Rosena Allin-Khan Portrait

Rosena Allin-Khan

Labour - Tooting

Shadow Minister (Mental Health)

(since April 2020)
1 APPG membership (as of 2 Jun 2021)
Women's Football
2 Former APPG memberships
Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, Governance and Inclusive Leadership
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport) (Sport)
3rd Jul 2017 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Minister (Culture, Media and Sport) (Sport)
9th Oct 2016 - 3rd Jul 2017


Department Event
Monday 28th June 2021
Department of Health and Social Care
Legislation - Main Chamber
The Rating (Coronavirus) and Directors Disqualification (Dissolved Companies) Bill: Second Reading
View calendar
Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Protecting the Public and Justice for Victims
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 193 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 0
Speeches
Wednesday 16th June 2021
Children and Young People’s Mental Health

It is such a pleasure to serve under your chairmanship, Sir Gary. I thank the hon. Member for Twickenham (Munira …

Written Answers
Thursday 17th June 2021
Mental Health Services: Hospital Beds
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to Answer of 7 June 2021 to Question …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 14th June 2021
1. Employment and earnings
6 May 2021, received £572. Hours: 10 hrs. (Registered 03 June 2021)
EDM signed
Tuesday 17th March 2020
Temporary universal basic income
That this House calls on the Government to introduce a temporary universal basic income or an emergency measure to help …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 19th July 2017
Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Act 2018
To make provision about the oversight and management of the appropriate use of force in relation to people in mental …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Rosena Allin-Khan has voted in 236 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Rosena Allin-Khan Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Nadine Dorries (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
(20 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(7 debate interactions)
Jo Churchill (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(37 debate contributions)
Northern Ireland Office
(1 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Rosena Allin-Khan has not made any spoken contributions to legislative debate
View all Rosena Allin-Khan's debates

Tooting Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with most Tooting signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Matthew was taken to, ‘a place of safety’, and died 7 days later.
24 others died by the same means, dating back to the year 2000. An indicator that little was done to address the growing problems.
Something went terribly wrong with the NHS Mental Health Services provided to my son.


Latest EDMs signed by Rosena Allin-Khan

16th March 2020
Rosena Allin-Khan signed this EDM on Tuesday 17th March 2020

Temporary universal basic income

Tabled by: Kevin Brennan (Labour - Cardiff West)
That this House calls on the Government to introduce a temporary universal basic income or an emergency measure to help freelancers and the self-employed effected by the covid-19 outbreak.
100 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Sep 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 51
Scottish National Party: 28
Liberal Democrat: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Independent: 3
Alba Party: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
29th October 2018
Rosena Allin-Khan signed this EDM on Tuesday 2nd July 2019

EATING DISORDER DIAGNOSIS

Tabled by: Wera Hobhouse (Liberal Democrat - Bath)
That this House believes that access to a diagnosis and treatment for eating disorders should not just depend on an individual's weight and fully supports the Dump the Scales campaign for earlier intervention and support before people hit crisis point; recognises the need for a focus by General Practitioners on …
40 signatures
(Most recent: 4 Jul 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 20
Liberal Democrat: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Independent: 3
Scottish National Party: 2
Conservative: 2
Green Party: 1
View All Rosena Allin-Khan's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Rosena Allin-Khan, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Rosena Allin-Khan has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Rosena Allin-Khan has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Rosena Allin-Khan has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


168 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Prime Minister, how many personal letters he has written to bereaved families of NHS and care staff who have died from covid-19.

I am acutely aware of the grief, heartbreak and loss suffered by families across the country as a result of this global pandemic.

I know first-hand the effect this terrible virus can have on someone and will always be thankful for the life saving care that I received at St Thomas’ hospital.

I write to the families of all NHS and care staff who have died from covid-19 in order to offer my condolences and to pay tribute to the tireless efforts of their loved ones.

In order to write, my office requires the relevant organisation to receive prior consent from the families that their personal information may be shared – which necessarily creates a slight time lag. I have so far sent 55 letters and will write to more families as soon as my office receives the relevant consents and information.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which senior Ministers (a) have been, (b) are and (c) plan to be engaged in the next five months in negotiations with the EU on the UK's post-transition relationship.

Details of Cabinet Committee membership and their terms of reference are available online at GOV.UK, including the EU Exit Strategy (XS) and EU Exit Operations (XO) committees.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the wedding industry is included in the hospitality category for the purpose of covid-19 financial support.

The wedding industry includes many different types of businesses. Some of these, such as certain wedding venues, are categorised as hospitality businesses for the purpose of COVID-19 support. Other wedding businesses are able to access other business support such as government-backed loans, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme. They may also be able to access grants through the Local Restrictions Support Grant.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the number of university students on placements who took their own lives between in (a) 2019 and (b) 2020.

Student mental health and suicide prevention are key priorities for this government. We continue to work closely with the higher education (HE) sector to promote good practice. Universities are not only experts in their student population, but also best placed to identify the needs of their particular student body, including those students undertaking placements as part of their studies.

Whilst it is for HE providers to determine what welfare and counselling services they need to provide to their students to offer that support, the government is proactive in promoting good practice in this area. We continue to work closely with Universities UK (UUK) on embedding the Stepchange programme within the sector. Further information can be found here: https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/stepchange. Stepchange calls on HE leaders to adopt mental health as a strategic priority and take a whole-institution approach, embedding it across all policies, cultures, curricula and practice. The Stepchange programme relaunched in March 2020 as the Mentally Healthy Universities programme. The university Mental Health Charter, announced in June 2018, is backed by the government and led by the sector. The charter, developed in collaboration with students, staff and partner organisations, aims to drive up standards of practice, including leadership, early intervention and data collection. Further information can be accessed here: https://www.studentminds.org.uk/charter.html.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, I have stressed the importance of protecting student and staff wellbeing. We recognise that many students are facing additional mental health challenges due to the disruption and uncertainty caused by the outbreak. I have engaged with universities on this issue and have written to Vice Chancellors on numerous occasions during the past year, most recently last month, outlining that student welfare should remain a priority. I have also convened a working group of representatives from the HE and health sectors to specifically address the current and pressing issues that students are facing during the COVID-19 outbreak.

My hon. Friend, the Minister for Children and Families, and I have also convened a Mental Health in Education Action Group to drive action to mitigate the impact of the outbreak on the mental health and wellbeing of children, young people and staff in nurseries, schools, colleges and universities.

We expect HE providers to continue to support their students, which has included making services accessible from a distance whilst restrictions have been in place. We encourage students to stay in touch with their provider’s welfare teams as these services are likely to continue to be an important source of support. Many providers have bolstered their existing mental health services, and adapted delivery mechanisms including reaching out to students who may be more vulnerable. Staff at universities and colleges have been proactive in supporting their students, showing resourcefulness and there are many examples of good practice.

We have worked with the Office for Students (OfS) to provide Student Space, a dedicated mental health and wellbeing platform for students, which has been funded by up to £3 million by the OfS in the 2020/21 academic year. We have also asked the OfS to allocate £15 million towards student mental health in 2021/22 through proposed reforms to Strategic Priorities Grant funding, to help address the challenges to student mental health posed by the transition to university, given the increasing demand for mental health services. This will target those students in greatest need of such services, including vulnerable groups and hard-to-reach students.

The Office for National Statistics data shows that in 2016/17 – the last year on record – there were 95 student deaths by suicide in England and Wales. Further information can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/estimatingsuicideamonghighereducationstudentsenglandandwalesexperimentalstatistics/2018-06-25#:~:text=The%20rate%20of%20suicide%20in,it%20difficult%20to%20identify%20statistically.

The incoming President of UUK, Professor Steve West, and I will jointly chair a new roundtable on suicide prevention in June. Through this we will develop and support the adoption of the Suicide Safer Universities framework and promote good practice in the sector, helping to make sure students are well supported during their time at university, including when undertaking placements as part of their studies.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to improve mental healthcare provision for students in the context of the covid-19 outbreak.

Student mental health and suicide prevention are key priorities for this government. We continue to work closely with the higher education (HE) sector to promote good practice. Universities are not only experts in their student population, but also best placed to identify the needs of their particular student body, including those students undertaking placements as part of their studies.

Whilst it is for HE providers to determine what welfare and counselling services they need to provide to their students to offer that support, the government is proactive in promoting good practice in this area. We continue to work closely with Universities UK (UUK) on embedding the Stepchange programme within the sector. Further information can be found here: https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/stepchange. Stepchange calls on HE leaders to adopt mental health as a strategic priority and take a whole-institution approach, embedding it across all policies, cultures, curricula and practice. The Stepchange programme relaunched in March 2020 as the Mentally Healthy Universities programme. The university Mental Health Charter, announced in June 2018, is backed by the government and led by the sector. The charter, developed in collaboration with students, staff and partner organisations, aims to drive up standards of practice, including leadership, early intervention and data collection. Further information can be accessed here: https://www.studentminds.org.uk/charter.html.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, I have stressed the importance of protecting student and staff wellbeing. We recognise that many students are facing additional mental health challenges due to the disruption and uncertainty caused by the outbreak. I have engaged with universities on this issue and have written to Vice Chancellors on numerous occasions during the past year, most recently last month, outlining that student welfare should remain a priority. I have also convened a working group of representatives from the HE and health sectors to specifically address the current and pressing issues that students are facing during the COVID-19 outbreak.

My hon. Friend, the Minister for Children and Families, and I have also convened a Mental Health in Education Action Group to drive action to mitigate the impact of the outbreak on the mental health and wellbeing of children, young people and staff in nurseries, schools, colleges and universities.

We expect HE providers to continue to support their students, which has included making services accessible from a distance whilst restrictions have been in place. We encourage students to stay in touch with their provider’s welfare teams as these services are likely to continue to be an important source of support. Many providers have bolstered their existing mental health services, and adapted delivery mechanisms including reaching out to students who may be more vulnerable. Staff at universities and colleges have been proactive in supporting their students, showing resourcefulness and there are many examples of good practice.

We have worked with the Office for Students (OfS) to provide Student Space, a dedicated mental health and wellbeing platform for students, which has been funded by up to £3 million by the OfS in the 2020/21 academic year. We have also asked the OfS to allocate £15 million towards student mental health in 2021/22 through proposed reforms to Strategic Priorities Grant funding, to help address the challenges to student mental health posed by the transition to university, given the increasing demand for mental health services. This will target those students in greatest need of such services, including vulnerable groups and hard-to-reach students.

The Office for National Statistics data shows that in 2016/17 – the last year on record – there were 95 student deaths by suicide in England and Wales. Further information can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/estimatingsuicideamonghighereducationstudentsenglandandwalesexperimentalstatistics/2018-06-25#:~:text=The%20rate%20of%20suicide%20in,it%20difficult%20to%20identify%20statistically.

The incoming President of UUK, Professor Steve West, and I will jointly chair a new roundtable on suicide prevention in June. Through this we will develop and support the adoption of the Suicide Safer Universities framework and promote good practice in the sector, helping to make sure students are well supported during their time at university, including when undertaking placements as part of their studies.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has issued to universities on safeguarding the mental health of (a) students on placements and (b) other students.

Student mental health and suicide prevention are key priorities for this government. We continue to work closely with the higher education (HE) sector to promote good practice. Universities are not only experts in their student population, but also best placed to identify the needs of their particular student body, including those students undertaking placements as part of their studies.

Whilst it is for HE providers to determine what welfare and counselling services they need to provide to their students to offer that support, the government is proactive in promoting good practice in this area. We continue to work closely with Universities UK (UUK) on embedding the Stepchange programme within the sector. Further information can be found here: https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/stepchange. Stepchange calls on HE leaders to adopt mental health as a strategic priority and take a whole-institution approach, embedding it across all policies, cultures, curricula and practice. The Stepchange programme relaunched in March 2020 as the Mentally Healthy Universities programme. The university Mental Health Charter, announced in June 2018, is backed by the government and led by the sector. The charter, developed in collaboration with students, staff and partner organisations, aims to drive up standards of practice, including leadership, early intervention and data collection. Further information can be accessed here: https://www.studentminds.org.uk/charter.html.

Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, I have stressed the importance of protecting student and staff wellbeing. We recognise that many students are facing additional mental health challenges due to the disruption and uncertainty caused by the outbreak. I have engaged with universities on this issue and have written to Vice Chancellors on numerous occasions during the past year, most recently last month, outlining that student welfare should remain a priority. I have also convened a working group of representatives from the HE and health sectors to specifically address the current and pressing issues that students are facing during the COVID-19 outbreak.

My hon. Friend, the Minister for Children and Families, and I have also convened a Mental Health in Education Action Group to drive action to mitigate the impact of the outbreak on the mental health and wellbeing of children, young people and staff in nurseries, schools, colleges and universities.

We expect HE providers to continue to support their students, which has included making services accessible from a distance whilst restrictions have been in place. We encourage students to stay in touch with their provider’s welfare teams as these services are likely to continue to be an important source of support. Many providers have bolstered their existing mental health services, and adapted delivery mechanisms including reaching out to students who may be more vulnerable. Staff at universities and colleges have been proactive in supporting their students, showing resourcefulness and there are many examples of good practice.

We have worked with the Office for Students (OfS) to provide Student Space, a dedicated mental health and wellbeing platform for students, which has been funded by up to £3 million by the OfS in the 2020/21 academic year. We have also asked the OfS to allocate £15 million towards student mental health in 2021/22 through proposed reforms to Strategic Priorities Grant funding, to help address the challenges to student mental health posed by the transition to university, given the increasing demand for mental health services. This will target those students in greatest need of such services, including vulnerable groups and hard-to-reach students.

The Office for National Statistics data shows that in 2016/17 – the last year on record – there were 95 student deaths by suicide in England and Wales. Further information can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/articles/estimatingsuicideamonghighereducationstudentsenglandandwalesexperimentalstatistics/2018-06-25#:~:text=The%20rate%20of%20suicide%20in,it%20difficult%20to%20identify%20statistically.

The incoming President of UUK, Professor Steve West, and I will jointly chair a new roundtable on suicide prevention in June. Through this we will develop and support the adoption of the Suicide Safer Universities framework and promote good practice in the sector, helping to make sure students are well supported during their time at university, including when undertaking placements as part of their studies.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Education)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of schools providing in-school counselling support as part of a whole school approach to mental health.

The department recognises that counselling can play a particularly effective role as part of a whole-school or college approach, and that many schools already provide their pupils access to counselling support.

To support the provision of counselling support in schools, the department published a blueprint for school counselling services.  This provides schools with practical, evidence-based advice, informed by schools and counselling experts, on how to deliver high quality school-based counselling. It also offers information on how to ensure that vulnerable children, including children with special educational needs and disabilities, looked after children and those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, who have a higher prevalence to mental illness, can access counselling provision.  Further guidance on counselling in schools can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/counselling-in-schools.

However, the department has not made the provision of access to counselling in schools and colleges mandatory, as it is important for schools to have the freedom to decide what support to offer their pupils, based on their particular needs, and drawing on an evidence base of effective practice. This support can come from a number of sources, including counselling.

The government has invested £8 million in the new Wellbeing for Education Return programme which funded expert advisers who offered training and support to schools and colleges and made links to local support available, including, potentially, counselling. Alongside this, the department launched a £95,000 pilot led by the Education Support charity to provide online peer-support and telephone counselling from experts to around 250 school leaders. The pilot ended in March 2021. The outcome of the pilot will inform any future wellbeing and mental health interventions for staff.

To increase support further in the long term, we remain committed to our joint green paper delivery programme with the Department of Health and Social care and NHS England, including introducing new mental health support teams linked to schools and colleges, providing training for senior mental health leads in schools and colleges, and testing approaches to faster access to NHS specialist support.

We have recently announced a £79 million boost to children and young people’s mental health support, accelerating introduction of Mental Health Support Teams. The support teams, which provide early intervention on mental health and emotional wellbeing issues in schools and colleges, will grow from the 59 set up by last March to around 400 by April 2023, supporting nearly 3 million children. This increase means that millions of children and young people will have access to significantly expanded mental health services.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department has spent to date on the delivery of the proposals in the Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health green paper.

The Department for Education has spent £9.2 million to date on the delivery of our specific commitments outlined in the government’s 2018 response to ‘Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health: A Green Paper’. This includes £2.6 million for supporting the roll-out of new mental health support teams, the national roll-out (and adaptation during the COVID-19 outbreak) of the Link Programme, improving joint working between local health and education partners, and developing a training offer for senior mental health leads in schools and colleges.

In response to the pressures of the COVID-19 outbreak, the government prioritised bespoke training and support to meet the immediate challenges that schools and colleges were facing in supporting children and young people. The department has therefore also spent £6.6 million contributing to the Wellbeing for Education Return programme alongside the Department for Health and Social Care, providing training and support to schools and colleges with their immediate approach to wellbeing and mental health during the COVID-19 outbreak.

The £8 million Wellbeing for Education Return programme has funded local experts to provide training, advice and resources for schools and further education (FE) providers to help support the wellbeing, resilience and recovery of pupils and students, parents and carers and staff in light of the ongoing impact of the COVID-19 outbreak and lockdown.

Over 90% of local authority areas in England have reported that they are delivering additional training and support into local schools and FE providers because of the Wellbeing for Education Return funding, and have been continuing to do so remotely. Nationally, information indicates that more than 15,000 education settings are being offered additional training and support. We remain committed to our joint green paper delivery programme with DHSC and NHS England, including introducing new mental health support teams for all schools and colleges, providing training for senior mental health leads in schools and colleges and testing approaches to faster access to NHS specialist support.

The support that schools and FE providers provide to their pupils as they return to face-to-face education should include time devoted to supporting mental health and wellbeing, which will play a fundamental part in supporting children and young people’s recovery. The £700 million package includes a new one-off Recovery Premium for state primary, secondary and special schools to use as they see best to support disadvantaged students. This will help schools and FE providers to provide their disadvantaged pupils with a one-off boost to the academic and pastoral support that has been proved most effective in helping them recover from the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak. It can be used for mental health and wellbeing support. The expectations for schools in this regard are set out clearly in the department’s guidance to schools, which also signposts further support: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak.

This funding follows our £1 billion COVID-19 catch-up package, which includes £650 million shared across early years, schools and 16-19 providers over the 2020/21 academic year to support education settings to put the right catch-up and pastoral support in place. This is already being used by schools to put in place additional mental health and wellbeing and other support.

We have also recently announced a £79 million boost to children and young people’s mental health support, including through mental health support teams. The support teams provide early intervention on mental health and emotional wellbeing issues in schools and colleges, supporting them with their wider approach and liaison with health services. The teams will grow from the 59 set up by last spring to around 400 by April 2023, supporting nearly 3 million children. This increase means that millions of children and young people will have access to significantly expanded mental health services.

As well as providing additional COVID-19 specific mental health advice and support, our relationships education, relationships and sex education and health education curriculum includes mental health and wellbeing. We have online training materials and implementation guides, as well as case studies, which gives inclusive advice to schools and staff on how best to support pupils’ mental health: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teaching-about-mental-wellbeing.

The department has convened its Mental Health in Education Action Group to look at the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the mental health and wellbeing of children, young people and staff in nurseries, schools, colleges, and universities. It is bringing together partners to take additional action to support mental wellbeing of children and young people with the return to education settings and with transitions between education settings in September 2021. This will include looking at what more we can do to help schools to make the most effective use of the recovery premium to support mental health and wellbeing.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of the recently announced £700 million of funding to help students catch-up on lost learning will be made available for the provision of mental health and wellbeing support in schools and colleges.

The support schools provide to their pupils as they return to face-to-face education should include time devoted to supporting mental health and wellbeing, which will play a fundamental part in supporting children and young people’s recovery. The £700 million package includes a new one-off Recovery Premium for state primary, secondary and special schools to use as they see best to support disadvantaged students. This will help schools to provide their disadvantaged pupils with a one-off boost to the support, both academic and pastoral, that has been proved most effective in helping them recover from the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak and can be used for mental health and wellbeing support.

This funding follows our £1 billion COVID-19 “catch-up” package which includes £650 million shared across early years, schools and 16-19 providers over the 2020/21 academic year to support education settings to put the right catch-up and pastoral support in place. This is already being used by schools to put in place additional mental health and wellbeing support.

We have recently announced a £79 million boost to children and young people’s mental health support, including through Mental Health Support Teams. The support teams, which provide early intervention on mental health and emotional wellbeing issues in schools and colleges, will grow from the 59 set up by last March to around 400 by April 2023, supporting nearly 3 million children. This increase means that millions of children and young people will have access to significantly expanded mental health services.

The department has convened its Mental Health in Education Action Group, to look at the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the mental health and wellbeing of children, young people and staff in nurseries, schools, colleges, and universities. It is bringing together partners to take additional action to support mental wellbeing of children and young people with the return to education settings and with transitions between education settings in September 2021. This will include looking at what more we can do to help schools to make the most effective use of recovery premium to support mental health and wellbeing.

We also remain committed to our joint green paper delivery programme with the Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England, including introducing new mental health support teams for all schools and colleges, providing training for senior mental health leads in schools and colleges, and testing approaches to faster access to NHS specialist support.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the importance of the wraparound childcare sector to supporting children’s mental health during the covid-19 outbreak.

The government recognises the important role wraparound childcare and other out-of-school activities play in providing enriching activities which support children’s physical and mental health, as well as the development of skills and attitudes which promote their wellbeing. That is why we have ensured that all before and after-school clubs, holiday clubs, and other out-of-school settings have been able to continue to stay open for those children that need or rely on these settings most, for the duration of the national lockdown.

Until 8 March 2021, providers could open for all vulnerable children and young people regardless of circumstance, and children of critical workers where the provision was reasonably necessary to support their parents to work, undertake education or training, or access medical care, in line with those children eligible to attend school on site. From 8 March, these providers have been able to open their doors for all children, where the provision supports certain essential purposes, with vulnerable children and young people able to continue accessing provision under any circumstance. We have updated our protective measures guidance for the sector to support them to open for more children as safely as possible, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak.

Given the importance of supporting children’s mental health and wellbeing throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, Dr Alex George has been appointed as a Youth Mental Health Ambassador to advise the government and raise the profile of mental health education and wellbeing in schools. He will play an important role in shaping children’s mental health education and support in schools as part of our plans to ensure all children and young people are supported with their mental health and wellbeing.

The Department for Education also launched in September its £8 million Wellbeing for Education Return programme. It has supported education staff to respond to the emotional and mental health pressures some children and young people may be feeling as a result of COVID-19. In addition, the Department for Health and Social Care also launched a campaign in September through the Every Mind Matters website to raise awareness of the guidance and tools available to support children and young people’s mental wellbeing.  Public Health England continues to update and promote the Every Mind Matters website, available here: https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/every-mind-matters/. The government has also provided over £10 million of additional funding to mental health charities to support adults and children.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that (a) GCSE and (b) A-level pupils who were unable to sit exams are not unfairly penalised by not having the opportunity to improve on their predicted grades before schools were closed due to the covid-19 outbreak.

Our priority is to ensure that this year’s grading is as fair as possible, given the exceptional circumstances, so that students can progress to the next stage of their education or training.

For students who were due to sit GCSE, AS level or A level exams this summer, schools and colleges have provided a centre assessment grade for each subject - the grade they believe their students would have most likely achieved had they been able to sit the exam. Ofqual published guidance on awarding GCSE, AS and A levels which explained to schools and colleges how to do this fairly and robustly, drawing on a range of evidence to reach a judgement. This includes any non-exam assessment that students had already completed; the results of any homework or mock exams; and any other records of student performance over the course of study. This could include predicted grades for university applications but centre assessment grades are not the same as predicted grades.

To make sure that grades are awarded fairly between schools and colleges, exam boards are putting all centre assessment grades through a process of standardisation using a model developed by Ofqual.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 15 June 2020 to Question 52591, and with reference to the recommendation to accelerate the development of culturally competent occupational risk assessment tools on page 10 of the publication of the Public Health England report entitled, Beyond the data: Understanding the impact of COVID-19 on BAME groups, whether his Department plans to implement that recommendation.

The Government is committed to reducing the disparity in health outcomes - whether that is from COVID-19 or from other causes – that some BAME communities experience in this country.

The recommendations in the Public Health England report cover a wide range of areas, many of which are already touched on by the terms of reference for the work that was announced by my hon. Friend, the Minister for Equalities on 4 June 2020. Those terms of reference can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/next-steps-for-work-on-covid-19-disparities-announced.

The Department continues to encourage schools to be especially sensitive to the needs and worries of Black, Asian and minority ethnic pupils, parents and carers, and staff, considering if any additional measures or reasonable adjustments may need to be put in place to mitigate concerns.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the World Health Organisation's air pollution limits on particulate matter; and what plans her Department has to adopt those targets.

In July 2019, the Government published a report assessing the progress that will be made towards World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines under a range of scenarios. The report concluded that while significant progress would be made, additional action would be required in large urban areas such as London. The analysis did not outline a pathway to achieve the WHO guideline level for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) across the country, and did not take into account full economic viability and practical deliverability.

The Environment Bill, which will be introduced shortly, will establish a legally binding duty to set a target for PM2.5, demonstrating our commitment to action on the air pollutant that has the most significant impact on human health. We are committed to setting challenging targets and following an evidence based process, seeking advice from a range of experts, in addition to giving consideration to the WHO’s air quality guidelines. We need to ensure that the target is based on realistic pathways, robust science and full economic analysis to ensure that it is both ambitious and achievable, and focus on how the greatest public health benefits can be achieved.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether there has been a review of the safety of air conditioning systems in commercial aircraft to reduce the risk of those systems spreading covid-19 among passengers.

Air conditioning systems on modern aircraft filter cabin air every few minutes through High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. These filters are very effective at capturing airborne microbes in the filtered air, and when coupled with the drawn in fresh air, can help to mitigate the longer range risk of transmission. A review is being undertaken for the other known routes of transmission.

28th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Answer of 21 January 2020 to Question 3859 on Cycling and Walking: Finance, what funding has been allocated to the £350 million cycling infrastructure fund; and whether and that fund has (a) tendered for bids and (b) received applications for funding from that fund; and whether any cycling schemes have been allocated financial support from that fund.

No funding has yet been allocated to the new Cycle Infrastructure Fund. This will be considered as part of forthcoming fiscal events. Further details, including on matters such as the fund’s eligibility criteria and application process, will be announced in due course.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Answer of 1 October 2019 to Question 291096 on Cycling and Walking: Finance, what additional funding will be allocated for (a) walking and (b) cycling to meet Government targets for levels of activity in those areas.

The levels of funding for cycling and walking in future years will be matters for the forthcoming Budget and Spending Review, further details of which will be announced in due course. The Government is committed to investing in cycling and walking to achieve the aims set out in the 2017 statutory Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS), and the manifesto included a commitment to create a new £350 million cycling infrastructure fund.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many FTE additional staff her Department has employed since March 2020.

4,026 FTE have joined payroll as at close 30 September 20. In addition, during the period between March 20 and end of September 20 we have had c1,000 loans from other government departments, c2,000 contractors and c1600 agency workers hired.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of allocating funding to businesses to provide training to employees on the early signs of poor mental health in the workplace.

The Stevenson/Farmer review of mental health and employers, published in October 2017, set out a series of recommendations. At its heart is an appeal to employers to adopt the “core standards”, which would make a real difference to the mental health support to people at work. A Leadership Council is driving adoption by sharing best practice and encouraging peer to peer conversations.

There is limited evidence on whether financial incentives can make a difference to adoption of health and wellbeing measures at work. We are supporting the evaluation of a trial led by the West Midlands Combined Authority testing whether financial incentives can be used to incentivise SME employers to take action along a health and wellbeing programme for SMEs. Final results will be published in due course.

Through our Challenge Fund we have funded a range of initiatives to help people with mental health and Musculoskeletal conditions stay in work. The Fund, which drew to a close in April 2020, funded 19 Initiatives to learn from different approaches that supported both individuals and employers. The learning will be used to inform future policies that are aimed at helping people with mental health and/or musculoskeletal conditions to retain employment.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of reviewing the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 to (a) strengthen the provisions on protecting mental health within existing legislation and (b) enshrine parity of esteem for mental health in law.

Under the Health and Safety (First Aid) at Work Regulations 1981 employers have a responsibility to consider the physical and mental health needs of their staff as part of their first aid needs assessment and decide what support is necessary, regardless of whether or not the cause is work-related. HSE published clarified guidance in November 2018 to increase employers’ understanding of their responsibilities and what factors to consider when undertaking a first aid needs assessment.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to Answer of 7 June 2021 to Question 3088 on Mental Health Services: Hospital Beds, how many mental health beds there were in each financial year from (a) 2010 to (b) 2021.

NHS England and NHS Improvement hold information on mental health beds classified as consultant-led only, which is shown in the following table.

Year

Consultant-led mental health beds

2010/11

23,447

2011/12

23,149

2012/13

22,396

2013/14

21,950

2014/15

21,547

2015/16

19,045

2016/17

18,731

2017/18

18,295

2018/19

18,366

2019/20

18,171

2020/21

17,610

Source: KH03 data collection, NHS England and NHS Improvement

Note:

The figures are averages across the year, calculated as weighted averages from the four quarters.

Since 2009/10, many trusts have started classifying some mental illness beds as non-consultant-led. Information on these beds is not collected centrally.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government has consulted mental health service users with complex needs on the use of the Serenity Integrated Mentoring (SIM) model; and whether he has plans to further consult users about the SIM model.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data his Department holds on the (a) effectiveness and (b) safety of the Serenity Integrated Mentoring model in mental healthcare.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment the Government has made of the effectiveness of the Serenity Integrated Mentoring model used in mental healthcare; and what plans he has to review the use of that model nationally.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Government has to tackle the stigma associated with being sectioned under the Mental Health Act.

We have published our proposals to reform the Mental Health Act 1983 and we will also be looking at policy and practices around the legislation and the support provided to support and help individuals sectioned under the Act, including through advocacy and culturally appropriate provision.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether all expectant mothers and birthing people can access NHS perinatal services in every region of England.

Expectant mothers and birthing people are able to access physical and mental health care during the perinatal period in every region in England.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children were admitted to accident and emergency for self-harming in each year from 2015 to 2020.

The information is not collected in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what specialist eating disorder organisations he has (a) met and (b) consulted on calorie counting on menus.

We have been careful to consider the views of a wide range of experts in response to our public consultation on introducing mandatory out-of-home calorie labelling including representatives from eating disorder groups. The Department has also engaged with the eating disorder charity BEAT, as well as others representing the views of people living with eating disorders, on several occasions since the Government published ‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’ last July.

The Department has published an impact assessment detailing the likely effect the policy will have, including the potential effect of the policy on people living with eating disorders. This and the Government’s response to its public consultation on calorie labelling in the out-of-home sector, set out the evidence used to support the policy. The impact assessment and consultation response are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/calorie-labelling-for-food-and-drink-served-outside-of-the-home

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish the findings of the consultation on Reforming the Mental Health Act.

On 13 January, we published the white paper ‘Reforming the Mental Health Act’.

The public consultation period on the white paper closed on 21 April. We are now analysing the consultation responses from the public and stakeholders. We will respond to the consultation this year, as part of our continuing work to develop a new Mental Health Bill.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish his plans to reform the Mental Health Act.

On 13 January, we published the white paper ‘Reforming the Mental Health Act’.

The public consultation period on the white paper closed on 21 April. We are now analysing the consultation responses from the public and stakeholders. We will respond to the consultation this year, as part of our continuing work to develop a new Mental Health Bill.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many mental health beds there were in (a) 2010 and (b) 2021.

The information is not collected in the format requested as data is only available for financial years.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many mental health doctors there were in (a) 2010 and (b) 2021.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS) workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, but not staff working in primary care, local authorities or other providers.

As at September 2010 there were 8,943 full time equivalent (FTE) HCHS doctors in the mental health workforce in the National Health Service in England, as at December 2020 this was 9,725 FTE, the latest available data.

Mental health service provision is also commissioned by the NHS from private sector providers. The above figures do not reflect staffing in the private sector.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many mental health nurses there were in (a) 2010 and (b) 2021.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is the independent professional regulator for nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom and is responsible for nurse and midwifery registration. The NMC’s latest published registration data as at March 2021 show there were 71,385 nurses resident in England registered in the field of practice ‘mental health nurses’, based on headcount. As of March 2010 there were 71,793.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will commit to (a) undertaking and (b) publishing a review of the prescription of anti-psychotic drugs to people with dementia during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has no plans to conduct a review.

NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to monitor the monthly data published by NHS Digital on the prescribing of anti-psychotic medication for people diagnosed with dementia and continue to have regular conversations with regional clinical network leads and local services to understand the patterns in prescribing and potential reasons for those trends.

In addition, Public Health England has recently published factsheets which will help to provide context around prescribing activity and support initiation of conversations at a local level to facilitate an understanding of the patterns in prescribing. These factsheets are available at the following link:

https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile-group/mental-health/profile/dementia/data#page/

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the report published in September 2020 by the Alzheimer's Society entitled Worst hit: dementia during coronavirus, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the increased deterioration of symptoms experienced by people with dementia during the covid-19 outbreak; and what steps his Department is taking to tackle the decline in dementia diagnosis rates during that outbreak.

We continue to closely monitor the dementia diagnosis rate on a monthly basis. The Government has made £17 million of the Comprehensive Spending Review Settlement available to tackle the decline in the dementia diagnosis rate. NHS England and NHS Improvement are using this funding to aid recovery of referrals to memory assessment services, diagnosis of dementia and support access to post-diagnostic support.

The NHS Long Term Plan commits to the expansion of the Enhanced Health in Care Homes service model and to expand further the NHS Comprehensive Model of Personalised Care, with a focus on enhancing access to social prescribing for people with dementia and their carers. NHS England and NHS Improvement have also made guidance and resources available to address the rehabilitation needs of people living with dementia who are recovering from COVID-19 infection.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the article published in the Lancet in November 202 entitled Anti-psychotic prescribing to people with dementia during covid-19, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the increase in the number of people with dementia who have been prescribed anti-psychotic drugs during the covid-19 outbreak; and what steps his Department plans to take to increase the number of medication reviews for those people.

NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to monitor the monthly data published by NHS Digital on the prescribing of anti-psychotic medication for people diagnosed with dementia and continue to have regular conversations with regional clinical network leads and local services to understand the patterns in prescribing and potential reasons for trends being seen.

NHS England and NHS Improvement also continue to promote best practice for medication reviews and monitor the data to ascertain trends to help evidence this element of post-diagnostic support. In addition, Public Health England has recently published CCG factsheets which will help to provide context around prescribing activity and support initiation of conversations at a local level to facilitate an understanding of the patterns in prescribing. These factsheets are available at the following link:

https://fingertips.phe.org.uk/profile-group/mental-health/profile/dementia/data#page/

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much his Department has spent to date on the delivery of the proposals in the Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health green paper.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of every GP practice having a fulltime mental health support worker.

From April 2021, Primary Care Networks (PCNs) will be able to offer an embedded mental health practitioner service. Mental health practitioner roles have been added to the Additional Roles Reimbursement Scheme that enables PCNs to secure additional staff to ensure a satisfactory provision of health services under the Directed Enhanced Services.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what mental health support is available for young people who are not in education, employment or training.

We are introducing new models of care that will give 370,000 adults, including young adults with serious mental illness greater choice and control over their care, and that will support them to live well in their communities. These models include access to employment support.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to help tackle the high suicide rate among people with bipolar disorder.

Under the NHS Long Term Plan, we are introducing new models of care which will, by 2023/24, give 370,000 adults with a severe mental illness such as bipolar disorder greater choice and control over their care and support them to live well in their communities. We are also investing £57million in suicide prevention through the Plan.

On 27 March, we published our COVID-19 mental health and wellbeing recovery action plan, backed by £500 million to support people’s mental health in 2021/22. £58 million of this will be used to accelerate the community mental health framework to treat adults with severe mental illness. The recovery action plan also includes £6 million to boost support for specific suicide prevention work, with £1 million for NHS England and NHS Improvement’s work on suicide prevention and £5 million to support voluntary sector organisations that prevent suicide in the community.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish a breakdown of spending before 31 March 2021 under the £1.4 billion Future in Mind strategy.

Funding under the Future in Mind strategy has been added to clinical commissioning groups’ (CCGs) baseline allocations. Spend by CCGs, as well as total spend nationally and regionally, on mental health services is published annually in the NHS Mental Health Dashboard Quarter 4 publication. This will include the funding from the £1.4 billion Future in Mind strategy. The Dashboard covering 2020/21 is expected to be published in August 2021.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to increase access to mental health support services for ICU survivors; and whether he has assessed the potential merits of working with local authorities and local health services to help ICU survivors’ rehabilitation via peer support groups.

In March, we published the Mental Health Recovery Action Plan, with a one-off targeted investment of £500 million to ensure that we have the right support in place over the coming year. This plan outlines our approach to support groups which have been most impacted by the pandemic including expanding capacity of services to respond to the growing number of individuals who may need clinical support as a result of their treatment in an intensive care unit (ICU). For example, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services, which offer confidential treatment of conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will expand, supporting 1.6 million more people to access services in 2021/22, backed by an additional £38 million.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have also invested £10 million to set up specialist ‘long’ COVID-19 assessment services in every area across England to assess the physical and mental health needs of patients, including those who have been treated in an ICU. This includes psychological assessments and referral if someone is suffering from mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety or PTSD. No specific assessment has been made of providing peer support groups with local services. However, expanding peer support is a key part of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of funding mental health support for ICU survivors to ensure they can be emotionally supported through rehabilitation.

In March, we published the Mental Health Recovery Action Plan, with a one-off targeted investment of £500 million to ensure that we have the right support in place over the coming year. This plan outlines our approach to support groups which have been most impacted by the pandemic including expanding capacity of services to respond to the growing number of individuals who may need clinical support as a result of their treatment in an intensive care unit (ICU). For example, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services, which offer confidential treatment of conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) will expand, supporting 1.6 million more people to access services in 2021/22, backed by an additional £38 million.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have also invested £10 million to set up specialist ‘long’ COVID-19 assessment services in every area across England to assess the physical and mental health needs of patients, including those who have been treated in an ICU. This includes psychological assessments and referral if someone is suffering from mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety or PTSD. No specific assessment has been made of providing peer support groups with local services. However, expanding peer support is a key part of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure that mental health support is provided in HIV clinics that have no existing psychological or mental health provision.

We would expect treatment services, such as HIV clinics, to take patients’ mental health needs into account as part of their overall care. Evidence related to people living with HIV and mental health will be considered as we develop our Sexual and Reproductive Health Strategy and the HIV Action Plan, which we plan to publish in 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of undertaking a review of the provision of mental health support services for people living with HIV as part of the HIV Action Plan.

We would expect treatment services, such as HIV clinics, to take patients’ mental health needs into account as part of their overall care. Evidence related to people living with HIV and mental health will be considered as we develop our Sexual and Reproductive Health Strategy and the HIV Action Plan, which we plan to publish in 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) availability of mental health services and (b) adherence to HIV medication among people living with HIV.

We would expect treatment services, such as HIV clinics, to take patients’ mental health needs into account as part of their overall care. Evidence related to people living with HIV and mental health will be considered as we develop our Sexual and Reproductive Health Strategy and the HIV Action Plan, which we plan to publish in 2021.

Adherence of HIV medication among people living with HIV is captured and reviewed by the clinical teams supporting patients through their ongoing care. Clinical care is further supported through the capturing of data by the HARS database. This system enables clinical teams to record treatment and prescribing information as well as collecting markers on viral load, which can also be an indicator of a patient’s adherence to their HIV medication.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the level of adherence to HIV medication among young people transitioning from children’s HIV services to adult HIV services.

As part of the remit of HIV services, there is continuous monitoring of compliance for the adherence of patients under the care of the treating clinician and pharmacy teams. No specific assessment has been made.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 12 March 2021 to Question 156496, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of ending financial support for bereavement charities on the ability of such charities to support their service users; and if he will take steps to introduce a new financial support package for bereavement charities in the next financial year.

The Department meets regularly with bereavement support organisations to assess what is needed at this difficult time. The Government is committed to ongoing engagement with the bereavement support sector and will continue to work closely with organisations over the coming months to ensure that grieving individuals and families receive the support they need.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Health and Social Care, what provision has been put in place to ensure that the wellbeing and safeguarding of people with pre-existing mental health conditions is protected while quarantining in hotels due to the covid-19 outbreak after international travel.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to page 84 of Budget Report 2021, how much funding in total will be allocated to mental health services .

As highlighted in the Budget Report 2021, the 2020 Comprehensive Spending Review confirmed an additional £3 billion for the National Health Service in 2021/22, on top of the already agreed funding for the NHS Long Term Plan settlement, to support the NHS recovery from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As part of that £3 billion, the NHS will receive around an additional £500 million in 2021/22, to address waiting times for mental health services, provide more people with mental health support and invest in the workforce.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the importance of the wraparound childcare sector to supporting the mental health of parents.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Streatham (Bell Ribeiro Addy MP) on 10 February 2021 to Question 147071

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that all eating disorder services are commissioned to provide NICE-approved treatments for people with binge eating disorder.

National Health Service commissioners and providers in England are expected to take National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines into account in the planning and provision of services.

For children and young people, there is a programme in place to promote early access to effective, NICE-approved treatments for eating disorders, working in partnership with children, young people and their families.

For adults, the Adult Eating Disorders: Community, Inpatient and Intensive Day Patient Care Guidance was published in August 2019, emphasising that eating disorder services should provide evidence-based treatment, care and support for the full range of eating disorder diagnoses, including binge eating disorder.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to appoint a new Mental Health Equalities Champion; what the process is for that appointment; and what the remit is of that role.

Our intention is to appoint a new Mental Health Equalities Champion. The process and remit of the role will be confirmed in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on public health of the lack of mental health expertise on the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE); and what plans he has to ensure that mental health expertise is included in that Group's advice.

No such assessment has been made.

The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) draws on a diverse range of leading scientific and medical experts from within Government, academia and industry, to formulate its advice. During this pandemic, SAGE has drawn on expertise from but not limited to environmental scientists, public health experts, behavioural and social scientists, epidemiologists, virologists, data scientists, modellers, genomic experts, anthropologists, psychologists, therapeutics and vaccine experts.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the cross-Government group of Ministers established to consider and respond to the longer-term mental health effects of the pandemic will set out its plans; and whether its proposals will be publicly funded.

The Government will publish an action plan setting out further measures to respond to and mitigate the impacts on mental health across the population in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing an equivalent Chief Medical Officer role for mental health.

As Chief Medical Officer, Professor Whitty’s interest covers both mental and physical health, therefore we have no plans at present to introduce an equivalent Chief Medical Officer role for mental health.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on tackling mental health stigma and discrimination following its announcement in October 2020 that it will stop funding Time to Change on 31 March 2021.

The Department is working with Time to Change on developing regional community-led hubs to secure its legacy. More widely, we are ensuring that work to address mental health inequalities, stigma and discrimination remains a priority across Government. Every Government department, as well as major corporations, has made a Time to Change Pledge to continue challenging mental health stigma and the inequalities experienced by people with mental illness.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will continue to financially support bereavement charities after 31 March 2021.

The Government will continue to work closely with bereavement organisations to ensure that support is available to those who have been bereaved, when they need it. This has included the provision of £10.2 million of funding since the start of the pandemic to mental health organisations, including bereavement organisations.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 6 January 2021 to Question 109529 on Electroconvulsive Therapy, who has overall responsibility for regulating electroconvulsive therapy; and what enforcement powers they have when breaches in guidance occurs.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is responsible for assessing whether service providers are following the current standards and guidelines on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), including those developed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

If the CQC becomes aware of concerns about the use of ECT which may lead to potential regulatory breaches, the CQC may its enforcement powers derived from the Health and Social Care Act 2008. The CQC’s inspectors would review the risk and decide on the appropriate regulatory response, which may include enforcement action.

In addition, the professional regulators set the standards of conduct and performance that regulated professionals must meet to safely practise. Professional regulators have a duty to investigate whether someone on their register is fit to practice if an allegation is made that they do not meet the required standards. Where necessary, the regulator will take action to ensure public safety including restricting or removing a professionals’ right to practise.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of prioritising for covid-19 vaccination frontline psychotherapists and counsellors who continue to support people psychologically affected by covid-19.

Counsellors and psychotherapists working in frontline health or social care settings and at COVID-19 vaccination sites are eligible for vaccination in the first phase as frontline healthcare workers. Counsellors and psychotherapists working across all other settings who are eligible for a vaccine, because of their age or other clinical factors, such as underlying health conditions, will also have access to a vaccine in the first phase.

Phase two of the COVID-19 vaccine programme will cover all adults under 50 years old not already included in phase one. Prioritisation for phase two has not yet been decided, but interim advice has been published by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation recommending an age-based approach, which the Government has accepted in principle.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much of the additional funding allocated to mental health charities in response to the covid-19 outbreak has been used to provide direct counselling support; and how many vulnerable people have been supported through that funding.

We have invested more than £10 million in supporting national and local mental health charities, enabling them to continue their vital work in supporting people across the country during the pandemic. Data is not available showing how much of this funding has been used to provide direct counselling support or how many vulnerable people have been supported by these organisations.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department plans to take in response to the finding of the Health Survey for England 2019 that 16 per cent of adults aged 16 and over screened positive for a possible eating disorder; and what steps he is taking to increase funding for adult eating disorder services.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Bath (Wera Hobhouse) on 11 January 2021 to Question 131380.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Downing Street press conference of 5 January 2021, if he will confirm whether £12 billion has been allocated to NHS mental health care during the covid-19 outbreak.

We are putting over £12 billion a year into mental health services in England, with investment set to rise still further by an additional £2.3 billion a year by 2023/24.

We have also awarded over £22 million in cash grants to mental health, ambulance, social care, learning disabilities, autism and dementia charities to ensure they could meet increased demand as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, while continuing their day-to-day activities to help those in need.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has set a target date to end the use of shared sleeping arrangements in mental health wards.

We recognise that every psychiatric inpatient deserves the dignity and privacy of their own room. We have committed to over £400 million over the next four years to support our plans to eradicate the use of shared sleeping arrangements in the mental health estate. This includes £250 million funding for 2020/21 and a further £165 million for 2021/22.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have a plan for the trusts and schemes that will take this work forward. No target end date has been set. However, we will deliver the first tranche of new accommodation this financial year.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on the target to increase the number of consultant doctors working in each of the expansion areas referred to on page 13 of the Health Education England plan entitled Stepping forward to 2020/21: The mental health workforce plan for England.

As of June 2020, the mental health workforce in National Health Service-delivered services has increased by over 13,800 whole time equivalents since March 2016. Within this figure there are over 150 more whole time equivalent consultant doctors.

It is not possible at this time to map the current or future consultant workforce plans to the specific expansion areas set out in ‘Stepping forward to 2020/21: The mental health workforce plan for England’.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Government has to develop a public mental health strategy in response to a potential increase in the number of people with (a) mental illness and (b) poor mental wellbeing as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

We have brought forward our Wellbeing and Mental Health Support Plan for COVID-19, backed by £50 million, to set out the support available for individuals in the context of a second wave, and the winter months. It sets out the steps we have taken to strengthen the support available for people who are struggling, our commitments to ensure services are there to support those who need it and the provision in place to keep our frontline workers well.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect isolation has on the mental health of vulnerable people during periods of shielding.

The Government is aware of the challenges faced by clinically extremely vulnerable people. Throughout the pandemic, we have been clear on the need to balance the risks to this group with the benefits of gradually returning to normal life. Therefore, it was important to ensure that no-one was asked to shield unless absolutely necessary and shielding was paused at the earliest opportunity.

Updated guidance, issued on 2 December 2020, aims to strike a better balance between providing practical steps to help keep people safe while reducing some of the potentially harmful impacts on mental and social wellbeing that were associated with the previous shielding arrangements. It sets out the steps clinically extremely vulnerable people in each local tier can take to protect themselves and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what wellbeing and mental health support he is making available to vulnerable people shielding during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Every Mind Matters site is available to everyone with advice and practical steps that people can take to support their wellbeing and manage their mental health during this pandemic. Anyone concerned about their mental health should speak to their general practitioner or existing care team or can access further advice via NHS.UK. Online self-referral options are commonly available for some services including children and young people’s mental health services, and psychological therapies services for adults with common mental health problems such as anxiety and depression.

All mental health providers, including providers of psychological therapies, have been issued with guidance to encourage them to deliver care remotely so that vulnerable groups can receive care safely and 24 hours a day, seven days a week urgent mental health helplines have been established in all parts of England to provide support and advice to people experiencing a mental health crisis.

On 23 November 2020, we published our Wellbeing and Mental Health Support Plan for COVID-19, which set outs the support available for individuals in the context of a second wave and the winter months, including for vulnerable people. It sets out the steps we have taken to strengthen the support available for people who are struggling, our commitments to ensure services are there to support those who need it and the provision in place to keep frontline workers well.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of NHS volunteer covid-19 supported the mental health and wellbeing people who were shielding during the covid-19 outbreak.

National Health Service volunteer responders carry out simple, one-off tasks to support people in England who need help with accessing essentials and to help prevent loneliness.

‘Check-in and Chat’ tasks provide telephone support to individuals during self-isolation because talking to someone has been shown to help people stay healthy. Check-in and Chat Plus gives regular telephone support over several weeks providing peer support and companionship to people who have previously been advised to shield.

From 1 April to 29 November, there have been 304,193 completed Check in and Chat tasks, plus 43,272 Check in and Chat Plus tasks. In the week ending 29 November, 8,244 Check in and Chat tasks were completed, as well as 2,190 Check in and Chat Plus tasks.

Up to 15 November, NHS volunteer responders completed a total of 1,089,923 tasks in support of shielding and self-isolating groups.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what long term mental health support he will make available to healthcare workers diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder linked to their work during the covid-19 outbreak.

Supporting the mental health of healthcare workers is a priority for the Government, particularly during this unprecedented pandemic. NHS England and NHS Improvement are investing £15 million to strengthen mental health support for National Health Service staff. This funding will be used to set up a first wave of mental health hubs that will provide outreach and assessment services to help frontline staff receive rapid access to mental health services.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the mental health of healthcare workers.

Supporting the mental health of health workers is a priority for the Government, particularly during this unprecedented pandemic. NHS England and NHS Improvement have put in place a comprehensive package of health and wellbeing services for National Health Service staff, including helplines for counselling and support and free access to well-being apps.

The NHS People Plan published in July is focused on the wellbeing of the NHS workforce. As part of this offer, £15 million is being invested to strengthen mental health support for NHS staff. This funding will be used to set up a first wave of mental health hubs that will provide outreach and assessment services to help frontline staff receive rapid access to mental health services. The NHS also funds NHS Practitioner Health, which provides confidential mental health services for doctors and dentists.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department is providing to people with mental health difficulties as a result of long covid.

On 7 October NHS England announced £10 million of investment to establish a network of specialist clinics in England to support patients suffering from the persistent effects of COVID-19 or ‘long COVID-19’.

These specialist clinics will support patients suffering from various symptoms of long covid including those relating to mental health. Every patient will undergo a psychological assessment to see if they are suffering from depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder or another mental health condition as a result of COVID-19. Further details on the location of the clinics will be announced shortly.

The National Health Service has also launched the ‘Your Covid Recovery’, an online rehabilitation service that provides personalised support to patients for both their physical and mental health.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on levels of substance misuse.

No formal assessment has been made.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Government has to increase access to community services to support people suffering from substance misuse disorders.

We are committed to ensuring that anyone with a substance misuse problem can access the help and support they need. This includes providing support for those who misuse drugs and additional funding over 2020/21 to 2021/22 to drug and alcohol treatment in targeted local authorities to individuals experiencing rough sleeping, including those currently in emergency accommodation following the COVID-19 response.

The second phase of Dame Carol Black’s independent review on drugs focuses on prevention, treatment services and recovery. The recommendations will be made available to Ministers in due course and will feed into wider Government work to tackle the serious harms caused by substance misuse, including through increasing access to services.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to measure the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the level of demand for mental health services by recording covid-19 as a reason for using NHS Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have been working with NHS Digital, providers of Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services and clinical experts to enable data related to the impact of COVID-19 for patients with common mental health disorders to be collected within the new iteration of the IAPT dataset.

This will allow us to collect data on the diagnosis of COVID-19 and whether there is evidence of long-COVID for the patient. This work is being finalised and is expected to be rolled out at the start of 2021.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure mental health data collection continues during winter 2020-21.

All mental health data collections managed by NHS Digital have continued throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and will continue through the winter and into next year.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to introduce specialist bereavement services for suicide.

Under the NHS Long Term Plan, we have set out our plans to invest £57 million to support local suicide prevention plans and establish suicide bereavement support services in all areas of England by 2023/24.

We have committed that all local systems will have suicide bereavement support services providing timely and appropriate support to families and staff by 2023/24 and have provided funding to 40% of local systems in 2020/21 for them to establish and deliver such services. This is in line with the planning and delivery expectations set out in the Mental Health Implementation Plan 2019/20-2023/24.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the £500 million for mental health provided in the Spending Review 2020 will be spent on (a) services and (b) training.

Next year the National Health Service will receive around an additional £500 million to address waiting times for mental health services, following the reduction in referrals due to COVID-19, and give more people the mental health support they need. Some of the £500 million will be used for investment in the NHS workforce. Further detail will be set out in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the £260 million for Health Education England provided in the Spending Review 2020 will be spent on mental health education and training.

The Spending Review 2020 provides £260 million to continue to grow the National Health Service workforce and support commitments made in the NHS Long Term Plan, including for mental health.

Full details on funding allocations towards NHS workforce budgets, including Health Education England, in 2021-22 will be subject to a detailed financial planning exercise and finalised in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the £500 million for mental health provided in the Spending Review 2020 will be spent on (a) adult and (b) children and young people's services.

Next year the National Health Service will receive around an additional £500 million to address waiting times for mental health services, following the reduction in referrals due to COVID-19, and give more people the mental health support they need. Some of the £500 million will be used for investment in the NHS workforce. Further detail will be set out in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to answer named day Questions 94510 and 94511 tabled on 23 September 2020 by the hon. Member for Tooting.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that hon. Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold the Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer to Question 94511 on 11 November.

The hon. Member’s remaining question will be answered as soon as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many suicides of frontline NHS staff have been recorded since January 2020 to date.

This information is not currently held in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many contacts have been made via the NHS test and trace app (a) in total and (b) by employment sector.

As of 17 February 2021 1,764,520 contact tracing alerts have been sent out to app users in England who have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus.

Users of the NHS COVID-19 app are anonymous. Therefore, we do not hold data on the number of contact tracing alerts by employment sector.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of people adhere to self-isolation rules when asked to do so after contracting, or found to be a close contact of someone who has contracted, covid-19.

Anyone notified by NHS Test and Trace that they have tested positive for COVID-19 or are a close contact of someone who has is legally required to self-isolate.

NHS Test and Trace, with input from Public Health England and the Scientific Pandemic Influenza – Behavioural group, have conducted a survey to understand compliance with self-isolation. The results of this survey will be published in due course.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made available mental health support to small businesses in the wedding sector affected by the covid-19 restrictions on weddings since March 2020.

We recognise how important it is that people get the support they need with their mental health during this unprecedented time, including those working in small businesses such as the wedding sector.


We have provided £10.2 million of additional funding for mental health charities to support people struggling with their mental wellbeing during this time.

In addition, the Department for Work and Pensions continues to work with the Thriving at Work Leadership Council and Mind to promote the best practice and guidance offered on the Mental Health at Work website, which includes links to toolkits for small businesses and the self-employed affected by COVID-19 pandemic. The Government is signposting these resources via GOV.UK at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-support-for-business-from-outside-government

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the mental health campaign, Time to Change on tackling stigma and discrimination; and if the Government will provide further funding for the continuation of that campaign's work.

The Time to Change campaign has helped transform the national conversation around mental health and successfully changed the attitudes of 5.4 million people towards mental illness since 2007. A copy of the Time to Change Social Impact report for 2019/20 is available at the following link:

https://www.time-to-change.org.uk/about-us/our-impact

Since 2011, the Department has provided over £30 million of funding to the campaign. The current phase of the campaign ends on the 31 March 2021 and we have no plans to provide further funding for the campaign.

The Government is committed to addressing mental health inequalities, stigma and discrimination. Every Government department, as well as major corporations, have made a Time to Change Pledge to continue challenging mental health stigma and the inequalities experienced by people with mental illness.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the condition of the NHS mental health estate.

The latest available data on the condition of the National Health Service mental health estate was published in October 2019. According to this data, the cost to eradicate backlog maintenance across mental health and learning disability trusts was £342 million. The publication of data for 2019-20 was delayed due to the outbreak of COVID-19 and is due to be published in January 2021.

In October 2020, the Government announced more than £400 million to eradicate dormitory accommodation from mental health facilities, as part of the Government’s record investment in NHS infrastructure. This investment will improve the safety, privacy and dignity of patients suffering with mental illness.

The Government has also recently announced that 40 hospitals are to be built by 2030 and this includes new mental health hospitals in Northgate and in Poole. A competition will be announced in due course for eight further hospital schemes.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the evidence given in the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review 2020 led by Baroness Cumberlege on the harms of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT); and if he will he make an assessment of the potential merits of initiating an independent review on how ECT is administered and monitored.

We have no plans for such an assessment. All recommendations of the Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review are being considered carefully. The Government will provide an update in due course.

Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is tightly regulated under the Mental Health Act 1983 and generally can only be given when a patient consents. The Mental Health Act 1983: Code of Practice provides statutory guidance on the usage of ECT.


Sir Simon Wessely’s Independent Review of the Mental Health Act made 154 recommendations, including proposing further safeguards to strengthen a patients’ rights to refuse this treatment in advance. We have committed to publishing a White Paper which will set out the Government’s response to the Review, which we aim to publish by the end of the year.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 6 October 2020 to Question 94509, what trauma informed services are available to victims of stalking; and what training on stalking healthcare staff complete.

Victims of stalking can access a range of healthcare services depending on their clinical needs, and healthcare services are increasingly becoming trauma-informed, including mental health community care and sexual assault and abuse services.

The Intercollegiate Document ‘Adult Safeguarding: Roles and Competencies for Health Care Staff’ sets out the safeguarding knowledge, skills and attitudes required by staff working in health and care settings. All healthcare staff must undertake mandatory safeguarding training.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much resilience funding has been made available for mental health services for winter 2020-21.

Supporting people’s mental health is a priority for this Government. For those who have a mental health condition or are particularly vulnerable to mental illness, we are committed to making sure the right help and support is in place.

We recognise the pressures on mental health services due to the COVID-19 pandemic. National Health Service mental health services have remained open for business throughout this time, including delivering support digitally and by phone. For those with severe needs or in crisis, NHS mental health providers have established all-age 24 hours a day, seven days a week mental health crisis lines.

Through the NHS Long Term Plan, we are investing an additional £2.3 billion a year by 2023/24 to deliver the most ambitious major expansion and transformation of mental health services ever across England. We have also invested over £10 million to support both national and local mental health charities to continue their vital work supporting people across the country.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the report on Exercise Cygnus identified a need for additional mental health provision during a pandemic.

The provision of mental health services during an influenza pandemic was not explicitly tested as part of Exercise Cygnus.

However, we are committed to supporting everyone’s mental wellbeing, especially during unprecedented events such as pandemics, and have ensured that mental health services have remained open throughout the current COVID-19 pandemic.

We are continuing to work with experts from the National Health Service and from public health to assess what further help and support people might need to maintain their mental health over the next few weeks and months. In addition, we have released tailored guidance to help people deal with their mental health and wellbeing on GOV.UK at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-the-public-on-mental-health-and-wellbeing

We are also promoting this through the Every Mind Matters website.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 16 October 2020 to Question 100446 on Mental Health Services: Children and Young People, if he will publish the details of the 32 Snapchat accounts; and over what time period £20,000 was spent on influencer content through Snapchat.

The Better Health-Every Mind Matters (BH-EMM) campaign Snapchat influencer campaign ran from 8 September to 31 October 2020. The £20,000 investment was deployed over eight weeks.

Public Health England is unable to publish details of the accounts used as this information is commercially confidential.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, by what date all people whose covid-19 tests had been misplaced as a result of the excel technical issue identified on 2 October 2020 had been contacted.

While there was a delay in reporting these positive test results in the public data, and in transferring them to the contact tracing system, anybody testing positive received their results in the normal way, and in the normal timeframe. All outstanding cases were immediately transferred to the contact tracing system by 1am on 3 October.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether more than 16,000 covid-19 tests were misplaced as a result of the technical issue identified on Friday 2 October in the data load process.

We identified that 15,841 cases between 25 September and 2 October were not included in the reported daily COVID-19 cases.

While there was a delay in reporting these positive test results in the public data, and in transferring them to the contact tracing system, anybody testing positive received their results in the normal way, and in the normal timeframe. All outstanding cases were immediately transferred to the contact tracing system by 1am on 3 October.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the NHS 111 service cost the public purse in 2019-20; and what its budget is for 2020-21.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how the Government’s obesity strategy will provide long-term support to people living with obesity beyond 12 weeks.

The National Health Service 12 Week Weight Loss Plan is a starting point for those who are overweight or living with obesity, by supporting them on their journey to lose weight and adopt healthier eating and physical activity habits over time. The Better Health campaign and webpage provides ongoing support, including offers from weight-loss providers for those who would like or require additional support to lose weight and from physical activity providers for those who wish to become more active.

Through the new obesity strategy we are delivering a range of measures on weight management including a National Health Service 12-week weight loss plan app, expanding weight management services to help more people get the support they need, accelerating the expansion of the NHS diabetes prevention programme and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm. Further details about these measures will be available later in the year and we will engage stakeholders throughout this process.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to ensure Government communications do not stigmatise weight to avoid adverse mental health effects for people who are (a) overweight and (b) obese.

We have been careful to consider the views of mental health charities and experts as we developed our plans for implementing the obesity strategy and we will continue to listen going forwards. This includes feedback from a wide range of experts in response to our public consultations on specific policy proposals.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government plans to take to support pregnant women to maintain a healthy weight during pregnancy as part of the obesity strategy.

Through the new obesity strategy, published on 27 July, we are delivering a range of measures on weight management including a National Health Service 12-week weight loss plan app, expanding weight management services to help more people get the support they need, accelerating the expansion of the NHS diabetes prevention programme and making conversations about weight in primary care the norm. Further details about these measures will be available later in the year and we will engage stakeholders throughout this process.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people died by suicide within two months of attending A&E for a mental health problem in 2019-20.

The information requested is not held.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether NHS Mental Health Trusts can access the £588 million fund, announced on 21 August 2020 to support the NHS in discharging patients from hospitals from 1 September 2020.

The £588 million discharge fund does not include funding for National Health Service mental health trusts.

NHS financial arrangements for the remainder of 2020/21 include amounts for local systems to respond to COVID-19 and support for mental health discharges can be funded through monies available to local systems.

Separate discharge guidance for NHS mental health trusts is being developed in collaboration with NHS England and we will seek to publish this shortly.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) specialist support is available for and (b) steps he is taking to improve the treatment available to stalking victims with mental health conditions.

The Government recognises the importance of a trauma-informed approach across the range of services in health that provide support to victims and survivors of abuse.

Mental health is one of our top priorities and we want to ensure that people can access services according to their clinical need.

All healthcare staff are required to complete training on safeguarding for children and adults to ensure they understand the key principles to identify and support victims of violence and abuse, including stalking.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reasons NHS Mental Health Trusts are not included in the guidance, Hospital discharge service: policy and operating model; and for what reasons there is no equivalent guidance for those Trusts.

It is our priority to ensure that people are discharged safely from hospital to the most appropriate place, and that they continue to receive the care and support they need.

Under the Discharge Service Requirements, people who are clinically ready will be supported to return to their place of residence, where an assessment of longer-term needs will take place, using the ‘Discharge to Assess (D2A)’ HomeFirst model. Mental health inpatient services are not within scope for this guidance.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to page 19 of the document entitled, Stepping Forward to 2020/21, published by Health Education England in 2017, what progress has been made on NHS England's target of recruiting an additional 4,500 staff in children and young people’s mental health by 2021 across all relevant fields.

The figures from the children and young people’s mental health national benchmarking collection show that the employed workforce has increased by 4,557 to 14,857 whole time equivalents between December 2015 and December 2018.

The national benchmarking study of the children and young people’s mental health workforce is available at the following link:

https://www.hee.nhs.uk/our-work/mental-health/children-young-peoples-mental-health-services

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many mental health support teams are operating within schools; and how many (a) educational mental health practitioners and (b) Designated Senior Leads have been trained in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services trailblazer sites as outlined in the Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health Green Paper published in 2017.

There are currently 59 mental health support teams operational within schools and colleges. Some teams may, however, have flexed their resources to meet other requirements as part of the COVID-19 response and any subsequent school closures.

192 education mental health practitioners completed their training during 2018/19 and a further 496 trainees are currently in training.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the CAMHS trailblazer initiative as outlined in Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health Green Paper.

We have committed to establishing new mental health support teams in 20-25% of areas in England by 2023 and we are ahead of trajectory for achieving this. The first trailblazer sites became fully operational in early 2020 but it is too early to assess their effectiveness.

An independent evaluation of the implementation of the core proposals within the Green Paper has been commissioned but the evaluation fieldwork had to be temporarily paused due to the COVID-19 restrictions. The next steps for this evaluation process are currently being considered.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were discharged from mental health hospitals in each month in (a) 2019 and (b) 2020.

The following table shows available discharge figures for all activity relating to people who receive specialist secondary mental health care services or who receive specialist secondary learning disabilities or autism spectrum disorder services.

Number of discharges1 from mental health hospitals in England

Month

2019

2020

January

9,865

10,622

February

9,134

9,388

March

9,836

11,829

April

9,983

8,426

May

10,412

June

9,878

July

10,965

August

10,096

September

9,567

October

10,795

November

9,842

December

9,970

Source: Mental Health Services Dataset - NHS Digital.

1 As this is a count of discharges it may include people who had more than one hospital spell in a month and are therefore counted more than once.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department has issued on the resumption of face-to-face treatments for counselling and psychotherapy services; and how many such face-to-face treatments have been delivered in each month of the last 12 months.

The National Health Service has issued guidance to services to support them in managing demand and capacity across inpatient and community mental health services and keeping services open for business at this time.

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, which include counselling and psychotherapy, are expected to adhere to the broader Government guidance on working in COVID-safe environments to ensure that both staff and patients are protected. IAPT services continue to offer therapy via remote means, and any decision to restore face to face treatment will be a local decision, taking into account Government advice.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Department's expenditure was on mental health services in 2019; and what estimate he has made of his Department's projected spend for mental health services in 2021.

This information is only available by financial year, not calendar year. Details of expenditure on National Health Service mental health services are published by NHS England and NHS Improvement through the NHS Mental Health Dashboard which is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/mental-health/taskforce/imp/mh-dashboard/

Final outturn figures for 2019/20 and planned expenditure figures for 2020/21 are not yet available.

Planned expenditure on mental health services for 2019/20 by clinical commissioning groups and NHS England and NHS Improvement specialised commissioning was £13,055 million.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what mental health support has been provided to clinically extremely vulnerable people shielding during the covid-19 outbreak; and what estimate he has made on the number of people that have accessed that support.

National Health Service mental health services have remained open for business, offering support using digital, telephone and face-to-face approaches, including 24 hours a day, seven days a week crisis helplines, clearly accessible from trust websites.

The NHS has written to service providers, including general practitioners (GPs), on 4 June asking them to undertake a series of actions to support people who have been asked to shield. This includes ensuring every shielding individual has a named care coordinator to help coordinate different aspects of their healthcare, including accessing appropriate mental health care from NHS mental health services via their GP or other routes. A copy of the letter is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/06/C0583-nhs-update-on-shielding-june-2020.pdf

No estimate has been made as the data does not identify people who are shielding.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the answer of 18 June 2020 to question 58760, on Mental Health, if he will (a) list the dates on which he held meetings with mental health (i) trusts and (ii) organisations since 23 March 2020 and (b) provide the details of those trusts and organisations.

Ministers meet many stakeholders in the conduct of their duties.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative estimate he has made of the mortality rates of people with severe mental illness in contact with NHS mental health trusts (a) during the last three months and (b) in the same period in previous years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the adult mental health survey for England 2021 has been commissioned.

The Department has commissioned NHS Digital to procure a new national survey of the prevalence of mental health conditions in adults, the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey. NHS Digital will run a tender exercise over the 2020 summer period to procure a supplier that will carry out the survey.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many mental health organisations he has met with (a) in 2020 and (b) since the start of the lockdown due to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and Ministers regularly engage with a wide range of mental health organisations, including mental health trusts, as part of Departmental business.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many mental health trusts he has met with (a) in 2020 and (b) since the start of the lockdown due to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and Ministers regularly engage with a wide range of mental health organisations, including mental health trusts, as part of Departmental business.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many meetings he has had on the subject of mental health since the start of the lockdown due to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care and Ministers regularly engage with a wide range of mental health organisations, including mental health trusts, as part of Departmental business.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what additional funding has been made available to the NHS for the (a) mental health hotline for staff and (b) package of measures to support NHS staff through the covid-19 outbreak.

At the beginning of the COVID-19 response, the Department commissioned NHS England and NHS Improvement to develop a comprehensive package of emotional, psychological, and practical support for National Health Service staff.

In response, NHS England and NHS Improvement have funded a range of services to support the health and mental wellbeing of NHS staff, including a dedicated staff support helpline (in partnership with Samaritans), virtual staff common rooms for mutual support, and a separate helpline offering bereavement support (in partnership with Hospice UK). More information on support available to all NHS staff is online at the following link:

people.nhs.uk/help

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients were discharged from mental health hospitals as part of the Government's response to the covid-19 outbreak between March and April 2020.

The total number of discharges from mental health hospitals in England during the period requested is shown in the following table. COVID-19 is not one of the options available to record the reason for a patient being discharged.

England

March 2020

April 20202

Discharges from mental health hospitals in the reporting period1

11,829

Not yet available


Source: Mental Health Services Data Set, NHS Digital

Notes:

1A person may have had been discharged more than once within any given period.

2 Data for April 2020 are still being collected and analysed.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure a safe return to face to face mental health appointments for people with severe mental illness.

Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, the National Health Service has been clear on the importance of maintaining face to face care for those patients who need it, and of patient choice in determining suitability for digital appointments.

When delivering face to face appointments, mental health services are expected to follow the latest guidance on the use of personal protective equipment in healthcare settings to support infection prevention and control. Services will be further enabled by the roll out of the NHS Test and Trace service to reduce transmission risk and deliver face to face services in as safe a way as possible.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many inpatients in mental health hospitals have been diagnosed with covid-19 since March 2020.

The information requested cannot be provided.

The Hospital Episode Statistics data for March 2020 includes a small number of finished consultant episodes where there has been a confirmed or suspected diagnosis of COVID-19 in inpatients in mental health hospitals. This number falls below the level that would be reported and the data are thereby suppressed under the disclosure controls applied to this data.

Data for April 2020 are not yet available

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Education on school-based support for children with mental health needs when schools reopen to all pupils.

Such discussions have not taken place between the Secretaries of State. However, I have met several times recently with the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Children and Families (Vicky Ford MP) to discuss how health and education can work together to support children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing as schools reopen.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of whether the number of (a) detentions under the Mental Health Act, (b) referrals to NHS community mental health teams and (c) presentations at A&E with a primary recorded psychiatric diagnosis has been affected by the covid-19 pandemic.

Detentions under the Mental Health Act are measured through the Mental Health Services Data Set (MHSDS) published by NHS Digital. NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with NHS Digital and the other arm’s-length bodies to get early access to MHSDS data where possible, to be able to explore trends in activity.

In relation to referrals to National Health Service community mental health teams NHS England are aware that, through analysis of early access to MHSDS data, as well as via feedback from regional teams and providers, there has been a reduction in referrals since the start of the pandemic. To address this issue, NHS England and NHS Improvement have been emphasising that mental health services have remained open during the pandemic, providing a combination of care via digital channels and face to face where needed, and are working to ensure that referral routes, via primary care in particular, are clear.

With regard to accident and emergency attendances for people with mental health needs, NHS England and NHS Improvement are undertaking an analysis of a sample of trusts’ submissions of Emergency Care Data Set data to explore trends.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to data on deaths of people subject to the Mental Health Act 1983 from the Care Quality Commission on 7 May 2020, what assessment he has of changes in the level of deaths of people subject to that Act (a) where covid-19 was a factor in the death (b) overall since 1 March 2020.

The Care Quality Commission has reported that there have been 152 deaths of people subject to the Mental Health Act 1983 (from 1 March to 5 June 2020). Around half of these cases (75 deaths) are suspected or confirmed to be related to COVID-19, according to mental health providers. The proportion of deaths associated with COVID-19 is consistent with that reported on 7 May 2020, which the CQC reported mirrored a rise in notifications from other sectors.

The CQC is continuing to monitor the numbers of deaths of patients under the Mental Health Act. It has also written to providers asking them to continue reporting the deaths of patients under the Mental Health Act regardless of whether they are transferred to an acute trust for treatment.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made in implementing the actions in chapters 3 and 4 of the Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health Green Paper, published in December 2017.

We have made good progress and we remain committed to carrying out the Green Paper’s core proposals. In 2018 we announced the first 25 trailblazer sites, delivering 59 mental health support teams (MHSTs), the first of which started to become operational in early 2020. Twelve of the first 25 sites are also testing four-week waiting times. In July 2019, NHS England confirmed a further 57 areas, developing 123 new MHSTs.

The Department for Education has committed to provide training for a senior mental health lead in all state-funded schools and colleges in England by 2025. Eighty-two per cent of schools and 77 per cent of post-16 institutions have someone leading on mental health.

The Department for Education has also allocated £6 million to support schools to implement the new Relationship, Sex and Health Education curriculum; and the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care hosted three social media summits in 2019 to discuss tackling online harmful content.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of updating the Carers Action Plan 2018-2020 with regard to support for BAME young carers in light of the disproportionate affect covid-19 has had on those communities.

The Carers Action Plan 2018-2020 is due to complete this year. Action 3.4 in the plan focuses on young carers from disadvantaged and seldom heard groups, to increase the timely identification of particularly hidden young carers and to support better identification among black, Asian and minority ethnic families.

The findings from the action will be reported on this summer. Next steps and recommendations from the report will form part of the review for the action plan.

We continue to work with carer organisations, and young carer organisations to understand the impact of COVID-19 on young carers. This will help inform our next steps.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many new referrals there were to NHS secondary mental health services in March and April 2020 compared to the same period in 2019.

The information requested is shown in the following table.

England

March 2019

April 2019

March 2020

April 20202

Referrals to mental health services starting in reporting period1

321,326

303,373

297,516

Not yet available

Source: Mental Health Services Data Set, NHS Digital3

Notes:

1 A person may have had more than one referral within any given period.

2 Data for April 2020 are still being collected and analysed.

3 Caution should be made when comparing data as the coverage of the Mental Health Services Data Set has increased with 266 providers submitting data in March 2020 compared to 171 providers in March 2019.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that child and adolescent mental health service can meet the needs of children and young people when covid-19 lockdown is fully lifted.

National Health Service mental health services have remained open, and services have deployed digital tools to connect with people and provide ongoing support.

We expect mental health services to liaise with local partners to ensure referral routes are understood, particularly where children and young people are not at school.

NHS England has asked all mental health trusts to ensure there are 24 hours a day, seven days a week open access telephone lines for urgent NHS mental health support, advice and triage for all ages through a single point of access.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of prolonged social isolation on the mental wellbeing of the general public.

We are working with the National Health Service and Public Health England, service users, academics and the voluntary sector to gather evidence and assess the potential longer-term mental health impacts of COVID-19 and plan for how to support the public’s mental health and wellbeing throughout the ‘recovery’ phase.

Mental health services remain open and are working to support people with mental health problems through the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond and, on 22 April, the Government launched a major effort to tackle loneliness due to social isolation during the COVID-19 outbreak to ensure that, for people of all ages and backgrounds, staying at home does not need to lead to loneliness.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients have had more than one ambulance in attendance before being taken to hospital since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

NHS England and NHS Improvement do not collect data on the number of patients who have had more than one ambulance in attendance before being taken to hospital, or how many patients have requested an ambulance on more than one occasion before receiving a response.

Numbers of 999 calls and incidents are published at England and ambulance trust level. These Ambulance Quality Indicators are published monthly by NHS England and can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ambulance-quality-indicators/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the performance of ambulance response times during the covid-19 outbreak.

Ambulance Quality Indicators, including national response time performance are published monthly by NHS England. This can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ambulance-quality-indicators/

In April, four of the six national response time standards were met for life threatening, emergency, urgent, and non-urgent calls. In March, one standard was met for life threatening calls. Ambulance services received a record number of calls per day to 999, alongside a reduction in patients conveyed to accident and emergency, in order to reduce the increased pressures hospitals are facing due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people in cardiac arrest did not have an ambulance respond to their call in time in the last six months.

NHS England and NHS Improvement do not hold information on how many people in cardiac arrest did not have an ambulance respond to their call in time in the last six months.

Ambulance Quality Indicators, including Clinical Outcomes are published monthly by NHS England. This can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ambulance-quality-indicators/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients have requested an ambulance on more than one occasion before receiving a response since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

NHS England and NHS Improvement do not collect data on the number of patients who have had more than one ambulance in attendance before being taken to hospital, or how many patients have requested an ambulance on more than one occasion before receiving a response.

Numbers of 999 calls and incidents are published at England and ambulance trust level. These Ambulance Quality Indicators are published monthly by NHS England and can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ambulance-quality-indicators/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the guidance his Department has issued to the London Ambulance Service in relation to people suspected of having covid-19; and what assessment he has made of the effect of that guidance on trends in the level of (a) morbidity and (b) mortality of people with covid-19.

National guidance has been made available for ambulance trusts at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-ambulance-trusts/covid-19-guidance-for-ambulance-trusts

No national assessment has been made of the effect of that guidance on trends in the level of morbidity and mortality of people with COVID-19.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many staff were employed by each mental health trust in (a) 2010 and (b) 2019.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, but not staff working in primary care, general practitioner surgeries, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the number of all staff at the mental health trusts specified as at September 2010, September 2019 and January 2020, the latest available data, full time equivalent.

-

September 2010

September 2019

January 2020

Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust

3,301

3,542

3,616

Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust

2,037

2,973

3,051

Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Trust

3,727

3,760

3,829

Dudley and Walsall Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust

1,056

1,138

1,198

Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust

2,633

4,660

4,689

South West London and St George's Mental Health NHS Trust

2,146

2,077

2,146

Suffolk Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust

1,560

-

-

Worcestershire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust

1,219

-

-

Provider staff from Enfield Primary Care Trust were transferred to Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health NHS Trust in March 2011.

Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust acquired Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust to form Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust in January 2017.

Suffolk Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust and Norfolk and Waveney Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust merged to become Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust in January 2012.

Worcestershire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust and Worcestershire Primary Care Trust merged to form Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust in July 2011.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to offer psychological support to the family members of people who have died with covid-19.

A number of charities and voluntary organisations provide a range of valued services for people experiencing bereavement, including Cruse Bereavement Care which provides a national helpline as does the National Bereavement Partnership COVID-19 Hub. For National Health Service staff, a confidential bereavement support line and other sources of support are available at the following link:

https://people.nhs.uk/help/

The Government is taking a cross-Government approach to address bereavement support, and what is needed to ensure that families and friends of those deceased get the support they need - particularly during this very difficult time.

We are working with the NHS, arm’s length bodies and other organisations to assess the increased need for psychological support as a result of COVID-19 and are committed to ongoing engagement with the voluntary sector during the COVID-19 pandemic. We will continue to work closely to assess how we can support charities in doing their important work.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to offer psychological support to the family members of people who have died during the covid-19 lockdown and who are unable to attend funerals.

A number of charities and voluntary organisations provide a range of valued services for people experiencing bereavement, including Cruse Bereavement Care which provides a national helpline as does the National Bereavement Partnership COVID-19 Hub. For National Health Service staff, a confidential bereavement support line and other sources of support are available at the following link:

https://people.nhs.uk/help/

The Government is taking a cross-Government approach to address bereavement support, and what is needed to ensure that families and friends of those deceased get the support they need - particularly during this very difficult time.

We are working with the NHS, arm’s length bodies and other organisations to assess the increased need for psychological support as a result of COVID-19 and are committed to ongoing engagement with the voluntary sector during the COVID-19 pandemic. We will continue to work closely to assess how we can support charities in doing their important work.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what additional resources his Department has allocated to NHS Mental Health Services since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has recently announced an additional £5 million grant to Mind and the Mental Health Consortia to administer a COVID-19 mental health response fund to mental health voluntary and community sector organisations across England. The aim is to promote mental health and wellbeing support, which complements NHS services, to those struggling with their mental health and will include peer support, telephone and online support.

We are also working to protect vital mental health services and support people with mental health issues particularly those shielding or self-isolating. We have published official guidance for the public on mental health and wellbeing and for parents and carers about supporting their children’s mental health and wellbeing and are promoting this through trusted channels like GOV.UK and Every Mind Matters.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he had made of the correlation between staff mental health issues and levels of job retention.

Improving the psychological wellbeing of those working in the National Health Service is an essential factor in retaining NHS staff. Therefore, improving psychological wellbeing has been a key focus of the NHS People Plan. An interim version of the NHS People Plan was published on 3 June, setting out the vision for how this will be achieved by creating a new offer for all NHS staff, developed through widespread engagement with our people and staff representatives.

Publication of the final NHS People Plan has been deferred to allow the NHS to provide maximum operational effort to COVID-19 response. However, we have commissioned NHS England to develop a comprehensive emotional, psychological and practical support package for NHS staff during and following the COVID-19 response. Details of the support available as a part of this package are online at the following link:

people.nhs.uk/help

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS staff sick days were taken as a result of mental health issues in (a) 2019 and (b) 2010.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, but not staff working in primary care, general practitioner surgeries, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the number of days lost due to mental health reasons and the number of absences due to unknown reasons across all staff in the time periods specified, full time equivalent (FTE).

Time

Days lost due to mental health reasons

Unknown reason for sickness absence

January 2010 – December 2010

2,060,416

4,055,904

January 2019 – December 2019

4,796,928

927,827

Source: NHS Digital

Figures cover 1 January to 31 December each year.

Mental health reasons for 2010 includes the following reasons: 'Other Mental Disorders', 'Psychological', 'Stress' and 'Anxiety/stress/depression/other psychiatric illnesses'.

Mental health reasons for 2019 includes the reason of 'Anxiety/stress/depression/other psychiatric illnesses'.

Part of the increase in FTE days lost by sickness absence reason may be attributable to the improvement in completion of sickness absence reason information by staff.

The recording of sickness absence may have been increased by initiatives such as the NHS Health and Wellbeing framework.

Mental health awareness has increased in the last 10 years, with employers being more understanding and employees feeling more able to disclose mental health issues.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps his Department has put in place to support NHS staff's mental wellbeing during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has commissioned NHS England to develop a comprehensive emotional, psychological and practical support package for National Health Service staff during and following the COVID-19 response.

This currently includes free access to well-being apps, virtual staff common rooms for mutual support, a dedicated support helpline and text service (in partnership with Samaritans), and a separate helpline offering bereavement support (in partnership with Hospice UK). NHS organisations are now also able to procure supplementary occupational health support for their staff through a new framework, available until 31 December.

More information on how to access this support can be found online at the following link:

people.nhs.uk/help

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the mortality rate was for (a) mental health services and (b) each NHS trust in each of the last three years.

Information on mortality rates in mental health trusts and other mental health services is not collected centrally.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people on average were on the waiting list for mental health services in England in (a) 2010 and (b) 2019.

We do not hold this information in the format requested. Currently, access and waiting times standards exist for Adult Improving Access to Psychological Therapies services, Early Intervention for Psychosis services, and Children and Young People's Eating Disorder Services. These standards are being met or are on track for delivery by the end of 2020/21.

The National Health Service has also committed to testing and rolling out further waiting time standards for adults and children as part of the NHS Long Term Plan.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many wellbeing teams there were in each NHS trust in (a) 2010 and (b) 2019.

The information requested on the number of wellbeing teams and members of staff in each National Health Service trust is not collected or held centrally.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether people with severe mental illness can register as extremely vulnerable to get access to essential food and medication supplies through the NHS volunteer scheme during the lockdown.

The NHS Volunteer Responders programme is available to anyone in England with a mental health illness if they are having issues accessing supermarkets or for picking up prescriptions. Whilst it was originally designed to support the shielded population, it is not limited to this cohort, and it is open to wider vulnerable groups who may having issues accessing essentials.

If a vulnerable person needs support in this way, they can either self-refer, or can be referred into the programme through a number of routes, including health professionals and local authorities.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many wellbeing members of staff there were in each NHS trust in (a) 2010 and (b) 2019.

The information requested on the number of wellbeing teams and members of staff in each National Health Service trust is not collected or held centrally.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what psychological support his Department is offering to (a) NHS and (b) social services (i) staff and (ii) volunteers during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department has commissioned NHS England to develop a comprehensive emotional, psychological and practical support package for National Health Service staff during and following the COVID-19 response. This currently includes free access to well-being apps, a dedicated support helpline and text service, and a separate helpline offering bereavement support. The Department is working with partners to extend both helplines to the social care workforce and will also be introducing an app and website aimed at providing timely information for the adult social care workforce.

NHS and social care organisations are continuing to support the psychological welfare of their volunteer staff, in line with the latest health, safety and wellbeing guidance.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what impact assessment he has undertaken on the effect of the increased pressure on NHS staff on staff mental wellbeing during the covid-19 outbreak.

We have anticipated that National Health Service staff will potentially face significant pressure during COVID-19 response. The Department has urgently commissioned NHS England and NHS Improvement to develop a comprehensive package of emotional, psychological, and practical support for NHS staff during and following COVID-19 response.

Details of the support available as a part of this package are online at the following link:

people.nhs.uk/help/

The package includes free access to several mental health and wellbeing apps, virtual staff common rooms for mutual support, a dedicated staff support helpline and a separate helpline offering bereavement support.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many referrals have been received in England for NHS Children and Young People’s Mental Health Services in each week since 1 March 2020.

The requested data is not yet available as it is still being collected. When collected, it will be published in the National Health Service mental health services monthly statistics.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the ability of NHS psychiatric wards to function effectively whilst following social distancing measures during the covid-19 outbreak.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have published guidance for mental health, learning disabilities and autism, and specialised commissioning services during the pandemic. It provides considerations for National Health Service commissioned services to help them meet the general principles laid out in that document, including that people with mental health needs, a learning disability or autism receive the same degree of protection and support with managing COVID-19 as other people, that decisions balance clinical need, patient safety and risk, and that providers maximise the use of digital technologies to ensure continuity of care.

The Care Quality Commission, as the independent regulator of health and social care in England, also continues, through its emergency support framework, to take action to keep people safe and support providers.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to offer psychological support to people who have received hospital treatment for covid-19.

Work is underway to plan for an expected increase in demand for patients needing mental health support due to COVID-19, including those directly affected following a stay in hospital. Existing mental health services are open and available for any person requiring support.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many calls have been made to the NHS staff mental health hotline in each week since 1 April 2020.

On 8 April, the National Health Service launched a mental health hotline as part of a package of measures to support the NHS’s 1.4 million staff as they help people deal with COVID-19.

As of 7 May, 1,625 calls have been made to the hotline.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many referrals were received in England for NHS Improving Access to Psychological Therapies Services in each week since 1 March 2020.

The requested data is not yet available as it is still being collected. When collected, it will be published in the National Health Service mental health services monthly statistics.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department has issued on patient-centred care for patients with (a) Alzheimer's disease and (b) dementia to (i) NHS trusts and (ii) providers of care; and what steps his Department takes to ensure that care practices for those patients take account of the effect of those diseases on a patient's ability to respond to questions.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has published a guideline on ‘Dementia: assessment, management and support’ for people living with dementia and their carers in 2018. It includes recommendations on involving people in decisions about their care and offering early and ongoing opportunities to discuss advance statement about their wishes, preferences, beliefs and values regarding their future care. The guidance is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng97

Commissioned by NHS England, the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health published ‘The Dementia Care Pathway: full implementation guidance’ in July 2018. It includes support for providers, commissioners and sustainability and transformation partnerships in providing personalised care for people with dementia and is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/mental-health/dementia/implementation-guide-and-resource-pack-for-dementia-care/

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of vacancies for music therapists in the NHS in each year from 2015 to 2020; and what recent steps his Department has taken to support the recruitment of music therapists to the NHS.

The number of vacancies for music therapists in the National Health Service is not held centrally. NHS Improvement collects vacancy data for three staff groups; doctors, nurses and ‘other staff’. These published vacancy statistics are not broken down by the different specialties and professions e.g. allied health professions.

The NHS People Plan work programme is completing a review of all allied health professions. This will look at both the current and future capacity need for the allied health professions including music therapists.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to add asthma to the list of long-term medical conditions that are exempt from prescription charges; and if he will make a statement.

The Department has no plans to change the list of medical exemptions from prescription charges. Extensive arrangements are already in place to help people access National Health Service prescriptions. These include a broad range of NHS prescription charge exemptions for which someone with asthma may qualify.

To support those with an ongoing medical condition who do not qualify for an exemption, the cost of the prescription pre-payment certificates has been frozen for another year. A holder of a 12-month certificate can get all the prescriptions they need for just £2 per week.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what national public awareness campaigns have been run to increase awareness of ovarian cancer in the last 12 months; and what steps his Department is taking to improve public awareness of ovarian cancer.

Public Health England (PHE) has run several Be Clear on Cancer (BCOC) campaigns to help improve early detection of cancer. PHE has not run a national public awareness campaign on ovarian cancer in the last 12 months. However, in 2014 PHE ran a regional ovarian cancer campaign and, in 2017, a pilot which focussed on a range of abdominal symptoms, such as diarrhoea, bloating and discomfort that can be indicative of several cancers, including ovarian cancer.

PHE is currently undertaking new data analysis and research to determine the future direction of BCOC campaign activity and will take into consideration the outcomes of these campaigns. Further information on the BCOC campaigns can be viewed at the following link:

http://www.ncin.org.uk/cancer_type_and_topic_specific_work/topic_specific_work/be_clear_on_cancer/

Decisions on which cancers BCOC campaigns should focus on are informed by a steering group with representatives from PHE, the Department, NHS England, primary and secondary care clinicians, and key voluntary sector organisations. These decisions are under constant review, informed by the available data and medical information resources.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to his Chinese counterpart on banning the live trade of wild and endangered animals; and what steps the Chinese Government is taking to (a) reduce and (b) eliminate the (i) trade of (A) elephant ivory and (B) rhino horn and (ii) live trade of (1) tigers, (2) pangolins and (C) sharks.

The UK is at the forefront of international efforts to protect endangered animals from unsustainable trade and my officials continue to raise the subject regularly with their Chinese counterparts. Specifically, senior officials in Beijing and London have raised concerns with China on proposed adjustments to 1993 legislation on tiger and rhino products. We hosted a high level conference on the illegal Wildlife Trade in London in October 2018. At that conference China co-hosted a session on combatting the ivory trade following their introduction of a domestic ivory ban. On 24 February 2020 China's National People's Congress passed a law banning the wildlife trade and the consumption of wild animals.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reason furlough pay for people who were originally furloughed in March 2020 and have retained their job is determined solely by their pre-pandemic earnings, including in circumstances where those people went on to work more hours in the months between the March and November 2020 covid-19 lockdowns.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) was designed to operate at significant scale to sustain individuals at 80% of their pre-coronavirus income, up to a maximum grant of £2,500 per month. It was therefore right that the default reference pay period to calculate CJRS was that of the pre-coronavirus period for those claiming prior to 31 October.

For the extended scheme from 1 November, the Government appreciates that a minority of employees may have seen an increase in earnings during the pandemic, but others have not, and therefore to be fair to all claimants the default reference pay period for those employees in continuous employment since claiming has remained at the pre-coronavirus period.

For newer employees, it was simply not possible to refer to a pre-coronavirus period, and therefore the reference pay period is necessarily different for this group.

Using the pre-coronavirus reference pay period to calculate the CJRS grant means that it is not necessary to recalculate the basis of the claim for the greatest number of employees and employers.

While a decision for employers to make alone, the terms of the scheme do allow for employers to make a top-up payment should they deem this affordable and appropriate.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that self-employed people who have recently taken (a) maternity leave and (b) extended sick leave and make a claim for support through the Self-employment Income Support Scheme do not have their average earnings calculated in a way that will disadvantage their payment.

The new Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) will help those with lost trading profits due to COVID-19. It means the UK will have one of the most generous self-employed COVID-19 support schemes in the world.

The new scheme will allow eligible individuals to claim a taxable grant worth 80% of their trading profits up to a maximum of £2,500 per month for 3 months. Self-employed individuals, including members of partnerships, are eligible if they have submitted their Income Tax Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018-19, continued to trade and have lost trading/partnership trading profits due to COVID-19.

Taking maternity leave, paternity leave, or sick leave does not mean that the trade has ceased and therefore should not affect a person’s eligibility for the SEISS as long as the individual intends to return to the trade after the period of leave.

To qualify for the SEISS, an individual’s self-employed trading profits must be less than £50,000, with more than half of their income from self-employment. Delivering a scheme for the self-employed is a very difficult operational challenge, particularly in the time available. There is no way for HM Revenue & Customs to know the reasons why an individual’s profits may have dropped in earlier years from Self Assessment returns.

However, to help those with volatile income in 2018-19 for whatever reason, an individual is eligible for the SEISS if their trading profits are no more than £50,000 and at least half of their total income, for either the tax year 2018-19 or the average of the tax years 2016-17, 2017-18, and 2018-19. If eligible, they will receive a taxable grant based on their average trading profit over the three tax years, including in years where their trading profits were less than half their total income.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government has plans to make changes to prevent spent hospital orders under the Mental Health Act from being recorded on patients' Disclosure and Barring Service records.

As the question refers to spent hospital orders, we assume you are referring to hospital orders for an individual detained under the Mental Health Act as part of the disposal for a conviction. Spent criminal records are never disclosed on basic criminal record certificates.

Jobs which require higher levels of trust (such as roles working with children) may be eligible for standard or enhanced criminal record certificates issued by the Disclosure and Barring Service. These checks may also disclose spent convictions and cautions in accordance with disclosure rules. According to the rules, a spent conviction or caution would be disclosed only if: it was imposed within the last 11 years; or it was for a specified offence which is serious, relates to sexual or violent offending or is otherwise relevant for safeguarding purposes; or where a custodial sentence is imposed. Where such convictions are disclosed, the certificates will also include any attached sentences/disposals which could include a hospital order.

Enhanced certificates may also contain other information held by the police if a Chief Officer of police considers it relevant to the role and proportionate for it to be disclosed. In making such a decision, Chief Officers must have regard to statutory guidance issued by the Secretary of State which makes clear that disclosure of information related to mental health is sensitive and requires careful consideration. Information suggesting a particular risk of harm to others, for example, might be considered appropriate for disclosure. If such information is disclosed, the criminal record certificate should provide sufficient explanation to ensure that the prospective employer will clearly understand the relevance of the information to the application.

The Government considers that the current approach strikes the right balance between public protection and an individual’s right to private life.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to extend the fiancée visa for people who are unable to (a) give notice to marry and (b) marry during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Home Office has put in place a range of measures to support those affected by the Covid-19 outbreak. We continue to monitor the situation closely and take these exceptional circumstances into account.

A fiancé, fiancée or proposed civil partner whose wedding or civil partnership is delayed due to Covid-19 can request an extension until 31 July by updating their records with the Coronavirus Immigration Team. (https://gov.smartwebportal.co.uk/homeoffice/public/ho_form.html)

The family Immigration Rules allow for an extension of leave if there is good reason for a wedding or civil partnership not taking place during the initial six-month period of leave to enter. Restrictions on giving notice to marry or delay to a wedding or civil partnership due to Covid-19 will be considered a good reason under this policy. They may otherwise be eligible to remain on the basis of exceptional circumstances.

These are unprecedented times and we may make further temporary adjustments to requirements where necessary and appropriate.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans the Government has to waive the requirement for applicants for Settlement Status not to have spent more than six months outside of the UK in circumstances where applicants are unable to return to the UK due to travel restrictions implemented during the Covid-19 pandemic.

For indefinite leave to remain, applicants must meet continuous residence requirements and are generally only allowed to be out of the UK for a maximum of 180 days in a 12 month period. However, absences beyond 180 days can be allowed if there are serious or compelling reasons and we are taking steps to ensure individuals will not be regarded as breaking continuity of residence where absences have arisen as a result of Covid-19 related travel restrictions.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on what date (a) Albanian and (b) Polish authorities will be granted permission to restart the processing of UK visas.

UK visa applications are processed by the Home Office, not other national authorities.

The decision on when to re-open the UK visa application centres in Poland and Albania, which are operated by the Home Office’s commercial partner TLS, will be made as soon as the Home Office and TLS are satisfied TLS are able to deliver the service safely for both staff and customers, and in compliance with local government guidelines relating to Covid-19.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether furloughed salaries will be calculated as part of the earnings requirement for applications for spousal visas.

The earnings requirement for those seeking a spouse visa is a minimum income of £18,600 or higher where a child is also applying for leave. Salaries received whilst the sponsor, or applicant who is in the UK with permission to work, is furloughed will be calculated as part of this minimum income requirement.

Income from other employment or self-employment, cash savings, pension, or property rental may also be counted; along with other sources of income where there are exceptional circumstances.

The Home Office has put in place a range of measures to support those affected by the Covid-19 outbreak. We continue to monitor the situation closely and may make further adjustments to requirements where necessary and appropriate to ensure people are not unduly affected by circumstances beyond their control.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what representations she has made to his European counterparts on finding suitable homes for displaced refugee (a) children and (b) families living in Calais; and what steps she is taking to support efforts to find those homes.

The living conditions and reception arrangements of migrants in France are a matter for the French government.

However, UK Government ministers and officials regularly meet their French counterparts to discuss our close cooperation on tackling illegal migration under the Sandhurst Treaty framework, which includes UK support to the French asylum system to improve access by vulnerable migrants.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government's review of pre-charge bail law will assess the potential merits of reforming Release Under Investigation (RUI), including (a) the introduction of time limits, (b) a requirement for sharing updates and (c) an updated approval process for using RUI.

This government is fully committed to protecting the public, and ensuring the police have the powers they need.

On 5 November the government announced its intention to review pre-charge bail legislation, including the practice of ‘Released Under Investigation’ (RUI), to ensure we have a system which more effectively prioritises the safety of victims and witnesses and the management of suspects.

Specifically, the review will look to:

  • ensure the proper use of bail to protect victims and witnesses;
  • support the police in the timely management of investigations, whether a suspect is released on bail or RUI;
  • respect the rights of suspects, victims and witnesses to timely decisions and updates;
  • ensure pre-charge bail supports the timely progression of cases to courts; and
  • design simplified and flexible rules to support effective operational decisions.
Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Prime Minister on 25 July 2019, Official Report, column 1491, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of an introducing an amnesty for undocumented immigrants.

The Government remains committed to an immigration policy which welcomes and celebrates people to the UK through safe and legal routes but deters illegal immigration. The Immigration Rules already provide for undocumented migrants to regularise their status.

The Immigration Rules are kept under continuous review and adjusted where necessary in light of feedback, impact and the findings of the courts.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)