Jonathan Djanogly Portrait

Jonathan Djanogly

Conservative - Huntingdon

19,383 (32.8%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 7th June 2001


Firearms Bill
8th Mar 2023 - 15th Mar 2023
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee
25th Oct 2022 - 1st Nov 2022
Business and Trade Committee
25th Oct 2022 - 1st Nov 2022
Speaker's Advisory Committee on Works of Art
12th Dec 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Exiting the European Union
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on the Future Relationship with the European Union
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
17th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Solicitor General
8th Dec 2005 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Solicitor General
10th May 2005 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Minister (Justice)
10th May 2005 - 6th May 2010
Trade & Industry
16th Jul 2001 - 12th Jul 2005
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
1st Jun 2004 - 10th May 2005
Statutory Instruments (Select Committee)
16th Jul 2001 - 23rd May 2002
Statutory Instruments (Joint Committee)
7th Jun 2001 - 23rd May 2002


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Jonathan Djanogly has voted in 887 divisions, and 18 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 35 Conservative No votes vs 305 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 341 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 351 Noes - 276
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 303
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 344 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 353 Noes - 277
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative No votes vs 319 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 308
30 Dec 2020 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 328 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 335 Noes - 212
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
2 Sep 2020 - Recall of MPs (Change of Party Affiliation) - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Conservative No votes vs 47 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 52
20 Jul 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 323 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 263 Noes - 326
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
30 Nov 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 259 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 36
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 38 Conservative No votes vs 271 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 441 Noes - 41
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 60 Conservative No votes vs 258 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
7 Mar 2022 - Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 296 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 234 Noes - 300
30 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 72 Conservative Aye votes vs 175 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 188
16 Apr 2024 - Tobacco and Vapes Bill - View Vote Context
Jonathan Djanogly voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Conservative No votes vs 179 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 383 Noes - 67
View All Jonathan Djanogly Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Greg Hands (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
(8 debate interactions)
Leo Docherty (Conservative)
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
(7 debate interactions)
Alex Chalk (Conservative)
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
(7 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for International Trade
(22 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(16 debate contributions)
Ministry of Defence
(13 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Jonathan Djanogly's debates

Huntingdon Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Chris Packham, Ruth Tingay and Mark Avery (Wild Justice) believe that intensive grouse shooting is bad for people, the environment and wildlife. People; grouse shooting is economically insignificant when contrasted with other real and potential uses of the UK’s uplands.


Latest EDMs signed by Jonathan Djanogly

9th December 2022
Jonathan Djanogly signed this EDM on Monday 12th December 2022

Special Tribunal on Russian Aggression in Ukraine

Tabled by: Stewart Malcolm McDonald (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South)
That this house seeks justice and accountability for atrocities committed by Russian troops during their invasion of Ukraine, as well as for the crime of the war itself; recognises that the decision by the Russian Federation to launch attacks on Ukraine poses a grave challenge to the post-1945 international order; …
41 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Apr 2023)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 19
Labour: 7
Liberal Democrat: 6
Conservative: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
23rd November 2020
Jonathan Djanogly signed this EDM on Monday 30th November 2020

VAT Retail Export Scheme

Tabled by: Tracey Crouch (Conservative - Chatham and Aylesford)
That this House expresses its concern at the Government's decision to abolish the VAT Retail Export Scheme, otherwise known as tax-free shopping, from 1 January 2021 with inaccurate determinations having been made of the impact of that decision; acknowledges that since that decision was announced, businesses have been facing the …
29 signatures
(Most recent: 17 Dec 2020)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 13
Conservative: 11
Labour: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
Independent: 1
View All Jonathan Djanogly's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Jonathan Djanogly, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Jonathan Djanogly has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Jonathan Djanogly has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Jonathan Djanogly has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

1 Bill co-sponsored by Jonathan Djanogly

Employee Share Ownership (Reform) Bill 2022-23
Sponsor - George Howarth (Lab)


Latest 34 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Restoring trust in audit and corporate governance white paper published in March 2021, when the new Audit, Reporting and Governance Authority regulator will be established.

The Government Response to consultation on ‘Restoring Trust in Audit and Corporate Governance’ set out ambitious proposals to improve audit and corporate governance in the UK. Reform is already underway, and the Financial Reporting Council has made significant changes.

Some of the Government’s plans, including the creation of the Audit, Reporting and Governance Authority, require primary legislation. The Government will legislate when Parliamentary time allows.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, with reference to the Restoring trust in audit and corporate governance white paper published in March 2021, what steps her Department is taking to establish the new Audit, Reporting and Governance Authority regulator.

The Government Response to consultation on ‘Restoring Trust in Audit and Corporate Governance’ set out ambitious proposals to improve audit and corporate governance in the UK. Reform is already underway, and the Financial Reporting Council has made significant changes.

Some of the Government’s plans, including the creation of the Audit, Reporting and Governance Authority, require primary legislation. The Government will legislate when Parliamentary time allows.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to Answer of 15 January 2021 to Question 133641 on Hen Harriers, whether she has made an assessment of the implications for her Department's policies of the effectiveness of hen harrier nests on non-RSPB nature reserves in comparison to RSPB nature reserves; and whether she has made an assessment of the reasons why nests were more successful in non-RSPB nature reserves.

No specific assessment of the effectiveness of our hen harrier recovery policies based on the ownership of land has been made.

31st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of the Genetic Technology (Precision Breeding) Bill on the cultivated meat sector.

The Genetic Technology (Precision Breeding) Bill will ensure that plants and animals developed using precision breeding technologies in ways which mimic traditional and natural processes, and food and feed products produced from such plants and animals, can be regulated proportionately to risk.

Under this Bill, HM Government intends to introduce simpler regulatory measures to enable food and feed produced from precision bred plants or animals to be brought to market more easily, and we will support our leading scientists to develop plants and animals that are more nutritious, resistant to pests and disease and resilient to extreme temperatures. HM Government acknowledges the potential benefits of innovative protein development and will continue to work together with interested parties including the cultivated meat sector on developments in this area.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will hold discussions with the RSPB on its decision to stop publishing its annual counts of the number of birds in its reserves.

It is for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) to decide how and when it publishes information collected from across its reserves, and as such, the Secretary of State has no plans to hold discussions with the RSPB on their internal decisions around publishing data.

24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department plans to restore four trains per hour on the Stansted Express.

Stansted Express services are operated by Greater Anglia which continues to carefully monitor passenger numbers on the route; targeted adjustments to service levels will be made when required. Greater Anglia continues to work closely with Network Rail and Manchester Airport Group, which manages Stansted Airport, to ensure service levels are adequate.

In terms of passenger numbers at Stansted Airport railway station, the last data set available relates to April 2019 - March 2020 and shows that there was an estimate of 8,474,784 station entries and exits. The data for 2023/24 is not yet available. The Office of Road and Rail produces this data and it will be available in due course.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when more frequent rail services on the Stansted Express will be restored.

Stansted Express services are operated by Greater Anglia which continues to carefully monitor passenger numbers on the route; targeted adjustments to service levels will be made when required. Greater Anglia continues to work closely with Network Rail and Manchester Airport Group, which manages Stansted Airport, to ensure service levels are adequate.

In terms of passenger numbers at Stansted Airport railway station, the last data set available relates to April 2019 - March 2020 and shows that there was an estimate of 8,474,784 station entries and exits. The data for 2023/24 is not yet available. The Office of Road and Rail produces this data and it will be available in due course.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the million passengers per annum (MPPA) rate was for London Stanstead station when trains serviced that station from London at least four times per hour; what the expected MPPA rate of that station is for 2023-24; and when a decision on restoring at least four trains per hour from London to that station will be next reviewed.

Stansted Express services are operated by Greater Anglia which continues to carefully monitor passenger numbers on the route; targeted adjustments to service levels will be made when required. Greater Anglia continues to work closely with Network Rail and Manchester Airport Group, which manages Stansted Airport, to ensure service levels are adequate.

In terms of passenger numbers at Stansted Airport railway station, the last data set available relates to April 2019 - March 2020 and shows that there was an estimate of 8,474,784 station entries and exits. The data for 2023/24 is not yet available. The Office of Road and Rail produces this data and it will be available in due course.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of exempting (a) cigar-based products and (b) pipe tobacco from the Government's proposed ban on the sale of tobacco products.

Smoking is the number one entirely preventable cause of ill-health, disability and death in this country. It is responsible for 80,000 yearly in the United Kingdom and one in four of all UK cancer deaths. It costs our country £17 billion a year, £14 billion of which is through lost productivity alone. It puts huge pressure on the National Health Service and social care, costing over £3 billion a year.

The evidence is clear that there is no safe level of tobacco consumption, and all tobacco products are harmful. When smoked, tobacco kills up to two-thirds of its long-term users. Tobacco smoke has been classified as a group one carcinogen, and tobacco smoke from cigars leads to the same types of diseases as cigarette smoke.

The upcoming smokefree generation legislation proposes to align to existing age of sale legislation by applying it to any product containing tobacco, including cigars and pipe tobacco. In the Government’s response to the consultation, Creating a smokefree generation and tackling youth vaping published on 29 January 2024, 63.8% of respondents to the question on product scope agreed that all tobacco products should be included in the new age of sale restrictions.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether she has had discussions with the Government of New Zealand on the proposed generational ban on smoking.

Smoking is responsible for around 80,000 deaths a year in the United Kingdom and causes around one in four cancer deaths in the UK. It also costs our country £17 billion a year and puts a huge burden on the National Health Service.

This is why the Government is planning to create a smokefree generation by bringing forward legislation so that children turning 14 years old this year or younger will never be legally sold tobacco products. On 12 October 2023, we launched a UK-wide consultation to gather views on these proposals and their implementation.

In development of this policy, we have, and will continue to, speak to a range of stakeholders including in the public health community both in the UK and globally, and government officials in countries such as New Zealand.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to streamline the process for the registration of qualified overseas dentists.

We have worked with the General Dental Council to develop and consult on legislative proposals which provide greater flexibility to amend its existing international registration processes and explore alternative registration pathways, as appropriate. The resulting draft order was laid in Parliament on 11 October 2022 and subject to Parliamentary approval, we expect it to come into force by early 2023.

12th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what discussions he has had with his Israeli counterpart on the activity of Iran-backed terror groups in the West Bank.

We discuss all aspects of the current conflict with the Government of Israel.

The Foreign Secretary has also raised Iran's long-term support for proscribed groups directly with the Iranian Foreign Minister on 17 January and the UK's new sanctions regime designed to target Iran and its proxies' hostile activity came into force on 14 December. Iran must use its influence to curb attacks and deescalate regional tensions.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
12th Mar 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, if he will make an assessment of the adequacy of Hamas's engagement with discussions on a potential humanitarian pause in the conflict in Gaza.

We will not provide a running commentary on negotiations, but the UK is using all diplomatic channels to support the international effort being facilitated through Egypt, Qatar and the US.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
22nd Nov 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what recent discussions he has had with his Middle Eastern counterparts on the threat to regional security and stability posed by Hamas.

Since Hamas' abhorrent terrorist attacks on 7 October, the Prime Minister, the Foreign Secretary, and the Minister of State for the Middle East have spoken to counterparts from more than 20 countries as part of extensive diplomatic efforts to prevent regional escalation and to sustain the prospect of peace and stability in the Middle East. On 22 November the Foreign Secretary hosted Islamic and Arab leaders in London to discuss the Israel/Gaza conflict and on 24 November, the Foreign Secretary travelled to Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories to engage with leaders from the Palestinian Authority and the Government of Israel. Ministers also continue to focus on opposing any attempts by malign actors to cause further escalation in the region.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of reports that Hezbollah is storing weapons in civilian areas in Beirut.

We have long been concerned by Hizballah's stockpiling of weapons within Lebanon, in contravention of relevant UN Security Council Resolutions (UNSCRs). We regularly raise this at the UN Security Council, and we call on the Lebanese authorities to abide by provisions of the relevant UNSCRs. Hizballah's destabilising influence threatens regional stability and endangers Lebanon and its people.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to reduce the Share Incentive Plan holding period.

The Government keeps all tax reliefs, including the Share Incentive Plan (SIP), under review. In June 2023, the Government published a call for evidence on SIP and the other non-discretionary share scheme, Save As You Earn. The government is carefully considering the responses and evidence submitted and will respond in due course. Any tax policy changes would be announced at a fiscal event in the usual way.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential impact that a generational ban on the purchase of cigarettes will have on the (a) excise duty and (b) VAT gap on tobacco products.

As announced by the Prime Minister on 4 October 2023, the Government is creating the first smokefree generation, by bringing forward legislation so that children turning 14 this year or younger will never be legally sold tobacco products. This will prevent future generations from ever taking up smoking, as there is no safe age to smoke. The ‘Stopping the start: our new plan to create a smokefree generation’ command paper sets out the proposed actions the Government will take to tackle smoking and youth vaping: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/stopping-the-start-our-new-plan-to-create-a-smokefree-generation

The Government launched the ‘Creating a smokefree generation and tackling youth vaping’ consultation on 12 October on the smokefree generation policy detailed in the command paper: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/creating-a-smokefree-generation-and-tackling-youth-vaping

Once final policy decisions are confirmed, the impact of those decisions on the public finances will be assessed and reflected in the Office for Budget Responsibility's forecast.

A smokefree generation will save the NHS billions over the long-term and put cash back in the pockets of millions of families across this country.

Gareth Davies
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many referrals have been made by the Office for Financial Sanctions Implementation to law enforcement for criminal investigations into financial sanctions breaches since February 2022.

Details of reports of potential financial sanctions breaches considered in 2021-2022 are included in OFSI’s latest annual review which is available on GOV.UK. Updated figures will be provided in the next annual review.

Breaches of financial sanctions are a criminal offence and OFSI continues to assess every reported suspected breach of UK sanctions regulations. OFSI does not initiate criminal investigations into suspected breaches. Where criminal investigation is appropriate, referrals are made to relevant law enforcement partners.

Companies and individuals looking to circumvent sanctions may have a specific interest in the number of law enforcement referrals arising from reports of suspected sanctions breaches. The disclosure of any information which could prejudice OFSI’s enforcement responsibilities would not be in the public interest and may aid crimes such as the circumvention of financial sanctions.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Feb 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many reports of possible sanctions breaches the Office for Financial Sanctions Implementation has received since August 2022.

Details of reports of potential financial sanctions breaches considered in 2021-2022 are included in OFSI’s latest annual review which is available on GOV.UK. Updated figures will be provided in the next annual review.

Breaches of financial sanctions are a criminal offence and OFSI continues to assess every reported suspected breach of UK sanctions regulations. OFSI does not initiate criminal investigations into suspected breaches. Where criminal investigation is appropriate, referrals are made to relevant law enforcement partners.

Companies and individuals looking to circumvent sanctions may have a specific interest in the number of law enforcement referrals arising from reports of suspected sanctions breaches. The disclosure of any information which could prejudice OFSI’s enforcement responsibilities would not be in the public interest and may aid crimes such as the circumvention of financial sanctions.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when the review of the Save As You Earn Bonus Rate Mechanism Review will be concluded; and if he will make a statement.

Following the announcement of a review of the Save As You Earn (SAYE) Bonus Rate Mechanism, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are consulting with administrators of SAYE schemes and their representatives to identify options to introduce a new, simpler and more transparent mechanism. HMRC is working closely with those groups to ensure any new mechanism will be appropriate for both current and future market conditions.

HMRC will provide a further update on the review for interested groups in due course.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
14th Dec 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation’s Annual Review, April 2021 to August 2022, whether the OFSI has expanded to around 100 staff.

OFSI has expanded to around 100 full-time employees, accelerating and enhancing the ambitious transformation programme it already had underway. HM Treasury and OFSI have been at the front and centre of an unprecedented financial sanctions response to Russia’s unprovoked and unwarranted attack on a sovereign nation, which brought war back to Europe.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
14th Dec 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation’s Annual Review, April 2021 to August 2022, how many warning letters have been sent by the OFSI since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on 24 February 2022.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) does not hold complete data on ‘warning letters’ as a sub-category of case closures since the invasion of Ukraine on 24 February 2022. However, OFSI has recorded case closures where it has been acknowledged that no breach occurred, where warnings or advice have been given, and where stakeholders have been put on notice to improve compliance. As of September, 33 case closure letters had been issued in 2022.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
1st Dec 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value is of Russian Federation state assets frozen in (a) the UK and (b) British Overseas Territories.

Relevant firms are legally obliged to report to the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI), part of HM Treasury, if they hold frozen assets of a designated person or entity they suspect to be on the list of asset freeze targets.

The aggregate figure of funds reported as frozen under the Russia regime (as at October 2022) in OFSI’s Annual Review, published 10 November 2022 was approximately £18.39 billion. However, the Treasury does not break down the return data by category and/or institution in the manner requested.

The value of frozen funds in the UK can fluctuate for numerous reasons. These include changes to sanctions designations, changes in share or market values, or certain financial activity being licensed.

OFSI is not the competent authority for financial sanctions implementation in the Overseas Territories which are self-governing jurisdictions with their own democratically elected governments, and which are responsible for their own financial services policy. UK sanctions apply in all Overseas Territories. The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office work closely with the Territories on implementation of sanctions. The Territories have publicly reported frozen Russian assets with a combined estimated value in excess of US$9bn to date.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Dec 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value is of the assets of sanctioned Russian nationals frozen in (a) the UK and (b) British Overseas Territories.

Relevant firms are legally obliged to report to the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI), part of HM Treasury, if they hold frozen assets of a designated person or entity they suspect to be on the list of asset freeze targets.

The aggregate figure of funds reported as frozen under the Russia regime (as at October 2022) in OFSI’s Annual Review, published 10 November 2022 was approximately £18.39 billion. However, the Treasury does not break down the return data by category and/or institution in the manner requested.

The value of frozen funds in the UK can fluctuate for numerous reasons. These include changes to sanctions designations, changes in share or market values, or certain financial activity being licensed.

OFSI is not the competent authority for financial sanctions implementation in the Overseas Territories which are self-governing jurisdictions with their own democratically elected governments, and which are responsible for their own financial services policy. UK sanctions apply in all Overseas Territories. The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office work closely with the Territories on implementation of sanctions. The Territories have publicly reported frozen Russian assets with a combined estimated value in excess of US$9bn to date.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the cost is of maintaining and servicing assets seized under the sanctions regime related to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

HM Treasury does not have powers to seize assets under the Russia sanctions regime, and so incurs no costs in maintaining or servicing assets.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation, part of HM Treasury, is responsible for implementing financial sanctions in the UK. Where the financial sanction is an asset freeze, it is generally prohibited to:

• deal with the frozen funds or economic resources, belonging to or owned, held or controlled by a designated person

• make funds or economic resources available, directly or indirectly, to, or for the benefit of, a designated person

• engage in actions that, directly or indirectly, circumvent the financial sanctions prohibitions

The funds and economic resources are to be frozen immediately by the person in possession or control of them. An asset freeze does not involve a change in ownership of the frozen funds or economic resources, nor are they confiscated or transferred to HM Treasury for safekeeping.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many recorded incidents of (a) violence, (b) abuse, (c) theft and (d) other crimes against retailers took place in (i) 2019, (ii) 2020, (iii) 2021 and (iv) 2022.

The latest estimates from the Crime Survey for England and Wales show that levels of crime on a comparable basis are down by 56% compared with the year ending March 2010.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on crime affecting retail premises as part of the Commercial Victimisation survey, the publication for 2022 was published in May 2023 and is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/crime-against-businesses-findings-from-the-2022-commercial-victimisation-survey

The data collected includes an estimation of the proportion of commercial premises which were a victim of crime. The data does not provide an estimate of the number of specific incidents of violence, abuse, theft, or other crimes.

The Government is clear that violent and abusive behaviour towards any public-facing worker is never acceptable. We take this issue very seriously and recognise the implications these incidents can have on businesses as well as the victims.

On 23 October, the National Police Chiefs Council launched their Retail Crime Action Plan; which includes a police commitment to prioritise attending the scene of retail crime instances where violence has been used; where an offender has been detained; or where evidence needs to be promptly secured and can only be done in person by police personnel.

The 23 October also saw the launch of Pegasus, a unique private-public partnership that will radically improve the way retailers are able to share intelligence with policing, to better understand the tactics used by organised retail crime gangs and identify more offenders.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many deaths have been caused by (a) licenced firearms, (b) unlicensed firearms and (c) bladed weapons in the last five years.

The Home Office collects data on homicides by method of killing in England and Wales. The latest data available, from April 2021 to March 2022, shows that there were 282 homicides involving a sharp instrument.

For the same period there were 9 homicides involving a licensed firearm and 19 involving an unlicensed firearm. The published data are available here Appendix tables: homicide in England and Wales - Office for National Statistics (ons.gov.uk) at worksheet 8, for data on method of killing including sharp instruments, and table 12 for firearms by licenced / unlicensed.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to reassure medical practitioners who have conducted a medical check for the grant of a firearms licence certificate that there is no legal liability in the event of future misuse of that firearm.

The Statutory Guidance to Chief Officers of Police for firearms licensing, which was introduced in November 2021 and refreshed in February 2023, requires applicants to provide relevant medical information from their doctor with their firearms application.

This is an important part of the licensing process which ensures that the police can consider the applicant’s medical suitability to be in possession of a firearm, helping to keep the public safe from the misuse of firearms. Doctors are also asked to place a firearms flag on the patient record as part of the continuous assessment by police of certificate holders during the five-year validity of the certificate.

The Statutory Guidance makes it clear that the responsibility for assessing whether a person is suitable to be granted a firearm certificate lies with the police, and not with the applicant’s GP or doctor. The Statutory Guidance contains a link to a Memorandum of Understanding agreed in July 2019 between the British Medical Association, the National Police Chiefs Council and the Home Office.

The Memorandum of Understanding sets out that the legal responsibility for the assessment of the suitability of a firearms applicant or certificate holder lies with the police and not with the GP. It states that while GPs will endeavour to share relevant medical information with the police, there is no legal liability if they fail to do so.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for firearms licence certificates have been refused in the last five years; and what the primary reasons for those refusals were.

The Home Office publishes annual figures on the number of firearm and shotgun licence certificate renewals and refusals in England and Wales in the ‘Statistics on firearm and shotgun certificates, England and Wales’ National Statistics publication. The latest data cover the year ending 31 March 2023 and are available here: Statistics on firearm and shotgun certificates, England and Wales: April 2022 to March 2023 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Data on the number of applications for the renewal of firearm and shotgun certificates that were granted, and the number of applications refused in the last five years are published in tables 1 and 3 of the accompanying data tables.

Reasons for refusing applications for a firearm certificate are not collected centrally. Under the Firearms Act 1968, police forces will refuse such applications where they are not satisfied that the applicant is fit to be entrusted with a firearm, has a good reason to possess a firearm, or that they can be permitted to possess a firearm without danger to the public safety or to the peace.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many firearms licence certificates have been renewed in the last five years.

The Home Office publishes annual figures on the number of firearm and shotgun licence certificate renewals and refusals in England and Wales in the ‘Statistics on firearm and shotgun certificates, England and Wales’ National Statistics publication. The latest data cover the year ending 31 March 2023 and are available here: Statistics on firearm and shotgun certificates, England and Wales: April 2022 to March 2023 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

Data on the number of applications for the renewal of firearm and shotgun certificates that were granted, and the number of applications refused in the last five years are published in tables 1 and 3 of the accompanying data tables.

Reasons for refusing applications for a firearm certificate are not collected centrally. Under the Firearms Act 1968, police forces will refuse such applications where they are not satisfied that the applicant is fit to be entrusted with a firearm, has a good reason to possess a firearm, or that they can be permitted to possess a firearm without danger to the public safety or to the peace.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent estimate he has made of (a) the number of local authorities which were subject to cyber attack, (b) the (i) largest and (ii) lowest single financial loss incurred by a local authority as a consequence of such an attack and (c) the average financial loss incurred by local authorities subject to such attacks in each of the last three calendar years.

The wider public sector, of which local authorities form a part, is reporting more incidents so it is imperative that councils remain vigilant of the cyber risks they face. In terms of financial impacts or financial support, the Government does not place information in the public domain that may be of value to cyber attackers. The Department is providing support to councils to strengthen their resilience against cyber-attacks. The Department is also working with the National Cyber Security Centre, who provide advice and guidance to local authorities in support of their work to secure their networks, as well as the development of their cyber security strategies. This includes encouraging registration for their Active Cyber Defence tools and services.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Education)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what (a) financial and (b) non-financial support his Department offered to local authorities to help protect them from cyber attacks in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019 and (iii) 2020.

The wider public sector, of which local authorities form a part, is reporting more incidents so it is imperative that councils remain vigilant of the cyber risks they face. In terms of financial impacts or financial support, the Government does not place information in the public domain that may be of value to cyber attackers. The Department is providing support to councils to strengthen their resilience against cyber-attacks. The Department is also working with the National Cyber Security Centre, who provide advice and guidance to local authorities in support of their work to secure their networks, as well as the development of their cyber security strategies. This includes encouraging registration for their Active Cyber Defence tools and services.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Education)