efficient and productive way possible.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many applications were received for the Help to Grow: Digital scheme; and how many of them were (a) accepted and (b) rejected.

At the closure of the Help to Grow Digital scheme (31/03/23), 1527 applications for vouchers had been received. 1394 applications were accepted, and 133 applications were rejected.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Government's publication A pro-innovation approach to AI regulation, published on 29 March 2023, how much and what proportion of the budget of each regulator in their Department was spent on regulation of artificial intelligence in the latest period for which information is available; how many staff in each regulator worked (a) wholly and (b) partly on those issues in the latest period for which information is available; and whether those regulators plan to increase resources for their work on artificial intelligence.

As part of the AI regulation White Paper consultation, the Government is engaging closely with regulators across the wider landscape to understand the organisation capacity they need to regulate AI effectively.

The Department for Business and Trade sponsors the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA). CMA staff recorded approximately 2,300 hours on the CMA’s “AI Foundation Models: Initial Review” project from 27 March to 2 June 2023. This equates to approximately 7 FTE. In addition, given the CMA’s remit other work by CMA staff may have direct or indirect relevance to AI. Decisions on future allocation of CMA resources will depend on the findings of the CMA’s initial review and other demands at that time.

The Department directly includes or sponsors a number of other regulators and public bodies, such as the Office for Product Safety and Standards and the Financial Reporting Council. These regulators are not directly responsible for regulating AI but may consider its implications and effects across numerous parts of their work. It is not possible to accurately disaggregate resource working on AI issues for these bodies.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the Government's publication A pro-innovation approach to AI regulation, published on 29 March 2023, how much and what proportion of the budget of each regulator in their Department was spent on regulation of artificial intelligence in the latest period for which information is available; how many staff in each regulator worked (a) wholly and (b) partly on those issues in the latest period for which information is available; and whether those regulators plan to increase resources for their work on artificial intelligence.

As part of the AI regulation White Paper consultation, the Government is engaging with regulators to inform policy options. The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero sponsors two regulators – the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets (Ofgem) and the North Sea Transition Authority (NSTA). These organisations are not directly responsible for regulating AI and, to date, neither of these organisations has spent budget on the regulation of AI.

7th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she had made of the potential effect of Ofcom's decision on BT and Equinox 2 on competition in the broadband wholesale and consumer markets.

The Government is committed to supporting competition in the UK’s fixed telecoms market. Our strategy aims to support market entry and expansion by making it as easy and attractive as possible for people to invest in, and build, networks. The Government’s Statement of Strategic Priorities for Ofcom, published in 2019, requires Ofcom to set stable and long-term regulation that incentivises network investment and ensures fair and effective competition between new and existing network operators. Ofcom must take this strategic priority into account when reaching its decisions, such as when considering offers from Openreach.

The Government has noted Ofcom’s decision to allow the Equinox II offer to proceed. Ofcom’s conclusion is that Equinox II is consistent with promoting network investment and competition, thereby delivering better consumer outcomes. Regulation of the fixed telecoms market remains a matter for Ofcom which is an independent regulator.

More broadly, competition is thriving in UK fixed telecoms, with over 100 companies now building gigabit-capable networks thanks to the Government’s policies to prioritise competition and investment.

7th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, with reference to her Department's publication A pro-innovation approach to AI regulation, published on 29 March 2023, how much and what proportion of the budget of each regulator in her Department was spent on regulation of artificial intelligence in the latest period of which information is available; how many staff in each regulator worked (a) wholly and (b) partly on these issues in the latest period of which information is available; and whether those regulators plan to increase resources for their work on artificial intelligence.

The AI White Paper emphasised the importance of ensuring that our regulators and public bodies have the capacity, expertise, and capabilities to implement our pro-innovation approach whilst recognising and understanding the risks. This is particularly true for those regulators for which AI falls squarely within their regulatory remit, but also applies to a much wider range of public and regulatory bodies considering the implications AI has across the economy.

The Department for Science, Innovation and Technology is the sponsoring department for the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), the Office for Communications (Ofcom), the Intellectual Property Office (IPO), and the Phone Paid Services Authority. Activity related to AI is carried out as part of wider activity that falls within each organisation’s remit, and this presents a challenge with disaggregating 'AI resource' in order to provide figures on the proportion of budget spent and staff working on AI regulation.

The ICO and Ofcom in particular have already taken significant steps to upskill themselves to understand new technologies and new business models, and develop and deploy new skills and regulatory tools. This includes their joint efforts via the Digital Regulation Cooperation Forum (DRCF) to develop their collective capabilities through knowledge exchange and joint work on cross-cutting topics. IPO continue to focus on AI reflecting the significant implications it has for areas falling within their remit - and are resourcing this work accordingly.

As part of the AI regulation White Paper consultation, we are engaging closely with regulators across the wider landscape and their sponsoring government departments to understand the organisational capacity they need to regulate AI effectively, across technical, regulatory, and market-specific expertise. This will inform our work to develop policy options with a view to addressing any gaps that emerge.

11th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, with reference to her Department’s White Paper New world leading approach to AI in the UK, published on 29 March, how much and what proportion of the budget of each existing regulator is spent on regulation of artificial intelligence; how many staff in each regulator work (a) wholly and (b) partly on these issues; and whether those regulators plan to increase the resources for work on artificial intelligence.

The different applications and uses of AI technologies are becoming increasingly central to many UK regulators within their domains, noting the faster adoption rates in some sectors - such as Finance, Information Technology, Media and Telecoms.

As part of the AI regulation White Paper consultation, we are engaging closely with regulators across the landscape and their sponsoring government departments to understand their relative levels of capability - noting that it is not a straightforward exercise to identify distinct 'AI resource'. We will continue to work closely with regulators to ensure that our regulatory framework for AI can be implemented effectively, including by exploring regulatory capability gaps and possible solutions or mitigations.

We are also developing a range of functions, outlined in the White Paper, to support regulators to undertake their regulatory activities. The proposed monitoring and evaluation function, along with other central functions designed to support implementation by regulators, including by supporting coordination between regulator, will allow us to quickly identify if regulator capability is a barrier to implementation and leverage existing AI expertise across government to build capability where necessary.

Alongside this, our regulators are already coordinating and working together to share expertise and ensure that AI innovations have efficient and safe regulatory routes to market, for example using forums like the Digital Regulation Cooperation Forum and the NHS AI and digital regulations service; or initiatives like the ICO’s award-winning AI and Data Protection Risk Mitigation Toolkit, or the MHRA’s ground-breaking Software and AI as a Medical Device Change Programme Roadmap.

We will be providing further details as part of the publication of the White Paper Consultation Response in the autumn. We encourage responses to the consultation - including in the context of regulators’ capabilities - before the 21 June deadline.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the level of UK-produced steel procured by his Department and associated departmental public bodies and agencies in 2019-20 and 2020-21.

The Government is working with the steel industry, the unions and devolved administrations to support the UK steel sector to develop a long-term sustainable future. We are working hard to make sure that UK producers of steel have the best possible chance of competing for and winning contracts across all Government procurement.

BEIS collates and publishes annually information on how much steel is purchased for Government’s major infrastructure projects in the previous financial year, including what proportion is UK-produced.

We have collated the 2019/20 data and expect to publish later this year. We will start collating the data on UK steel procured in 2020/21 in due course.

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding has been allocated (a) in total and (b) for each funding stream to the Aerospace Technology Institute in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020, (iii) 2021, (iv) 2022, (v) 2023, (vi) 2024, (vii) 2025.

The Government and industry have made a joint commitment to invest £3.9 billion in aerospace research and development (R&D) from 2013 to 2026. The Government’s share of the £1.95 billion is managed through the Aerospace Technology Institute Programme. An annual breakdown of funding allocated (a) in total, and (b) by each funding stream is set out in the table below. Budget allocations have not been made beyond 2021 so are assumed.

£m

Allocated Budgets

Planned Allocations

Year

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

23/24

24/25

25/26

Strategic Programme

138.1

147

130

143.2

145.6

149.2

150

Small Business

1.9

0.5

1.7

1.9

1.8

0.8

0

NATEP

0

1

4.8

4.9

2.6

0

0

FlyZero

0

1.5

13.5

0

0

0

0

Total

140

150

150

150

150

150

150

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many expressions of interest there were to the Aerospace Technology Institute’s Strategic Programme (a) in total and (b) in each quarter of 2020; how many of those expressions of interest each quarter were invited to submit a full application; how many of those full applications were successful; and how much each successful application was awarded.

The table below sets out the breakdown Expressions of Interest (EoIs) submitted the Aerospace Technology Institute Strategic Programme by quarter in 2020.

Expressions of Interest to the ATI Strategic Programme in 2020

2020

PROCEED

REJECT

Total

Q1

11

22

33

Q2

7

52

59

Q3

23

29

52

Q4

37

26

63

Grand Total

78

129

207

Projects that are successful at EOI have options about when to submit a full stage application. They will be automatically invited to the next available competition but can choose to defer. This means it is not simple to track which EOIs submitted in 2020 came forward to a full stage application in the same year and we cannot provide that breakdown here.

In total 35 full stage applications were recommended for funding in 2020. Not all these projects have completed the due diligence and grant award process and so we are unable to provide a project-level breakdown of grant awarded. Details of live projects can be found on the Innovate UK transparency data page:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/innovate-uk-funded-projects.

Some of the 35 successful projects will relate to EoIs received in the previous year. Not all successful EoIs received in 2020 will result in a full application in that year.

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many expressions of interest were submitted to the Aerospace Technology Institute’s Research and Development Funding for Smaller Businesses fund; how applicants will be assessed; and when will this funding be announced.

A total of 32 expressions of interest were submitted. The full stage applications are assessed in parallel by the ATI, Innovate UK and BEIS based on technical, market and economic criteria. Applicants will be notified of the results of the full stage competition on 14 May 2021, with public announcements expected once the grant offer process is completed.

17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applications there were for the National Aerospace Technology Exploitation Programme autumn 2020 funding round; and how many and which projects have been allocated funding.

There were 34 applications and 11 projects were recommended for funding. The 11 projects are all in the contracting phase, going through financial and viability checks. Until they receive their grant offer letters we cannot announce which projects have been allocated funding.

11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the restart grants announced in the Budget 2021, how much funding each local authority will receive to administer those grants; and what estimate he has made of the number of businesses that will be eligible for that grant in each local authority area.

The Department is using information on eligible businesses, held by the Valuation Office Agency, to help determine the level of support each Local Authority requires.

We expect that over 680,000 businesses will benefit from the new £5bn Restart Grant scheme, and in the coming weeks we will be communicating the level of funding each Local Authority will receive, including publishing on GOV.UK.

11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number businesses eligible in each local authority for restart grants; and how much funding each local authority area will receive through those grants.

The Department is using information on eligible businesses, held by the Valuation Office Agency, to help determine the level of support each Local Authority requires.

We expect that over 680,000 businesses will benefit from the new £5bn Restart Grant scheme, and in the coming weeks we will be communicating the level of funding each Local Authority will receive, including publishing on GOV.UK.

25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure consumers are protected against misinformation online, including fake and misleading reviews.

The Government is committed to protecting consumers from unfair behaviours. The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 (CPRs) prohibits fake and misleading reviews online. Alleged breaches of the CPRs should be sent in the first instance to the Citizens Advice consumer service, www.citizensadvice.org.uk/, who will refer on cases to trading standards for appropriate enforcement action.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has issued guidance to consumers on avoiding fake reviews which can be found at: https://www.asa.org.uk/news/avoiding-fake-views-a-guide-to-testimonials-and-endorsements.html.

Furthermore, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) opened an investigation into online reviews displayed on several major websites in May 2020. The CMA will investigate, among other things, whether the traders responsible for the websites are taking sufficient measures to remove fake and misleading reviews. Details can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/cma-cases/online-reviews.

25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to implement the recommendation of the Digital Markets Taskforce to give the Competition and Markets Authority additional powers to prevent the trading of online reviews.

The Government is committed to ensuring digital markets remain competitive and deliver positive outcomes for consumers, small businesses, and society. That is why we have announced funding to establish a new Digital Markets Unit within the Competition and Markets Authority from 2021-22. We set up the Digital Markets Taskforce in March to offer expert advice.

The Government is now considering the Taskforce’s recommendations and will respond in due course.

25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to implement the recommendation of the Digital Markets Taskforce for the Government to strengthen powers to tackle unlawful or illegal activity or content on digital platforms which could result in economic detriment to consumers and businesses.

The Government is committed to ensuring digital markets remain competitive and deliver positive outcomes for consumers, small businesses, and society. That is why we have announced funding to establish a new Digital Markets Unit within the Competition and Markets Authority from 2021-22. We set up the Digital Markets Taskforce in March to offer expert advice.

The Government is now considering the Taskforce’s recommendations and will respond in due course.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his Department's consultation, Subsidy control: designing a new approach for the UK, published on 3 February 2021, whether interim arrangements for the UK’s subsidy control regime will be published pending the outcome of that consultation.

The Department is consulting on a new approach to subsidy control that will best reflect the needs of the UK economy. Since 1 January 2021, the subsidy control regime with which public authorities need to comply is defined by our international commitments, including World Trade Organisation rules on subsidies, the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation agreement (TCA),Article 10 of the Northern Ireland Protocol, and other obligations resulting from other international trade agreements.

Details on these commitments, with a particular focus on granting authorities, was published by the Department on 31 December 2020 and is available online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/complying-with-the-uks-international-obligations-on-subsidy-control-guidance-for-public-authorities.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether grants paid in England on the basis of the rateable value of closed premises can contribute towards the €3 million state aid threshold for uncovered fixed costs subject to businesses meeting the relevant eligibility criteria.

The guidance relating to grant support for businesses required by law to close states that these grants count towards applicable subsidy control limits, including that which limits support to €3 million per undertaking under Section 3.12 of the Temporary Framework.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 15 February 2021 to Question 149789 on Post Office: Subsidies, whether EU state aid rules do not apply to lockdown grants announced on 5 January 2021.

EU State aid rules no longer apply to subsidies granted from 1st January 2021 in the UK. The only exception is aid within scope of the Withdrawal Agreement, specifically Article 10 of the Northern Ireland Protocol which applies to measures affecting trade in goods and wholesale electricity markets between Northern Ireland and the EU, and Article 138 in relation to aid for EU programmes and activities within the Multiannual Financial Framework.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the UK will adopt or mirror the higher state aid thresholds announced by the EU on 28 January 2021 of €1.8 million for the Temporary Framework and €10 million for uncovered fixed costs.

The Government is currently consulting on its proposed approach for establishing a bespoke UK-wide subsidy control regime. The Government is keeping under close review the impact of subsidy control rules on the ability of businesses to access grants and will publish new guidance as and when circumstances require it.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the basis is of the decision to apply EU state aid limits to grants in England issued after 1 January 2021.

The EU State Aid rules and limits no longer apply in the UK, except in respect of aid in scope of the Northern Ireland Protocol and Article 138 in relation to aid for EU programmes and activities within the Multiannual Financial Framework. Subsidies must instead meet the terms of the EU-UK Trade and Co-operation Agreement as well as the other Free Trade Agreements we have reached with the rest of the world and our WTO commitments.

Existing guidance for Covid-19 Business Support grants references pre-existing EU State Aid limits. A policy decision has been taken to retain the previous limits allowed under the EU State aid regime to ensure continuity for beneficiaries.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding has been allocated to each local authority area for the £1,000 wet-led pubs grant for December 2020; and how much of that funding has been disbursed.

The Government has put forward an unprecedented package of support for businesses in recognition of the disruption caused by Covid-19. This support includes the Christmas Support Payment for wet-led pubs who missed out on much needed business during the busy festive period. Grants were made available to eligible pubs upon entry to Tier 2 or Tier 3 restrictions following the scheduled Tier review dates of 2 December and 16 December, and to those that entered Tier 4 between 2 and 29 December if they had not already qualified for the grant.

On 24 February, we published data relating to allocations and grant payments made by Local Authorities to businesses up to 17 January 2021. This includes the Christmas Support Payment: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding has been allocated to local authorities through the Additional Restrictions Grant; and how much of this funding has been disbursed.

The Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG) is a discretionary scheme aimed at supporting businesses, including those that have not been mandated to close but have had their trade adversely affected by the nationalised restrictions. Local Authorities have been allocated a further £500m in discretionary funding via the ARG, in addition to £1.1bn already allocated in November 2020. Local Authorities can use the ARG to support businesses in their local area, as they see fit. We expect Local Authorities to use this additional resource quickly to support businesses in their area.

This data relates to allocations and grant payments made by Local Authorities to businesses up to 17 January 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding has been allocated to each local authority for the one-off business covid-19 lockdown grants payment announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer on 5 January 2020; and how much of this funding has been disbursed by local authorities.

My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced on 5 January a further package of support for businesses that are required to close, or which are severely affected by the restrictions put in place to tackle Covid-19 and save lives. Business that are mandated to close may be eligible for grants of up to £4,500 for every six weeks of closure through the Local Restrictions Support Grant (LRSG) Addendum: 5 January onwards. The Closed Business Lockdown Payment (CBLP) is a one-off payment of up to £9,000 to support business during the difficult Spring period. In order to make administration simpler for Local Authorities, the CBLP has been paid to eligible businesses, together with the LRSG, in one single payment.

We have not yet published data on the CBLP. Yesterday, we published data relating to allocations and grant payments made by Local Authorities to businesses up to 17 January 2021: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-grant-funding-local-authority-payments-to-small-and-medium-businesses.

27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much interest the Government has paid to banks for (a) bounce back loans and (b) Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS); and how much banks have charged the Government for arranging CBILs loans.

The Government covers interest payments on behalf of borrowers for the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) for the first 12 months after drawdown of a facility. For CBILS, interest rates and fees will vary between banks and will depend on the specific lending proposal. The interest rate for Bounce Back loans is set at 2.5%.

As of 28 January 2021, the total value of interest payments made for both schemes is as follows:

  • Total amount recorded for interest paid to Banks under BBLS: £193,269,778
  • Total amount recorded for interest paid to Banks under CBILS: £81,991,145

For CBILS, the Government also covers arrangement fees on behalf of borrowers.

As of 28 January 2021, the total amount recorded for arrangement fees paid to banks is £24,256,440.

Banks are not permitted to charge any fees for administering BBLS.

20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding has been allocated to each local authority area for the £1,000 wet-led pubs grant for December 2020.

The Government has put forward an unprecedented package of support for businesses in recognition of the disruption caused by Covid-19. This support includes the Christmas Support Payment for wet-led pubs who missed out on much needed business during the busy festive period. Pubs in scope of this scheme will need to provide evidence that they derive more than 50% of their income from drink sales. Grants were made available to eligible pubs upon entry to Tier 2 or Tier 3 restrictions following the scheduled Tier review dates of 2 December and 16 December, and to those that entered Tier 4 between 2 and 29 December if they had not already qualified for the grant.

We worked closely with Local Authorities to calculate the amount of funding required for this scheme, using business rates data and local business information. We continue to work closely with Local Authorities to ensure that funding is delivered to pubs that are in scope of this scheme as quickly as possible.

19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding each local authority has received under the latest one-off business grants announcement for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses; and how much each local authority area has disbursed.

On 5 January 2021, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced one-off top-up grants, worth up to £9,000 per property, to help retail, hospitality and leisure businesses affected by the new closures through to Spring.

We have worked with Local Authorities to best calculate the amount of funding required, using business rates data and local business information. We are working with places to ensure that funding reaches businesses that are in scope as quickly as possible.

19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number and proportion of businesses that are eligible for the Additional Restrictions Grant (a) nationally, (b) regionally and (c) in each local authority area.

Local Authorities have discretion to use the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG) to support businesses in the way that best fits their local area.  Eligibility for the ARG is set locally and guidance makes clear that Local Authorities may use this funding for grants or for other related business support as they see fit. The number of businesses that are eligible in each area is determined by individual Local Authorities.

19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding each local authority has received through the Additional Restrictions Grant; and how much funding has been disbursed.

The Government has put forward an unprecedented package of support to help businesses which are severely affected by restrictions put in place to tackle Covid-19 and save lives. This package of support includes the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG) which was announced in November 2020 to provide discretionary business grants and wider business support in England. An initial £1.1 billion was allocated to Local Authorities under this scheme in November, and a further £500 million of top-up ARG funding was announced at the start of the third lockdown period in January.

This funding is shared between all Local Authorities in England and they have the discretion to use the ARG scheme to help businesses in the way they see fit. We are working closely with Local Authorities to ensure that support is delivered to businesses that are in scope as quickly as possible.

13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many proposed redundancies were indicated on HR1 forms received by the Redundancy Payments Service in each month since January 2019.

The table below sets out the volume of proposed redundancies indicated on HR1 forms received between January 2019 and December 2020:

Volume of proposed redundancies indicated on HR1 forms received by the Redundancy Payments Service

2019

2020

Jan

28,138

29,496

Feb

32,189

27,804

Mar

41,626

44,235

Apr

85,913

61,502

May

35,229

73,254

Jun

23,932

155,576

Jul

21,372

149,301

Aug

22,581

57,749

Sep

26,575

81,670

Oct

23,798

51,351

Nov

27,652

36,686

Dec

17,412

23,083

Employers are only required to file a Form HR1 where they are “proposing” to dismiss 20 or more employees at a single “establishment”.

“Propose” and “establishment” have distinct meanings in this context.

The aggregate number could include proposed dismissals due to insolvency, restructuring of a solvent/continuing business, or proposed relocation of employees, for example.

It should be noted that a proposal to make a given number of dismissals does not necessarily result in all or any of the proposed dismissals occurring.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding each local authority will receive from the £594 million discretionary fund to support businesses affected by the covid-19 outbreak announced by the Chancellor on 5 January 2021.

The Government has put forward an unprecedented package of support to help businesses which are severely affected by restrictions put in place to tackle Covid-19 and save lives. This package of support includes the Additional Restrictions Grant (ARG) which was announced in November 2020 to provide discretionary business grants and wider business support in England. An initial £1.1 billion was allocated to Local Authorities under this scheme in November, and a further £500 million of top-up ARG funding was announced at the start of the third lockdown period in January.

This funding is shared between all Local Authorities in England and we are working closely with Local Authorities to ensure that support is delivered to businesses that are in scope as quickly as possible.