Angus Brendan MacNeil Portrait

Angus Brendan MacNeil

Scottish National Party - Na h-Eileanan an Iar

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Trade Team Member)

(since January 2020)
Committees on Arms Export Controls
6th Jul 2020 - 6th Jul 2020
Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
30th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
International Trade Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Environment and Rural Affairs)
20th Jun 2017 - 1st Jul 2018
International Trade Committee
19th Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Liaison Committee (Commons)
19th Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
30th Nov 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Liaison Committee (Commons)
10th Sep 2015 - 17th Oct 2016
Energy and Climate Change Committee
18th Jun 2015 - 17th Oct 2016
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Transport)
15th Jun 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Constitutional Reform)
15th Jun 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Scotland)
1st Jul 2008 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th May 2005 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Spokesperson (Culture, Media and Sport)
5th May 2005 - 6th May 2010
Scottish Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 24th Nov 2008
Shadow Spokesperson (Work and Pensions)
1st Jul 2007 - 1st Jul 2008


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 20th October 2021
10:00
International Trade Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: UK trade negotiations
20 Oct 2021, 10 a.m.
At 11.00am: Oral evidence
The Rt Hon Penny Mordaunt MP - Minister of State (Minister for Trade Policy) at Department for International Trade
Victoria Prentis MP - Minister of State (Minister for Pacific and the Environment) at Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs
Chris Heaton - Deputy Director in International Trade Policy at Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 20th October 2021
14:20
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee) - Oral evidence
Subject: Work of the National Security Adviser
20 Oct 2021, 2:20 p.m.
At 3.00pm: Oral evidence
Sir Stephen Lovegrove - National Security Adviser at Cabinet Office
David Quarrey - Prime Minister’s International Affairs Adviser and Deputy National Security Adviser at Cabinet Office
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 27th October 2021
09:30
Division Votes
Wednesday 22nd September 2021
Compensation (London Capital & Finance plc and Fraud Compensation Fund) Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 36 Scottish National Party Aye votes vs 0 Scottish National Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 52 Noes - 292
Speeches
Wednesday 22nd September 2021
Subsidy Control Bill

That is a vital point that will come forward in the next couple of months, when the Scottish islands could …

Written Answers
Thursday 9th September 2021
Tuna: Fishing Catches
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, to which fisheries his Department has allocated the …
Early Day Motions
Thursday 4th February 2021
Treatment options for multiple sclerosis patients
That this House welcomes the Scottish Medicines Consortium’s approval of ozanimod for Scottish patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis; notes …
Bills
Tuesday 29th January 2019
European Union (Revocation of Notification of Withdrawal) (No. 2) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
1. Employment and earnings
Tenant crofter on the Island of Barra.
EDM signed
Tuesday 21st September 2021
Centenary of the Victory Baths in Renfrew
That this House notes that the Victory Baths in Renfrew celebrated its centenary on 19 September 2021; understands that the …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Angus Brendan MacNeil has voted in 184 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Angus Brendan MacNeil Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Elizabeth Truss (Conservative)
Minister for Women and Equalities
(11 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(10 debate interactions)
Pete Wishart (Scottish National Party)
Shadow SNP Leader of the House of Commons
(7 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for International Trade
(20 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(12 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(10 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Angus Brendan MacNeil's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Angus Brendan MacNeil

21st September 2021
Angus Brendan MacNeil signed this EDM on Tuesday 21st September 2021

60th anniversary of Kirklandneuk Primary School

Tabled by: Gavin Newlands (Scottish National Party - Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
That this House notes that Kirklandneuk Primary School in Renfrew celebrated its 60th anniversary on 28 August 2021; understands that the school has over the last three weeks had several events celebrating the occasion; believes that Kirklandneuk Primary School has made a substantial contribution to educating youngsters in the Renfrew …
46 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Sep 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 45
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
21st September 2021
Angus Brendan MacNeil signed this EDM on Tuesday 21st September 2021

Centenary of the Victory Baths in Renfrew

Tabled by: Gavin Newlands (Scottish National Party - Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
That this House notes that the Victory Baths in Renfrew celebrated its centenary on 19 September 2021; understands that the swimming baths were gifted to the town by shipbuilder and government minister, Sir Frederick Lobnitz, who, along with his wife, Lady Lobnitz and Lady Blythswood conducted the opening ceremony watched …
46 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Sep 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 45
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Angus Brendan MacNeil's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Angus Brendan MacNeil, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Angus Brendan MacNeil has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Angus Brendan MacNeil has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Angus Brendan MacNeil


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom to be granted to the family members of refugees and of people granted humanitarian protection; to provide for legal aid to be made available for such family reunion cases; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 16th March 2018
(Read Debate)
Next Event - Committee Stage: House Of Commons
Date TBA

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Prime Minister to revoke the notification, under Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union, of the United Kingdom’s intention to withdraw from the European Union, subject to the legislative consent of the Scottish Parliament and the National Assembly for Wales; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 29th January 2019

A Bill to establish a mechanism by which the Scottish Government, Scottish Parliament and a majority of Members representing Scottish constituencies may jointly determine further powers and responsibilities to be devolved to Scotland; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 25th November 2015

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to provide that, in the event of a positive vote in the Scottish Independence referendum, Members of Parliament representing Scottish constituencies shall vacate their seats on the day on which Scotland becomes independent; that Scottish constituencies shall be abolished with effect from the same date; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 2nd April 2014

Angus Brendan MacNeil has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


86 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Prime Minister, what plans he has to appoint a new Advocate General for Scotland.

An appointment will be announced in the usual way.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which team in his Department is responsible for arrangements for Scottish people to demonstrate their (a) consent and (b) opposition to the Union; and what the work priorities of that team are for 2021.

The Cabinet Office is responsible for maintaining the integrity of the Union. The UK Government’s full focus is on ensuring the whole of the United Kingdom overcomes the challenges that the Covid-19 pandemic has created, including helping our NHS, our schools and our economic recovery. These are challenges that all parts of the UK face and our collective priority must be to tackle them together.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what plans he has to make arrangements for the Scottish people to demonstrate their (a) consent and (b) opposition to the Union.

Our full focus must be on recovering from the challenges that the Covid-19 pandemic has created, on helping our NHS, our schools and our economic recovery. These are challenges that all parts of the UK face and our collective priority right now should be on tackling them together. That is what people across the UK want and expect.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Government department has responsibility for (a) oversight of and (b) answering questions on matters relating to trade between the UK and the EU; and if he will make a statement.

Lord Frost, Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, has Ministerial responsibility for the overall relationship between the UK and the EU, including the core elements of the trade relationship. Within this framework, relevant departments have responsibility for implementing the Trade and Cooperation Agreement in their policy areas.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether (a) the Trade Partnership Council and (b) any of its 16 sub-committees have met to date.

Further to the answer given to PQ138410 on 20 January, there have been no meetings of the Trade Partnership Council to date. It has however agreed by committee procedure, the extension of the provisional application of the Trade and Cooperation Agreement.


From 1 March Lord Frost, as Cabinet Office minister, is the UK co-chair of the Partnership Council as of 1 March 2021, and is accountable for its overall operation. Departments will lead on the Trade and Cooperation Specialised Committees in their areas.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason the Government (a) is asking for grace periods from the EU and (b) did not ask in June 2020 for an extension to the transition period.

I refer the Honourable Member to the letters my Right Honourable Friend the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster sent to Vice-President Maros Sefcovic on 2 February 2021, and to Mike Russell MSP on 14 June 2020.

The Government was elected in 2019 on a manifesto which was clear that we would leave the EU in January 2020 and that the transition period would end on 31 December 2020.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what contingency plans he has with respect to the UK's future relationship with the EU in the event of lorries queuing to cross the Channel after the transition period.

I refer the hon. Member to the oral statement made by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 23 September about the Reasonable Worst Case Scenario planning assumptions which were published to support these planning activities.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his timeframe is for the allocation of the Clean Steel Fund; and what steps his Department has taken to ensure the effective allocation of that funding.

The Department announced the Clean Steel Fund (CSF) in 2019 and it is currently in development. This policy will take time to design in order to be delivered effectively.

Based on previous evidence, complex decarbonisation projects have long lead-in times and take time to set up. Due to this and other factors, the steel sector indicated in response to the 2019 Call for Evidence that their preference is for the CSF to be launched in 2023. Other schemes are available to support the sector and are live now, including the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of progress in Europe on trialling hydrogen-based steelmaking; and what steps he plans to take to ensure that the UK keeps up with international developments in clean steel production.

The UK is monitoring international progress on low carbon steel making trials, using hydrogen and other technologies, and is actively engaged in international initiatives to support industrial decarbonisation innovation, including the Mission Innovation platform and the Leadership Group for Industry Transition.

Decarbonising UK industry is a core part of the Government’s ambitious plan for the green industrial revolution. The Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy, published on 17 March, commits government to work with the Steel Council to consider the implications of the recommendation of the Climate Change Committee to ‘set targets for ore-based steelmaking to reach near-zero emissions by 2035’. The Steel Council offers the forum for government, industry and trade unions to work in partnership on the shared objective of creating an achievable, long-term plan to support the sector’s transition to a competitive, sustainable and low carbon future. Hydrogen-based steelmaking, Carbon Capture, Utilisation and Storage (CCUS), and electrification are some of the technological approaches being examined as part of this process.

The UK steel sector will be given the opportunity to bid into industrial fuel switching innovation programmes under the £1 billion Net Zero Innovation Portfolio (NZIP), which is intended to promote switching away from more carbon-intensive fuel sources. The Government has also announced a £250 million Clean Steel Fund to support the UK steel sector to transition to lower carbon iron and steel production, through investment in new technologies and processes.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
8th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of potential additional policy measures needed to support future clean steel production in the UK.

The UK is monitoring international progress on low carbon steel making trials, using hydrogen and other technologies, and is actively engaged in international initiatives to support industrial decarbonisation innovation, including the Mission Innovation platform and the Leadership Group for Industry Transition.

Decarbonising UK industry is a core part of the Government’s ambitious plan for the green industrial revolution. The Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy, published on 17 March, commits government to work with the Steel Council to consider the implications of the recommendation of the Climate Change Committee to ‘set targets for ore-based steelmaking to reach near-zero emissions by 2035’. The Steel Council offers the forum for government, industry and trade unions to work in partnership on the shared objective of creating an achievable, long-term plan to support the sector’s transition to a competitive, sustainable and low carbon future. Hydrogen-based steelmaking, Carbon Capture, Utilisation and Storage (CCUS), and electrification are some of the technological approaches being examined as part of this process.

The UK steel sector will be given the opportunity to bid into industrial fuel switching innovation programmes under the £1 billion Net Zero Innovation Portfolio (NZIP), which is intended to promote switching away from more carbon-intensive fuel sources. The Government has also announced a £250 million Clean Steel Fund to support the UK steel sector to transition to lower carbon iron and steel production, through investment in new technologies and processes.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to trials, pilots and full-scale projects underway in countries including France, Austria, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Italy on using hydrogen to produce primary steel, what steps she is taking to ensure steel production in the UK keeps pace with international competitors on developing and using clean steel production technology.

The UK is monitoring international progress on low carbon steel making trials, using hydrogen and other technologies, and is actively engaged in international initiatives to support industrial decarbonisation innovation, including the Mission Innovation platform and the Leadership Group for Industry Transition.

Decarbonising UK industry is a core part of the Government’s ambitious plan for the green industrial revolution. The Industrial Decarbonisation Strategy, published on 17 March, commits government to work with the Steel Council to consider the implications of the recommendation of the Climate Change Committee to ‘set targets for ore-based steelmaking to reach near-zero emissions by 2035’. The Steel Council is a forum for Government, industry and trade unions to work together on the shared objective of creating a competitive, sustainable and low carbon future for the sector. Hydrogen-based steelmaking is one of the technological approaches being examined as part of this process.

The UK steel sector will be given the opportunity to bid into industrial fuel switching innovation programmes under the £1 billion Net Zero Innovation Portfolio (NZIP), which is intended to promote switching away from more carbon-intensive fuel sources. The Government has also announced a £250 million Clean Steel Fund to support the UK steel sector to transition to lower carbon iron and steel production, through investment in new technologies and processes.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps with the Chancellor of the Exchequer to (a) extend the payback period for Bounce Back Loans for 6-12 months and (b) write-off a proportion of debt incurred under that scheme in response to the ongoing economic effects of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government launched the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) to ensure that the smallest businesses could access loans of up to £50,000 to help businesses through this difficult period. Under BBLS no repayments are due from the borrower for the first 12 months of the loan, giving businesses the breathing space they need during this difficult time. In addition, the Government covers the first 12 months of interest payments charged to the business by the lender.

We have always been clear that businesses are responsible for repaying any finance they take out. However, we recognise that some borrowers will benefit from flexibility for their repayments. That is why we announced the Pay As You Grow measures.

Pay As You Grow was designed to provide Bounce Back Loan borrowers more time and flexibility over their repayments by giving them the option to:

  • Extend the length of the loan from six years to ten.
  • Make interest-only payments for six months, with the option to use this up to three times throughout the loan.
  • Once six payments have been made, have the option of a six-month repayment holiday.

On 8 February, the Government announced that these options would be made more generous – removing the requirement to make six payments before accessing the six-month repayment holiday.

Businesses will be able to use these options either individually or in combination with each other. In addition, they have the option to fully repay their loan early and will face no early repayment charges for doing so.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including binding contractual clauses for supply chain plan estimates in future contract for difference offshore wind projects.

The Department does not have the legal power to require the holder of a Contract for Difference to sell all or most of their stake in a project under these circumstances.

The Secretary of State can take into account an Applicant’s failure to demonstrate that they have implemented a previously approved supply chain plan when considering a plan for a future CfD Allocation Round. This could lead to the Applicant (and any partner(s) with a 20% share or greater) having their supply chain plan rejected and therefore be prevented from entry to that CfD Allocation Round.

We recently consulted on potential changes to the CfD scheme for the next allocation round, due to be held in 2021. This included questions around the potential merits of strengthening the powers to fail supply chain plans, including the remedies the Department could consider for Applicants who do fail, and of linking compliance with an approved supply chain plan with CfD payments. We will publish the Government’s response to the consultation in due course.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
26th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what penalties his Department applies to offshore wind developers who fail to meet estimates made on (a) value and (b) jobs for the UK supply chain in awarded contract for differences.

The Department does not have the legal power to require the holder of a Contract for Difference to sell all or most of their stake in a project under these circumstances.

The Secretary of State can take into account an Applicant’s failure to demonstrate that they have implemented a previously approved supply chain plan when considering a plan for a future CfD Allocation Round. This could lead to the Applicant (and any partner(s) with a 20% share or greater) having their supply chain plan rejected and therefore be prevented from entry to that CfD Allocation Round.

We recently consulted on potential changes to the CfD scheme for the next allocation round, due to be held in 2021. This included questions around the potential merits of strengthening the powers to fail supply chain plans, including the remedies the Department could consider for Applicants who do fail, and of linking compliance with an approved supply chain plan with CfD payments. We will publish the Government’s response to the consultation in due course.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
26th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what legal recourse his Department has to ensure that the original developer of a contract for difference for offshore wind sells (a) the project or (b) a majority stake in that project if they no longer meet the conditions on the UK supply chain in that contract.

The Department does not have the legal power to require the holder of a Contract for Difference to sell all or most of their stake in a project under these circumstances.

The Secretary of State can take into account an Applicant’s failure to demonstrate that they have implemented a previously approved supply chain plan when considering a plan for a future CfD Allocation Round. This could lead to the Applicant (and any partner(s) with a 20% share or greater) having their supply chain plan rejected and therefore be prevented from entry to that CfD Allocation Round.

We recently consulted on potential changes to the CfD scheme for the next allocation round, due to be held in 2021. This included questions around the potential merits of strengthening the powers to fail supply chain plans, including the remedies the Department could consider for Applicants who do fail, and of linking compliance with an approved supply chain plan with CfD payments. We will publish the Government’s response to the consultation in due course.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
26th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will place in the Library a copy of the supply chain plans for consented offshore wind contract for difference projects.

The redacted supply chain plans for renewable energy projects that were awarded Contracts for Difference (CfD) in the CfD Allocation Round 3 will be published on the Government website shortly.

The supply chain plans for previous Allocation Rounds can be found here:

Allocation Round 1

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/contracts-for-difference-supply-chain-plans-for-projects-over-300mw-which-secured-contracts

Allocation Round 2

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/contracts-for-difference-2nd-allocation-round-supply-chain-plans-for-projects-over-300mw-which-secured-contracts-2017

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he last met with Scottish and Southern Energy regarding their Seagreen Offshore wind development; and what was discussed at that meeting.

Details of meetings held by BEIS Ministers are recorded in the Transparency data published on gov.uk, and available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/beis-ministerial-gifts-hospitality-travel-and-meetings-october-to-december-2019

Officials have regular meetings with SSE to discuss various issues, including the Seagreen offshore wind development.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations he has received from Scottish and Southern Energy on the minimum levels of (a) UK and (b) Scottish content in the supply chain for the Seagreen offshore wind farm development prior to the award of a contract for difference.

The Seagreen Offshore Wind Farm Supply Chain Plan (which will be published in due course), submitted prior to the award of a contract for difference, committed to maximising opportunities for UK suppliers with an aspirational target of achieving 50% - 55% lifetime UK content.

Seagreen Wind Energy Ltd also committed to encouraging new suppliers into the market and promoting supply chain opportunities to the local and national supply chain and has collaborated with Scottish Enterprise and Highlands and Islands Enterprise to compile a list of Scottish companies capable of supplying to the sector.

The Department will monitor the implementation of the Seagreen Supply Chain Plan.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Seagreen offshore wind farm’s Environmental Impact Assessment report Chapter 15, paragraph 15.95, how much of the £690 million of estimated contracts available to Scottish companies in the CAPEX phase of the project have been awarded; and with reference to table 15.10 of that report, how much of the estimated £79m for foundations has been awarded by Scottish and Southern Energy.

The Department does not hold that information. However, we work closely with the Scottish Government and the Department for International Trade and the industry to maximise the opportunities for UK suppliers from offshore wind projects.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport what contingency plans he has with respect to the UK's future relationship with the EU in the event of a UK-based companies being disadvantaged through the treatment of data after the transition period.

We are working constructively with the Commission to secure data adequacy by the end of the transition period. We see no reason why we should not be awarded adequacy. However, the process is controlled by the Commission, and we are realistic about the increasingly challenging timelines for completion.

If adequacy decisions are not in place by the end of the transition period, organisations would be able to use alternative legal mechanisms to continue receiving personal data from the EU. Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) are the most common legal safeguard and will be the relevant mitigation for most organisations.

The ICO has created an interactive SCCs tool for businesses to use and further guidance can be found on GOV.UK and the ICO’s website regarding steps organisations may be required to take relating to data protection and data flows by the end of the transition period.

6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, to which fisheries his Department has allocated the 48 tonne bluefin tuna quota set out under the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement; and where those fisheries are located.

The UK’s quota of bluefin tuna for 2021 has not been allocated to any specific sector of the UK fishing industry this year. A proportion has been reserved to account for any incidental bycatch in commercial fisheries targeting other species, in line with requirements of ICCAT (International Commission for the conservation of Atlantic Tunas) of which the UK is a member, and a further proportion has been reserved to account for any incidental mortality arising from scientific catch and release tagging programmes.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 25 April 2021 to Question 180947 on fishing quotas, what (a) allocation of the quota, (b) tonnage and (c) species will be allocated to Scotland.

As annual negotiations to set fishing opportunities have not yet concluded the final quota allocations for each administration are not yet finalised.

On 22 April Defra published the UK quota management rules which set out how quota will be split across the UK. On 14 April we published the provisional quota for all parts of the UK in the Secretary of State determination.

The final allocations will be published on gov.uk once negotiations have concluded.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what his timeframe is for the allocation of the fishing quota; and what proportion of that quota is planned to be allocated to (a) coastal communities and (b) companies.

On 24 March, we announced the method we will use to apportion additional quota between the four UK administrations.

On 14 April, we announced how the English share of this additional quota will be allocated to industry. The details of both of these announcements can be found on gov.uk. We will be working with the Marine Management Organisation to finalise allocations for England in the coming weeks.

As the allocation of quota is a devolved responsibility it is for each administration to decide how and when to allocate their share of the UK quota.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to publish the (a) eligibility criteria and (b) application process for the compensation scheme for seafood exporters and fishing boats affected by the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement; and how much funding will be available for each nation of the UK through that scheme.

We expect to publish the eligibility criteria and application process for the Seafood Disruption Support Scheme in the week beginning 8 February.

Funding will be delivered centrally at a UK level based on the qualifying applications. Therefore we are not able to identify in advance the funding split between the nations of the UK.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the £23 million compensation announced for the fishing industry, how much of that funding will be available to organisations for hiring and training staff for customs declarations.

The Government has put in place measures to support businesses and to ensure that exports keep moving. The £23 million announced for the fishing industry will provide financial support towards verifiable losses incurred by seafood exporting businesses.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of animal medicines used in the UK are produced in the EU.

81% of veterinary medicines authorised for use in the UK are produced at manufacturing sites based in the EU.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government is taking steps to ensure the supply of animal medicines into UK after 1 January 2020 in the potential event of delays at ferry ports; and whether his Department has plans to import animal medicines to the UK from the EU by air after that date.

Defra has well-established mechanisms for dealing with supply issues as and when they arise and works closely with the veterinary pharmaceutical industry to detect potential problems at the earliest point.

Veterinary medicines manufacturers and suppliers have prepared for the end of the transition period by establishing appropriate stock levels and working with delivery partners so they are ready to meet the new customs and border requirements. Many veterinary medicines transit into the UK from manufacturing sites in the EU and do so via the short straits. This ferry crossing is vulnerable to disruption and as such pharmaceutical companies have been considering alternative logistics options. Veterinary medicines are classified as Category 1 goods and can access Government secured freight capacity. These contingencies provide assurance that there are ways to facilitate the ongoing flow of veterinary medicines into the UK.

In addition, veterinary surgeons will continue to be able to use the Special Import Scheme to apply for alternative medicines to be imported where there is no suitable UK authorised medicine available in the UK. Due to the small order size and immediate need, it is usual that these medicines arrive via air freight.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government plans to meet the potential increase in costs of animal medicines after 1 January 2021.

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) – the UK regulator of veterinary medicines – charges fees for authorising applications from companies for marketing authorisations for veterinary medicines on a cost recovery basis. From 1 January 2021 the VMD’s fees will continue to apply for each GB and NI veterinary medicine marketing authorisation. To minimise the regulatory costs to industry and avoid any consequential price increases to UK consumers, we continue to explore opportunities to introduce fee reductions wherever possible.

The prices of veterinary medicines are a commercial consideration for the private veterinary pharmaceutical industry who manufacture and market these medicines, as well as for retailers. The Government has no influence over the price of UK medicines and there will be no extra costs associated with the Government’s regulation of veterinary medicines.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans he has with respect to the UK's future relationship with the EU in the event of an interruption in the supply of animal medicines after the transition period.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain. Our thorough preparations for leaving the EU in 2019, alongside the lessons we have learned during the Covid-19 response, provide a robust foundation for end of Transition Period planning on food supply. We are working alongside industry and across Government, including with the Devolved Administrations, to plan for the end of this year. The Government has well established ways of working with the food industry, which is experienced in dealing with situations that can cause disruptions to supply.

In terms of disruption at the border, the Border Operating Model (www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-border-operating-model) provides greater detail on how the border with the EU will work following the end of the Transition Period and the mechanisms which will seek to mitigate the impact of additional volumes of traffic. We will, for example, have a contingency measure to prioritise single loads of fresh seafood and day old chicks which met the bar of hitting two out of three of the following criteria: perishability, animal welfare considerations, and economic impact on a specific geographical area. Defra is working very closely with other Government departments and local stakeholders, such as the Kent Resilience Forum, to ensure that those wishing to trade with the EU can do so in the most efficient and effective way possible.

Defra has made regulatory provisions for all veterinary medicines currently authorised for use in the UK via an EU approval system to continue to be authorised in the UK after the end of the transition period. These products can remain on the UK market for sale and supply in their existing packaging.

Defra’s close working relationship with the veterinary pharmaceutical industry has enabled the industry to prepare for the end of the transition period, including taking mitigating actions in the event of disruption to supply. These activities include maximising stocks within the UK and diverting supply routes away from the short straits, where the greatest risk of interruption to supply is posed, that being from border disruption. In addition, veterinary medicines are classified as eligible for use of the Government Secured Freight Capacity.

We have well-established mechanisms for dealing with supply issues as and when they arise. Enhanced early warning indicator systems are now in place which will provide early warnings of demand exceeding supply. The prescribing cascade legislation, which for availability and animal welfare reasons permits veterinary surgeons to import veterinary medicines from outside the UK, allows sourcing of products from countries beyond the EU.

Almost all fresh produce (including fruit, vegetables and cut flowers) from the EU will not be subject to any plant heath import controls until April 2021. From April, fresh produce will require a phytosanitary certificate and some goods will also require pre-notification. Importantly, there will continue to be no physical checks required at the border until July 2021 for almost all produce. From July onwards physical checks will be undertaken at approved designated Border Control posts on a risk basis. Any required checks will be performed as quickly as possible to minimise delays to the passage of goods and maintain border flow.

The phased approach will allow time for trade to adapt to the new import requirements for EU goods.

GB plant health authorities are undertaking significant recruitment to increase the number of plant health inspectors in order to service the demand for import and export checks and certification. We will have sufficient resources to meet demand from 1 January 2021 and ensure minimal disruption to trade. GB plant health services are currently reviewing their operating hours to make sure that biosecurity standards will continue to be met and strengthened in ways that support trade and the smooth flow of goods while minimising new burdens on businesses.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans he has with respect to the UK's future relationship with the EU in the event of a UK-based companies experiencing losses through waste of perishable produce as a result of delays in importing and exporting after the transition period.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain. Our thorough preparations for leaving the EU in 2019, alongside the lessons we have learned during the Covid-19 response, provide a robust foundation for end of Transition Period planning on food supply. We are working alongside industry and across Government, including with the Devolved Administrations, to plan for the end of this year. The Government has well established ways of working with the food industry, which is experienced in dealing with situations that can cause disruptions to supply.

In terms of disruption at the border, the Border Operating Model (www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-border-operating-model) provides greater detail on how the border with the EU will work following the end of the Transition Period and the mechanisms which will seek to mitigate the impact of additional volumes of traffic. We will, for example, have a contingency measure to prioritise single loads of fresh seafood and day old chicks which met the bar of hitting two out of three of the following criteria: perishability, animal welfare considerations, and economic impact on a specific geographical area. Defra is working very closely with other Government departments and local stakeholders, such as the Kent Resilience Forum, to ensure that those wishing to trade with the EU can do so in the most efficient and effective way possible.

Defra has made regulatory provisions for all veterinary medicines currently authorised for use in the UK via an EU approval system to continue to be authorised in the UK after the end of the transition period. These products can remain on the UK market for sale and supply in their existing packaging.

Defra’s close working relationship with the veterinary pharmaceutical industry has enabled the industry to prepare for the end of the transition period, including taking mitigating actions in the event of disruption to supply. These activities include maximising stocks within the UK and diverting supply routes away from the short straits, where the greatest risk of interruption to supply is posed, that being from border disruption. In addition, veterinary medicines are classified as eligible for use of the Government Secured Freight Capacity.

We have well-established mechanisms for dealing with supply issues as and when they arise. Enhanced early warning indicator systems are now in place which will provide early warnings of demand exceeding supply. The prescribing cascade legislation, which for availability and animal welfare reasons permits veterinary surgeons to import veterinary medicines from outside the UK, allows sourcing of products from countries beyond the EU.

Almost all fresh produce (including fruit, vegetables and cut flowers) from the EU will not be subject to any plant heath import controls until April 2021. From April, fresh produce will require a phytosanitary certificate and some goods will also require pre-notification. Importantly, there will continue to be no physical checks required at the border until July 2021 for almost all produce. From July onwards physical checks will be undertaken at approved designated Border Control posts on a risk basis. Any required checks will be performed as quickly as possible to minimise delays to the passage of goods and maintain border flow.

The phased approach will allow time for trade to adapt to the new import requirements for EU goods.

GB plant health authorities are undertaking significant recruitment to increase the number of plant health inspectors in order to service the demand for import and export checks and certification. We will have sufficient resources to meet demand from 1 January 2021 and ensure minimal disruption to trade. GB plant health services are currently reviewing their operating hours to make sure that biosecurity standards will continue to be met and strengthened in ways that support trade and the smooth flow of goods while minimising new burdens on businesses.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans he has with respect to the UK's future relationship with the EU in the event of food shortages in shops after the transition period.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain. Our thorough preparations for leaving the EU in 2019, alongside the lessons we have learned during the Covid-19 response, provide a robust foundation for end of Transition Period planning on food supply. We are working alongside industry and across Government, including with the Devolved Administrations, to plan for the end of this year. The Government has well established ways of working with the food industry, which is experienced in dealing with situations that can cause disruptions to supply.

In terms of disruption at the border, the Border Operating Model (www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-border-operating-model) provides greater detail on how the border with the EU will work following the end of the Transition Period and the mechanisms which will seek to mitigate the impact of additional volumes of traffic. We will, for example, have a contingency measure to prioritise single loads of fresh seafood and day old chicks which met the bar of hitting two out of three of the following criteria: perishability, animal welfare considerations, and economic impact on a specific geographical area. Defra is working very closely with other Government departments and local stakeholders, such as the Kent Resilience Forum, to ensure that those wishing to trade with the EU can do so in the most efficient and effective way possible.

Defra has made regulatory provisions for all veterinary medicines currently authorised for use in the UK via an EU approval system to continue to be authorised in the UK after the end of the transition period. These products can remain on the UK market for sale and supply in their existing packaging.

Defra’s close working relationship with the veterinary pharmaceutical industry has enabled the industry to prepare for the end of the transition period, including taking mitigating actions in the event of disruption to supply. These activities include maximising stocks within the UK and diverting supply routes away from the short straits, where the greatest risk of interruption to supply is posed, that being from border disruption. In addition, veterinary medicines are classified as eligible for use of the Government Secured Freight Capacity.

We have well-established mechanisms for dealing with supply issues as and when they arise. Enhanced early warning indicator systems are now in place which will provide early warnings of demand exceeding supply. The prescribing cascade legislation, which for availability and animal welfare reasons permits veterinary surgeons to import veterinary medicines from outside the UK, allows sourcing of products from countries beyond the EU.

Almost all fresh produce (including fruit, vegetables and cut flowers) from the EU will not be subject to any plant heath import controls until April 2021. From April, fresh produce will require a phytosanitary certificate and some goods will also require pre-notification. Importantly, there will continue to be no physical checks required at the border until July 2021 for almost all produce. From July onwards physical checks will be undertaken at approved designated Border Control posts on a risk basis. Any required checks will be performed as quickly as possible to minimise delays to the passage of goods and maintain border flow.

The phased approach will allow time for trade to adapt to the new import requirements for EU goods.

GB plant health authorities are undertaking significant recruitment to increase the number of plant health inspectors in order to service the demand for import and export checks and certification. We will have sufficient resources to meet demand from 1 January 2021 and ensure minimal disruption to trade. GB plant health services are currently reviewing their operating hours to make sure that biosecurity standards will continue to be met and strengthened in ways that support trade and the smooth flow of goods while minimising new burdens on businesses.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which species of fish are referred to in the Bilateral Fisheries Memoranda with (a) Greenland and (b) Iceland; and what effect those agreements have on fishing quotas.

The aims of the bilateral Memoranda of Understanding with Greenland and Iceland are to promote discussion and cooperation on fisheries issues with both of the two countries. Fishing opportunities form no part of either of these Memoranda. Accordingly, no species of fish are referred to and neither Memorandum has any effect on fishing quotas.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which species of fish are mentioned in the UK-Norway Fisheries Framework Agreement of 30 September 2020; and what changes that agreement makes to quotas.

The UK-Norway fisheries framework agreement does not refer to any species of fish or quotas of fish stocks, nor does it provide for any access to UK waters. The framework agreement sets out that these issues will the subject of annual negotiations between the parties.

Certain stocks in the North Sea that are jointly managed between the UK, Norway and the EU will be subject to trilateral discussions between the parties.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether negotiations on accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership will respect the UK's obligations to (a) the European Patent Convention and (b) other international agreements.

The UK possesses a world leading intellectual property regime, and it will not sign trade deals that compromise it. The Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) sets coherent and consistent rules in intellectual property, which will benefit both UK businesses and consumers. CPTPP represents a baseline and commits parties to a minimum level of IP standards.

The UK takes its existing international obligations seriously and have no intention of leaving the European Patent Convention or any other international intellectual property conventions that the UK is party to.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership on the intellectual property sector.

The UK possesses a world leading intellectual property regime, and it will not sign trade deals that compromise it. The Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) sets coherent and consistent rules in intellectual property, which will benefit both UK businesses and consumers. CPTPP represents a baseline and commits parties to a minimum level of IP standards.

The UK takes its existing international obligations seriously and have no intention of leaving the European Patent Convention or any other international intellectual property conventions that the UK is party to.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 25 May 2021 to Question 3839, whether work on a potential trade agreement with Australia has been prioritised as part of the full focus on recovering from the covid-19 pandemic.

Free trade and resilient supply chains through open markets will be crucial to the global economic recovery as the coronavirus crisis passes.

The biggest regional benefits from an ambitious UK-Australia trade agreement, as modelled in the deeper scenario of our Scoping Assessment, are expected to go to Scotland, the North East and the North West of England, the West Midlands, the South East and London.

A trade agreement with Australia will help to reduce trade barriers and drive increased two-way trade in goods. A UK-Australia trade agreement will be an important part of the UK’s post-COVID economic strategy, making it easier for businesses to access goods, services, and capital to fuel economic recovery, and growth.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps her Department is taking to support UK maritime businesses to export clean maritime technologies globally as part of the Government's commitment to reducing emissions from international shipping.

In support of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the Department for International Trade (DIT) will launch a Clean Green Shipbuilding Export Campaign at London International Shipping Week in September, as part of the wider DIT Clean Growth Export Strategy. DIT is also working with other Government departments to highlight UK green marine expertise to a global audience during COP 26 in November.

Shipyards and other maritime exporters can also access UK Export Finance (UKEF) support which helps them compete for international business. The sector can benefit from UKEF’s £2 billion Direct Lending Facility dedicated to clean growth projects, which offers competitive fixed rates of interest. UKEF’s Transition Export Development Guarantee is available to enable oil and gas focused exporters with credible clean energy transition plans to access working capital support.

27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what support her Department is providing to help UK maritime businesses export clean maritime technologies globally as part of the Government's commitment to reducing emissions from international shipping.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the Government plans to join the Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability.

Sustainable trade is a priority for the UK as an independent trading nation. We have already liberalised over 100 environmental goods in the UK Global Tariff and co-sponsored the new plurilateral Structured Discussions on Trade and Environmental Sustainability in the World Trade Organisation (WTO).

We are actively considering further policy options, including the three policy areas which comprise the Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability (ACCTS) - environmental goods and services liberalisation, ecolabelling and fossil fuel subsidies.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will make it her policy to negotiate tariff-free access for products imported from Greenland.

The UK has announced a number of tariff suspensions and Autonomous Tariff Quotas as part of our independent global tariff regime to help ensure continuity of trade, including with Greenland. We welcome continued engagement with Greenland and are considering options to ensure a prosperous trading relationship in the future.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of (a) the implications for her policies and (b) the effect on UK businesses of the EU trade remedies (i) AD653 and (ii) AS656 not being transitioned; and whether she has received representations from businesses on that matter.

HM Government ran a Call for Evidence to determine which EU trade remedy measures should be transitioned to the United Kingdom’s system after the transition period. As part of the consistent criteria applied, the evidence from respondents needed to demonstrate that transitioning a measure had support from British businesses that produce a sufficient proportion of those products.

The deadlines for the Call for Evidence were determined by legislative obligations and operational requirements to make sure that measures were successfully transitioned by 31st December 2020. While we received some evidence from British producers in support of transitioning measures AD653 and AS656, this did not meet the criterion of demonstrating support from businesses producing a sufficient proportion of the products. Further evidence was not submitted in time for consideration and HM Government was, therefore, unable to transition these measures.

Businesses can raise trading issues and apply for a new trade remedy investigation. However, my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade can only decide in favour of the imposition of new trade remedy measures following a full investigation and recommendation from the Trade Remedies Investigations Directorate (or its successor, in due course, the Trade Remedies Authority).

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason the EU trade remedies (a) AD653 and (b) AS656 were not transitioned; and what assessment she has made of the adequacy of the evidence collected to represent the UK manufacture of woven glass fibre in the context of that matter.

HM Government ran a Call for Evidence to determine which EU trade remedy measures should be transitioned to the United Kingdom’s system after the transition period. As part of the consistent criteria applied, the evidence from respondents needed to demonstrate that transitioning a measure had support from British businesses that produce a sufficient proportion of those products.

The deadlines for the Call for Evidence were determined by legislative obligations and operational requirements to make sure that measures were successfully transitioned by 31st December 2020. While we received some evidence from British producers in support of transitioning measures AD653 and AS656, this did not meet the criterion of demonstrating support from businesses producing a sufficient proportion of the products. Further evidence was not submitted in time for consideration and HM Government was, therefore, unable to transition these measures.

Businesses can raise trading issues and apply for a new trade remedy investigation. However, my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade can only decide in favour of the imposition of new trade remedy measures following a full investigation and recommendation from the Trade Remedies Investigations Directorate (or its successor, in due course, the Trade Remedies Authority).

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she plans to take in response to EU trade remedies (a) AD653 and (b) AS656 not being transitioned.

HM Government ran a Call for Evidence to determine which EU trade remedy measures should be transitioned to the United Kingdom’s system after the transition period. As part of the consistent criteria applied, the evidence from respondents needed to demonstrate that transitioning a measure had support from British businesses that produce a sufficient proportion of those products.

The deadlines for the Call for Evidence were determined by legislative obligations and operational requirements to make sure that measures were successfully transitioned by 31st December 2020. While we received some evidence from British producers in support of transitioning measures AD653 and AS656, this did not meet the criterion of demonstrating support from businesses producing a sufficient proportion of the products. Further evidence was not submitted in time for consideration and HM Government was, therefore, unable to transition these measures.

Businesses can raise trading issues and apply for a new trade remedy investigation. However, my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade can only decide in favour of the imposition of new trade remedy measures following a full investigation and recommendation from the Trade Remedies Investigations Directorate (or its successor, in due course, the Trade Remedies Authority).

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which Minister of her Department is responsible for international trade relating to agri-tech.

I am responsible for UK Agri-Tech exports overseas and my noble Friend the Minister of State for Investment, Lord Grimstone, for foreign direct investment in the UK Agri-Tech sector.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with which countries the Government is engaged in trade talks with.

I refer the hon Member for Na h-Eileanan an Iar to the answer I gave to the hon Member for Birmingham, Edgbaston on 26 February, UIN: 18647.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has plans to mandate controlled airspace at air traffic control airports.

The Government has no such plans. Any proposal to amend the specific classification of UK airspace must follow the Civil Aviation Authority’s CAP1616 airspace change process. This requires active engagement and consultation with stakeholders and the airspace change sponsor must be able to demonstrate that its proposal is safe and consistent with relevant UK aviation policy such as the Airspace Modernisation Strategy.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the Specialised Committee on Road Transport is planned to meet.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement establishes a standard set of committees to oversee its operation. This includes a Partnership Council, providing political strategic oversight across the relationship. The Government is currently considering carefully the process around the establishment of the Partnership Council.

Once the Partnership Council has been established, a series of specialised committees will be established including the Specialised Committee on Road Transport.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the DVLA are returning personal identification items to their owner in a timely fashion.

Paper applications which include identification documents are taking longer to process as they must be dealt with in person. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) has a reduced number of staff on-site to comply with social distancing requirements and ensure staff safety. Where possible, the DVLA is prioritising the return of identification documents that have been sent to them by customers.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which UK produce and products, by value, comprise the main freighted items transported by air to international markets; and what the primary destinations are of those products.

Information on the value of goods by mode of transport is only available for goods exported to non-EU countries that are cleared for customs purposes at UK airports from HMRC. Table 1 displays the top five product categories exported by air by value in 2018, and the associated top five export partner countries for these goods.

Table 1: Main UK good exports by air to non-EU countries by value, 2018

Goods category exported by air, and top 5 export countries

Exports, £ billions

Precious metals, stones and jewellery

30.18

Switzerland

14.75

China

4.58

Turkey

2.47

Hong Kong

2.22

United Arab Emirates

1.64

Machinery and mechanical appliances

19.96

United States

5.12

United Arab Emirates

2.18

Singapore

1.98

Hong Kong

1.69

Japan

1.01

Pharmaceutical products

8.41

United States

3.81

China

1.02

Japan

0.63

Australia

0.24

Saudi Arabia

0.23

Electrical machinery and equipment

7.28

United States

2.01

China

0.60

Hong Kong

0.49

Singapore

0.34

United Arab Emirates

0.40

Optical, measuring, medical or surgical instruments

6.79

United States

2.45

China

0.65

Japan

0.52

Hong Kong

0.29

Saudi Arabia

0.23

8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the (a) volume and (b) value was of the freight transported from UK airports to international destinations in each of the last 10 years, by airport.

The volume of freight handled at UK airports that receive commercial traffic and transported to international destinations is collected by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and is displayed in the attached Table 1.

The CAA does not collect data on the value of freight handled at UK airports. Information on the value of goods is only available for goods exported to non-EU countries that are cleared for customs purposes at UK airports from HMRC and is displayed in the attached Table 2.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment the Disability Unit has made of the potential merits of extending the £20 uplift to legacy benefit claimants.

The Government is committed to supporting disabled people affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. The temporary Universal Credit Standard Allowance uplift was introduced to support those facing the most financial disruption due to the pandemic. There are no plans to extend this temporary uplift to legacy benefits. Claimants on legacy benefits can make a claim for Universal Credit if they believe that they will be better off.

Claimants should check their eligibility before applying to Universal Credit as legacy benefits will end when they submit their claim and they will not be able to return to them in the future. For this reason, prospective claimants are signposted to independent benefits calculators on GOV.UK. There are special arrangements for those in receipt of the Severe Disability Premium, who are now able to make a new claim to Universal Credit.

The Government will publish the National Strategy for Disabled People this year taking into account the impacts of the pandemic on disabled people. The strategy will focus on the issues that disabled people say affect them the most in all aspects of life.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people who were in receipt of disability living allowance have not migrated to personal independence payments (PIP); and whether his Department has been in contact with people who have not migrated to PIP.

There were 274,970 claimants with entitlement to Disability Living Allowance (DLA) as of the end of May 2020 who were aged 16-64 on 8th April 2013, the day Personal Independence Payment (PIP) was introduced, who remain in scope to be invited to claim PIP. Children in receipt of DLA will continue to be invited to claim PIP on reaching age 16.

In July 2020, we started to resume some activity on reviews and reassessments where it was possible to do so safely and without compromising the delivery of new claims and change of circumstance cases, which remain our priority.

DLA claimants have been informed of the roll-out of PIP, including who is in scope to be invited, through their annual uprating letters and information published on GOV.UK.

Notes

Source: DLA Computer System

  • From 8th April 2013, DLA for people of working age was replaced by PIP for new claims. PIP is also gradually replacing existing DLA claims for people who were aged between 16 and 64 on 8 April 2013, or reach age 16 after that date.
  • This data includes all claimants with a DLA claim with entitlement who were aged 16-64 on 8th April 2013, this means that they were born between 9th April 1948 and 8th April 1997 inclusive.
  • It is assumed that all DLA claimants aged 16-64 on 8th April 2013 will be eligible for a reassessment to PIP in the future.
  • The statistics here include those who have had their payment suspended, for example if they are in hospital.
  • Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  • Great Britain only
  • This is unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the Scottish Medicine Consortium’s approval of ozanimod for Scottish patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis; and whether it is his policy to provide for the same access to innovative medicines for MS patients in England.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body responsible for providing evidence-based guidance for the National Health Service in England on whether medicines represent a clinical and cost-effective use of resources. NICE’s appraisal of ozanimod for treating relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis is ongoing and a consultation on NICE’s draft guidance closed on 12 February.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the access of multiple sclerosis patients to critical healthcare professional support; and what long-term plan he has in place to ensure that MS patients are able to access treatment and support conveniently.

While no specific assessment has been made, throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the National Health Service in England has maintained access to urgent and emergency care, including for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). For non-urgent care, providers have offered remote consultations using video, telephone, email and text message services as a priority where appropriate.

On 23 December 2020, NHS England and NHS Improvement outlined priorities for the remainder of 2020-2021 and into 2021-2022, including maximising the NHS’s capacity to treat non-COVID-19 patients. This capacity includes services for people with neurological diseases, including MS - for example, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech and language therapy. In the longer term, NHS systems should also continue to implement the guidance set out in the Progressive Neurological Conditions RightCare Toolkit, which was developed in collaboration with key stakeholders such as the MS Trust and the MS Society.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what contingency plans he has with respect to the UK's future relationship with the EU in the event of an interruption in the supply of medicines after the transition period.

The Department, in consultation with the devolved administrations and the Crown Dependencies, is working with trade bodies, product suppliers, and the health and care system to help ensure continued supply of medicines and medical products, to the whole of the United Kingdom at the end of the transition period.

As set out in a letter from the Department to industry of 17 November, we are implementing a multi-layered approach, that involves asking suppliers of medicines, vaccines and other medical products to the UK from or via the European Union to get trader ready, reroute their supply chains away from any potential disruption and stockpile on UK soil where this is possible. The letter is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/letter-to-medicines-and-medical-products-suppliers-17-november-2020

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his oral contribution of 7 July 2002, Official Report, column 839, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of testing asymptomatic people for covid-19 on returning (a) merchant mariners and (b) oil rig workers to the UK.

Current clinical advice is that testing of individuals without symptoms should be used where clinically appropriate. We continue to use the latest science and clinical advice to inform our approach.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties on (a) the rights of British nationals resident in France and (b) residency rights of British nationals living in the EU following the UK's departure from the EU.

The Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties was concluded at Vienna on 23 May 1969. The UK ratified the Convention on 25 June 1971 and remains a Party to the Convention today. The Convention is broad in scope and codifies the rules relating to international laws on treaties between states. The Convention does not provide for the rights, related to residence or otherwise, of British nationals living in the EU.

The Withdrawal Agreement established the terms of the UK's withdrawal from the EU, in accordance with Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union. The Withdrawal Agreement entered into force on 31 January 2020 and protects citizens' rights. It means over five million EU citizens in the UK and over one million UK nationals in the EU can continue to live, work, study and access benefits and services, such as healthcare, broadly as they did before the UK left the EU.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he has made to his Colombian counterparts on ensuring the full investigation into the numerous reports of eye injuries caused by projectiles fired by police during recent protests in that country.

UK ministers and senior officials regularly raise human rights issues, as well as specific cases of concern, with the Colombian Government, and in multilateral fora. We are clear that we support the right of all Colombians to protest peacefully, and that the right to peaceful assembly and association must be guaranteed.

Colombia is a UK 'Human Rights Priority Country,' and we have raised our concerns with the relevant state actors in Colombia since protests began. Most recently, I spoke with acting Foreign Minister Adriana Mejía on 14 May to express my concerns, and welcome Colombia's commitment to transparent investigations into allegations of abuse. We look to the Colombian authorities to investigate fully any reports on excessive use of force against protestors, and take appropriate action against those responsible. Security services must be held accountable for their actions, and any complaints thoroughly investigated.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment has made of the implications for diplomatic relations with Greenland of products of Greenlandic origin no longer being eligible for tariff-free access for import to the UK.

The UK-Greenland bilateral relationship is important and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office continues to work across Whitehall and with Greenlandic counterparts to ensure it continues to flourish and supports our mutual interests. The UK-Greenland Trade relationship is a key part of that and one on which businesses in the seafood industry in both countries depend. We welcome continued engagement with Greenland and are considering options to ensure a prosperous trading relationship in the future.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that tackling violence against women and girls remains a priority for his Department.

Tackling violence against women and girls (VAWG) is a core part of this Government's mission and we remain steadfast in our commitment to this agenda. This work is more important than ever, as COVID-19 has intensified the shadow pandemic of gender-based violence (GBV).

We are scaling up our investments in VAWG, including through the launch early next year of a new £67.5 million seven-year programme to scale up effective interventions to prevent VAWG. We are also making the biggest single investment worldwide to date by any international donor to end FGM (£50 million). Next year the UK will take up Presidency of the G7 and we are co-leading the global Generation Equality Action Coalition on GBV. We are using these opportunities to rally the international community to do more to end VAWG.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what plans he has to develop the Falkland Islands’ future relationship with the EU.

We are in regular contact with the political leaders of the Falkland Islands to discuss the Islands' international interests, and to identify how best the UK Government can represent these with the EU and elsewhere.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people are subject to the Loan Charge as at 21 April 2021.

HMRC’s latest estimates of those affected by the Loan Charge are included in their GOV.UK publication titled Independent Loan Charge review: HMRC report on implementation.

As set out in this report, in January 2020, HMRC wrote to more than 55,000 individuals and employers who were identified as potentially affected by the Loan Charge. HMRC estimate the changes to the Loan Charge enacted in Finance Act 2020 took 11,000 people out of paying the charge altogether.

The report goes on to state that 5,600 employers and individuals settled their use of disguised remuneration schemes in the period to 30 September 2020.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when applications will open for the SME Brexit Support Fund.

The Government has recently announced a £20 million SME Brexit Support Fund to help small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) adjust to new customs, rules of origin, and VAT rules when trading with the EU. It is due to open for applications shortly.

4th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 4 February 2021 to Question 144640 on Customs Grant Scheme, if he will allocate additional funding to the Customs Grant Scheme to allow businesses on the waiting list for that scheme to receive support.

In total, the Government has made over £80 million available to support businesses to deal with EU trade after 2020. The fund has now been fully allocated, no further applications are being accepted and a waiting list is being maintained by the grant scheme administrator.

The end of the transition period offers new opportunities to the intermediaries sector and means there are increased demands for the services of an intermediary, meaning intermediaries will be receiving significant income. Further Government support with cash flow remains available through the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) and related schemes.

In addition, the Government recently announced a £20 million SME Brexit Support Fund to support small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) to adjust to new customs, rules of origin, and VAT rules when trading with the EU. More information can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/grants-to-help-small-and-medium-sized-businesses-new-to-importing-or-exporting.

27th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether additional funding will be made available for the Customs Grant Scheme.

Businesses have been applying enthusiastically to the Grant Scheme and the Government is nearing full allocation of the funds. Applications are considered on a first come first served basis. If applications cannot be fulfilled due to funding, applicants will be placed on a waiting list to have funds allocated if and when funds are returned.

There is also support available for businesses through the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS), and related schemes. These schemes can be accessed even if a business has applied for grants, and they provide support for businesses that have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Loans can be used for any purpose, including for growth.

16th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what contingency plans he has with respect to the UK's future relationship with the EU in the event of manufacturers encountering difficulties with importing components after the transition period.

The Government has provided extensive guidance to traders to support them in their preparations for the end of the transition period, including publishing the detailed Border Operating Model to help traders take the necessary steps.

Recognising the impact of coronavirus on businesses’ ability to prepare, the UK Government has taken the decision to introduce the new border controls in three stages up until 1 July 2021. From 1 January to 30 June, traders when importing non-controlled EU goods to GB will have the option to make a declaration in their own records at the time of import followed by a supplementary declaration up to 175 days later, which provides traders and intermediaries with more time to prepare.

HMRC continue to work closely with industry to ensure they are engaging with the new requirements and can take the necessary steps to prepare, including through the latest public information campaign, cross-Government industry steering groups, webinars and events.

HMRC will continue to engage with industry beyond the end of the transition period to understand any concerns and identify any further support that HMRC can provide.

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what economic impact assessment he has undertaken of (a) not extending tax-free shopping to EU-bound passengers from 1 January 2021, and (b) withdrawing tax-free shopping from passengers travelling to non-EU destinations from 1 January 2021; and if he will publish that impact assessment.

Ahead of the end of the transition period, the Government has announced the VAT and excise duty treatment of goods purchased by individuals for personal use and carried in their luggage arriving from or going overseas (passengers). The following rules will apply from 1 January 2021:

- Passengers travelling from Great Britain to any destination outside the United Kingdom (UK) will be able to purchase duty-free excise goods once they have passed security controls at ports, airports, and international rail stations.

- Personal allowances will apply to passengers entering Great Britain from a destination outside of the UK, with alcohol allowances significantly increased.

- The VAT Retail Export Scheme (RES) in Great Britain will not be extended to EU residents and will be withdrawn for all passengers.

- The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales for non-excise goods will be removed across the UK.

The Government published a consultation which ran from 11 March to 20 May. During this time the Government held a number of virtual meetings with stakeholders to hear their views and received 73 responses to the consultation. The Government is also continueing to meet and discuss with stakeholders following the announcement of these policies.

The detailed rationale for these changes are included in the written ministerial statement and summary of responses to the recent consultation: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2020-09-11/hcws448 and https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/a-consultation-on-duty-free-and-tax-free-goods-carried-by-passengers.

HMRC estimate that VAT RES refunds cost around £0.5 billion in VAT in 2019 for around 1.2 million non-EU visitors. In 2019 the ONS estimate there were substantially more EU visitors (24.8 million) than non-EU passengers (16.0 million) to the UK. This implies an extension to EU residents would significantly increase the cost by up to an estimated £0.9 billion. This would result in a large amount of deadweight loss by subsidising spending from EU visitors which already happens without a refund mechanism in place, potentially taking the total cost up to around £1.4 billion per annum.

The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales currently affects airports that fly to non-EU destinations. The extension of duty-free sales to EU bound passengers will be a significant boost to all airports in England, Scotland and Wales, including Edinburgh and Glasgow and smaller regional airports which have not been able to offer duty-free to the EU before.

HMRC estimate that around £150 million of VAT is not charged as a result of tax-free airside sales. As with the VAT RES, extending the relief to the EU would significantly increase the cost of the scheme and result in a large amount of deadweight loss by subsidising spending from EU-bound passengers which already happens.

The final costings will be subject to scrutiny by the independent Office for Budget Responsibility and will be set out at the next forecast.

The Government also recognises the challenges the aviation sector is facing as it recovers from the impacts of Covid-19 and has supported the sector throughout the pandemic, and continues to do so, including schemes to raise capital, flexibilities with tax bills, and financial support for employees.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Government’s decision to withdraw tax-free shopping for international visitors from 1 January 2021, what the total value of tax-free spend was in (a) Edinburgh and (b) Glasgow in 2019.

Ahead of the end of the transition period, the Government has announced the VAT and excise duty treatment of goods purchased by individuals for personal use and carried in their luggage arriving from or going overseas (passengers). The following rules will apply from 1 January 2021:

- Passengers travelling from Great Britain to any destination outside the United Kingdom (UK) will be able to purchase duty-free excise goods once they have passed security controls at ports, airports, and international rail stations.

- Personal allowances will apply to passengers entering Great Britain from a destination outside of the UK, with alcohol allowances significantly increased.

- The VAT Retail Export Scheme (RES) in Great Britain will not be extended to EU residents and will be withdrawn for all passengers.

- The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales for non-excise goods will be removed across the UK.

The Government published a consultation which ran from 11 March to 20 May. During this time the Government held a number of virtual meetings with stakeholders to hear their views and received 73 responses to the consultation. The Government is also continueing to meet and discuss with stakeholders following the announcement of these policies.

The detailed rationale for these changes are included in the written ministerial statement and summary of responses to the recent consultation: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2020-09-11/hcws448 and https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/a-consultation-on-duty-free-and-tax-free-goods-carried-by-passengers.

HMRC estimate that VAT RES refunds cost around £0.5 billion in VAT in 2019 for around 1.2 million non-EU visitors. In 2019 the ONS estimate there were substantially more EU visitors (24.8 million) than non-EU passengers (16.0 million) to the UK. This implies an extension to EU residents would significantly increase the cost by up to an estimated £0.9 billion. This would result in a large amount of deadweight loss by subsidising spending from EU visitors which already happens without a refund mechanism in place, potentially taking the total cost up to around £1.4 billion per annum.

The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales currently affects airports that fly to non-EU destinations. The extension of duty-free sales to EU bound passengers will be a significant boost to all airports in England, Scotland and Wales, including Edinburgh and Glasgow and smaller regional airports which have not been able to offer duty-free to the EU before.

HMRC estimate that around £150 million of VAT is not charged as a result of tax-free airside sales. As with the VAT RES, extending the relief to the EU would significantly increase the cost of the scheme and result in a large amount of deadweight loss by subsidising spending from EU-bound passengers which already happens.

The final costings will be subject to scrutiny by the independent Office for Budget Responsibility and will be set out at the next forecast.

The Government also recognises the challenges the aviation sector is facing as it recovers from the impacts of Covid-19 and has supported the sector throughout the pandemic, and continues to do so, including schemes to raise capital, flexibilities with tax bills, and financial support for employees.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on (a) long-haul air travel demand and (b) and long-haul connectivity at Scottish airports of the cessation of tax-free shopping for passengers from 1 January 2021.

Ahead of the end of the transition period, the Government has announced the VAT and excise duty treatment of goods purchased by individuals for personal use and carried in their luggage arriving from or going overseas (passengers). The following rules will apply from 1 January 2021:

- Passengers travelling from Great Britain to any destination outside the United Kingdom (UK) will be able to purchase duty-free excise goods once they have passed security controls at ports, airports, and international rail stations.

- Personal allowances will apply to passengers entering Great Britain from a destination outside of the UK, with alcohol allowances significantly increased.

- The VAT Retail Export Scheme (RES) in Great Britain will not be extended to EU residents and will be withdrawn for all passengers.

- The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales for non-excise goods will be removed across the UK.

The Government published a consultation which ran from 11 March to 20 May. During this time the Government held a number of virtual meetings with stakeholders to hear their views and received 73 responses to the consultation. The Government is also continueing to meet and discuss with stakeholders following the announcement of these policies.

The detailed rationale for these changes are included in the written ministerial statement and summary of responses to the recent consultation: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2020-09-11/hcws448 and https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/a-consultation-on-duty-free-and-tax-free-goods-carried-by-passengers.

HMRC estimate that VAT RES refunds cost around £0.5 billion in VAT in 2019 for around 1.2 million non-EU visitors. In 2019 the ONS estimate there were substantially more EU visitors (24.8 million) than non-EU passengers (16.0 million) to the UK. This implies an extension to EU residents would significantly increase the cost by up to an estimated £0.9 billion. This would result in a large amount of deadweight loss by subsidising spending from EU visitors which already happens without a refund mechanism in place, potentially taking the total cost up to around £1.4 billion per annum.

The concessionary treatment on tax-free sales currently affects airports that fly to non-EU destinations. The extension of duty-free sales to EU bound passengers will be a significant boost to all airports in England, Scotland and Wales, including Edinburgh and Glasgow and smaller regional airports which have not been able to offer duty-free to the EU before.

HMRC estimate that around £150 million of VAT is not charged as a result of tax-free airside sales. As with the VAT RES, extending the relief to the EU would significantly increase the cost of the scheme and result in a large amount of deadweight loss by subsidising spending from EU-bound passengers which already happens.

The final costings will be subject to scrutiny by the independent Office for Budget Responsibility and will be set out at the next forecast.

The Government also recognises the challenges the aviation sector is facing as it recovers from the impacts of Covid-19 and has supported the sector throughout the pandemic, and continues to do so, including schemes to raise capital, flexibilities with tax bills, and financial support for employees.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
28th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what his Department's definition is of a viable job.

The Government, through the Job Support Scheme, is targeting support on those businesses that are being impacted by Coronavirus and who can support their employees doing some work, but that need more time for demand to recover.

As the Chancellor said, it is clear we are living with Coronavirus for a while, and therefore, our economy is likely to undergo a period of adjustment and it is right that our approach to economic support evolves.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many meetings Ministers in his Department have had with representatives of the aviation industry on the covid-19 outbreak in each of the last three months.

Treasury Ministers and officials meet with a wide range of stakeholders across sectors as part of ongoing policy development and implementation.

Ministers and officials from the Department for Transport are in regular contact with airlines, airports and unions to understand the impact that COVID-19 is having on the sector and its workers.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how often Ministers in his Department have held discussions with representatives from UK airports since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

Treasury Ministers and officials meet with a wide range of stakeholders across sectors as part of ongoing policy development and implementation.

Ministers and officials from the Department for Transport are in regular contact with airlines, airports and unions to understand the impact that COVID-19 is having on the sector and its workers.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on how many occasions Ministers in his Department have met the Secretary of State for Transport to discuss the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the aviation industry in each of the last three months.

HM Treasury Ministers have regular discussion with the Secretary of State for Transport on a range of topics.

The Government has announced an unprecedented package of support for workers and businesses to protect against the current economic emergency.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has plans to extend eligibility to veterinary practises to business rates relief during the covid-19 outbreak.

Business rates are devolved in Scotland.

In England, the Government has provided enhanced support to the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors through business rates relief given the direct and acute impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on those sectors.

A range of further measures to support all businesses, including those not eligible for the business rates holiday, such as veterinary practices, has also been made available. For example, the Government has launched the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help firms continue to keep people in employment, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme offering loans of up to £5 million for SMEs through the British Business Bank backed by an 80% Government guarantee, and the deferral of VAT payments for this quarter.

The Government will consider any further financial assistance necessary to help businesses get through this period.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when non-EEA fishermen will be able to gain employment on fishing boats on the west coast of Scotland.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to PQ 19790 on 27 February 2020.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to enable non-EEA fishermen to gain employment on fishing boats on the west of Scotland.

From 1 January 2021, we will introduce the UK’s points-based system.

The future points-based immigration system will prioritise attracting the high-skilled workers we need to contribute to our economy, our communities and our public services.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many decisions were made on applications for family reunification with a beneficiary of international protection in 2019; and how many of those applications were (a) accepted and (b) rejected.

The Home Office publishes data on Family Reunion in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on grants of Family Reunion visas by nationality are published in table Fam_D01 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets. Data on applications and outcomes of Family Reunion visas by nationality are included in the ‘Family: other’ visa subgroup in tables Vis_D01 and Vis_D02 of the https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/managed-migration-datasets#entry-clearance-visas-granted-outside-the-uk

Although ‘family reunion’ visas are not separately available, the vast majority of ‘Family: other’ visas are family reunion.

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to year ending September 2019. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the asylum summary tables and entry clearance summary tables. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and entry clearance visas.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?keywords=immigration&content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=relevance

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for family reunification with a beneficiary of international protection were received by the UK in 2019, by nationality.

The Home Office publishes data on Family Reunion in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on grants of Family Reunion visas by nationality are published in table Fam_D01 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets. Data on applications and outcomes of Family Reunion visas by nationality are included in the ‘Family: other’ visa subgroup in tables Vis_D01 and Vis_D02 of the https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/managed-migration-datasets#entry-clearance-visas-granted-outside-the-uk

Although ‘family reunion’ visas are not separately available, the vast majority of ‘Family: other’ visas are family reunion.

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to year ending September 2019. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the asylum summary tables and entry clearance summary tables. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and entry clearance visas.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?keywords=immigration&content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=relevance

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many travel documents were issued to beneficiaries of international protection by the UK in 2019.

The Home Office publishes data on the number of travel documents issued to those people who are not British and cannot use or get a passport.

Information correct to August 2019 can be accessed via: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/asylum-transparency-data-august-2019

Table TD01. Information regarding eligibility for travel documents can be viewed at https://www.gov.uk/apply-home-office-travel-document.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
17th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the incident involving the Belfast to Cairnryan passenger ferry and a nuclear-powered submarine in November 2018, what (a) lessons have been learned from that incident, (b) steps have been taken to ensure that nuclear-powered submarines do not travel at periscope depths on any ferry lanes on the west coast of Scotland, (c) is now the minimum clearance between ferries and submarines passing, on the surface or submerged, and (d) additional safety measures have been taken, as a result of that incident, for all ferries around the Scottish coast.

Ensuring safety at sea is a top priority for the Royal Navy. The Marine Accident Investigation Branch's (MAIB) report is welcomed and the Royal Navy fully accepts their recommendation. Actions have been taken to prevent re-occurrence and a system of assurance is in place in accordance with the Navy's Safety Management System.? To deliver the MAIB's recommendation, the Fleet Commander has directed an independent review of the actions taken to provide assurance that such actions have been effective. This review will be led by the Defence Maritime Regulator, part of the independent Defence Safety Authority.

I can confirm that there is no plan for submarines to cease operating at periscope depth.

The safe distance between a submarine operating at periscope depth and surface shipping is determined by the combined speed of the vessels at a given time, and is achieved by manoeuvring the submarine to ensure that surface vessels do not approach within the distance that the submarine would dive to a safe depth to remain safe.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland, if he will agree to the section 30 order requested by the Scottish Government for a Scottish independence referendum; and what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on a referendum of the (a) 2019 general election results in Scotland and (b) votes for a referendum in the Scottish Parliament.

The Prime Minister has received the First Minister of Scotland’s correspondence of 19 December 2019 seeking a transfer of power from the UK Parliament to the Scottish Parliament to allow for an independence referendum. The Prime Minister will respond in due course. The UK Government remains committed to respecting the result of the 2014 Referendum as set out in the Edinburgh Agreement.

Alister Jack
Secretary of State for Scotland