Anna McMorrin Portrait

Anna McMorrin

Labour - Cardiff North

Shadow Minister (Justice)

(since May 2021)
Shadow Minister (International Development)
2nd Sep 2020 - 14th May 2021
Shadow Minister (International Development)
10th Apr 2020 - 2nd Sep 2020
Welsh Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 15th Jun 2020
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Welsh Affairs Committee
16th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Environmental Audit Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019


Department Event
Tuesday 14th December 2021
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
14 Dec 2021, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
Save to Calendar
View calendar
Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 8th February 2022
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
8 Feb 2022, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
Save to Calendar
View calendar
Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 7th December 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 164 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 251 Noes - 296
Speeches
Wednesday 1st December 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

COP26 agreed that the Paris climate agreement must now be implemented to keep global warming below 1.5°, but it has …

Written Answers
Thursday 25th November 2021
Domestic Abuse: Homicide
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timetable is for the publication of the outcome of the …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 23rd April 2019
PROVIDING FINANCIAL RESTITUTION TO 1950s WOMEN
That this House welcomes the positive interventions from many hon. Members from across the House on behalf of women born …
Bills
Wednesday 5th February 2020
Co-operative and Community Benefit Societies (Environmentally Sustainable Investment) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to enable co-operative and community benefit societies to raise external share capital for the purpose of making environmentally …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 4th October 2021
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: Green Man Festival (trading name Plantpot Ltd)
Address of donor: Green Man, Office Old Bank House, Beaufort …
EDM signed
Tuesday 22nd June 2021
GKN Automotive alternative plan
That this House is alarmed by GKN Automotive’s decision to close its Birmingham factory next year, with the loss of …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 24th March 2020
Wellbeing of Future Generations (No. 2) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to make provision for requiring public bodies to act in pursuit of the United Kingdom’s environmental, social, economic …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Anna McMorrin has voted in 289 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Anna McMorrin Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(14 debate interactions)
David T C Davies (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Wales Office)
(8 debate interactions)
Simon Hart (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Wales
(7 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(34 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(24 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Anna McMorrin's debates

Cardiff North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Cardiff North signature proportion
Petition Open
162
of 6,037 signatures (2.68%)
Petition Open
156
of 85,821 signatures (0.18%)
Petition Open
227
of 126,208 signatures (0.18%)
Petition Open
146
of 92,060 signatures (0.16%)
Petition Debates Contributed

Enact legislation to protect retail workers. This legislation must create a specific offence of abusing, threatening or assaulting a retail worker. The offence must carry a penalty that acts as a deterrent and makes clear that abuse of retail workers is unacceptable.


Latest EDMs signed by Anna McMorrin

22nd June 2021
Anna McMorrin signed this EDM on Tuesday 22nd June 2021

GKN Automotive alternative plan

Tabled by: Jack Dromey (Labour - Birmingham, Erdington)
That this House is alarmed by GKN Automotive’s decision to close its Birmingham factory next year, with the loss of over 500 highly skilled jobs and work transferred to continental Europe; notes that GKN’s origins trace back to the industrial revolution, with over 260 years of history that include making …
67 signatures
(Most recent: 7 Sep 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 63
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
30th December 2020
Anna McMorrin signed this EDM on Wednesday 27th January 2021

Holocaust Memorial Day 2021

Tabled by: Bob Blackman (Conservative - Harrow East)
That this House notes that on 27 January 2021 the UK will observe Holocaust Memorial Day marking the anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, where an estimated 1.1 million people were murdered; commemorates the six million victims of the Holocaust; further notes that the theme for Holocaust Memorial Day 2021 …
97 signatures
(Most recent: 11 May 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 45
Scottish National Party: 31
Conservative: 7
Liberal Democrat: 4
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
View All Anna McMorrin's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Anna McMorrin, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Anna McMorrin has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Anna McMorrin has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Anna McMorrin


A Bill to enable co-operative and community benefit societies to raise external share capital for the purpose of making environmentally sustainable investment; to make associated provisions about restricting conversion to company status and the distribution of capital on winding-up; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading (Commons)
Friday 11th September 2020
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require producers of packaging products to assume responsibility for the collection, transportation, recycling, disposal, treatment and recovery of those products; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 13th June 2018
(Read Debate)

156 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the Supply Chain Advisory Group plan to report their recommendations to the Cabinet on resolving export/import supply chain issues.

The Supply Chain Advisory Group will bring together experts in the field, including from outside of Government, to provide views on how to resolve live supply chain issues. The Group will look at issues across the supply chain holistically. Once its work is concluded, its recommendations will be reported to the appropriate fora.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much Overseas Development Assistance funding his Department allocated to the Clean Technology Fund in 2020-21; and when he plans to release the Overseas Development Assistance funding allocation for the Clean Technology Fund in 2021-22.

UK support for the Clean Technology Fund (CTF), as part of the umbrella Climate Investment Funds (CIFs), is an important element of UK global leadership to tackle climate change and mobilise climate finance at scale.

BEIS allocated £12,583,808 to the CTF in 2020-21, to enable developing countries accelerate adoption of appropriate renewable energy technologies.

Overseas Development Assistance (ODA) funding allocations decisions for CTF in 2021-22 are being reviewed as part of wider ODA budgeting processes for 2021-22 and will be released as part of standard Government commitments on ODA transparency.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department spent on the Consultation, Aligning UK international support for the clean energy transition, which closed on 8 February 2021.

The consultation was produced at no additional cost to the Government.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he had with the board of CDC Group and UK Export Finance ahead of the announcement of the Aligning UK International Support for Energy Transition consultation on 12 December 2020.

The Government has been in consistent contact with government departments and arms length bodies throughout the development of the consultation, the associated announcement, and pursuant Government response and implementation.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish his Department’s definition of clean energy products and services included in the new overseas fossil fuel policy outlined in the UK Government’s response to the Aligning UK International Support for Energy Transition consultation.

The Government published detailed guidance accompanying the implementation of the policy shift on 31st March. This is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/how-the-government-will-implement-its-policy-on-support-for-the-fossil-fuel-energy-sector-overseas.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to improve transparency and ensure due diligence is undertaken for new businesses registering with Companies House prior to the conclusion of ongoing Government consultations on corporate transparency and register reform.

Government proposals to improve the accountability of people owning and controlling companies were set out in our transparency and register reform consultation response published in September 2020.

Companies House has strong working relationships with a range of law enforcement agencies, including the Insolvency Service, HMRC, the National Crime Agency and others Within its current powers to act and share information, Companies House is continually improving collaboration with UK Law Enforcement and trusted private sector partners.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many and what proportion of the responses to his Department's consultation on Aligning UK international support for the clean energy transition called for a policy implementation date of (a) March 2021, (b) June 2021, (c) October 2021 and (d) later than 2021.

The consultation closed on February 8th and the UK Government is now considering the information received and will respond in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications of the end of the transition period for the recognition of British ski instructors' qualifications in the rest of Europe.

Under the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement, British ski instructors who have had their qualifications recognised and who are resident or a frontier worker in the EU Member State that recognised them at the end of the Transition Period will have that recognition protected, and will be able to continue to work there. This includes qualifications which have been recognised before the end of the Transition Period under the EU legislation establishing a Common Training Test for ski instructors.

The EU legislation which established the Common Training Test for ski instructors applies to EU citizens only. Accordingly, it will not apply to UK citizens not within scope of the Withdrawal Agreement who wished to rely on it in the EU after the end of the Transition Period.

The recognition of UK professional qualifications across all industries (including ski instructors) in the EU after the end of the Transition Period is subject to ongoing negotiations with the EU, and the local laws and regulations in Member States.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the risks to the UK’s energy security in the event that a deal is not reached on the future relationship with the EU after the transition period; and what steps his Department is taking to mitigate risks arising from that matter to the UK’s energy supply.

The UK has one of the most reliable energy systems in the world. The UK’s exit from the EU does not alter the fact that our energy system is resilient and secure, and UK energy is supplied from diverse sources. Electricity and gas will continue to flow over interconnectors between the UK and the EU at the end of the transition period in any scenario. We have planned extensively for the end of the transition period, alongside industry, to ensure electricity demands are met. We are confident that electricity margins will remain adequate and that the electricity system is able to respond to any changes in demand securely and efficiently. The forecast electricity margin for this winter is healthy, at 4.8GW or 8.3% additional generation.

The UK gas market is one of the world’s most developed and provides security through supply diversity, most of which is not dependent on the EU. The forecast gas margin for this winter is healthy, at around 79 million cubic metres or 15% more supply than would be required to meet demand on the coldest day in 20 winters.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of retaining the requirement of minimum energy efficiency standards for new biomass plants in future contract for difference projects.

In June 2018 the Government published Part A of the response to the December 2017 consultation on proposed amendments to the Contracts for Difference scheme.

This stated that the Government intended to require all dedicated biomass with CHP, and energy from waste with CHP, schemes applying for new support contracts under the Contract for Difference scheme to have a minimum overall efficiency of 70% (net calorific value).

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure expectant fathers that have been furloughed and are receiving 80 per cent of their normal pay are not disadvantaged in qualifying for Statutory Paternity Pay because of a reduction in their earnings.

The Government is committed to making sure that all employees are supported at this time. We are currently considering?how the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme interacts with existing employment rights to family-related payments, including Statutory Paternity Pay, to ensure that the scheme works for parents.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to engage Parliamentarians as part of preparations for the 26th United Nations Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change hosted by the UK Government in December 2020.

The Government is working to ensure that parliamentarians are involved in the preparations and delivery of COP26, and that cross party ambition is galvanised to ensure the success of the conference.

The Government is committed to making a success of COP26, working across Departments. A key element of this is working towards the UK’s net zero commitment, which is very important to this Government both domestically and internationally.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much Official Development Assistance his Department (a) was allocated in (i) 2019-20 and (ii) 2020-21 and (b) will be allocated in 2021-22.

HM Treasury has published departmental allocations of Official Development Assistance (ODA) for 2019-20, here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-aid-tackling-global-challenges-in-the-national-interest/official-development-assistance-oda-allocation-by-department.

In this table, DCMS is included in the “Other Departments” group. In 2019-20, DCMS’s ODA allocation was £11m.

Outturn information of 2019 calendar year ODA spend is available in the Statistics of International Development publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-on-international-development.

The Government has committed to publishing departmental allocations of ODA for 2020/21 in due course.

Outturn information of 2020 calendar year ODA spend will be published later this year, as normal, in the Statistics of International Development publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-on-international-development.

The Foreign Secretary recently published departmental ODA allocations for 2021-22, including DCMS’s allocation, in a Written Ministerial Statement available online here: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-01-26/hcws735.

DCMS also manages ODA funding provided by the Prosperity Fund. This is reported separately by the Prosperity Fund.

15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to publish her Department’s response to the consultation on Digital Identity that closed on 19 September 2019.

The Department’s response to the Digital Identity call for evidence will be published in Spring 2020.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of girls aged (a) 11 to 14 and (b) 15 to 18 who have been taken into care with sexual exploitation and/or sexual violence assessed as a factor (i) in total in England and (ii) by local authority, in each year since 2018.

Information on the number of looked after children who have been taken into care as a result of sexual exploitation and/or sexual violence is not collected centrally by the department.

Information on the number of girls who have been referred to children’s services with child sexual exploitation and/or sexual abuse (which includes sexual violence) identified as a factor at the end of assessment is provided in the attached table.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of girls aged (a) 11 to 14 and (b) 15 to 18 who have been referred to children’s services with sexual exploitation and/or sexual violence assessed as a factor (i) in total in England and (ii) by local authority in England, in each year since 2018.

Information on the number of looked after children who have been taken into care as a result of sexual exploitation and/or sexual violence is not collected centrally by the department.

Information on the number of girls who have been referred to children’s services with child sexual exploitation and/or sexual abuse (which includes sexual violence) identified as a factor at the end of assessment is provided in the attached table.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to publish a response to the Children Not In School consultation which closed on 24 June 2019.

The Department remains committed to a registration system for children not in school. We will set out further details on this in the Government response to the consultation, which we intend to publish in the coming months.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure that access is provided to schools to obtain (a) interim insurance cover for educational visits beyond December 2021 and (b) insurance cover for educational visits affected by covid-19 outbreak related cancellations beyond December 2021.

The Department will issue advice to schools and colleges on the planning and booking of residential trips when it is safe to do so and in line with the Government’s roadmap to recovery which is set out here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-response-spring-2021/covid-19-response-spring-2021.

The Department has no plans to provide schools with interim insurance or insurance cover for the cancellation of educational visits affected by the COVID-19 outbreak.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if his Department will issue guidance to schools on the planning and booking of domestic residential trips to take place after the 21 June 2021 subject to the lifting of covid-19 restrictions.

The Department will issue advice to schools and colleges on the planning and booking of residential trips when it is safe to do so and in line with the Government’s roadmap to recovery which is set out here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-response-spring-2021/covid-19-response-spring-2021.

The Department has no plans to provide schools with interim insurance or insurance cover for the cancellation of educational visits affected by the COVID-19 outbreak.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to improve the efficiency of export and import supply chains for UK-based food and drink business in the context of HGV driver shortages.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain, as demonstrated throughout the Covid-19 response. It is well equipped to deal with situations with the potential to cause disruption. Our high degree of food security is built on access to a range of sources, including robust supply chains domestically, and from a diverse range of other stable countries.

On 20 July, the Government announced a package of measures to help the road haulage industry tackle the issues caused by the HGV driver shortage. These measures consist of support for the recruitment and retention of drivers, proposals to streamline the process to obtain a licence, increasing the number of driving test slots available, offering financial assistance for training, and backing industry-led initiatives to improve the working conditions for drivers and the image of the industry.

We announced further measures on 25 September. These include training up to 4,000 new HGV drivers through skills bootcamps and the adult education budget. Alongside this, 5,000 HGV drivers will be able to come to the UK in the run-up to Christmas, providing short-term relief for the fuel and food haulage sectors.

Nearly one million letters have been sent to drivers who currently hold an HGV driving licence, to thank them for their vital role supporting the economy, and to encourage those who have left the industry to consider returning. We will continue to work closely with industry to address the HGV driver shortage and to explore all avenues which will help the sector recover and help the economy thrive.

The Government has launched a short consultation on 14 October setting out proposals to temporarily extend so-called “cabotage” rights. This would allow overseas haulage operators delivering goods to the UK to make further unlimited collections and deliveries within a 14 day period, as opposed to the current limit of two such trips within seven days.

Subject to the outcome of the one-week consultation, these temporary measures would come into force towards the end of this year for up to six months, helping secure supply chains in the medium term alongside the wider package of measures the Government has put in place to address the shortage of drivers more broadly.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the dog and cat boarding sector.

Defra has been monitoring the impact that coronavirus restrictions have been having on the companion animal sector and has maintained a regular dialogue with the pet industry, welfare charities, local authorities and the veterinary sector.

We understand that lifestyle changes resulting from measures put in place to control the spread of coronavirus, including cancelled holidays, have affected occupancy rates in boarding establishments as people spend more time at home with their pets. However, the sector continues to provide a valued service for many people, including looking after the pets of key workers, people hospitalised as a result of coronavirus and vulnerable people, all of whom may need their services at this current time.

We have worked with the Canine and Feline Sector Group to agree guidance for pet businesses, including boarding establishments, to enable them to undertake core operations as far as possible, while maintaining compliance with the social distancing rules and need for hygiene precautions to help prevent the spread of coronavirus. We remain committed to engagement with the animal boarding sector to monitor any concerns they have and offer appropriate advice.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Environmental Audit Committee's first report of Session 2019 entitled, Invasive Species, if her Department will establish a biosecurity citizens' army to (a) improve public understanding of invasive non-native species and (b) help identify emerging biosecurity threats.

Partnership working is vital to deliver long-term management of invasive non-native species (INNS). The Great Britain INNS Strategy aims to guide a strong partnership approach with non-Governmental organisations, businesses, Government and the general public working together to improve biosecurity and reduce the risk from INNS.

Defra funded 29 Non-native Species Local Action Groups (LAGs) between 2011 and 2015 to support their start-up and give them time to become self-sustaining. Defra continues to provide advice to the LAGs and hosts an annual workshop for LAGs to meet and share progress. Non-native Species LAG coordinators and volunteers work with land owners to control INNS in catchment areas to reduce the risk of reinvasion. LAGs provide a key resource to help manage many species and raise awareness and they have mobilised a large number of volunteers in the fight against INNS. Other stakeholders also play a key role, such as Angling Trust members undertaking clearance of Himalayan balsam on river banks and trapping signal crayfish in their ponds. British Canoeing participates in our strategic approach to floating pennywort control and its members are engaged in organised control work alongside the Environment Agency and the Canal and River Trust.

We will examine the Environmental Audit Committee’s recommendation, and in particular the New Zealand model that it promotes for the mobilisation of large numbers of people. Citizen science is a vital addition to Government surveillance, providing more eyes on the ground and shared responsibility, which improves our overall biosecurity culture. We are assessing the options to facilitate the expansion of current local action into a ‘biosecurity citizens’ army’.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if her Department will fund a public awareness campaign on invasive non-native species in 2020.

Increasing levels of public awareness is critical to tackling invasive species. Extra resources will be considered as part of departmental business planning and future Government spending reviews, including Spending Review 2020.

The Great Britain Non-native Species Secretariat (GBNNSS), on behalf of Defra, the Scottish Government and the Welsh Government, is currently reviewing the Be Plant Wise campaign. We will be revising the messaging and extending it to cover terrestrial as well as aquatic plants. The GBNNSS is in discussion with some of the English water companies about extending the very successful partnership work on the Check Clean Dry campaign with them for a further five years beyond 2020 and expanding the campaign to the near Continent.

We launched the first Invasive Species Week in 2015, to bring together a wide range of organisations to raise awareness of invasive non-native species, to highlight work going on to tackle them and to inspire people to get involved and help prevent their spread. Over 320 organisations were involved in last year’s Invasive Species Week with 93 events held across the country. Invasive Species Week 2020 will take place from 18-22 May and I would encourage all hon. Members to look for ways to get involved in their constituencies.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of (a) the contribution of the commercial crayfish industry to the UK economy and (b) the cost to the UK economy of signal crayfish damage and control.

We have made no specific assessment of the contribution of the crayfish industry to the UK economy. As part of the development of the Invasive Alien Species (Enforcement and Permitting) Order 2019, we engaged with representatives of the crayfish industry to understand the impact of the Order on their businesses.

The 2010 technical report “The economic cost of invasive non-native species on Great Britain” investigated the cost of signal crayfish to the GB economy in regard to management, riverbank restoration, angling and research. The total cost to GB was found to be £2,689,000 annually (England: £1,538,000; Wales: £576,000; Scotland: £575,000. Northern Ireland has no populations of signal crayfish).

Defra recently published the results of a scoping study documenting the current evidence in relation to the ecosystem service impacts of invasive non-native species (INNS) in the UK. This study[1] sought to determine the feasibility of expanding on the 2010 report by estimating natural capital costs resulting from INNS, alongside the direct economic costs which were the focus of the 2010 report. This found that the costs of control were higher than the reported economic impacts, but these did not include river bank damage or wider ecosystem costs.

[1] Scoping study: ecosystem services and natural capital costs of invasive non-native species in the UK - BE0162 http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Default.aspx?Menu=Menu&Module=More&Location=None&Completed=1&ProjectID=20315

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what proportion of the £160 million funding for humanitarian aid pledged by the UK at the United Nation’s Yemen Pledging Conference in Riyadh on 2 June 2020 has been paid to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

The UK’s £160 million funding will be delivered through a range of UN agencies and aims to provide support to at least 300,000 vulnerable people each month to help them buy food and household essentials, treat 40,000 children for malnutrition and provide 1 million people with improved water supply and basic sanitation.

The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) is one of the UK’s partners in Yemen. We currently support the Cash and Markets Working Group coordinator and stand ready to consider support to the OCHA led Yemen Humanitarian Fund when an allocation round is announced.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether the Government's £300 million funding pledge to the Syrian humanitarian relief fund at the Brussels Conference on 30 June 2020 is inclusive of or separate from current projected Official Development Assistance spending in (a) Syria, (b) Lebanon, (c) Jordan and (d) Turkey.

At the Brussels Conference, the Secretary of State pledged to provide at least £300 million of humanitarian and development assistance. This is the currently-approved UK ODA expenditure for Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey for 2020. This figure is made up of DFID country budgets, total operating costs, and ODA-eligible budgets from other Government departments towards these four countries.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps she has taken to ensure that Official Development Assistance is not spent on fossil fuel projects.

Countries need reliable and sustainable supplies of energy if they are to tackle poverty effectively by growing their economies, creating jobs, and delivering essential services. UK aid is focused on helping them achieve this, and our support for energy is increasingly invested in renewables. Since 2011, the UK has provided 26 million people with improved access to clean energy and installed 1,600 MW of clean energy capacity, avoiding 16 million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions.

In 2019, in the Green Finance Strategy, the Government committed to aligning the UK’s Official Development Assistance with the goals of the Paris international climate change agreement, including our support for energy.

The Government has also announced that the UK will double our international climate finance to £11.6 billion between 2021/22 and 2025/26. A significant proportion of this funding will be invested in clean energy, including up to £1 billion in developing and testing new technology in areas such as energy storage, innovations in renewable energy, cooling, low carbon and electric transport and technologies for industrial decarbonisation. This funding for innovation is targeted at driving forward the clean energy transition in developing countries, by creating and demonstrating new technologies and business models to deploy them.

1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much the CDC Group has invested in fossil fuel projects in each of the last three years.

Since 2017, CDC has made new direct commitments to fossil fuel projects totalling $207.4 million ($84.8 million in 2017; $0 million in 2018; $122.6 million in 2019). During the same period CDC has made over $1 billion of commitments into climate related investments including renewable power, forestry and resource efficiency projects.

Last week, CDC published an ambitious Climate Strategy, which sets out a comprehensive approach to align all of CDC’s investing activities with the Paris Agreement, based on the core principles of reaching net zero by 2050, enabling a just transition and strengthening adaptation and resilience.

CDC is committed to Paris Alignment including net zero emissions by 2050 and will not make new investments in any business – either directly or through an intermediary fund – that is deemed to be misaligned with the Paris Agreement. CDC is targeting 30% of total investments to be committed to climate finance in 2021.

More information here: https://www.cdcgroup.com/en/news-insight/news/cdc-group-unveils-commitment-to-become-aligned-to-the-paris-agreement/.

23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on the reallocation of responsibility over the globally agreed Sustainable Development Goals following the merger of her Department with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

The UK remains committed to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the SDGs will play an important role in collective approaches to post-COVID-19 recovery. Responsibility for the oversight of the SDGs will need to be considered in the round as part of the formation of the new Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office. Notwithstanding this, all government departments have responsibility for the aspects of the SDGs that relate to their respective policy responsibilities.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of merging her Department with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on the UK’s ability to meet the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

The UK remains committed to the Sustainable Development Goals. The SDGs will play an important role in post-COVID-19 recovery, recognising the connection between healthy lives, healthy societies and a healthy environment. As the Prime Minister affirmed on 28 May, we owe it to future generations to build back better, basing our recovery on a fairer, greener and more resilient global economy, and to get our shared goals back on track, including the Sustainable Development Goals.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent discussions she had with international counterparts on the urgent need for increased pledged funding for humanitarian aid programmes in Yemen.

Over the last month the International Development Secretary and I have held several calls with our counterparts, including from Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Kuwait, to stress the importance of donors providing funds to the humanitarian response in Yemen.

UK officials have also held similar discussions with their counterparts around the world.

The UK announced our new pledge of £160 million in humanitarian funding for Yemen in the 2020/21 financial year at the Yemen Pledging Conference on 2 June, taking our total commitment since the conflict began to £970 million.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what outcomes were agreed on 23 April 2020 during discussions between her Department's Acting Permanent Secretary and the UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs on international humanitarian funding levels in Yemen.

On Thursday 23 April, DFID’s Acting Permanent Secretary discussed the worsening humanitarian situation in Yemen and the urgent need for additional funding with UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, Mark Lowcock.

The UN has requested over $2.4 billion of funding to be able to respond to the humanitarian crisis in Yemen until the end of this year.

I announced on 2 June that the UK will provide £160 million in response to Yemen’s humanitarian crisis this financial year (2020/21). This brings our overall commitment to Yemen to £970 million since the conflict began in 2015.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to ensure logistical strategies are in place to help ensure the timely distribution of vaccines to international NGOs working on the ground in low-income and fragile states.

My Department is at the forefront of global efforts to ensure that Covid-19 vaccines are available to everyone who needs them, including in low-income and fragile states. On 4 June, the UK will host the Global Vaccines Summit (GVS2020) alongside GAVI who are uniquely placed to ensure safe, effective and affordable COVID-19 vaccines can be rolled out at scale to ensure equitable access. The UK is the leading donor to GAVI and we recently announced the equivalent of £330 million a year for five years, covering the business planning period 2021-2025.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions she has had with her international counterparts in the (a) G7, (b) G20, (c) UN and (d) World Health Organisation on the scaling up of WASH facilities available in refugee camps in (i) Greece, (ii) Turkey, and (iii) throughout the Middle East.

The UK is at the forefront of tackling forced displacement and supporting refugees around the world, including support to Syrian refugees in Turkey and the Middle East, most notably Jordan and Lebanon. We also continue to offer support to the Greek Government to alleviate pressure and deliver sustainable improvements in the Greek migration system.

To date, the UK has committed £744 million in the international fight against COVID-19. We are a key contributor to the UN Global Humanitarian Response Plan which aims to ensure support to the most vulnerable groups including refugees and other forcibly displaced populations. This includes significant support to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) to help install hand-washing stations and isolation and treatment centres in refugee camps, and increase access to clean water for displaced people.

We are working closely with the UN, International Financial Institutions, global health multilaterals, and wider international system to push for a strong and coordinated global response to the crisis and to ensure the most vulnerable groups, including refugees, are not left behind. As part of this, there is regular Ministerial and senior official engagement with the G7, G20, World Bank Group and other Multilateral Development Banks, UN agencies, and bilateral partners.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment she has made of the need to increase the UK Government's contributions to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency to meet increased demand for core services for Palestinian refugees throughout the Middle East.

The UK is a long-term supporter of the UN Relief and Works Agency (UNWRA). Our funding helps provide education to more than 533,000 children (half of which are girls), health services for around 3.1 million Palestinian refugees, and social safety net assistance for around 255,000 of the most vulnerable.

The services that UNRWA provide play a key role in helping contain and address the spread of COVID-19. We continue to monitor the situation closely and are working closely with UNRWA and the international community to ensure a co-ordinated response to the outbreak.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of UK Government-funded nutrition programmes in developing countries.

DFID undertakes reviews of all its programmes, including nutrition programmes, on an annual basis, including whether intended outcomes and impacts are being achieved. We also invest in evaluating our programmes to enable us to learn what works and to adapt our approaches accordingly.

In 2020, we have been looking across DFID’s country portfolio to assess where there is scope to improve how we address malnutrition as part of the government’s commitment to end the preventable deaths of mothers, newborns and children – and considering current efforts to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Independent Commission for Aid Impact is close to finalising its review of DFID’s work on nutrition. This will provide important insights into how we can further strengthen the work we do, and we look forward to receiving the final report in September.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the extent to which her Department’s funding for nutrition programmes in low-income and fragile states throughout the Middle East is meeting demand for those programmes.

Across the Middle East, malnutrition rates, as well as food insecurity levels, are very concerning, particularly in Yemen and Syria where rates are among the highest in the world.

In Yemen, last financial year (19/20), UK support helped UNICEF screen over 400,000 children for severe acute malnutrition and enabled 45,000 children to be enrolled in nutrition programmes after screening. The UK is the second-largest donor to the malnutrition response in Yemen and we continue to encourage other donors to provide significant funding to Yemen, including for the malnutrition response.

In Syria, last financial year (19/20), the UK reached over 170,000 children under five, or pregnant or new mothers, with nutrition interventions. The UK is one of the largest bilateral donors to the Syria Crisis since it began in 2011. We are at the forefront of the humanitarian response, driving other donors to help those acutely in need, including on key issues such as malnutrition.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions she has had with her international counterparts on the need to tackle (a) malnutrition and (b) food scarcity among vulnerable people throughout the Middle East.

On Friday 17 April, the Secretary of State for International Development spoke with the Executive Director of the World Food Programme, David Beasley. Their discussion covered COVID-19, the need for humanitarian access in Yemen (to enable the delivery of food to vulnerable people) and the current food scarcity risk posed by locusts in the Middle East and Africa.

On Monday 27 April, I spoke with the Government of Yemen’s Foreign Minister, Mohammad Hadrami, where we discussed ways of stabilising Yemen’s economy (which will be critical for ensuring food imports and preventing a further deterioration in food scarcity).

On Thursday 23 April, DFID’s Acting Permanent Secretary discussed ways of improving humanitarian funding levels in Yemen, including in response to malnutrition and food scarcity, with the United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, Mark Lowcock.

Ministers and UK officials also remain in close contact with other donors on malnutrition and food scarcity across the Middle East.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 1 February 2021 to Question 144824 Fossil Fuels: Export Credit Guarantees, when she plans to provide details of the two upstream UK Export Finance funded projects located in Brazil and one midstream project in Turkmenistan.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) carries out due diligence on all relevant aspects of a project before reaching a decision on whether to provide support. UKEF is currently reviewing whether any projects that had been under consideration fall within the limited exemptions to the new policy. It is not UKEF policy to comment on potential transactions for reasons of commercial sensitivity.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much Official Development Assistance his Department (a) was allocated in (i) 2019-20 and (ii) 2020-21 and (b) will be allocated in 2021-22.

The Department for International Trade’s (DIT) final allocations for Official Development Assistance (ODA), as per the Department’s Supplementary Estimate were as following:

a) i) 2019-20 £5.4m

ii) 2020-21 £8.7m.

b) 2021-22 allocations: £0m

[These figures include ODA received via the Joint Funds Unit as well as directly from the (former) Department for International Development.]

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 25 November 2020 to Question 118559 on Fossil Fuels: Export Credit Guarantees, what the locations are of the (a) two upstream projects, (b) one midstream project, (c) two downstream projects and (d) two power projects.

The projects referred to in the response to PQ118559 are in the following locations:

a) The upstream projects are both located in Brazil.

b) The midstream project is in Turkmenistan.

c) One downstream project is in Malaysia, and the other is in Turkey

d) The previous Answer referred to one power project, which is located in Iraq.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 29 June 2020 to Question 63442 on Liquefied Natural Gas: Mozambique, if her Department will (a) undertake and (b) publish an Environmental, Social and Health Impact Assessment (ESHR) independent of the ESHR published by the private financiers of the Mozambique LNG project.

In line with its regular policy, UK Export Finance (UKEF) has undertaken an environmental, social and human rights (ESHR) review of the Mozambique LNG Project. This has been conducted alongside other export credit agencies and the African Development Bank, with the support of an independent ESHR consultant.

This review considered all the relevant ESHR documentation provided by the Project sponsors such as ESHR impact assessments, strategies, management and monitoring plans, amongst others. UKEF published a Category A notice of its consideration of the Project in August 2019, which includes a link to an Environmental, Social and Health Impact Assessment (ESHIA) of the Mozambique LNG project and related information. This notice can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/category-a-project-under-consideration-mozambique-lng-project. In undertaking its review, UKEF considered the most up-to-date ESHIA.

19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to improve the timeliness of correspondence (a) with non-UK citizens applying for a driving or provisional driving licence and (b) to return additional documentation provided by those applicants.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) receives around 60,000 items of mail every day and industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services union has led to delays for customers. The DVLA has also been working with a significantly reduced number of staff on site to ensure social distancing in line with Welsh Government requirements. The current increased demand for the DVLA’s services has also contributed to delays with paper applications.

The DVLA has introduced additional online services and recruited more staff. The DVLA is urgently securing extra office space to house more staff to help reduce waiting times while providing future resilience and business continuity.

The DVLA understands the impact that delays can have on people’s everyday lives and is working as quickly as possible to process paper applications and return people’s documentation to them.

The DVLA recognises the effect that the delays are having on drivers who have been revoked on medical grounds and additional resource is being utilised to process cases as quickly as possible.

However, DVLA is often reliant on receiving information from medical professionals to ensure drivers can meet the required medical standards which can add to delays.

The DVLA deals with around 750,000 medical driver licensing cases each year. The length of time taken to deal with an application depends on the medical condition(s) involved and whether further information is required from medical professionals. Although doctors play an important role in the driver licensing process, the DVLA is responsible for considering the medical information supplied in the context of safe driving and deciding whether a licence can be issued.

When a decision has been taken to issue a driving licence, the DVLA writes to the applicant to inform them that they should receive the licence within ten working days.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average length of time is between receiving documentation of a medical decision to restore a driver's licence and retuning the licence to the driver; and what steps he is taking to improve correspondence in that process.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) receives around 60,000 items of mail every day and industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services union has led to delays for customers. The DVLA has also been working with a significantly reduced number of staff on site to ensure social distancing in line with Welsh Government requirements. The current increased demand for the DVLA’s services has also contributed to delays with paper applications.

The DVLA has introduced additional online services and recruited more staff. The DVLA is urgently securing extra office space to house more staff to help reduce waiting times while providing future resilience and business continuity.

The DVLA understands the impact that delays can have on people’s everyday lives and is working as quickly as possible to process paper applications and return people’s documentation to them.

The DVLA recognises the effect that the delays are having on drivers who have been revoked on medical grounds and additional resource is being utilised to process cases as quickly as possible.

However, DVLA is often reliant on receiving information from medical professionals to ensure drivers can meet the required medical standards which can add to delays.

The DVLA deals with around 750,000 medical driver licensing cases each year. The length of time taken to deal with an application depends on the medical condition(s) involved and whether further information is required from medical professionals. Although doctors play an important role in the driver licensing process, the DVLA is responsible for considering the medical information supplied in the context of safe driving and deciding whether a licence can be issued.

When a decision has been taken to issue a driving licence, the DVLA writes to the applicant to inform them that they should receive the licence within ten working days.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the impact of the DVLA casework backlog on the return of licences revoked on medical grounds; and what steps he is taking to improve the efficiency of DVLA.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) receives around 60,000 items of mail every day and industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services union has led to delays for customers. The DVLA has also been working with a significantly reduced number of staff on site to ensure social distancing in line with Welsh Government requirements. The current increased demand for the DVLA’s services has also contributed to delays with paper applications.

The DVLA has introduced additional online services and recruited more staff. The DVLA is urgently securing extra office space to house more staff to help reduce waiting times while providing future resilience and business continuity.

The DVLA understands the impact that delays can have on people’s everyday lives and is working as quickly as possible to process paper applications and return people’s documentation to them.

The DVLA recognises the effect that the delays are having on drivers who have been revoked on medical grounds and additional resource is being utilised to process cases as quickly as possible.

However, DVLA is often reliant on receiving information from medical professionals to ensure drivers can meet the required medical standards which can add to delays.

The DVLA deals with around 750,000 medical driver licensing cases each year. The length of time taken to deal with an application depends on the medical condition(s) involved and whether further information is required from medical professionals. Although doctors play an important role in the driver licensing process, the DVLA is responsible for considering the medical information supplied in the context of safe driving and deciding whether a licence can be issued.

When a decision has been taken to issue a driving licence, the DVLA writes to the applicant to inform them that they should receive the licence within ten working days.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the effect of covid-19 lockdown restrictions on the secure transferal of private pension funds to a dependent, upon the death of a partner, who would have been a spouse were it not for those restrictions placed on wedding and civil partnership ceremonies.

The rules governing what surviving spouses or partners might inherit following the death of a member will differ for different private pension schemes, and will depend on individual scheme rules. Some schemes will require a couple to be married or in a civil partnership, others will require the scheme member to nominate their partner, in others again the unmarried partner may have to prove financial dependency.

Many Defined Benefit pension schemes pay death benefits, such as death in service lump sums, or, for those already retired, the remainder of the first five year’s pension on the member’s death. These benefits are normally payable even if no survivor benefit is due. In many cases, the trustees have discretion as to who payment should be made to, although the member is encouraged to complete a nomination form to make their wishes known.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that pregnant women that have been furloughed and are receiving 80 per cent of their normal pay are not disadvantaged in qualifying for Statutory Maternity Pay because of a reduction in their earnings.

The Government is committed to making sure that all employees are supported at this time. We are currently considering?how the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme interacts with existing employment rights to family-related payments, including Statutory Maternity Pay, to ensure that the scheme works for parents.

21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of girls aged (a) 11 to 14 and (b) 15 to 18 who have presented to A&E with sexual exploitation and/or sexual violence assessed as a factor in each year since 2018.

No such estimate has been made as the information requested is not collected centrally.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the Government's response to the Law Commission's consultation entitled Building families through surrogacy: a new law, which closed on 11 October 2019.

The Law Commissions of England and Wales, and Scotland, are undertaking an independent review of United Kingdom surrogacy legislation, funded by the Government. I am intending to meet with the Law Commissions’ team in the spring to discuss their analysis of the consultation responses and the policy implications.

The Government has no plans to publish any draft legislative about surrogacy of its own.

The Government does not provide a formal Government response to the Commissions’ independent consultations. Under the Government’s Protocol with the Commissions we commit to providing an interim response to the recommendations within six months of publication of the report, and a full response within one year. The Law Commissions intend to publish a report, which will consider the responses received to their consultation and set out their recommendations for reform of the law, in 2021. This will be accompanied by a draft Bill.

27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government plans to bring forward legislative proposals on surrogacy before the planned report on the issue by the Law Commission in 2021; and if he will make a statement.

The Law Commissions of England and Wales, and Scotland, are undertaking an independent review of United Kingdom surrogacy legislation, funded by the Government. I am intending to meet with the Law Commissions’ team in the spring to discuss their analysis of the consultation responses and the policy implications.

The Government has no plans to publish any draft legislative about surrogacy of its own.

The Government does not provide a formal Government response to the Commissions’ independent consultations. Under the Government’s Protocol with the Commissions we commit to providing an interim response to the recommendations within six months of publication of the report, and a full response within one year. The Law Commissions intend to publish a report, which will consider the responses received to their consultation and set out their recommendations for reform of the law, in 2021. This will be accompanied by a draft Bill.

13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Maltese counterparts on lifting restrictions on UK citizens vaccinated with AstraZeneca covid-19 vaccines manufactured by the Serum Institute of India.

All AstraZeneca vaccines given in the UK are the same product and appear on the NHS COVID Pass as Vaxzevria. The European Medicines Agency, as well as our own medicines regulator, has authorised this vaccine and travel should not be affected. We have confirmed with the Maltese authorities that all vaccines delivered in the UK, regardless of type, batch or location of manufacture, are sufficient for entry into Malta.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the delivery of covid-19 vaccines via the COVAX facility in Syria are not (a) disrupted and (b) manipulated by the Syrian Government.

The UK provides £548 million globally to the COVAX initiative which enables equitable access to vaccines. The first batch of COVID-19 vaccines were delivered to Syria on 22 April, with 203,000 doses via Damascus and 53,800 doses delivered into north west Syria.

The COVAX initiative is led by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, which works closely with stakeholders, including development partners to ensure robust governance and programme management to deliver the vaccines to those in need. UNICEF is the designated global supply agency for COVID-19 vaccines via the COVAX facility and follow rigorous monitoring and reporting measures. The UK is confident that any risks to COVAX vaccine delivery and aid diversion by the regime and other bad actors are mitigated by the efforts of UNICEF and our partners. As such it is crucial that UN Security Council Resolution 2533 on cross-border aid access into north west Syria is renewed.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when his Department plans to publish the 2021-22 official development assistance funding allocation for Lebanon.

As The Foreign Secretary set out at the International Development Committee last week, budgets would not normally be set out this early in the year. The normal process is for country allocations to be published by the Statistics for International Development. That process will not take place until 2022.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when his Department plans to publish the 2021-22 Official Development Assistance funding allocation for the United Nations Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

The Foreign Secretary's Statement to Parliament on 21 April 2021 set out preliminary details of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office's ODA spending plans for Financial Year 2021-2022. We have prioritised our aid to be more strategic and remain a force for good across the world. Following a thorough review, the FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in accordance with UK strategic priorities against a challenging financial climate of COVID. The FCDO is now working through what this means for individual partners and programmes, in line with the priorities identified. The funds for individual agencies and programmes will be published on DEVtracker and in Statistics on International Development.

The portfolio agreed by the Foreign Secretary will focus our investment and expertise on issues where the UK can make the most difference and achieve maximum strategic coherence, impact, and value for money. The UK will spend more than £10 billion in aid this year, including more than a billion pounds fighting the international causes and consequences of climate change and more than a billion pounds improving global health systems to build back better after the coronavirus pandemic.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the 2021-22 reduction in Official Development Assistance funding on (a) the humanitarian response, (b) health, (c) poverty alleviation, (d) food security and nutrition and (e) conflict resolution in Iran.

The FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in line with the UK strategic objectives set out in the Integrated Review, amid the challenging financial climate of COVID. We have prioritised our aid to be more strategic and remain a force for good across the world. Allocation decisions took into account a range of factors, including qualitative and quantitative analyses of draft business plans and sectoral analysis of key trends. Impact on beneficiaries of UK aid, on supply partners and on equalities were all considered.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the 2021-22 reduction in Official Development Assistance funding on (a) the humanitarian response, (b) health, (c) poverty alleviation, (d) food security and nutrition and (e) conflict resolution in Libya.

The FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in line with the UK strategic objectives set out in the Integrated Review, amid the challenging financial climate of COVID. We have prioritised our aid to be more strategic and remain a force for good across the world. Allocation decisions took into account a range of factors, including qualitative and quantitative analyses of draft business plans and sectoral analysis of key trends. Impact on beneficiaries of UK aid, supply partners and equalities were all considered.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when his Department plans to publish the 2021-22 Official Development Assistance funding allocation for the Global Environment Facility Special Climate Change Fund.

In 2018, the UK pledged £250 million as core funding for the Global Environment Facility. This is paid over four years (2018-2022) with annual payments of £62.5 million. We will be making the 2021/22 payment later this financial year. The Government does not intend to make an additional contribution to the Global Environment Facility's Special Climate Change Fund this year.

23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when his Department plans to publish the 2021-22 Official Development Assistance funding allocation for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees.

As set out at the International Development Committee last week, budgets would not normally be set out this early in the year. The normal process is for country allocations to be published by the Statistics for International Development. That process will not take place until 2022.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the reduction in Official Development Assistance funding on non-governmental organisations' (a) programming and (b) levels of in-country staff to deliver programmes in (i) Yemen, (ii) Syria, (iii) the Occupied Palestinian Territories, (iv) Lebanon, (v) Turkey, (vi) Egypt, (vii) Iraq, (viii) Libya and (ix) refugee settlements in Europe.

The FCDO has prioritised our reduced Overseas Development Assistance funding in the Middle East and North Africa so that the UK remains a force for good across the region against the challenging financial climate created by COVID-19. We are prioritising essential humanitarian assistance to those worst affected by conflict and COVID-19, notably in Syria and Yemen. We are continuing to focus on education and getting vulnerable girls into school and will also continue to support conflict resolution and stabilisation, open societies. Alongside our current programmes, we will also begin new programming to tackle climate change.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the 2021-22 reduction in Official Development Assistance funding on (a) the humanitarian response, (b) health, (c) poverty alleviation, (d) food security and nutrition and (e) conflict resolution in Turkey.

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office's aid budget has been allocated in accordance with UK strategic priorities against the challenging financial climate of COVID. UK Aid will continue to prioritise humanitarian support and conflict resolution as part of its core priorities for poverty reduction. Allocation decisions took into account a range of factors, including qualitative and quantitative analyses of draft business plans and sectoral analysis of key trends.

The UK's contribution to the EU's Facility for Refugees in Turkey (FRIT) remains unaffected by the decision to reduce UK ODA from 0.7% to 0.5% of GNI, in line with Article 155 of the UK-EU Withdrawal Agreement. The UK will continue to meet direct contribution commitments to the FRIT for the duration of the programme.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the 2021-22 reduction in Official Development Assistance funding on (a) the humanitarian response, (b) health, (c) poverty alleviation, (d) food security and nutrition and (e) conflict resolution in Egypt.

The FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in line with the UK strategic objectives set out in the Integrated Review, amid the challenging financial climate of COVID-19. We have prioritised our aid to be more strategic and remain a force for good across the world. Allocation decisions took into account a range of factors, including qualitative and quantitative analyses of draft business plans and sectoral analysis of key trends. Impact on beneficiaries of UK aid, on supply partners and on equalities were all considered.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the 2021-22 reduction in Official Development Assistance funding on (a) the humanitarian response, (b) health, (c) poverty alleviation, (d) food security and nutrition and (e) conflict resolution in Jordan.

The FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in line with the UK strategic objectives set out in the Integrated Review, amid the challenging financial climate of COVID-19. We have prioritised our aid to be more strategic and remain a force for good across the world. Allocation decisions took into account a range of factors, including qualitative and quantitative analyses of draft business plans and sectoral analysis of key trends. Impact on beneficiaries of UK aid, on supply partners and on equalities were all considered.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the reduction in official development assistance on the logistics, delivery and rollout of a covid-19 vaccine in active conflict zones in (a) northwest Syria, (b) northeast Syria and (c) Yemen.

Despite financial pressures, the UK remains a leading humanitarian donor, having committed over £3.7 billion to the Syria crisis and more than £1 billion to the Yemen responses since the conflicts began. COVID-19 continues to pose a particularly significant threat in Syria. The UK is one of the leading donors supporting UN and International Non-Governmental Organisation (INGO) partners to deliver vital healthcare, water, sanitation and hygiene activities across Syria, all which help to mitigate the threat posed by COVID-19. UK support to the COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access (COVAX) facility has seen the first batch of 203,000 vaccine doses delivered to Damascus and 53,800 doses to north west Syria on 22 April.

In Yemen, in partnership with the World Bank and WHO, the UK will fund roll out costs for nearly 2 million doses of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine allocated to Yemen via the COVAX facility. The first batch of 360,000 doses was delivered on the 31 March.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the reduction in Official Development Assistance funding on the effectiveness of programmes providing safe passage and support for refugee and displaced persons.

The UK is at the forefront of responding to forced displacement globally and we remain committed to supporting refugees and displaced persons. We continue to champion the principles of the Global Compact on Refugees (GCR), with its focus on longer term support that enables refugees to find work, access education and other key services, while also benefitting host communities and countries. The UK endorsed the Global Compact for Migration (GCM) in 2018, the first international framework for cooperation on migration. The UK resettled over 20,000 refugees fleeing the brutal conflict in Syria through the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme (VPRS). This included those requiring urgent medical treatment, survivors of violence, torture, and women and children at risk to safely rebuild their lives in the UK.

Following a thorough review, the FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in accordance with UK strategic priorities against a challenging financial climate of COVID. The portfolio agreed by the Foreign Secretary will focus our investment and expertise on issues where the UK can make the most difference and achieve maximum strategic coherence, impact, and value for money. FCDO will now work through what this means for individual programmes, in line with the priorities we have outlined.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the 2021-22 reduction in official development assistance on (a) the humanitarian response, (b) health, (c) poverty alleviation, (d) food security and nutrition and (e) conflict resolution in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

The FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in line with the UK strategic objectives set out in the Integrated Review, amid the challenging financial climate of COVID. We have prioritised our aid to be more strategic and remain a force for good across the world. Allocation decisions took into account a range of factors, including qualitative and quantitative analyses of draft business plans and sectoral analysis of key trends. Impact on beneficiaries of UK aid, supply partners and equalities were all considered.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the reduction in overseas development assistance in 2021-2022 on (a) the humanitarian response, (b) health, (c) poverty alleviation, (d) food security and nutrition and (e) conflict resolution in Lebanon.

The FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in line with the UK strategic objectives set out in the Integrated Review, amid the challenging financial climate of COVID. We have prioritised our aid to be more strategic and remain a force for good across the world. Allocation decisions took into account a range of factors, including qualitative and quantitative analyses of draft business plans and sectoral analysis of key trends. Impact on beneficiaries of UK aid, supply partners and equalities were all considered.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the reduction in Official Development Assistance funding on humanitarian and health programming for refugee and internally displaced communities in the Middle East and North Africa region.

The FCDO has prioritised our reduced Overseas Development Assistance funding in the Middle East and North Africa so that the UK remains a force for good across the region against the challenging financial climate created by COVID-19. We are prioritising essential humanitarian assistance to those worst affected by conflict and COVID-19, notably in Syria and Yemen. We are continuing to focus on education and getting vulnerable girls into school and will also continue to support conflict resolution and stabilisation, open societies. Alongside our current programmes, we will also begin new programming to tackle climate change.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the 2021-22 reduction in Overseas Development Assistance on (a) the humanitarian response, (b) health, (c) poverty alleviation, (d) food security and nutrition and (e) conflict resolution in Yemen.

The impact of the pandemic on the UK economy has forced us to take tough decisions, including temporarily reducing the overall amount we spend on aid. For Yemen, we have pledged at least £87 million for this financial year. This will feed 240,000 of the most vulnerable Yemenis every month, support 400 healthcare clinics and provide clean water for 1.6 million people. We will also provide one-off cash support to 1.5 million of Yemen's poorest households to help them buy food and basic supplies.

We fully support the peace process led by the UN Special Envoy, Martin Griffiths, and urge the parties to engage constructively with this process. On 1 March 2021 I [Minister Cleverly] spoke to UN Special Envoy Griffiths about how best the UK can help him end the war.

The FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in14714 accordance with UK strategic priorities against the challenging financial climate of COVID. Officials considered any impact on women and girls, the most marginalised and vulnerable, people with disabilities and people from other protected groups, when developing advice to Ministers.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the 2021-22 reduction in Overseas Development Assistance on (a) the humanitarian response, (b) health, (c) poverty alleviation, (d) food security and nutrition and (e) conflict resolution in Syria.

Following a thorough review, the FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in accordance with UK strategic priorities against the challenging financial climate of COVID. UK Aid will continue to prioritise humanitarian response and conflict resolution as part of its core priorities for poverty reduction.

The Syria crisis remains one of the UK's top priorities. The ongoing humanitarian crisis, deteriorating economic conditions, and growing food insecurity in Syria, means we must seek more sustainable, long-term solutions to increase the resilience of millions living in conflict. Last month the UK pledged at least £205 million in 2021 to continue providing life-saving and life-sustaining assistance in Syria and across neighbouring countries. This brings our total support to over £3.7 billion since 2012. The FCDO will now work through what this means for individual programmes, in line with the priorities we have outlined.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much and what proportion of the official development assistance budget was spent on climate and biodiversity in 2020-21.

The Foreign Secretary has outlined via Written Ministerial Statement to Parliament the thematic and regional allocations for FCDO ODA spend. Official Development Assistance budgets for 2021/22, along with final audited spend for 2020/21, will be published in the Annual Report and Accounts in due course.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 16 April 2021 to Question 179382 and with reference to the Written Statement of 21 April 2021 on UK Official Development Assistance departmental allocations 2021-22, Official Report, HCWS935, if he will publish the Government’s budget allocations for the £11.6 billion allocated to international climate finance in each financial year from 2021-22 to 2025-26.

The Government is committed to doubling UK International Climate Finance (ICF) to £11.6 billion over the next five years. In 2021/22 the UK Government (through the FCDO, BEIS and DEFRA) will spend at least £1.4 billion of ICF.

The allocations for future years will be settled in subsequent Spending Reviews.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the reduction in Overseas Development Assistance on the Government’s ability to help deliver 2030 targets for UN Sustainable Development Goals.

The Integrated Review reaffirmed our commitment to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. Following a thorough review, the FCDO's aid budget has been allocated in accordance with UK strategic priorities, which are closely aligned with the SDGs, against a challenging financial climate of COVID. Officials considered any impact on women and girls, the most marginalised and vulnerable, people with disabilities and people from other protected groups, when developing advice to Ministers.

COVID makes the challenge of achieving the SDGs even harder. Aid cannot do it alone. Mobilisation of domestic resources and private finance is critical, as has always been the case. The UK is demonstrating leadership on the SDGs, as one of the largest donors to the international response tackling COVID-19. And we will use our COP26 and G7 Presidencies this year to reinforce the importance of the SDGs on the global stage.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the £11.6 billion committed by the Government to international climate finance between 2021-22 and 2025-26, how much and what proportion of that £11.6 billion the Government plans to spend in each financial year between 2021-22 and 2025-26.

The Government is committed to doubling UK International Climate Finance to £11.6 billion over the next five years. No final decisions have yet been made on budget allocations.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when he plans for the new overseas fossil fuel policy outlined in the Government’s response to the Aligning UK International Support for Energy Transition consultation to replace CDC Group’s fossil fuel policy adopted in December 2020.

The Prime Minister announced at the Climate Ambition Summit on 12 December 2020 that the Government will no longer provide any new direct financial or promotional support for the fossil fuel energy sector overseas, with very limited exemptions. On the same day, CDC Group announced its fossil fuel policy which is fully aligned with HMG's fossil fuel policy.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the new fossil fuel policy outlined in the Government’s response to the Aligning UK International Support for Energy Transition consultation in meeting the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

The UK is firmly committed to Sustainable Development Goal 7 aimed at helping developing countries establish a secure and sustainable energy supply, economic growth and poverty reduction. We do this in a way that supports the UK's climate and environment objectives. Since 2011, the UK International Climate Finance (ICF) has provided 33 million people with improved access to clean energy.

HMG's fossil fuels policy demonstrates the UK's global climate leadership ahead of the UK's COP 26 Presidency. In developing this policy, HMG consulted with civil society, oil and gas majors, SMEs and industry bodies to gather views and evidence which reinforced the importance of the UK taking ambitious and decisive action on climate. However, in doing so, HMG would also ensure that the skilled and dynamic UK energy industry is effectively supported to transition successfully to clean energy export markets. And, in support of SDG 7, there would be few limited exemptions allowed for activities that support health and safety improvements, form part of wider clean energy transitions, decommissioning and humanitarian responses.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what estimate he has made of the CDC Group's expected investment in fossil fuel projects in the next five financial years beginning in 2021/22.

CDC has published its complete portfolio of energy investments as held at 31 December 2019 on its website, with details including the start date of each investment and the total amount committed.

For future investments, CDC has published its fossil fuel policy to align with the Government's new approach. The policy excludes the vast majority of fossil fuel sub-sectors including coal, oil and upstream gas exploration and production. Limited exceptions, such as selective gas power investments, are required to demonstrate alignment with a country's pathway to net zero emissions by 2050, amongst other criteria. The stringent criteria applied to such investments is also available on CDC's website.

CDC has invested over $1 billion of climate finance in the past three years, and has set a target for 30% of all new commitments in 2021 to be to climate finance. CDC does not set sector specific investment targets for its future investments. Specific pipeline information is not disclosed as this is commercially sensitive.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the value is of UK official development assistance investments in the Indorama Eleme petrochemicals plant in Port Harcourt, Nigeria (a) in total and (b) through the (i) CDC Group, (ii) Private Infrastructure Investment Group, (iii) International Finance Corporation and (iv) African Development Bank.

While CDC Group (CDC), Private Infrastructure Investment Group (PIDG), International Finance Corporation (IFC), African Development Bank (AfDB) are funded by UK ODA, their investments are not solely funded by the UK. Details of CDC, PIDG, IFC and African Development Bank investments in Indorama are available from their websites. Investment into Indorama has helped Nigeria meet its domestic needs for urea fertiliser and plastics as well as shifting the country to be a net exporter.

Further details can be accessed on the respective data portals at www.cdcgroup.com/en/our-impact/search-results/, http://data.pidg.org/, https://disclosures.ifc.org/ and https://mapafrica.afdb.org/en/.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what restrictions on investment in fossil fuels apply to CDC Group's recently announced $100 million investment in the Helios Investors IV fund.

Every investment CDC makes is assessed for its positive development impact using an internationally recognised methodology. In addition to this, through its Code of Responsible Investing, CDC applies rigorous environmental, social and governance (ESG) standards to each investment.

As part of its commitment to Helios Investors IV, CDC has in place legal agreements to ensure that the fund cannot invest in a range of fossil fuel activities, including coal-fired power plants, coal mining, processing and trading, upstream oil and gas exploration and production, midstream oil, oil refineries and HFO only-fired power plants and mini-grids.

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential environmental effect of the UK aid-funded Private Infrastructure Investment Group (PIDG) providing a $31 million loan to the Tema gas project in Ghana.

The UK invests in the Private Infrastructure Development Group (PIDG) to improve access to critical infrastructure services for people in the poorest regions of Africa and Asia. Before approving any investment, PIDG gives due consideration to the environmental impact of projects. This is done through an Environmental and Social Impact Assessment of every project. Each investment must comply with PIDG's Environmental, Social, Health and Safety standards, which are based on the internationally recognised International Finance Corporation Environment and Social Performance Standards.

With regards to a project's climate impacts specifically, PIDG only invests in projects which satisfy stringent tests. In 2020, PIDG updated its climate change approach to adopt a new 'Climate Change Standard'. This is in line with the UK Government's policy that it will no longer provide any new direct financial or promotional support for the fossil fuel energy sector overseas, with the exception of gas in limited circumstances where it is aligned with climate goals. The Tema Energy investment in Ghana is a legacy transaction which pre-dates the PIDG Climate Change Standard. PIDG undertook detailed assessments of the transaction to determine the impact of the project on Ghana's renewable energy targets, decarbonisation of the energy mix and transition risks. This assessment concluded that the project will play an important role in Ghana's transition from oil dependency and improve security of fuel supply to the poorest, with positive economic and net Green House Gas emissions benefits.

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the oral contribution of the Prime Minister of 3 March 2021, Official Report, column 242, what the UK's role is in the Saudi-led coalition's participation in conflict in Yemen.

The UK is not a member of the Saudi-led coalition. We have an ongoing relationship with Saudi Arabia which includes sharing advice and guidance to support the Saudi military's compliance with International Humanitarian Law and efforts to protect their national security. The UK continues to use all our diplomatic and humanitarian expertise to support UN-led peace efforts to end the conflict and alleviate the humanitarian situation in Yemen.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the value of CDC Group's support is for (a) Africa Finance Corporation, (b) Afrexim Bank and (c) the Trade and Development Bank; and what the value of funding provided by those institutions for the Gisagara peat-burning power plant in Rwanda was.

In 2019, the banks and other financial institutions supported by CDC lent $34 billion to businesses across Africa and South Asia. This economic activity supported the jobs of an estimated 1.88 million workers.

CDC has trade finance facilities with Afrexim Bank ($100 million) and the Trade and Development Bank ($75 million). In addition, CDC has provided three loans to the Trade and Development Bank ($200 million in total). CDC's capital, through both Afrexim and Trade and Development Bank, is enabling trade in critical goods as well as supporting broad economic growth across Africa. In 2010, CDC made an investment commitment to European Financing Partners IV ($32.6 million) which has a small exposure to the Africa Finance Corporation.

CDC was not a party in any funding provided by the listed institutions to the Gisagara power plant.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the timeframe is for the publication of the CDC Group's full energy portfolio as of December 2020.

Information on CDC's portfolio, including new commitments made in 2020, will be made available following publication of its 2020 Annual Review and Annual Accounts in July 2021. CDC's latest Annual Review and Accounts, published in 2020, are available on its website - https://www.cdcgroup.com/en/annual-review-2019/.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the postponement of Small Charities Challenge Fund funding on (a) UK-based small international development charities, (b) jobs supported by the Small Charities Challenge Fund and (c) the UK achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals by 2030.

The impact of the global pandemic on the UK economy has forced us to take the tough but necessary decision to temporarily reduce how much we spend on Official Development Assistance (ODA). We are currently working through the implications of these changes for individual programmes, including for Small Charities Challenge Fund. No decisions have yet been made.

The UK remains fully committed to the Sustainable Development Goals. Everyone has a role to play to achieve them including communities, local government, the private sector, and civil society.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total Official Development Assistance spend on Gift Aid was in 2020-21; and what allocation has been set for 2021-22.

Official Development Assistance (ODA) is reported on a calendar year basis. The FCDO National Statistics publication, 'Statistics on International Development', which is due to be published on 8 April, will provide a breakdown of high-level UK ODA spend for 2020, including the estimate of ODA eligible Gift Aid claimed by international development charities.

ODA eligible Gift Aid is determined by the estimated amount of Gift Aid claimed and then spent by charities on ODA eligible activities. As such, it does not have an allocated budget. ODA eligible Gift Aid spend for 2021 will be published in 'Statistics on International Development' in Spring 2022.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2021 to Question HL11567 on Overseas Aid: Charities, what assessment he has made of the role of small UK-based international development charities in helping his Department meet its seven core development priorities as part of preparing Official Development Assistance budgets for 2021-22; what plans he has to engage with civil society organisations on those budgets.

Civil society organisations have a significant role to play in delivering the seven core priorities. We recognise the unique role played by small UK-based international development charities in understanding and connecting with local communities and delivering support to the most marginalised and vulnerable, including during the latest COVID-19 crisis.

We will share further information with civil society organisations to start working through implications of decisions once they are taken, and we intend to work closely with our partners to implement any changes.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of recent reductions in UN-authorised cross-border aid mechanisms on the delivery of UK-funded health programmes in Syria.

The reduction of UN-mandated cross-border aid has made access to essential healthcare services even more difficult for millions across Northern Syria. Only 6% of public hospitals in the north-east are assessed to be fully functioning. In the North West, widespread food insecurity has led to stunted growth for one-third of children, one in nine pregnant women are malnourished, and COVID-19 is further exacerbating ongoing healthcare issues. The current UN cross-border aid mechanism is critical to ensure the successful delivery of COVID-19 vaccines to hard-to-reach populations such as north-west Syria, with other 330,000 vaccines to be distributed via Turkey.

The UK is clear that no other mechanism can replace the scale and scope of the UN operations in northern Syria, and strongly supports the renewal of UNSCR 2533, so that UN operations can continue to meet the needs in North West Syria, avoiding further humanitarian disaster.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 21 January 2021 to Question 138856 on Syria: Coronavirus, what (a) assessment he has made of the role of cross-border aid mechanisms in the delivery of the covid-19 vaccine and (b) discussions he (i) has had and (ii) plans to have with his international counterparts on the reauthorisation of cross-border aid mechanisms in July 2021 to enable the distribution of the covid-19 vaccine in Syria.

To date the UK has committed £548 million to COVAX, to ensure global access to vaccines, and has consistently called other donors to step up their support. Alongside this, the UK is clear that humanitarian partners must have unfettered access to distribute COVID-19 vaccines across the whole of Syria. Cross-border aid mechanisms are critical to ensuring the successful delivery of vaccines to hard-to-reach populations such as north-west Syria where over 2.7 million people remain displaced. Operations from Turkey will distribute over 330,000 vaccines to those most vulnerable.

The UK regularly raises the issue of UN-mandated cross-border access, including most recently on 02 March with Russian authorities, who have twice used their veto to unfairly reduce humanitarian aid access into Syria. The UK also continues to use its position at the UN Security Council and in bilateral discussions to push for greater aid access into Syria and to urge renewal of Resolution 2533. This approach is informed by regular Ministerial and Official consultation with International partners, UN agencies, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator Mark Lowcock, human rights and non-governmental organisations and others, We strongly support the renewal of UNSCR 2533 and are urging members of the UN Security Council to vote in favour of renewing the resolution to avoid further humanitarian disaster.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he (a) has had and (b) plans to have with his international counterparts on international humanitarian aid funding in advance of the fifth Brussels conference on Supporting the future of Syria and the region, scheduled to take place on 29 to 30 March 2021.

The Syria Crisis remains one of the UK's top priorities and we will continue to stand by the Syrian people by delivering to those in need, both inside Syria and to refugee hosting countries. The UK is one of the largest bilateral donors to the Syria Crisis, having spent over £3.5 billion to date, our largest ever response to a single humanitarian crisis.

We continue to use our position at the UN Security Council, relationships with International Partners, UN agencies, human rights and non-governmental organisations and others, to push for greater aid access into Syria and more sustainable, long-term solutions, to increase the resilience of millions living in conflict. The UK's Special Representative for Syria plays an essential role in engaging the international community, to improve the lives of over 13 million people who are currently in need of humanitarian assistance. The UK's Special Representative is also committed to driving support for a genuine political process to reach a lasting settlement. The UK will continue to engage with and lead the wider international humanitarian response to do the same, including at the fifth Brussels Conference for Syria and the Region.

The FCDO is in the process of rigorous internal prioritisation process in response to the spending review announcement, and we will provide an update on any implications as soon as possible. We are still working through what this means for individual programmes and no decisions have yet been made.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with (a) UK’s Special Representative for Syria and (b) representatives of non-governmental organisations on the UK’s allocation of 2021-22 overseas development aid for Syria.

The Syria Crisis remains one of the UK's top priorities and we will continue to stand by the Syrian people by delivering to those in need, both inside Syria and to refugee hosting countries. The UK is one of the largest bilateral donors to the Syria Crisis, having spent over £3.5 billion to date, our largest ever response to a single humanitarian crisis.

We continue to use our position at the UN Security Council, relationships with International Partners, UN agencies, human rights and non-governmental organisations and others, to push for greater aid access into Syria and more sustainable, long-term solutions, to increase the resilience of millions living in conflict. The UK's Special Representative for Syria plays an essential role in engaging the international community, to improve the lives of over 13 million people who are currently in need of humanitarian assistance. The UK's Special Representative is also committed to driving support for a genuine political process to reach a lasting settlement. The UK will continue to engage with and lead the wider international humanitarian response to do the same, including at the fifth Brussels Conference for Syria and the Region.

The FCDO is in the process of rigorous internal prioritisation process in response to the spending review announcement, and we will provide an update on any implications as soon as possible. We are still working through what this means for individual programmes and no decisions have yet been made.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when he plans to announce the UK’s allocation of 2021-22 overseas development aid for (a) Syria and (b) Libya.

As announced last year, the impact of the global pandemic on the UK economy has forced us to take the tough but necessary decision to temporarily reduce how much we spend on Official Development Assistance (ODA).We are now working through the implications of these changes for individual programmes. No decisions have yet been made on individual budget allocations.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, which international counterparts he discussed the humanitarian and conflict situation in Yemen with prior to the UN Yemen pledging conference on 1 March 2021.

Ministers and officials regularly engage with international actors, including the UN and other donors, to ensure life-saving humanitarian aid reaches the millions of Yemenis in need. The only sustainable way to protect civilians and bring long-term stability to Yemen is an inclusive political settlement and an end to the conflict.

On 25 February, the Foreign Secretary spoke to Saudi Foreign Minister Faisal bin Farhan about the Yemen peace process and he has also recently discussed this with US Secretary of State. I discussed Yemen with the Omani Ambassador to the UK on 4 February, and spoke to Yemeni Foreign Minister on 20 January regarding the attack on Aden and the formation of the new cabinet. We fully support the efforts of the UN Special Envoy Martin Griffiths to secure a lasting political settlement to the Yemen conflict. I spoke with Martin Griffiths on 1 March to discuss how the UK can best support the UN-led peace process.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what (a) criteria and (b) conditionality his Department has set for increases in the UK's aid contribution to Yemen in 2021-22; and what steps will be taken to establish such criteria.

The Foreign Secretary has set out seven core priorities which will inform FCDO ODA budgets for 2021/22. These are: climate and biodiversity; Covid and global health security; girls' education; science and research; defending open societies and resolving conflict; humanitarian assistance; and promoting trade and economic growth. FCDO does not apply conditionality to our aid, except where those conditions are linked to the purpose of the funding at hand (for example in results-based aid funding).

The UK's minimum commitment of £87 million to Yemen for financial year 2021/22 was decided and approved by the Foreign Secretary ahead of the UN Pledging Event on 1 March. This is a floor, not a ceiling. Despite the financial pressures at home, the UK remains a leading donor to Yemen and made the 5th highest pledge at the UN pledging conference. In previous years, the UK has exceeded its announced annual commitment to Yemen in response to developments on the ground.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when the decision to reduce the Government's Official Development Assistance spend in Yemen was made.

The Foreign Secretary has set out seven core priorities which will inform FCDO ODA budgets for 2021/22. These are: climate and biodiversity; Covid and global health security; girls' education; science and research; defending open societies and resolving conflict; humanitarian assistance; and promoting trade and economic growth. FCDO does not apply conditionality to our aid, except where those conditions are linked to the purpose of the funding at hand (for example in results-based aid funding).

The UK's minimum commitment of £87 million to Yemen for financial year 2021/22 was decided and approved by the Foreign Secretary ahead of the UN Pledging Event on 1 March. This is a floor, not a ceiling. Despite the financial pressures at home, the UK remains a leading donor to Yemen and made the 5th highest pledge at the UN pledging conference. In previous years, the UK has exceeded its announced annual commitment to Yemen in response to developments on the ground.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many fossil fuel projects CDC Group plans to support in 2021; where those projects are located; and which of those projects are panned to reach financial close in the next six months.

CDC's fossil fuel policy was published in December 2020. The policy excludes new investment in the vast majority of fossil fuel subsectors, with very limited exceptions. CDC will only consider investments in gas power and related infrastructure if they are aligned with the Paris Agreement and aligned with a country's pathway to net zero emissions by 2050.

Prior to 2021, CDC made investment commitments to two gas power generation projects which are expected to reach financial close in 2021. Both of these projects are in Africa. A small number of the investment funds to which CDC committed prior to the adoption of its fossil fuel policy, in December 2020, may make investments to fossil fuel projects under their existing legal mandates.

Specific pipeline information is not disclosed as this is commercially sensitive.

CDC has invested over $1 billion of climate finance in the past three years and has set a target for 30% of all new commitments in 2021 to be to climate finance.

CDC's policy is aligned with the HMG fossil fuel policy which excludes fossil fuel investments, except under certain circumstances. Any time line for completely stopping gas investments would be dependent on HMG fossil fuel policy.

27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many of the fossil fuel projects that CDC Group is currently considering support for are (a) upstream, (b) midstream, (c) downstream and (d) for power generation; and where each of those projects is located.

CDC published a new fossil fuel policy in December 2020, which will be applied to all new commitments. This policy excludes future investment in the vast majority of fossil fuel subsectors including coal, oil and upstream gas exploration and production, with very limited exceptions.

Prior to 2021, CDC made investment commitments to two gas power generation projects which are expected to reach financial close in 2021. Both of these projects are in Africa. A small number of the investment funds to which CDC committed prior to the adoption of its new fossil fuel policy, in December 2020, may make commitments to fossil fuel projects under their existing legal mandates.

Specific pipeline information is not disclosed as this is commercially sensitive.

CDC's policy is aligned with the HMG fossil fuel policy which excludes fossil fuel investments, except under certain circumstances. Any time line for completely stopping gas investments would be dependent on HMG fossil fuel policy.

27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will pause the approval of fossil fuel projects by CDC Group until his new policy on those projects is adopted.

The Prime Minister announced at the Climate Ambition Summit on 12 December 2020 that the Government will no longer provide any new direct financial or promotional support for the fossil fuel energy sector overseas, with very limited exemptions. Immediately following the announcement, CDC published its updated fossil fuel policy, which is fully aligned with the Government's approach, and is effective. The policy excludes future investment in the vast majority of fossil fuel subsectors with very limited exceptions. CDC's approach is consistent with the Paris Agreement and requires investments to demonstrate alignment with a country's pathway to net zero emissions by 2050.

Further details on CDC's updated fossil fuel policy are available at: www.cdcgroup.com/en/news-insight/news/announcing-our-new-fossil-fuel-policy-and-guidance-on-natural-gas-power-plants/?fl=true.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much and what proportion of the UK's total overseas development assistance contribution provided to the 13th Replenishment Fund of African Development Bank (2014-2020) was allocated to (a) fossil fuel projects and connected business programmes and (b) to the East African Crude Oil Pipeline project.

Since 2014, the UK has supported replenishments of the African Development Fund (AfDF) as follows:

13th replenishment (2014-16) £604 million of the £4.8 billion total;

14th replenishment (2017-19) £447 million of the £4.3 billion total;

15th replenishment (2020-22) £620 million of the £6.0 billion total.

The 16th replenishment is expected to be agreed in 2022.

Between 2014 and 2020 two AfDF projects with fossil fuel components have been approved by the Bank's Board, with a total value of £71 million. One relates to the installation of a generator for a diesel-powered power plant and the other to improving transmission from an existing gas power plant. No AfDF support has been provided for the East African Crude Oil Pipeline project. Future AfDF projects have yet to be agreed with country governments and the Bank's Board. The Bank is preparing a new climate change and green growth policy, due to be published in late 2021. We are engaging with this process with the aim of further limiting the Bank's support for fossil fuel projects, in line with the UK's recently announced policy.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much and what proportion of the UK's total overseas development assistance contribution made available for the 14th Replenishment Fund of African Development Bank (2020-2026) is planned to be allocated to (a) fossil fuel projects and connected business programmes and (b) the East African Crude Oil Pipeline project.

Since 2014, the UK has supported replenishments of the African Development Fund (AfDF) as follows:

13th replenishment (2014-16) £604 million of the £4.8 billion total;

14th replenishment (2017-19) £447 million of the £4.3 billion total;

15th replenishment (2020-22) £620 million of the £6.0 billion total.

The 16th replenishment is expected to be agreed in 2022.

Between 2014 and 2020 two AfDF projects with fossil fuel components have been approved by the Bank's Board, with a total value of £71 million. One relates to the installation of a generator for a diesel-powered power plant and the other to improving transmission from an existing gas power plant. No AfDF support has been provided for the East African Crude Oil Pipeline project. Future AfDF projects have yet to be agreed with country governments and the Bank's Board. The Bank is preparing a new climate change and green growth policy, due to be published in late 2021. We are engaging with this process with the aim of further limiting the Bank's support for fossil fuel projects, in line with the UK's recently announced policy.

24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the oral contribution of the Minister for the Middle East and North Africa, Official Report, column 116WH, if his Department will maintain as a minimum the current level of Official Development Assistance spend in Syria in financial year 2021-22.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office's Syria's budget allocation for financial year 2021/22 will be confirmed when the details of the Government's Spending Review are finalised.

The UK has been one of the largest bilateral donors to the Syria Crisis since 2011. To date, we have committed over £3.3 billion in response to the Syria Crisis, our largest ever response to a single humanitarian crisis. We will continue to support the Syrian people affected by the brutality of the Assad regime and we will continue to honour our commitment to support the Syrian people through humanitarian aid and pursuing accountability for the most serious crimes committed in Syria.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, on what date funding decisions will be made on the level of Official Development Assistance to be allocated to Syria in financial year 2021-22.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office's Syria's budget allocation for financial year 2021/22 will be confirmed when the details of the Government's Spending Review are finalised.

The UK has been one of the largest bilateral donors to the Syria Crisis since 2011. To date, we have committed over £3.3 billion in response to the Syria Crisis, our largest ever response to a single humanitarian crisis. We will continue to support the Syrian people affected by the brutality of the Assad regime and we will continue to honour our commitment to support the Syrian people through humanitarian aid and pursuing accountability for the most serious crimes committed in Syria.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what progress the Government has made in discussions with EU representatives on whether UK citizens will require a visa to travel to the EU for stays of over 90 days after the end of the transition period.

The Government has discussed arrangements with the EU for UK nationals travelling to the Schengen Area. Regrettably, the EU has consistently maintained that UK nationals will be treated as Third Country Nationals under the Schengen Borders Code from 1 January 2021. UK nationals will only be able to travel visa-free for short stays for up to 90 days in a rolling 180-day period. This is the standard length of stay that the EU offers to nationals of eligible third countries that offer visa-free travel for EU citizens, in line with existing EU legislation.

UK nationals planning to stay longer will need permission from the relevant Member State. This may require applying for a visa and/or permit. Information about travel to Europe after the transition period is available on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/visit-europe-1-january-2021

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the political and humanitarian situation in Yemen will be discussed as part of the agenda for the G20 summit.

The G20 Leaders' Summit agenda has yet to be finalised. It is likely to focus on health, the global economic recovery and climate change. The UK continues to raise the ongoing conflict and humanitarian crisis in Yemen in multiple multilateral fora.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what estimate he has made of the (a) number and (b) cost to the public purse of UK aid-funded projects in the West Bank and Gaza which have been demolished by Israeli authorities; and whether he plans to fund their replacement.

The UK is concerned by the continued demolitions of Palestinian structures by Israeli authorities. In all but the most exceptional of circumstances demolitions are contrary to International Humanitarian Law. We have made clear to the Israeli authorities our serious concern at the increase in demolitions of Palestinian properties in the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. Between 2015 and 2019, around eight per cent of West Bank Protection Consortium (WBPC) structures were demolished or seized by the Israeli authorities. The UK continues to fund the WBPC, and has provided a total of £1.9 million to the WBPC and its activities since 2018. Our legal aid programme supports Bedouin communities and Palestinians facing demolition or home eviction in both the West Bank and East Jerusalem.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has taken steps to help prevent the demolition of the Palestinian school in Ras Al Tin on the West Bank.

The UK is seriously concerned by the possible demolition of a Palestinian school in Ras Al-Tin by Israeli authorities. Our Embassy in Tel Aviv raised our concern with the Government of Israel on 13 October, alongside European partners. Officials also visited the school on 16 October. In all but the most exceptional of circumstances demolitions are contrary to International Humanitarian Law. We recognise that Palestinians face severe difficulty in securing building permissions for homes and infrastructure in East Jerusalem and Area C. We continue to urge the Government of Israel to develop improved mechanisms for zoning, planning and permitting in Area C for the benefit of the Palestinian population, including by facilitating local Palestinian participation in such processes.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the demolition of UK aid-funded schools and other social and humanitarian service projects by Israeli authorities in the West Bank and Gaza; and what recent discussions he has had with his counterpart in the Israeli Government on that demolition.

The UK is concerned by the continued demolition of Palestinian property, including schools, by Israeli authorities. In a joint statement on 16 October, the UK, alongside France, Germany, Spain and Italy, urged Israel to halt its policy of evictions and demolitions of Palestinian structures in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. Our Embassy in Tel Aviv also raised this issue with the Government of Israel on 13 October, alongside European partners. We keep the case for compensation under review but the UK is focused on preventing demolitions from happening in the first place. In all but the most exceptional of circumstances demolitions are contrary to International Humanitarian Law. The right to education is a basic right, and it is essential to have a strong and thriving Palestinian education system in order to provide opportunities for the next generation. This is why the UK is committed to providing support to education workers in the West Bank, and UNRWA education in the West Bank and Gaza.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has had discussions with (a) EU and (b) West Bank Protection Consortium members on (i) deducting funds from EU-Israel bilateral support and (ii) securing other compensation for demolished projects and seized aid in the West Bank.

The UK is concerned by the continued demolitions of Palestinian structures by Israeli authorities. In all but the most exceptional of circumstances demolitions are contrary to International Humanitarian Law. We have made clear to the Israeli authorities our serious concern at the increase in demolitions of Palestinian properties in the West Bank and in East Jerusalem. The UK is focused on preventing demolitions from happening in the first place through our legal aid programme, which supports Bedouin communities and Palestinians facing demolition or home eviction in both the West Bank and East Jerusalem. The UK and international partners will continue to call bilaterally, and in international fora, for Israel to cease demolitions and provide a clear, transparent route to construction for Palestinians in Area C. No funds have been deducted from EU-Israel bilateral support. We have consulted a number of EU and West Bank Protection Consortium partners on the issue of compensation. They share our concerns. We are keeping the case for compensation under review.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department has prepared a contingency plan in the event that the abandoned FSO Safer oil tanker off the coast of Yemen capsizes.

We remain deeply concerned by the deteriorating state of the FSO SAFER oil tanker. The Foreign Secretary raised the tanker's dire condition, which poses an environmental, economic and humanitarian threat to Yemen and the region, during the P5+ High Level Ministerial meeting on 17 September. The Houthis urgently need to grant access to the tanker so that the UN can inspect the vessel and carry out any much needed repair work. The UK is working with the UN and other donors to ensure the mission proceeds and that comprehensive UN contingency plans are in place should a leak occur.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with (a) his relevant international counterparts and (b) the United Nations regarding ongoing negotiations to obtain approved authorisation for UN investigators to inspect the physical condition of the FSO Safer oil tanker off the coast of Yemeni port, al-Hudaydah.

The FSO SAFER oil tanker remains is an environmental disaster waiting to happen. The Foreign Secretary raised the tanker's dire condition, which poses an environmental, economic and humanitarian threat to Yemen and the region, during the P5+ High Level Ministerial meeting on 17 September that he co-hosted with his Swedish, German and Kuwaiti counterparts. The Group agreed a Joint Communique - https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/joint-communique-on-the-conflict-in-yemen - which called on the Houthis to urgently facilitate unconditional and safe access for UN experts to conduct an assessment and repair mission. The UK is also working with the UN and other donors to ensure there is enough funding in place for that mission to proceed and that comprehensive UN contingency plans are in place should a leak occur.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, (a) what was the total budget this year for DFID's Palestinian aid programme; and (b) with reference to his 22 July announcement of cuts to the aid budget of £2.9bn, how much will be cut from the programme's proposed spend.

Following an internal review and prioritisation exercise of all Overseas Development Aid spending, we have not planned cuts to proposed total spend in the OPTs for financial year 2020/2021. This is £71.4m as per the DFID annual report published in July 2020.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the total budget was this year for DFID's Yemen aid programme; and with reference to his 22 July announcement of cuts to the aid budget of £2.9bn, how much will be cut from the programme's proposed spend.

The UK committed £160 million in new aid for Yemen for the current financial year (2020/21) at the 2020 Yemen Humanitarian Pledging Conference on 2 June.

We have every intention of meeting our commitment and have already disbursed 60 per cent of our £160 million funding for this year. We will continue to disburse funding quickly to ensure our partners have the resources to continue delivering assistance.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Department for International Development's budgeted funding for the Mixed Migration Centre through to April 2023 will be (a) maintained following the merger of that department with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and (b) maintained at the same level of projected spend.

Support to the Mixed Migration Centre (MMC) will be maintained by FCDO Ethiopia via the 'Programme Addressing Irregular, Unsafe Migration through and from Ethiopia' until April 2023, and by FCDO Sudan via the 'Routes Based Migration Response Programme' until October 2021. Funding under the centrally-managed 'Safety, Support and Solutions Phase 2' programme, which ends in March 2021, has been reduced by approximately 10 per cent. This cut was discussed and agreed with MMC and their partners.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total budget this year for DFID's Syria aid programme; and with reference to his 22 July announcement of cuts to the aid budget of £2.9bn, how much will be cut from the programme's proposed spend.

This financial year (2020/21) the Government budgeted £137 million for delivery of aid in Syria as a part of the UK's Syria Crisis Response. Difficult decisions have been necessary around the ODA budget to make sure we meet the 0.7 per cent commitment, however the UK continues to play a leading role in mobilising the international community.

At the Brussels Conference on "Supporting the Future of Syria and the Region" in June, the UK pledged at least £300 million to the Syria Crisis for 2020, bringing our total commitment to over £3.3 billion since 2012. This support will continue the essential life-saving and life-sustaining assistance in Syria and provide vital support in neighbouring countries.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total budget this year for DFID's Turkey aid programme; and with reference to his 22 July announcement of cuts to the aid budget of £2.9bn, how much will be cut from the programme's proposed spend.

In the financial year 2020/21 the UK has contributed £41.9 million through the EU Facility for Refugees in Turkey (FRIT), to support Turkey help meet the needs of refugees and their host communities. This forms part of the UK's Syria Crisis Response. The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office will continue to meet direct contribution commitments to the FRIT for the duration of the programme with no cuts to the programme's proposed spend.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what was the total budget this year for DFID's Middle East and North Africa programme; and with reference to his 22 July announcement of cuts to the aid budget of £2.9bn, how much will be reduced from that programme's proposed spend.

Programme plans for the delivery of £639.2 million ODA funding in the Middle East and North Africa were published in financial year 2020/21. This figure excludes Conflict, Stability and Security Funds.

Revised ODA allocations for 2020/21 will be published by HM Treasury at Autumn Budget. The Statistics for International Development published in 2021 will provide a full breakdown of the UK's ODA spend for 2020.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of increased economic sanctions by the US Administration on the Syrian Government on achieving the reauthorisation of humanitarian and medical aid border crossings under UN Security Council Resolution 2504, due for renewal by 10 July 2020.

We welcome US statements that these new sanctions are targeted and humanitarian exemptions continue to apply. As such, we do not believe that they should impact current negotiations regarding UN Security Council Resolution 2504. The renewal is a matter for the UN Security Council and the UK continues to be vocal on the need for cross-border aid into both north-west and north-east Syria.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what diplomatic discussions he has had with his counterparts in (a) Germany, (b) Belgium, (c) France and (d) China on the re-authorisation of the humanitarian aid border crossing at Al Yarubiyah in north-east Syria at the UN Security Council in January 2020.

The UK strongly supports the re-authorisation of the Al Yaroubiyah border crossing to allow humanitarian aid into north-east Syria. As outlined in the UN Secretary General's report of February 2020, this remains the best route through which to deliver aid cross-border into north-east Syria. We have set out our position repeatedly at the UN Security Council, mostly recently on 19 May. The Foreign Secretary has raised this with his Russian, German and French counterparts and senior officials have discussed this with the other Security Council members including Belgium and China.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what diplomatic discussions he has had with his counterparts in UN Security Council member states on the authorisation of alternative humanitarian aid border crossings into north-east Syria.

The UK strongly supports the re-authorisation of the Al Yaroubiyah border crossing to allow humanitarian aid into north-east Syria. As outlined in the UN Secretary General's report of February 2020, this remains the best route through which to deliver aid cross-border into north-east Syria. We have set out our position repeatedly at the UN Security Council, mostly recently on 19 May. The Foreign Secretary has raised this with his Russian, German and French counterparts and senior officials have discussed this with the other Security Council members including Belgium and China.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the progress in the negotiations to renew UN Security Council Resolution 2504.

The UK is strongly committed to the renewal of UNSCR 2504 to enable continued cross-border humanitarian access into Syria. We have expressed this position repeatedly at the UN Security Council, mostly recently at the Syria Humanitarian session on 19 May, and have also engaged bilaterally with other Security Council members on this issue. Negotiations remain ongoing ahead of the expiry of the current resolution in July.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what progress has been made on agreeing the pay settlement for staff at the Intellectual Property Office.

Following a successful pilot, the Intellectual Property Office has been granted approval to agree their annual pay remit through a system called paybill control. They are removed from the Civil Service pay remit guidance process and instead submit their requested paybill control total to HMT each year for approval.

The Intellectual Property Office are finalising their pay award for 2020/21 and will communicate the settlement to staff.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has made of the level of use of debt management plans as a result of financial difficulties due to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government continues to engage closely with the debt advice sector, the Money and Pensions Service, the Financial Conduct Authority and other stakeholders to monitor and understand the ongoing and future impact of COVID19 on people’s finances, including on the demand for debt advice and debt solutions, such as debt management plans.

The Government recognises that some people are struggling with their finances at this challenging time. To help people in problem debt get their finances back on track, an extra £37.8 million support package has been made available to debt advice providers this financial year, bringing this year’s budget for free debt advice in England to over £100 million.

From May 2021 the Breathing Space scheme will offer people in problem debt a pause of up to 60 days on most enforcement action, interest, fees and charges, and will encourage them to seek professional debt advice.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to protect jobs in the (a) travel and (b) tourism industries, which operate domestic and overseas school trips, beyond the current scheduled end date of the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme and to allow companies to plan for the future in the event restrictions on (i) domestic and (ii) overseas school trips remain in place.

The Government has announced unprecedented support for business and workers to protect them against the current economic emergency including almost £300 billion of guarantees – equivalent to 15% of UK GDP. Travel and tourism businesses continue to have access to a range of support measures including, but not limited to:

  • A 12-month business rates holiday for all eligible retail, leisure and hospitality businesses in England
  • Small business grant funding (SBGF) of £10,000 for all business in receipt of small business rate relief or rural rate relief
  • The retail, hospitality and leisure grant fund (RHLGF)
  • A Discretionary Grant Fund for Local Authorities in England
  • The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS)
  • The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS)
  • The Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS)
  • The Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBL) for small and micro enterprises
  • VAT deferral for up to 12 months
  • The Time To Pay scheme, through which businesses in financial distress, and with outstanding tax liabilities, can receive support with their tax affairs
  • Protection for commercial leaseholders against automatic forfeiture for non-payment until June 30, 2020 – with an option for the Government to extend if needed.

The Business Support website provides further information about how businesses can access the support that has been made available, who is eligible and how to apply - https://www.gov.uk/business-coronavirus-support-finder.

On 11 May the Government published its COVID-19 recovery strategy which sets out our plan for moving to the next phase of our response. The strategy sets out a cautious roadmap for easing existing measures in a safe and measured way. On 23 June the Government announced that elements of the tourism industry in England, such as hotels and guesthouses – that meet the required social distancing and public health measures – can reopen from 4 July. Options for overseas travel are currently being reviewed.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
5th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to ensure environmental charities are financially supported during the covid-19 outbreak.

Environmental charities make a valuable contribution to the Government’s environmental agenda, through conservation of the natural environment; engaging people in the natural world; and providing access to our beautiful landscapes and coastlines. The Government will continue to work with these organisations on shared objectives during and after the Covid-19 outbreak.

There is no specific financial support available solely to environmental charities. However, environmental charities may benefit from a number of the business support schemes the Government has launched. These include VAT deferrals, Small Business Grant Funding, business rates holidays for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses, and the Job Retention Scheme. Full details of the unprecedented support the Government has made available are available at https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus/business-support.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
5th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps the Government plans to take to support environmental charities that have experienced reduced income and capacity to deliver on the Government’s environmental objectives as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

Environmental charities make a valuable contribution to the Government’s environmental agenda, through conservation of the natural environment; engaging people in the natural world; and providing access to our beautiful landscapes and coastlines. The Government will continue to work with these organisations on shared objectives during and after the Covid-19 outbreak.

There is no specific financial support available solely to environmental charities. However, environmental charities may benefit from a number of the business support schemes the Government has launched. These include VAT deferrals, Small Business Grant Funding, business rates holidays for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses, and the Job Retention Scheme. Full details of the unprecedented support the Government has made available are available at https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus/business-support.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking with (a) Cabinet colleagues and (b) businesses in the hospitality sector to help tackle the spiking of drinks within nightclubs and hospitality venues.

The reports of the spiking of drinks with illegal substances, and of other attacks on individuals in night time venues, are of course concerning. This is an ongoing matter which the police are investigating. The Home Secretary has asked the police for an urgent update on the issues reported, including what steps they are taking to prevent the offences and apprehend the perpetrators. We would encourage anyone who is a victim or a witness of the offences to report the information to the police.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on extending the additional HGV driver visas beyond Christmas 2021.

The UK Government is working with the haulage sector to promote jobs, training and a range of other initiatives to get more people into HGV driving.

Like other sectors the focus should be on training and recruiting from the UK based workforce in the first instance, especially given the impact of the pandemic resulting in more looking for secure new employment.

The temporary visa provision for HGV drivers was introduced in response to potential reduced availability of some food products in the run up to Christmas, enabling drivers to work in the UK until 28 February 2022. There are no plans to extend the validity of these visas beyond this date.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the number of girls aged (a) 11 to 14 and (b) 15 to 18 who have been referred to the police with sexual exploitation and/or sexual violence assessed as a factor in each of the last three years.

All forms of sexual violence against children are terrible crimes, which have devastating consequences on young lives. The Government is determined to protect and support those who are targeted, exploited and harmed by criminals. We are working to improve our understanding of the scale and nature of child sexual abuse, to enable us to better prevent and disrupt offending. We use data gathered through the Office of National Statistics England and Wales Crime Survey to understand the number of victims and their ages. We also draw on the research and insight produced by the Centre of Expertise on Child Sexual Abuse, which we established in 2017, and the insight of other experts including the Independent Inquiry on Child Sexual Abuse.

The Home Office does not receive data on cases referred to the police, but instead collects data on offences recorded by police.

In 2021, the Office for National Statistics published data on the gender and age of victims of all sexual offences between March 2019 and March 2020, excluding image offences, in the records of 24 police forces. This data shows that 24.1% of female victims of sexual offences were aged 10 to 14 and 21.0% of female victims of sexual offences were aged 15 to 19.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish the 2021 Domestic Abuse Strategy.

The Government is determined to tackle domestic abuse.

Following the landmark Domestic Abuse Act, the Government will be publishing a first-ever, national Domestic Abuse Strategy, as well as a complementary Tackling Violence Against Women and Girls strategy, this year.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many meetings she has had with members of the National Retail Crime Steering Group since July 2020.

Meetings of the National Retail Crime Steering Group were held on 20 January and 28 April 2021.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the withdrawal of European countries from Collective Passports recognition scheme on educational and recreational school visits from the UK to Europe.

A number of countries have declined to continue accepting UK issued Collective Passports this year, but many will continue to accept them. Given that, we have not made an assessment of the effect this change will have on educational and recreational school visits from the UK to Europe.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Feb 2021
What recent assessment he has made of the effect of the international climate emergency on UK defence preparedness.

The Ministry of Defence recognises that climate change is already having an impact on Defence. A review is ongoing to assess the wider implications and to identify actions needed to enable defence to operate at full potential in an increasingly challenging security and physical environment.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
7th Dec 2020
What recent assessment he has made of the effect of the climate emergency on UK defence preparedness.

The Department recognises that climate change is already having a potential impact on Defence. A review is ongoing to assess the strategic implications and how these can be best addressed.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timetable is for the publication of the outcome of the Domestic homicide sentencing review.

The first stage of the review, an analysis of data and relevant sentencing remarks for cases of domestic homicide tried between 2018-2020, has already been completed. Clare Wade QC, the independent expert who is conducting the second and final stage of the review, is expected to produce her report, including potential options for reform, for the Secretary of State before the end of the year.

Her report, together with the findings of the initial case review, will be published shortly thereafter.

The Terms of Reference for the Domestic Homicide Sentencing Review have now been published and can be accessed here: Guidance overview: Domestic Homicide Sentencing Review: Terms of Reference - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure delays in family courts are not used to further financially control a former partner.

This government is determined to protect and support the victims of domestic abuse and their children better. We recognise the additional pressures that the family justice system has faced since the Covid-19 pandemic, and the impact this has had on children and families who use the family courts. Cases with the most significant safeguarding issues remain our priority, and where suitable, cases are being heard remotely to continue maximising our use of our estate.

HMCTS has been prioritising certain cases for processing. The ‘highest priority’ category in private law includes urgent applications in children cases, domestic abuse injunctions and urgent applications in financial remedy cases and decrees absolute. When an application for a domestic abuse injunction is received, there is a requirement for court staff to refer the application to a judge within three hours of receipt and inform the applicant or their legal representative of the next steps.

This year, the government will be providing around £300m for victim and witness support services. This includes £800k funding per year to the FLOWS project, run by RCJ Advice, to provide free legal support to victims of domestic abuse who wish to apply for an emergency protective order from the courts.

Where there are divorce proceedings, either party may apply for a financial order at any time and do not need to wait until the divorce is finalised to seek financial freedom. A respondent to the divorce proceedings can ask the court to delay the divorce until the court is satisfied with their financial situation.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure the delays in family courts do not result in further abuse of former partners.

This government is determined to protect and support the victims of domestic abuse and their children better. We recognise the additional pressures that the family justice system has faced since the Covid-19 pandemic, and the impact this has had on children and families who use the family courts. Cases with the most significant safeguarding issues remain our priority, and where suitable, cases are being heard remotely to continue maximising our use of our estate.

HMCTS has been prioritising certain cases for processing. The ‘highest priority’ category in private law includes urgent applications in children cases, domestic abuse injunctions and urgent applications in financial remedy cases and decrees absolute. When an application for a domestic abuse injunction is received, there is a requirement for court staff to refer the application to a judge within three hours of receipt and inform the applicant or their legal representative of the next steps.

This year, the government will be providing around £300m for victim and witness support services. This includes £800k funding per year to the FLOWS project, run by RCJ Advice, to provide free legal support to victims of domestic abuse who wish to apply for an emergency protective order from the courts.

Where there are divorce proceedings, either party may apply for a financial order at any time and do not need to wait until the divorce is finalised to seek financial freedom. A respondent to the divorce proceedings can ask the court to delay the divorce until the court is satisfied with their financial situation.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his Department's policy is on the length of time children in secure custody should spend in their cells per day.

Children’s experiences in custody should be rehabilitative, aiming to prevent and reduce future offending and crime. They should spend as long as possible out of their rooms engaged in purposeful activities, such as education, training and physical activity for this reason. This must be balanced with managing the risks to safety and good order and, most recently, the significant challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to (a) recruit and (b) retain prison officers and support staff in youth custody settings.

The Youth Custody Service (YCS) has bespoke recruitment material that aligns with our vision of delivering outstanding children’s services in secure settings and further professionalising the workforce. Over 150 new entrant youth justice workers (YJW) in a young adult setting have commenced employment in the YCS so far this year, with a further 70 to start prior to April 2022.

Since introducing the youth justice specialist role, we have provided funding for every prison officer in the youth secure estate to take up a qualification in youth justice. As of August, there were 249 youth justice specialist officers already in post, having completed the qualification. A further 260 staff are signed up or undertaking the learning, with the next cohort due to start in October 2022, with up to 110 more frontline staff participating. We have continuously reviewed this development offer and have recently introduced a new apprenticeship for our newly recruited YJW officers.

We have reviewed staff turnover in public sites in the youth secure estate, focussing on frontline positions from entry grade YJWs to custodial managers, with an emphasis on resignations. Improvements to inductions and support for new entrants is now in place to help ensure a supported, resilient, and effective workforce.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his policy is on the use continued use of Joint Interim Interview Protocol 4 with regard to access to remote legal assistance during police interviews.

From 4 October 2021 the default position is that advice is provided to suspects by legal representatives in person during police interviews. The Joint Interim Interview Protocol now only allows for remote advice in limited circumstances, such as when the detainee is confirmed or believed to be Covid positive.

James Cartlidge
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (and Assistant Government Whip)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions he has had with external relevant stakeholders on the introduction of a consultation on a victims law.

The Government is committed to consulting on a Victims’ Bill to deliver a step-change in the support victims receive and how it is coordinated.

The Deputy Prime Minister is developing the consultation as one of his top priorities and is carefully considering the evidence to determine where legislation could be used most effectively. He is looking forward to discussing this with stakeholders in the coming weeks.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to publish his Department's review of youth custodial remand.

The Ministry of Justice committed to look into the use of custodial remand for youth following a recommendation by the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse.

My officials have concluded the engagement and data collection stages of the review; its conclusions and our next steps will be published in due course.

The Government is already taking action to improve the remand framework and process. The proposals in the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill will strengthen the tests applied by the courts to ensure children are only remanded to custody as a last resort and will require courts to record their reasons for any custodial remand.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on what date he last visited a (a) secure training centre, (b) young offender institution and (c) secure children's home.

When Covid-19 related restrictions have allowed, the Secretary of State has visited a number of our prisons, courts, and probation premises, and continues to do so in addition to his departmental meetings, constituency work, and time in Parliament. He last visited a Young Offender Institution on Thursday 19 August 2021. The Secretary of State for Justice has not visited a Secure Training Centre or a Secure Children’s Home but has been closely engaged in issues relating to them and regularly meets with the Chief Executive of HMPPS to discuss performance across the adult and youth estates.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what percentage of children exiting youth custody reoffended within (a) one month, (b) six months and (c) 12 months in each of the last 10 years.

Data on the length of custodial episodes for children and young persons is contained in the Youth Justice Annual Statistics which can be found at the following link.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/youth-justice-statistics

A custodial episode is defined as the total length of time the child or young person spent in custody, from the date they were admitted from the community to the date the custodial episode ended (either because they were released to the community, transitioned to the over 18 estate, transferred to a mental health unit or they turned 18). It should be noted that a custodial episode may contain nights spent on remand as well as those spent serving a sentence.

Supplementary table 7.30 contains a table by sector type.

If the child or young person has multiple custodial sentences of the same type, only the sentence with the most serious offence group will be included in the snapshot reports contained in the report. Analysis of all of the custodial sentences to which an individual has been sentenced would require examination of each offender’s own records and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Juvenile proven reoffending data, by custody release for England and Wales, broken down into three-monthly periods can be found in the attached table. Reoffending data more generally is contained in the Proven Reoffending Statistics, which can be found at this link:

Proven reoffending statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average length of custodial sentence was for children and young people in (a) Secure Training Centres, (b) Young Offender Institutions and (c) Secure Children's Homes in each of the last 10 years.

Data on the length of custodial episodes for children and young persons is contained in the Youth Justice Annual Statistics which can be found at the following link.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/youth-justice-statistics

A custodial episode is defined as the total length of time the child or young person spent in custody, from the date they were admitted from the community to the date the custodial episode ended (either because they were released to the community, transitioned to the over 18 estate, transferred to a mental health unit or they turned 18). It should be noted that a custodial episode may contain nights spent on remand as well as those spent serving a sentence.

Supplementary table 7.30 contains a table by sector type.

If the child or young person has multiple custodial sentences of the same type, only the sentence with the most serious offence group will be included in the snapshot reports contained in the report. Analysis of all of the custodial sentences to which an individual has been sentenced would require examination of each offender’s own records and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Juvenile proven reoffending data, by custody release for England and Wales, broken down into three-monthly periods can be found in the attached table. Reoffending data more generally is contained in the Proven Reoffending Statistics, which can be found at this link:

Proven reoffending statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the cost was to the public purse of a child placed in youth custody (a) on remand and (b) for other reasons in (i) secure children's homes, (ii) secure training centres and (iii) young offenders' institutes in the most recent period for which figures are available.

The average cost per place per year for a child placed in youth custody is:

£271,000 at a Secure Children’s Home

£201,000 at a Secure Training Centre

£119,000 at a Young Offender Institution

There is no difference in average cost if the child is placed on remand or for other reasons. These costs are inclusive of education services.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of bringing forward proposals to broaden the scope of claimants entitled to a bereavement award under the Fatal Accidents Act 1976.

The Government considered the case for reform when responding to a report by the Joint Committee on Human Rights in February 2020.

The Government believes that the existing system involving a fixed level of award and clear eligibility criteria represents a reasonable, proportionate and practical approach, and the Government does not currently have any plans for wider consultation on the bereavement damages regime or the Fatal Accidents Act more generally.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the potential need for his Department to provide additional funding to local authorities to help clear coroner inquest backlogs.

The Government has provided £6 billion in unringfenced grant funding to local authorities to support the costs of Covid-19 pressures, which can be used to help offset any extra costs incurred in the administration of coroner services, including coroner inquest backlogs, for example.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, where the 33 children removed from Rainsbrook secure training centre on 16 June 2021 have been placed.

Following ongoing concerns relating to staffing, safety and on-site operational grip, we have taken the decision to transfer all children at Rainsbrook Secure Training Centre (STC) to alternative secure accommodation as soon as possible. We have taken this action to ensure the safety and wellbeing of the children at Rainsbrook STC, which remains our priority.

Work is underway to transfer all children in the coming weeks. All placement decisions will be based on the individual needs and requirements of the children. YCS staff have spoken to all children at Rainsbrook STC, to ensure that they and their families are aware of the current situation, and will work closely with the relevant Youth Offending Teams to ensure that children are appropriately placed into suitable accommodation in a smooth and organised manner.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to announce proposals for the consultation on a Victims' Bill.

This Government is committed to ensuring that victims are supported at every stage of the criminal justice system, so that justice can be secured, victims and the public protected, and offenders punished. This is why we committed to legislation for victims in the Queen’s Speech and will be consulting on a Victims’ Bill later this year. The public consultation will ensure that a truly bipartisan approach can be taken and will allow a wide range of stakeholders and interested parties to input into our careful deliberations.

The new Victims’ Code, which came into force in April, is the culmination of two years of extensive work, including hearing from victims and victims’ groups, to ensure that we have a clear and comprehensive framework for victims’ rights. This vital work has laid the foundations for effective legislation in this area, and it is our intention to proceed without delay.

We will consult on how we will enshrine the 12 key rights in the new Victims’ Code in law and ensure that those rights of victims are upheld. We will consult too on the provision of community-based domestic abuse and sexual violence services to set the expectations for the availability of support, as well as a statutory underpinning for the roles of independent sexual and domestic violence advisers to ensure that victims receive a high standard of care.

Ahead of the consultation, we are working across government and with victims and those who support them to understand the key issues that need to be addressed by the Victims’ Bill. This work is vital to ensure that the Victims’ Bill is as comprehensive and impactful as intended.

This builds on the huge amount of work already underway from the Government in this area. We will publish new Violence Against Women and Girls and Domestic Abuse strategies this year to help drive a step-change in the response to these crimes, building on the existing landmark legislation in this area, the Domestic Abuse Act and the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, and we are investing record amounts in support for victims, more than £300 million this year.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
11th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to publish details of the independent review into the sentencing of domestic homicides.

This Government fully recognises the devastation that domestic homicides cause and is committed to improving outcomes for victims of domestic abuse in all its forms and, crucially, preventing more victims in the future.

A number of concerns have been raised over the way in which sentencing outcomes are reached in cases of domestic homicide, and therefore we have committed to undertake a review of sentencing practice in domestic homicide cases. We have already worked with the Crown Prosecution Service to identify relevant cases, in order that sentencing outcomes and remarks can be analysed. We will provide further detail on the review in due course.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders sentenced to custody served half or less than their full sentence term as a result of early release in each year from 2015 to date.

Under section 244 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 most prisoners sentenced to a standard determinate sentence are required to be released at the half-way point, with the remainder served on licence.

Most prisoners serve standard determinate sentences (SDS). Until recently, this meant that they were released automatically at the half-way point of the sentence, regardless of the nature of the offence. We believe that serious violent and sexual offenders should serve sentences that truly reflect the severity of the crime, which will help to protect the public and give victims confidence that justice has been served. Since 1 April 2020, and the implementation of the Release of Prisoners (Alteration of Relevant Proportion of Sentence) Order 2020, anyone given an SDS of 7 years or more for serious sexual or violent offences where the maximum penalty is a life sentence is required to spend two-thirds – rather than half – of that sentence in prison before being released on licence. In the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill, we are seeking to extend this to those sentenced to an SDS of between 4 – 7 years for certain serious sexual and violent offences.

Table 1 (attached) gives the relevant information.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)