Rosie Duffield Portrait

Rosie Duffield

Labour - Canterbury

1,836 (3.1%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 8th June 2017


Genetic Technology (Precision Breeding) Bill
22nd Jun 2022 - 26th Jun 2022
Pension Schemes (Conversion of Guaranteed Minimum Pensions) Bill
26th Jan 2022 - 2nd Feb 2022
Animal (Penalty Notices) Bill
1st Dec 2021 - 8th Dec 2021
Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill
9th Nov 2021 - 25th Nov 2021
Opposition Whip (Commons)
14th Apr 2020 - 31st May 2020
Women and Equalities Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Work and Pensions Committee
4th Jun 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Women and Equalities Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 4th Jun 2018


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Rosie Duffield has voted in 630 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Rosie Duffield Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(8 debate interactions)
Priti Patel (Conservative)
(5 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(13 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(11 debate contributions)
Home Office
(11 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Domestic Abuse Bill 2019-21
(964 words contributed)
Fisheries Act 2020
(950 words contributed)
Holocaust Memorial Bill 2022-23
(870 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Rosie Duffield's debates

Canterbury Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The Government must exercise its power under s.23 of the Gender Recognition Act to modify the operation of the Equality Act 2010 by specifying the terms sex, male, female, man & woman, in the operation of that law, mean biological sex and not "sex as modified by a Gender Recognition Certificate"

It has been reported that the Government may amend the Equality Act to "make it clear that sex means biological sex rather than gender." The Government has previously committed to not remove legal protections for trans people, an already marginalised group, but this change would do so.

Millions of UK citizens have a disability or serious medical condition that means they use more energy. Many people need to use a ventilator 24/7. People use electric pumps to feed through a tubes. People need to charge their mobility equipment, such as electric wheelchairs, stair lifts, bath seats.

Disabled people should be included alongside carers in the £650 one off payment as part of the Cost of Living support package. We have larger utilities bills and food costs when compared to non-disabled people. We rely on these utilities and food to stay alive.

Revoke all licences (PEL) for commercial breeders of laboratory animals. Require all Project Licences (PPLs) applications be reviewed by an independent Non Animal Methods (NAMs) specialist committee. Revise s24 ASPA 1986 to allow review. Urge International Regulators to accept & promote NAMs.

Ensure Water companies treat the sewage they are responsible for. Not discharge it into rivers and water courses. After all what goes into the ocean comes back as the fish we eat.


Latest EDMs signed by Rosie Duffield

8th May 2024
Rosie Duffield signed this EDM on Thursday 23rd May 2024

Public ownership of water

Tabled by: Caroline Lucas (Green Party - Brighton, Pavilion)
That this House condemns the mismanagement and underinvestment which led to untreated sewage being discharged into English waterways for more than 3.6 million hours in 2023; notes that water companies in England have incurred debts of more than £64 billion and paid out £78 billion in dividends since they were …
39 signatures
(Most recent: 23 May 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 25
Scottish National Party: 5
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Green Party: 1
Workers Party of Britain: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
30th April 2024
Rosie Duffield signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 30th April 2024

Price cap on baby milk formula

Tabled by: Barry Gardiner (Labour - Brent North)
This House recognises the impact that food price inflation has had on family budgets in recent years, with annual inflation of 19.1% to March 2023, which was the highest rate of food inflation in 45 years; notes with dismay that some retailers have taken to placing baby milk formula under …
29 signatures
(Most recent: 24 May 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 20
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Scottish National Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Rosie Duffield's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Rosie Duffield, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.



Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6 Other Department Questions
14th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps she is taking with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care to help reduce maternal mortality.

At the Spring Budget, the Government announced £35m over the next three years to improve maternity safety across England.

This is in addition to our three-year maternity plan, backed by £186m per year from April. Through this, we have introduced 14 maternal medicine networks to provide specialist advice to pregnant women, and we expect all CSs to have a Maternal Mental Health Service by the end of the month.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
4th Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps her Department is taking to reduce age discrimination against older people.

Age discrimination against older people that cannot be objectively justified is unacceptable and unlawful across a range of fields under the Equality Act 2010. It is the strong protections in the 2010 Act that enable older people and their representatives to challenge such unlawful behaviour and ultimately seek redress in the courts or, in the case of older workers, an employment tribunal.

In addition, as regards to the public sector, the Public Sector Equality Duty places a duty on Government Departments, local authorities, the NHS and other bodies to have due regard to meeting equality requirements, including to eliminate unlawful age discrimination, where this is relevant to their policies and activities.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
17th May 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that people with assistance dogs are not discriminated against when entering public buildings.

No one should be refused access to businesses or services because they use a guide or other assistance dog.

Under the Equality Act 2010 (the Act), businesses and public bodies that provide goods and services to the public must not unlawfully discriminate against disabled people, including those with assistance dogs. The Act places a duty on service providers to make reasonable adjustments to improve access to premises, buildings and services. This could include allowing the use of assistance dogs so that disabled customers have the same access to goods and services and are not placed at a substantial disadvantage compared to non-disabled customers.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has published guidance for all businesses, including service providers, on this subject. The guidance explains that assistance dogs should be treated as auxiliary aids and not as pets. The guidance is available at: https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/sites/default/files/assistance-dogs-a-guide-for-all-businesses.pdf and makes clear that businesses and service providers should allow assistance dogs access to buildings where dogs would normally not be permitted whenever this is reasonable.

Anybody who thinks that they have been discriminated against in the services offered to them - including where access to an assistance dog has been refused - can take legal action to resolve the issue. Before doing so, they might first find it useful to contact the Equality Advisory and Support Service (EASS) which provides free bespoke advice and in-depth support to individuals with discrimination concerns via their website - http://www.equalityadvisoryservice.com/ , or by telephone on 0808 800 0082 or by text phone on 0808 800 0084.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Apr 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of legal protection for disabled people when (a) applying for work and (b) having their employment terminated.

There is long-standing legal protection for disabled people under the Equality Act 2010 (the Act). The Act makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against a disabled job applicant or employee because of their disability, provided the Act’s definition of disability is met.

Specifically, the Act requires employers to make reasonable adjustments in relation to the disabled job applicant’s assessment and interview process and, once employed, the disabled employee’s job and decisions made in relation to it. These adjustments ensure that disabled applicants or employees are not placed at a substantial disadvantage compared to their non-disabled colleagues. The failure of an employer to make reasonable adjustments for a disabled employee or job seeker, or discounting a job application simply because the applicant is disabled could amount to direct disability discrimination under the Act. Similarly, where an employer is looking to reduce their staff, choosing someone for redundancy simply because they are disabled, may amount to unlawful discrimination.

However, the Act also recognises the need to strike a balance between the needs of disabled employees and the circumstances of their employers. What is ‘reasonable’ will therefore vary from one employer to another because of factors such as the practicality of making the adjustment, the cost of the adjustment to the employer and the resources available to different employers. In the event of a claim of alleged disability discrimination, it will ultimately be for the courts to decide on a case-by-case basis, what reasonable adjustments should be made for a particular disabled service-user, taking into account all relevant circumstances of the case.

In terms of employment law, should a person be unfairly dismissed because they have a disability, they can seek redress under the Act for being discriminated against by their employer. Where an employer treats a worker with a disability or life-limiting illness so badly that the worker is forced to resign from their job, the constructive dismissal provisions in employment law may apply.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to help tackle (a) misogyny and (b) other forms of discriminatory behaviour at football grounds.

There is no place for sexism or any other kind of discrimination in sport, including at football grounds. It is vital that sports bodies continue to work together to tackle it.

We continue to liaise closely with all the police and football authorities about their work to tackle discrimination. This includes actions targeted at and around football grounds, such as improving reporting systems, providing better training and support for referees and stewards, and improving the quality of CCTV around stadia.

The Government also welcomes the work of organisations such as Women in Football and Kick it Out in challenging discrimination and breaking down inequalities between the sexes.

Fans can also be charged with a Football Banning Order and fined if found to use derogatory language at football games, with the possibility of more severe sentences if it has been recorded as a hate crime. The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has been working with the FA, Premier League and English Football League to determine what evidence is required to charge an incident as a hate crime.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the recruitment of civil servants can be delegated to special advisers by a minister.

I refer the Hon member to the response which I gave to PQ1411 on 14 January 2020.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the blog post dated 2 January 2020 published by Dominic Cummings, what steps he is taking to ensure that the proposed recruitment processes are compliant with (a) General Data Protection Regulation, (b) the Civil Service code and (c) the Equality Act 2010.

The blog invites people to get in touch to discuss opportunities. The blog post does not set out proposed recruitment processes.

Recruitment to the Civil Service is through fair and open competition following section 10 of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act.

Special Adviser appointments are made by Ministers in accordance with section 15 of the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
17th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department has been informed of when Australia will implement the immigration visa changes under the UK-Australia Free Trade Agreement.

The UK-Australia Free Trade Agreement (FTA) will make it easier for UK professionals to live and work in Australia, creating greater certainty for businesses. We expect the UK-Australia FTA will enter into force in Spring 2023. The agreement’s commitments on the temporary movement of skilled professionals will come into effect at this time.

Outside of the agreement, Australia has also committed to implementing changes to their Working Holiday Maker programme within two years of entry into force, and the delivery of a unilateral Innovation and Early Careers Skills Exchange Pilot within one year of entry into force.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has had discussions with Ofgem on disabled tenants in supported housing paying bills at domestic rates rather than business rates.

The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero has regular discussions with Ofgem on a wide range of issues in relation to energy retail markets.

On 28 February Ofgem published a call for input on the non-domestic gas and electricity market. This included seeking inputs about the arrangements whereby some domestic customers have their energy supply collectively arranged for them by a managing entity that agrees a non-domestic energy contract, such as mobile park residents, care home residents, and residents of managed flats. Ofgem’s call for input is open until 31 March.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he plans to provide additional financial support to disabled people in receipt of Income-related (a) Employment Support Allowance and (b) Personal Independence Payment to help replace the support provided by the one-off Warm Home Discount.

The Government has expanded the Warm Home Discount scheme this year, providing £150 rebates to over 3 million households, an increase of 800,000.

Energy suppliers can provide additional support to households through the Industry Initiatives element of the scheme, including financial assistance. This support can be provided irrespective of whether a household is eligible for a rebate.

The Government is providing additional assistance this winter through the Disability Cost of Living Payments, alongside the Energy Price Guarantee, Energy Bill Support Scheme and other Cost of Living Payments.

The Government has also committed to continue Cost of Living payments next winter and is working to develop a new approach to consumer protection in relation to energy, which will apply from April 2024 onwards.

23rd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what his timetable is for the UK's association with the Horizon scheme.

The UK welcomes the EU’s recent willingness to engage in discussions on UK association to EU programmes. My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State travelled to Brussels on 4 April for an introductory meeting with R&I Commissioner Mariya Gabriel to discuss research collaboration including the UK’s expectations around association to Horizon Europe. The visit in Brussels follows engagement between the UK and the EU Ambassador on 14 March. The UK wants to engage constructively with the EU regarding Horizon Europe association. Discussions will need to reflect the lasting impact of 2 years delay to the UK’s association.

30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, by what date he expects the Energy Bill Relief Scheme payment to be made, in relation to residents of Park Homes.

The Energy Bill Support Scheme alternative funding portal on gov.uk will open on or by Monday 27th February.

30th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the Strikes (Minimum Service Levels) Bill on public workers in Canterbury.

The Department is conducting an economic impact assessment of the Strikes (Minimum Service Levels) Bill, which takes the most recent industrial action, as well as other instances of industrial action, into consideration. This will be published shortly.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
17th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing liquidity loans to the charitable trust sector to help support employment and services in that sector.

I agree with the Hon. Member’s assessment of the importance of the charitable trust sector. Charities make an important social and economic contribution to the UK economy. Loans and other types of finance can be an important enabler of growth and investment in the services that charities provide, increasing their economic and social impact, providing increased employment, and delivering superb services to the communities they serve.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of including homes in Council Tax Band E in the ECO+ scheme.

The Government has consulted on the ECO+ scheme being open to households in the lower council tax bands (A-E in Scotland, A-D in England and A-C in Wales) with an EPC rating of D or below, as well as low-income households.

This Government is currently analysing feedback received through its consultation, which closed on 23 December 2022, and will publish a response in due course.

9th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential ecological impacts of the Space Based Solar Power Innovation Competition.

Before launching the space-based solar power innovation competition, the Government funded the Frazer-Nash consultancy to produce an independent report looking at the feasibility of the technology, including the potential environmental and safety impacts. The report can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/space-based-solar-power-de-risking-the-pathway-to-net-zero. The main ecological impacts identified were related to the large potential size of the ground receiving station and the innovation competition is looking at developing concepts that will minimise these issues.

27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of pro-rata splitting of covid-19-related business grants when the business has passed between owners during the covid-19 lockdown period.

This point has been considered and is covered by the guidance issued to Local Authorities. In respect of the Local Restrictions Support Grant (Closed) Addendum payments from 5 January onwards and Closed Businesses Lockdown Payment, any changes to the rating list (rateable value or to the hereditament) after 5 January 2021, including changes which have been backdated to this date, should be ignored for the purposes of eligibility. Local Authorities are not required to adjust, pay or recover grants where the rating list is subsequently amended retrospectively to the date that national restrictions began.

In cases where it is factually clear to the Local Authority that the rating list was inaccurate on 5 January 2021, Local Authorities may withhold the grant and/or award the grant based on their view of who would have been entitled to the grant had the list been accurate. This is entirely at the discretion of the Local Authority and only intended to prevent manifest errors. By accepting grant support, business owners are confirming that they are eligible to receive that support.

Should further business grant support measures be introduced in future, new guidance on eligibility and other related matters would be issued to local authorities to ensure that grant funding can be directed to where it is needed as quickly as is practicable.

18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will instruct Ofgem to extend the claims period for the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The requirement for accreditation applications to the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive scheme to be made within 12 months of the renewable heating system being commissioned, is set out in the Renewable Heat Incentive regulations. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, we are already taking steps to amend the regulations, and relax this requirement. Should these amendments pass successfully through Parliament, they will come into force in April 2021.

In March 2021, we intend to publish a consultation on closing the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive to new applications, as scheduled, at the end of March 2022.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to provide support to help private practitioner physiotherapists rebuild their businesses in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government introduced an unprecedented and comprehensive package of business support measures to help as many individuals and businesses as possible during this difficult period. This support package included measures such as the small business grants, the coronavirus loan guarantee schemes, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), the deferral of VAT and income tax payments, and more. These measures were designed to be accessible to businesses in most sectors and across the UK.

The Government has set out a plan for recovery that focusses on backing business, improving skills, and creating jobs. Further measures were also announced by the Chancellor that build on the significant support already available as well as set out how current support will evolve and adapt. This includes the extension of the CJRS until the end of March 2021, the increase of the third Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) grant from 55% to 80% of trading profits, the extension of the coronavirus loan guarantee schemes until 31 January 2021, and the introduction of Pay As You Grow measures, meaning businesses now have the option to repay their Bounce Back Loans over a period of up to ten years.

Businesses who also deferred VAT due from 20 March to 30 June 2020 will now have the option to pay in smaller instalments up to the end of March 2022, interest free. Businesses will need to opt-in to the scheme, and for those who do, this means that their VAT liabilities due between 20 March and 30 June 2020 do not need to be paid in full until the end of March 2022.

Additionally, the Government has worked closely with Public Health England and the Health and Safety Executive to develop our workplace guidance. Close-contact service providers can check what they need to do to keep people safe and to make their business COVID-secure on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/close-contact-services.

Businesses, including private practitioner physiotherapists, are also able to access tailored advice through our Freephone Business Support Helpline, online via the Business Support website or through their local Growth Hubs in England.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many households in (a) Kent and Medway and (b) Canterbury district council area are affected by fuel poverty.

The latest sub-national fuel poverty statistics for 2018 show a) 68,000 households in Kent and Medway estimated as fuel poor, and b) 6,600 households in Canterbury.

These figures are derived from Fuel Poverty Sub-regional tables at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/sub-regional-fuel-poverty-data-2020.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many social housing properties in Canterbury district council area have an EPC energy efficiency rating of (a) F and (b) G.

Estimates for the total number of homes by tenure and EPC energy efficiency rating for England are made using the English Housing Survey. Due to small sample sizes, these estimates cannot be made for local authorities. https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/english-housing-survey-2018-energy-report

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many households in Canterbury district council area that live in social housing are affected by fuel poverty.

The latest sub-regional data (2018) can be found in Fuel Poverty Sub-regional tables at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/sub-regional-fuel-poverty-data-2020.

Estimates are only available for the number of households and number and proportion of fuel poor households at sub-regional level. Estimates by tenure are not available. Information on the sub-regional methodology can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/fuel-poverty-sub-regional-methodology-and-documentation.

4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applications have been made to the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme; how many of those applications have been successful; and how much money has been allocated to successful applicants, as of 1 May 2020.

As of 1 May 2020 over £4.7 billion worth of loans had been issued under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) to 29,496 businesses.

As of 6 May 2020 over £5.5 billion worth of loans had been issued under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) to 33,812 businesses. Lenders have received 62,674 completed applications. The balance includes applications pending as well as those unsuccessful or abandoned.

24th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether builders' merchants are defined as essential businesses, for the purposes of his Department's 23 March 2020 guidance entitled Further businesses and premises to close.

Construction plays a crucial role in supporting our public services, maintaining the nation’s infrastructure, and providing safe, decent homes for people to live in. Recently, the Government wrote to all those working in the construction sector to thank them for the critical contribution they are making to the resilience of this country.

Builders’ merchants are an essential part of the construction supply chain and it is therefore important that they continue to operate. However, it is important that they do so in accordance with the guidance issued by Public Health England, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/social-distancing-in-the-workplace-during-coronavirus-covid-19-sector-guidance#construction

1st Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to help tackle abusive behaviour on social media.

The Online Safety Bill will stamp out illegal abusive behaviour on social media, while giving users greater control over their online experience.

The new duties in the Bill will increase transparency over companies’ terms of service, allowing users to make more informed choices about the services they use. Companies must also provide users with tools to protect themselves from abuse.

The Bill is currently at Report Stage and is due to return to the Commons on 5 December.

14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment her Department has made of the adequacy of places in swimming lessons for (a) adults and (b) children in (i) Canterbury constituency and (b) Kent.

The Government recognises the importance of ensuring public access to indoor and outdoor pools. Swimming is a great way for people of all ages to stay fit and healthy as well as being a crucial life skill in terms of water safety.

The Government has provided a range of support for swimming pools during the pandemic. The £100 million National Leisure Recovery Fund supported the reopening of local authority swimming pools throughout the country. Local Authorities in Kent were awarded £2,855,093 through the National Leisure Recovery Fund, of which £374,030 was awarded to Canterbury City Council. Sport England has awarded over £166,000 for specific investments in swimming in Kent since 2012.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Government will publish data on the airborne transmission of covid-19 as a result of groups of more than six people singing.

I know that the restrictions on singing are frustrating to large numbers of amateur choirs and performance groups across the country and that many people have made sacrifices in order to drive down infections and protect the NHS over the last year. I can assure you that everyone across the Government wants to ease these restrictions as soon as possible.

However, it is important that we take a cautious approach in easing restrictions. We have followed the views of public health experts on singing. We are aware, through the NERVTAG and PERFORM studies that singing can increase the risk of COVID-19 transmission through the spread of aerosol droplets. This was backed up by a consensus statement from SAGE, resulting in the suggested principles of safer singing being published.

We will continue to keep guidance and restrictions under review, in line with the changing situation. Further detail on step 4 will be set out as soon as possible.

1st May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on providing further financial support for self-employed people working in the creative industries during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Secretary of State has spoken with the Chancellor on several occasions to ensure that the full spectrum of government support reaches all the sectors for which this department is responsible, including the UK's world-leading creative industries. My officials are in regular contact with their Treasury colleagues to ensure there is a good understanding of the way the government support schemes are working for DCMS sectors, including the creative industries.

16th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she has made an assessment of the potential merits of introducing non-repayable maintenance grants for higher education students from the least advantaged backgrounds.

The government believes that income contingent student loans are a fair and sensible way of financing higher education (HE). It is only right that those who benefit from the system should make a fair contribution to its costs. The government have continued to increase maximum loans and grants for living and other costs for undergraduate and postgraduate students each year, with a 2.8% increase for the 2023/24 academic year and a further 2.5% increase announced for 2024/25.

In addition, the government have frozen maximum tuition fees for the 2023/24 and 2024/25 academic years. By 2024/25, maximum fees will have been frozen for seven successive years. The department believe that the current fee freeze achieves the best balance between ensuring that the system remains financially sustainable, offering good value for the taxpayer, and reducing debt levels for students in real terms.

The government understands the pressures people have been facing with the cost of living and has taken action to help. The government have already made £276 million of student premium and mental health funding available for the 2023/24 academic year to support successful outcomes for students including disadvantaged students.

The government have also made a further £10 million of support available to help student mental health and hardship funding for the 2023/24 academic year. This funding will complement the help universities are providing through their own bursary, scholarship and hardship support schemes. For the 2024/25 financial year, the government have increased the Student Premium (full-time, part-time, and disabled premium) by £5 million to reflect high demand for hardship support. Further details of this allocation for the academic year 2024/25 will be announced by the Office for Students in the summer.

Overall, support to households to help with the high cost of living is worth £108 billion over 2022/23 to 2024/25, which is an average of £3,800 per UK household. The government believes this will have eased the pressure on family budgets, which will in turn enable many families to provide additional support to their children in HE to help them meet increased living costs.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Education)
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has issued recent guidance on the provision by local authorities of accommodation to care leavers beyond the age of 18.

Young people aged 16 or 17 who present as homeless should be supported in accordance with the following guidance, issued jointly by the Department for Education and the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5b0ed0b240f0b634b1266bc9/Provision_of_accommodation_for_16_and_17_year_olds_who_may_be_homeless.pdf.

Care leavers aged over 18 do not have an automatic entitlement to be accommodated by their local authority. However, care leavers aged 18-21 are judged to have a ‘priority need’, as set out in Chapter 22 of the Homelessness Code of Guidance for local authorities, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/homelessness-code-of-guidance-for-local-authorities/chapter-22-care-leavers. This includes categories and definitions of people who have priority need and includes young people under 21 who were looked after between the ages of 16 and 18; and people aged 21 or over who are vulnerable as a result of having been looked after, accommodated or fostered.

In addition, the Children Act 1989 sets out responsibilities on local authorities to support care leavers to make a successful transition from care to independent living. This includes a requirement on local authorities to appoint a Personal Adviser to support the young person up to at least age 21, and up to age 25 if the young person requests it. The Act also includes a duty on local authorities to support care leavers to remain living with their former foster carers up to age 21 under a ‘staying put’ arrangement, if both the young person and carer want to continue living together. The department is providing £99 million to local authorities in this Spending Review period to support implementation of ‘staying put’.

The department is also providing £53 million in this Spending Review period to roll-out ‘staying close’, which provides an enhanced support package for young people leaving children’s homes, and £9.6 million in this Spending Review period to support around 60 local authorities with the highest numbers of care leavers at risk of rough sleeping, as part of the cross-government rough sleeping strategy.

The Department has not had discussions with Kent County Council on this issue.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has issued recent guidance on the duties of responsible authorities to provide supported accommodation for care leavers under the age of 21.

Young people aged 16 or 17 who present as homeless should be supported in accordance with the following guidance, issued jointly by the Department for Education and the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5b0ed0b240f0b634b1266bc9/Provision_of_accommodation_for_16_and_17_year_olds_who_may_be_homeless.pdf.

Care leavers aged over 18 do not have an automatic entitlement to be accommodated by their local authority. However, care leavers aged 18-21 are judged to have a ‘priority need’, as set out in Chapter 22 of the Homelessness Code of Guidance for local authorities, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/homelessness-code-of-guidance-for-local-authorities/chapter-22-care-leavers. This includes categories and definitions of people who have priority need and includes young people under 21 who were looked after between the ages of 16 and 18; and people aged 21 or over who are vulnerable as a result of having been looked after, accommodated or fostered.

In addition, the Children Act 1989 sets out responsibilities on local authorities to support care leavers to make a successful transition from care to independent living. This includes a requirement on local authorities to appoint a Personal Adviser to support the young person up to at least age 21, and up to age 25 if the young person requests it. The Act also includes a duty on local authorities to support care leavers to remain living with their former foster carers up to age 21 under a ‘staying put’ arrangement, if both the young person and carer want to continue living together. The department is providing £99 million to local authorities in this Spending Review period to support implementation of ‘staying put’.

The department is also providing £53 million in this Spending Review period to roll-out ‘staying close’, which provides an enhanced support package for young people leaving children’s homes, and £9.6 million in this Spending Review period to support around 60 local authorities with the highest numbers of care leavers at risk of rough sleeping, as part of the cross-government rough sleeping strategy.

The Department has not had discussions with Kent County Council on this issue.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she has had recent discussions with Kent County Council on its proposal to reduce the eligible age for accessing its supported accommodation service for care leavers from 21 to 19.

Young people aged 16 or 17 who present as homeless should be supported in accordance with the following guidance, issued jointly by the Department for Education and the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5b0ed0b240f0b634b1266bc9/Provision_of_accommodation_for_16_and_17_year_olds_who_may_be_homeless.pdf.

Care leavers aged over 18 do not have an automatic entitlement to be accommodated by their local authority. However, care leavers aged 18-21 are judged to have a ‘priority need’, as set out in Chapter 22 of the Homelessness Code of Guidance for local authorities, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/homelessness-code-of-guidance-for-local-authorities/chapter-22-care-leavers. This includes categories and definitions of people who have priority need and includes young people under 21 who were looked after between the ages of 16 and 18; and people aged 21 or over who are vulnerable as a result of having been looked after, accommodated or fostered.

In addition, the Children Act 1989 sets out responsibilities on local authorities to support care leavers to make a successful transition from care to independent living. This includes a requirement on local authorities to appoint a Personal Adviser to support the young person up to at least age 21, and up to age 25 if the young person requests it. The Act also includes a duty on local authorities to support care leavers to remain living with their former foster carers up to age 21 under a ‘staying put’ arrangement, if both the young person and carer want to continue living together. The department is providing £99 million to local authorities in this Spending Review period to support implementation of ‘staying put’.

The department is also providing £53 million in this Spending Review period to roll-out ‘staying close’, which provides an enhanced support package for young people leaving children’s homes, and £9.6 million in this Spending Review period to support around 60 local authorities with the highest numbers of care leavers at risk of rough sleeping, as part of the cross-government rough sleeping strategy.

The Department has not had discussions with Kent County Council on this issue.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department has provided recent guidance to local authorities on consulting with affected children on proposed changes to (a) the provision of accommodation and (b) other services for (i) children in care and (ii) care leavers.

It is vital that children in care and care leavers are properly consulted on the decisions that affect their lives. Local authorities must give due consideration to a child’s wishes and feelings before making any decisions about their care. This is clearly set out in the care planning guidance, which can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1000549/The_Children_Act_1989_guidance_and_regulations_Volume_2_care_planning__placement_and_case_review.pdf. Every child must be appointed an Independent Reviewing Officer, who has a duty to ensure that care plans have given proper consideration to a child’s wishes and feelings and that the child fully understands the implications of changes to their care plan.

In addition, the Children Act 1989 sets out the responsibilities of local authorities to support care leavers to make a successful transition from care to independent living. This includes a requirement on local authorities to appoint a Personal Adviser to support the young person up to at least age 21, and up to age 25 if the young person requests it. The Personal Adviser is required to work with the young person to develop a mandatory Pathway Plan that sets out the young person’s aims and ambitions across seven domains, including accommodation, and the support that the local authority will provide to support them. The Pathway Plan must be reviewed at least every six months, or whenever the young person moves accommodation.

The department consults widely with children in care and care leavers on changes to national policy which might affect them. The department has established the National Implementation Board which includes people with lived experience of the children’s social care system, to challenge and support implementation and delivery of the reform programme, and has awarded contracts to Barnardo’s and Coram Voice until Spring 2024 who are working with policy officials to facilitate engagement with care experienced young people. Topics covered to date have included fostering, family help, corporate parenting and the national framework and dashboard.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of processes for investigating allegations made against foster carers; and what right of access foster carers have to information on allegations made against them.

The National Minimum Standards (NMS) are clear that allegations should be handled fairly, quickly, and consistently in a way that provides effective protection for the child and at the same time supports the person who is the subject of the allegation.

The NMS are clear that fostering service providers should provide foster carers with written guidance that sets out how they will be supported during an investigation, including the payment of allowance and any fees to foster carers while investigations are ongoing. The NMS also makes clear the duty of the fostering service provider to make available a person, independent of the service provider, who can offer information, advice, emotional support and, where needed, mediation and/or advocacy.

Foster carers should be given appropriate information about any allegation made against them and the reasons for an unplanned removal of a child. As soon as the investigation is concluded a comprehensive summary of any allegations should be given to the person that has been subject to the allegation. This summary will be held confidentially by the organisation until the person reaches retirement age, or for ten years if this is longer.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
30th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason the extension of free childcare will not commence until 2024.

The government announced in the Spring Budget 2023 that there will be a number of transformative reforms to childcare for parents, children and the economy. By 2027/28, this government will expect to be spending in excess of £8 billion every year on free hours and early education, helping working families with their childcare costs. This announcement represents the single biggest investment in childcare in England.

Currently, eligible working parents of 3 and 4-year-olds are eligible for 30 hours of free childcare per week, over 38 weeks a year. From April 2024, working parents of 2-year-olds will be able to access 15 hours of free childcare per week, over 38 weeks a year. From September 2024, this will be extended to parents of 9 month to 3-year-olds, and from September 2025, working parents of 9 month to 3-year-olds will be able to access 30 free hours per week, over 38 weeks a year.

This is a large expansion in the 30 hours offer and will take some time to implement and rollout. The department wants to make sure that taxpayers’ money is used efficiently, and the new offer is delivered in the best way. The department is ensuring a phased implementation of the expansion to the offer to allow the market to develop the necessary capacity, and we are working closely with the sector on the implementation of these reforms.

The department has already spent more than £20 billion over the past five years to support families with the cost of childcare. In the last decade, we have doubled the free childcare entitlement for working parents of 3 and 4-year-olds to 30 hours and introduced 15 free hours a week for disadvantaged 2-year-olds.

The reforms announced build on our current early education entitlements which continue to support parents, including a universal 15-hour offer for all 3 and 4-year-olds, the 15-hour offer for the most disadvantaged 2-year-olds, and the existing 30 hours offer, as well as Tax Free Childcare and Universal Childcare.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
31st Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 20 July 2022 to Question 37614 on Schools: Buildings, which schools in Canterbury constituency had at least one construction element in (a) condition grade C and (b) condition grade D, when that data was collated; and which of those schools (i) have already received funding from the School Rebuilding Programme and (ii) are expected to receive funding from the School Rebuilding Programme in the next two years.

The Condition Data Collection (CDC) is one of the largest and most comprehensive data collection programmes in the UK’s public sector. It collected data on the building condition of government funded schools in England. It provides a robust evidence base to enable the Department to target capital funding for maintaining and rebuilding school buildings.

The key, high level findings of the CDC programme were published in May 2021 in the ‘Condition of School Buildings Survey: Key Findings’ report. This is available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/989912/Condition_of_School_Buildings_Survey_CDC1_-_key_findings_report.pdf.

Individual CDC reports have been shared with every school and their responsible body to use alongside their existing condition surveys to plan maintenance schedules and investment plans. The Department plans to publish detailed school level CDC data. The Department is still preparing the data and will publish it as soon as possible.

Well maintained, safe school buildings are a priority for the Department. Our funding is directed both to maintaining the condition of the school estate and rebuilding schools. The Department has allocated over £13 billion for improving the condition of schools since 2015, including £1.8 billion committed this financial year.

The ten year School Rebuilding Programme (SRP) is condition led. 400 of the 500 available places on the programme have been provisionally allocated. A list of these schools and the methodology used to select them is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme-schools-in-the-programme.

Canterbury constituency has had two schools selected as part of the SRP. These are St Anselm's Catholic School, Canterbury, (announced December 2022) and Pilgrims' Way Primary School (announced July 2021)

The 239 schools announced in December 2022 will enter delivery at a rate of approximately 50 per year, over a five year period from 2023. The Department is currently undertaking due diligence on these schools prior to scheduling them, with schools prioritised according to the condition of their buildings, readiness to proceed, and efficiency of delivery. The scope and funding for each project will be confirmed following detailed feasibility studies and condition surveys of buildings.

Where a school identifies significant safety issues with a building, that cannot be managed within local resources, the Department considers additional support on a case-by-case basis. This includes applications for Urgent Capital Support (UCS) from eligible institutions. Schools eligible for Condition Improvement Fund (CIF) can apply for UCS where there are urgent health and safety issues that threaten school closure and cannot wait until the next CIF bidding round.

30th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether a summer-born child with an Education, Health and Care Plan has the right to apply to (a) start and (b) maintain education outside their chronological year group as a compulsory school age start set out in the Admissions Code.

A child does not have to start school until they have reached compulsory school age. For summer born children, this means that they do not need to start school until the September after their fifth birthday.

Where a child has an education, health and care (EHC) plan, the School Admissions Code does not apply to the admission decision. Instead, the Children and Families Act 2014 and Regulations made under the Act set out the process for a local authority drawing up such a plan. The local authority must set out, at section B of the plan, the needs of a child and, at section F, the special educational provision to meet those needs. The local authority must review the plan at least annually.

The local authority has various statutory duties that apply to its decisions over a plan. These include a duty to have regard to the views, wishes and feelings of the parents of the child. A parent of a summer born child, when an EHC plan is being reviewed or when a plan is first being drawn up, has a right to ask a local authority for them to be placed in a year group other than the usual for their chronological age.

If a child has special educational needs (SEN) that may be connected with their being summer born, such as a developmental delay, then the local authority will have to reflect these in Section B of the plan. The local authority must specify in Section F of the plan ‘special educational provision’ for each and every need specified in Section B. The local authority may decide that a child being placed in a year group other than the usual for their chronological age should be such special educational provision, and if so, the local authority must write this into Section F.

If the parents are dissatisfied with what an EHC plan does or does not say in relation to SEN or special educational provision, they have certain rights of appeal to the first-tier Tribunal.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
14th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of extending the HGV Skills bootcamp programme beyond 2023, to alleviate the shortage of HGV drivers.

Skills Bootcamps in HGV driving provide more opportunities for people to train as a HGV driver, gain their HGV driving licence and launch new careers in the sector, helping to alleviate the HGV driver shortage.  Since the launch in December 2021, the suppliers contracted to deliver Skills Bootcamps in HGV driving have seen high demand for places.

The department is investing up to £34 million to create up to 11,000 HGV driver training places for people that are new, returning to, or looking to upskill as an HGV driver. We have listened to HGV driver training companies and have confirmed that the new drivers can be trained between December 2021 and end of March 2023.

The department is currently reviewing HGV delivery, and more detail on the future availability of Skills Bootcamps in HGV driving will be announced in due course.

31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to increase attendance in post-16 education for students with anxiety.

The mental health and wellbeing of young people is a priority for this government, and we know post-16 providers can play a critical role in this. Colleges that take an effective whole-college approach are best placed to promote and support learners’ mental health and wellbeing, which can in turn can improve attendance.

The department has coordinated several programmes that are available to colleges to support the mental health of post-16 learners, including those with anxiety. This has included the opportunity for all colleges in England to access senior mental health leads training by 2025, and a £79 million boost to young people mental health support, including expanding Mental Health Support Teams, to bring colleges closer with mental health professionals in their local area.

Colleges funded through the £5.4 million College Collaboration Fund developed new creative ways to support learner mental health and wellbeing, with resources available to all Further Education (FE) providers online, while the Challenge Competition Fund has delivered project funding which has involved FE colleges, such as the University of Keele’s project to integrate a ‘whole community’ approach to mental health, including both FE and higher education providers in the region.

As part of our commitment to a long-term education recovery plan, the department is investing over £800 million across the next three academic years to fund an average of 40 additional learning hours for band 5 and T Level students in 16 to 19 education. The additional hours can be used to support areas where there are barriers for learners to effectively access and engage with teaching and learning, which can include their mental health.

24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department plans to increase the level of hardships funds for students.

The department recognises the additional cost of living pressures that have arisen this year and that have impacted students. Many higher education providers have hardship funds that students can apply to for assistance.

There is £261 million of student premium funding available this academic year to support disadvantaged students who need additional help. The department has worked with the Office for Students (OfS) to ensure that universities support students in hardship using both hardship funds and the student premium.

In addition, all households will save on their energy bills through the Energy Price Guarantee and the £400 Energy Bills Support Scheme discount. Students who buy their energy from a domestic supplier are eligible for the energy bills discount. The Energy Prices Bill introduced on 12 October 2022 includes the provision to require landlords to pass benefits they receive from energy price support, as appropriate, onto end users. Further details of the requirements under this legislation will be set out in regulations. A Treasury-led review will be launched to consider how to support households and businesses with energy bills after April 2023.

As part of the package of support for rising energy bills, the government is also giving a council tax rebate payment of £150 to households that were living in a property in council tax bands A to D as their main home on 1 April 2022. This includes full-time students that do not live in student halls or in property that is not considered a House in Multiple Occupation for council tax purposes.

14th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to help increase the number of primary school places in Canterbury.

The statutory duty to provide sufficient school places sits with local authorities. The department provides capital funding through the basic need grant to support local authorities to provide school places, based on their own forecast data. They can use this funding to provide places in new schools, or through the expansion of existing schools and can work with any school in their local area, including academies and free schools.

In March 2022, the department announced Kent will receive just below £43 million to support the provision of new school places needed for 2024 and just over £5 million for 2025. This takes their total funding allocated between 2011 and 2025 to just below £422 million.

The department also engages with councils on a regular basis to review their plans for creating additional places and to consider alternatives where necessary. When local authorities are experiencing difficulties, the department supports them to find solutions as quickly as possible.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many year nine places are available in Canterbury as of 11 October 2022.

The Department does not collect or hold real-time data on school capacity or pupil numbers on roll, which would be needed to calculate how many year 9 places are available on any given date. The statutory duty to provide sufficient school places sits with local authorities. Kent local authority will have further information on school places in the Canterbury area.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding has been distributed through the National Tutoring Programme in Canterbury in each month since that programme was launched.

The Department does not hold information on Tuition Partners or Academic Mentors in the required format at constituency level.

School-led tutoring grant allocations by school and local authority for the academic year 2021 to 2022 have been published at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1071234/School_Led_Funding_Publication_File_flat_values_v1.ods

Payment information relating to School-Led Tutoring for the academic year 2021 to 2022 will be published by the ESFA once the reconciliation process has been completed for that period.

School-led tutoring grant allocations for the academic year 2022 to 2023 have been published at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-tutoring-programme-ntp-allocations-for-2022-to-2023-academic-year.

Between November 2020 and June 2022, over 2 million tuition courses were started. The Government has committed more than £1 billion to support tutoring over academic years 2020 to 2023/24, during which we aim to offer up to six million tutoring courses.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the number of SEND places available in schools in Canterbury.

The statutory duty to provide sufficient school places, including places for pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), sits with local authorities. Therefore, the department has not collected central data on the capacity of special schools or of the availability of SEND places more broadly. However, starting from summer 2023, we plan to collect data from local authorities on the physical capacity of special schools and SEND units and resourced provision in mainstream schools, as well as corresponding forecasts of demand for specialist places. We expect this to be an annual data collection, forming part of the existing School Capacity Survey.

To support local authorities fulfil their statutory duties, the department is investing £2.6 billion between 2022 and 2025 to help deliver new places and improve existing provision for children and young people with SEND or who require alternative provision (AP). This represents a significant, transformational investment in new high needs provision. It will support local authorities to deliver new places in mainstream and special schools, as well as other specialist settings, and will also be used to improve the suitability and accessibility of existing buildings.

As part of this commitment, in March 2022 the department announced High Needs Provision Capital Allocations amounting to over £1.4 billion of new investment, focused on academic years 2023/24 and 2024/25. In June 2022, we announced that we will build up to 60 new centrally delivered special and AP free schools. The application process for special free schools will close on 21 October 2022.

14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on fulfilling the core objectives of the national curriculum physical education programme for primary school children.

The department recognises that the extended school closures have had a substantial impact on children and young people’s education.

While we do not collect detailed data on PE outcomes, we have been monitoring the effect of the COVID-19 outbreak on education. The department’s school snapshot panel survey in December 2020 provided insights into the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on PE provision, showing a mixed picture. 73% of schools had changed their delivery of PE in some way, for 90% the change was around delivering different or modified activities. 19% of all schools reported increased PE time, for example due to pupils attending school in PE kit reducing changing time, and 15% of all schools reported reduced time for PE often due to the lack of appropriate inside space. The school recovery report of January 2022 shows that whilst some schools report increased hours for PE, 56% of primary schools have reported reducing hours for some subjects, such as PE.

The department’s COVID-19 guidance has supported schools to continue to provide PE, sport and physical activity through COVID-19 restrictions, and online PE lessons have been available through Oak National Academy.

PE will play an important role in supporting recovery. We are continuing to support schools to provide high quality PE. Primary schools continue to receive the £320 million PE and sport premium, which is supporting improvements to the quality of the PE, sport and physical activity which they offer. In October 2021 the government also announced nearly £30 million a year will go towards improving the teaching of PE at primary school, as well as to improving and opening up school sport facilities in England.

2nd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of available nursery places in (a) Canterbury constituency, (b) Canterbury district, during the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 school year.

Department for Education officials monitor the sufficiency of childcare places in England through a combination of regular surveys, telephone calls and email contact with local authority early years teams. We have not seen councils reporting any substantial place supply issues, and we have not seen a substantial number of parents unable to secure a childcare place this term or since early years settings re-opened fully on 1 June 2020. Kent County Council, which holds the statutory duty to secure sufficient childcare places in Canterbury, is not reporting any issues with childcare places at present.

According to Ofsted data published on 30 November, the number of places offered by non-domestic providers on the Early Years Register in the Kent County Council area has remained broadly stable between August 2015 and August 2021, as is true across England.

12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Prime Minister's announcement of 10 May 2020, whether primary school children returning to a school setting on 1 June 2020 will return on a full-time basis where possible until the end of the summer term.

From the week commencing 1 June, at the earliest, we will be asking primary schools to welcome back children in nursery, reception, year 1 and year 6 on a full-time basis, alongside priority groups. We will only do this provided that the five key tests set by the Government justify the changes at the time. We are asking schools to plan on this basis, ahead of confirmation that the tests are met.

Guidance for schools and childcare settings to prepare for wider opening from 1 June 2020 can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-educational-and-childcare-settings-to-prepare-for-wider-opening-from-1-june-2020/actions-for-education-and-childcare-settings-to-prepare-for-wider-opening-from-1-june-2020.