Iain Duncan Smith Portrait

Iain Duncan Smith

Conservative - Chingford and Woodford Green

First elected: 9th April 1992


6 APPG memberships (as of 24 Jan 2024)
Dark Skies, Dying Well, Gambling Related Harm, Magnitsky Sanctions, Rohingya, Uyghurs
2 Former APPG memberships
Fixed Odds Betting Terminals, Street Children
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
12th May 2010 - 19th Mar 2016
Leader of Her Majesty's Official Opposition
12th Sep 2001 - 6th Nov 2003
Leader of the Conservative Party
12th Sep 2001 - 6th Nov 2003
Leader of HM Official Opposition
12th Sep 2001 - 6th Nov 2003
Shadow Secretary of State for Defence
15th Jun 1999 - 12th Sep 2001
Shadow Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
11th Jun 1997 - 15th Jun 1999
Standards and Privileges
23rd Oct 1996 - 21st Mar 1997
Administration Committee
11th Jan 1994 - 21st Mar 1997
Members' Interests
24th Mar 1995 - 8th Nov 1995
Standards in Public Life
16th Nov 1994 - 8th Nov 1995
Health and Social Care Committee
24th Jan 1994 - 10th Jul 1995


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 293 Conservative No votes vs 2 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 179 Noes - 294
Speeches
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Ukraine: Military Equipment
Along with a group of colleagues, I went to the US before Christmas to try to persuade the Republicans there …
Written Answers
Thursday 29th February 2024
Chelsea Football Club: Sales
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the …
Early Day Motions
Thursday 13th July 2023
Debate on the Intelligence and Security Committee's report on China
That this House ensures that the Intelligence and Security Committee Report on China, published on 13 July 2023, is debated …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th October 2023
1. Employment and earnings
18 January 2024, received £600 for an article published in the Mail on Sunday on 24 December 2023. Hours: 4 …
EDM signed
Tuesday 17th October 2023
Calling for a free and democratic Iran
That this House is deeply concerned by the ongoing crackdown on peaceful protesters by the regime of Iran, which continues …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 3rd May 2023
Greater London Authority Act 1999 (Amendment) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to amend the Greater London Authority Act 1999 to give the Secretary of State power to review and …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Iain Duncan Smith has voted in 770 divisions, and 30 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 29 Conservative Aye votes vs 318 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 300 Noes - 318
22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 297
9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 303
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative No votes vs 319 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 308
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
1 Jul 2020 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 317 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 232 Noes - 321
1 Jul 2020 - Finance Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 316 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 254 Noes - 317
24 Jun 2020 - Demonstrations (Abortion Clinics) - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative No votes vs 56 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 47
17 Jun 2020 - Divorce, Dissolution and Separation Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Conservative Aye votes vs 283 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 31 Noes - 400
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
27 Apr 2021 - Delegated Legislation - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Conservative No votes vs 222 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 89
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
7 Dec 2021 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 289 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 251 Noes - 296
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 293 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 296 Noes - 184
22 Jun 2022 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Conservative No votes vs 106 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 70
18 Oct 2022 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 113 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 297 Noes - 110
22 Mar 2023 - Northern Ireland - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 515 Noes - 29
7 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 107 Conservative Aye votes vs 109 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 299
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 284 Noes - 242
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 285 Noes - 243
17 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 227
17 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 280 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 284 Noes - 226
5 Sep 2023 - Energy Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative No votes vs 275 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 19
4 Dec 2023 - Business without Debate - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative No votes vs 217 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 381 Noes - 37
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 57 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 58 Noes - 525
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 68 Noes - 529
17 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
Iain Duncan Smith voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 266 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 536
View All Iain Duncan Smith Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Nigel Adams (Conservative)
(26 debate interactions)
Tim Loughton (Conservative)
(24 debate interactions)
James Cleverly (Conservative)
Home Secretary
(20 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(69 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(53 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Iain Duncan Smith's debates

Chingford and Woodford Green Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Chingford and Woodford Green signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

Revoke local government powers to charge CAZ, LEZ, and ULEZ.

The Mayor's proposed extension of ULEZ over a short timeframe could negatively impact millions of people and businesses across SE England.

Many missing microchipped pets are never reunited as it’s optional to scan & check microchip registration. It’s time veterinary professionals, authorities and rescues checked pet & keeper match on the original database at a pets 1st consultation or yearly checkup. It’s their only chance to get home

A healthy young dog with RBU was euthanised. The person who requested euthanasia was not the registered keeper.

The UK Government plans to introduce “Magnitsky law”, a law which targets people who commit gross human rights violations. Through this law or alternative means, this petition urges the UK Government to impose sanctions on China for their human rights violations on the Uyghur people.


Latest EDMs signed by Iain Duncan Smith

12th September 2023
Iain Duncan Smith signed this EDM on Tuesday 17th October 2023

Calling for a free and democratic Iran

Tabled by: Bob Blackman (Conservative - Harrow East)
That this House is deeply concerned by the ongoing crackdown on peaceful protesters by the regime of Iran, which continues to execute dissidents with total impunity and which is also trying to export its reign of terror abroad, including by targeting dissidents living in Europe with terrorist attacks; condemns illegal …
32 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Oct 2023)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 17
Liberal Democrat: 5
Conservative: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Scottish National Party: 2
Alba Party: 1
Independent: 1
13th July 2023
Iain Duncan Smith signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Thursday 13th July 2023

Debate on the Intelligence and Security Committee's report on China

Tabled by: Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative - Chingford and Woodford Green)
That this House ensures that the Intelligence and Security Committee Report on China, published on 13 July 2023, is debated on the floor of the House of Commons before the House rises on Thursday 20 July 2023.
4 signatures
(Most recent: 18 Jul 2023)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Iain Duncan Smith's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Iain Duncan Smith, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.



91 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
12th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps (a) 10 Downing Street and (b) other Government departments have taken to ensure government cars do not contain preinstalled electronic devices that may threaten the security of both the occupants and HM Government.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is government policy not to comment on security procedures.

Government cars are subject to regular security checks and have robust protections in place.

6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department has taken steps in response to the findings in the Human Rights Watch report entitled Asleep at the Wheel: Car Companies' Complicity in Forced Labor in China, published on 1 February 2024.

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime which we are determined to stamp out. In 2022, the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights published its assessment of the human rights situation in Xinjiang, which found that China had carried out “serious human rights violations” against Uyghurs and other predominantly Muslim minorities.

The Government’s overseas business risk guidance sets out the risks of operating in Xinjiang and urges UK companies to conduct appropriate due diligence and consider their corporate responsibilities when making business decisions. The Department for Business and Trade is continuing to consider actor agnostic measures that would improve supply chain transparency and traceability. I have requested meetings with named manufacturers in the Human Rights Watch (HRW) report to discuss this issue in more detail.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has made an assessment of the implications for her policies of the findings of the report entitled China: Carmakers Implicated in Uyghur Forced Labor, published by Human Rights Watch on 1 February 2024 that car manufacturers including Tesla and Toyota are using Uyghur slave labour.

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime which we are determined to stamp out. In 2022, the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights published its assessment of the human rights situation in Xinjiang, which found that China had carried out “serious human rights violations” against Uyghurs and other predominantly Muslim minorities.

The Government’s overseas business risk guidance sets out the risks of operating in Xinjiang and urges UK companies to conduct appropriate due diligence and consider their corporate responsibilities when making business decisions. The Department for Business and Trade is continuing to consider actor agnostic measures that would improve supply chain transparency and traceability. I have requested meetings with named manufacturers in the Human Rights Watch (HRW) report to discuss this issue in more detail.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that the supply chains of UK car manufacturers do not include Uyghur slave labour.

Modern slavery is a barbaric crime which we are determined to stamp out. In 2022, the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights published its assessment of the human rights situation in Xinjiang, which found that China had carried out “serious human rights violations” against Uyghurs and other predominantly Muslim minorities.

Section 54 of The UK’s Modern Slavery Act 2015 requires businesses with a turnover of £36m or more to publish modern slavery statements and statements from relevant UK car manufacturers are available at https://modern-slavery-statement-registry.service.gov.uk. We have set out clear guidance for businesses on the risks of doing business in Xinjiang and announced plans to introduce financial penalties for organisations who fail to meet their statutory obligations to publish annual modern slavery statements.

I have requested meetings with named manufacturers in the Human Rights Watch (HRW) report entitled ‘Asleep at the Wheel: Car Companies' Complicity in Forced Labor in China’, published in February 2024, to discuss this issue in more detail.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 17 October 2023 to Questions 200185, 200186 and 200187 on UK Export Finance: China, what her policy is on public funds being directed to Chinese companies involved in the Belt and Road Initiative through (a) UK Export Finance and (b) other public bodies.

As advised in the response to the previous questions (200185, 200186 and 200187), UK Export Finance (UKEF) follows the UK government’s policy towards engagement with China set out in the Integrated Review and elsewhere.

UKEF is committed to high standards of environmental, social and human rights (ESHR) risk management. Its specialist ESHR team reviews projects for ESHR risks and impacts before any decision on support is made. If a decision is taken to provide support, UKEF undertakes ESHR monitoring of the project for the duration of that support.

UKEF’s due diligence also includes appropriate assessment of attendant risks. UKEF charges a risk-based premium to companies for its support, and has a robust recovery process in place to protect the taxpayer and offset potential losses.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 17 October 2023 to Questions 200185, 200186 and 200187 on UK Export Finance: China, what (a) labour standards and (b) other human rights due diligence procedures are applied to prospective UK Export Finance partner companies.

As advised in the response to the previous questions (200185, 200186 and 200187), UK Export Finance (UKEF) follows the UK government’s policy towards engagement with China set out in the Integrated Review and elsewhere.

UKEF is committed to high standards of environmental, social and human rights (ESHR) risk management. Its specialist ESHR team reviews projects for ESHR risks and impacts before any decision on support is made. If a decision is taken to provide support, UKEF undertakes ESHR monitoring of the project for the duration of that support.

UKEF’s due diligence also includes appropriate assessment of attendant risks. UKEF charges a risk-based premium to companies for its support, and has a robust recovery process in place to protect the taxpayer and offset potential losses.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what the value of funding was provided by UK Export Finance to Chinese companies operating in Africa in (a) 2020, (b) 2021 and (c) 2022.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) helps UK exporters access finance and insurance on commercial terms to support them to win business overseas, fulfil orders and get paid. UKEF follows the UK government’s policy towards China set out in the Integrated Review Refresh 2023 and elsewhere.

UKEF's deals in all countries go through an extensive due diligence process to take account of relevant UK Government policies, applicable sanctions and other relevant bars as well as meeting high international environmental, social and human rights standards.

UKEF is unable to comment on pending applications for the department’s support for reasons of commercial sensitivity. Details of business supported by UKEF can be found in its Annual Report and Accounts for the relevant year which are available online here.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether UK Export Finance is considering applications for trade (a) finance and (b) insurance for projects delivered by Chinese companies operating in Africa.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) helps UK exporters access finance and insurance on commercial terms to support them to win business overseas, fulfil orders and get paid. UKEF follows the UK government’s policy towards China set out in the Integrated Review Refresh 2023 and elsewhere.

UKEF's deals in all countries go through an extensive due diligence process to take account of relevant UK Government policies, applicable sanctions and other relevant bars as well as meeting high international environmental, social and human rights standards.

UKEF is unable to comment on pending applications for the department’s support for reasons of commercial sensitivity. Details of business supported by UKEF can be found in its Annual Report and Accounts for the relevant year which are available online here.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment she has made of the potential implications for her policies of the China Strategic Risks Institute's report on Building a Green, Fair and Resilient Solar Supply Chain, published on 24 November 2023.

The Solar Taskforce is considering wide-ranging actions needed to develop resilient, sustainable and innovative supply chains. This work will inform the Government’s Solar Roadmap setting out the trajectory and actions needed to deploy up to 70GW by 2035.

The Government already encourages developers to grow sustainable supply chains through the Supply Chain Plan process included in the Contracts for Difference scheme. The Government also supports innovation in supply chains through the Energy Entrepreneurs Fund and initiatives funded by UK Research and Innovation.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the China Strategic Risks Institute's report on Building a Green, Fair and Resilient Solar Supply Chain, published on 24 November 2023, if she will have discussions with Cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of using funds raised through the Partnership for Global Infrastructure and Investment to help build solar supply chain capacity.

The Department has noted the findings of the CSRI report, including the recommendation to use funds raised through the Partnership for Global Infrastructure and Investment to help build solar supply chain capacity.

The Solar Taskforce is considering wide-ranging actions needed to develop resilient, sustainable and innovative supply chains. This work will inform the Government’s Solar Roadmap setting out the trajectory and actions needed to deploy 70GW by 2035.

The UK’s main solar industry trade association is leading the industry’s response by developing and piloting the Solar Stewardship Initiative to further develop a responsible, transparent, and sustainable solar value chain.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 23 May 2022 to Question 4425 and with reference to the Answer of 23 February 2022 to Question 124950, if he will review his response of 23 May; and whether he plans to remove any Hikvision cameras in use at his Department.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is not government policy to comment on the security arrangements of government buildings. Specific details regarding the make and model of security systems are withheld on national security grounds.

The National Cyber Security Centre and the Centre for Protection of National Infrastructure provide guidance on the use of IP-connected cameras and cyber-connected physical security systems.

Security measures within departments are tailored to protect each site, proportionate to the level of threat, aligned with the HMG Minimum Security Standards and, take into account the building risk categorisation and the physical composition of the site.

18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Hikvision products are in use in his Department.

It is not government policy to comment on the security arrangements of government buildings. Specific details regarding the make and model of security systems are withheld on national security grounds.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the target response time between (a) notification being made to the Investment Security Unit and (b) response from that Unit; and what his Department's latest assessment is of that Unit's performance against that target.

The National Security and Investment Act 2021 requires the Secretary of State to prepare an annual report, including information on the numbers of notifications accepted and rejected, the average number of working days taken to accept or reject them, and the sectors in which they fall.

The first annual report covering 4 January 2022 – 31 March 2022 is currently being prepared and will be laid before both Houses and published in due course.

The Government does not publish individual notifications in recognition of the fact that most acquisitions raise no national security risks and are primarily a matter for the parties.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish those notifications made to the Investment Security Unit under the National Security and Investment Act 2021, by sector.

The National Security and Investment Act 2021 requires the Secretary of State to prepare an annual report, including information on the numbers of notifications accepted and rejected, the average number of working days taken to accept or reject them, and the sectors in which they fall.

The first annual report covering 4 January 2022 – 31 March 2022 is currently being prepared and will be laid before both Houses and published in due course.

The Government does not publish individual notifications in recognition of the fact that most acquisitions raise no national security risks and are primarily a matter for the parties.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many notifications the Investment Security Unit has received in relation to the National Security and Investment Act 2021 since that Act came into force.

The National Security and Investment Act 2021 requires the Secretary of State to prepare an annual report, including information on the numbers of notifications accepted and rejected, the average number of working days taken to accept or reject them, and the sectors in which they fall.

The first annual report covering 4 January 2022 – 31 March 2022 is currently being prepared and will be laid before both Houses and published in due course.

The Government does not publish individual notifications in recognition of the fact that most acquisitions raise no national security risks and are primarily a matter for the parties.

19th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department will consider make an assessment of the potential merits of a precautionary approach to gambling advertising.

In our approach to gambling advertising, we have struck a balanced and evidence-led approach which tackles aggressive advertising that is most likely to appeal to children, while recognising that advertising is an entirely legitimate commercial practice for responsible gambling firms.

Earlier this year, HM Government published a White Paper on gambling which outlined a comprehensive package of reforms to make gambling safer following an exhaustive assessment of the evidence, including on gambling advertising. We concluded that further action on advertising was needed, which is why we and the Gambling Commission are introducing measures to tackle the most aggressive and harmful advertising practices by preventing bonuses being constructed and targeted in harmful ways, giving customers more control over the marketing they receive, and introducing messaging about the risks associated with gambling.

This supplements the already robust rules in place to ensure that gambling advertising is socially responsible and that it cannot be targeted at or strongly appeal to children. This includes specific licence conditions for operators, including the requirement to abide by the UK Advertising Codes, which further regulate how gambling operators advertise. The UK Advertising Codes were strengthened in 2022, with new protections for children and vulnerable adults.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department plans to take to help ensure that the gaming industry complies with voluntary or self-regulatory measures to prevent gambling harms.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to address the concerns identified for all players, including young people.

Measures to protect players should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

The Government has agreed a 12-month implementation period for the new guidance on loot boxes and has asked the industry, coordinated by Ukie, to report back to DCMS on the extent to which it has been implemented.

We will continue to keep our position on possible future legislative options under review, informed by academic scrutiny of the industry-led measures. We will provide a further update in due course, following the 12-month implementation period.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment the Government has made of the adequacy of the UK Interactive Entertainment principles and guidance on loot boxes; and what steps she plans to take to help ensure compliance with that guidance.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to address the concerns identified for all players, including young people.

Measures to protect players should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

The Government has agreed a 12-month implementation period for the new guidance on loot boxes and has asked the industry, coordinated by Ukie, to report back to DCMS on the extent to which it has been implemented.

We will continue to keep our position on possible future legislative options under review, informed by academic scrutiny of the industry-led measures. We will provide a further update in due course, following the 12-month implementation period.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether the she plans to bring forward legislative proposals to regulate loot boxes.

Following the Government response to the call for evidence on loot boxes in video games, the Government has welcomed new industry-led guidance that aims to address the concerns identified for all players, including young people.

Measures to protect players should ensure that the purchase of loot boxes should be unavailable to all children and young people unless enabled by a parent or guardian, and all players should have access to, and be aware of, spending controls and transparent information to support safe and responsible gameplay.

The Government has agreed a 12-month implementation period for the new guidance on loot boxes and has asked the industry, coordinated by Ukie, to report back to DCMS on the extent to which it has been implemented.

We will continue to keep our position on possible future legislative options under review, informed by academic scrutiny of the industry-led measures. We will provide a further update in due course, following the 12-month implementation period.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
16th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has assessed the potential merits of reducing the review period for statutory levy rates on gambling operators and the distribution of funds to every three years, to allow for changes in the gambling landscape to be appropriately accounted for.

We launched a consultation on the structure, distribution and governance of the levy in October to ensure the government has the best available evidence to make implementation of the levy effective, transparent and proportionate. The consultation closes on 14 December. Legislation requires the levy to be paid by all Gambling Commission licensees, including on forms of gambling licensed in the future, to provide sustainable, ring-fenced funding for research, prevention and treatment (RPT) of gambling-related harms.

It is important that the new levy system provides sufficient long-term stability as the new arrangements come into force, while providing scope for the government to intervene should issues arise. We think a five year review period strikes an appropriate balance. However, we are keen to receive the best available evidence on this point through the consultation.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department plans to develop a mechanism for the statutory gambling levy to enable new forms of gambling to be (a) assessed and (b) levied at an appropriate level.

We launched a consultation on the structure, distribution and governance of the levy in October to ensure the government has the best available evidence to make implementation of the levy effective, transparent and proportionate. The consultation closes on 14 December. Legislation requires the levy to be paid by all Gambling Commission licensees, including on forms of gambling licensed in the future, to provide sustainable, ring-fenced funding for research, prevention and treatment (RPT) of gambling-related harms.

It is important that the new levy system provides sufficient long-term stability as the new arrangements come into force, while providing scope for the government to intervene should issues arise. We think a five year review period strikes an appropriate balance. However, we are keen to receive the best available evidence on this point through the consultation.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the reasons for International Olympics Committee President Thomas Bach's intervention in the voting process that led to the award of the 2022 Winter Olympics to Beijing at the meeting of the International Olympics Committee in Kuala Lumpur in 2015.

The voting procedures to award the hosting of Olympic Games are a matter for the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The British Olympic Association are our representatives to that forum, operating independently of the government.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment the Department has made of the Bet365's compliance with Chinese law in relation to its operations in that country.

All gambling companies providing gambling facilities to consumers in Great Britain must be licensed by the Gambling Commission and comply with the conditions and codes of practice of their operating licences. The Gambling Commission expects operators to obey the laws of other jurisdictions in which they operate, and requires operators to report any regulatory investigation or finding into their activities in any other jurisdiction.

Operators must inform the Gambling Commission if they have a substantial customer base outside of Britain. Where this is the case, the Gambling Commision asks operators why they do not consider themselves to be acting illegally by providing gambling facilities in these jurisdictions. This may be because they are licenced to operate in that jurisdiction, or because they have satisfied themselves in some other way that they are not breaking the law by providing gambling facilities. If operators are found to not to be acting in a lawful manner in other jurisdictions, the Gambling Commission will re-assess their suitability to hold a licence to offer gambling services in Britain.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made representations to universities in the UK that have (a) awarded honorary doctorates and (b) otherwise honoured members of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region government in the context of its role in the Government-acknowledged ongoing breach of the Sino-British Declaration in Hong Kong.

The department has not made representations to universities in the UK in the context as described. It is for universities as autonomous institutions to make their own judgement calls, in line with our laws. We continue to recommend that university due diligence processes, including regarding appointments, should consider reputational, ethical and security risks.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
7th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 6 June 2023 to Question 186806 on UK Internal Trade: Labelling, if he will provide the legal basis for the introduction of Not for EU labelling in Great Britain.

The legal basis for the “Not for EU” label requirements in Great Britain, confirmed in the Windsor Framework Command Paper, will be set out in due course, following consultation with the Scottish and Welsh governments. This requirement is planned to come into force in October 2024.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of creating a separate offence for pet theft to tackle the level of pet theft.

All reported crimes should be taken seriously, investigated and, where appropriate, taken through the courts and met with tough sentences. The theft of a pet is already a criminal offence under the Theft Act 1968 and the maximum penalty is seven years' imprisonment.

The Government takes the issue of pet theft very seriously and is concerned by suggestions that occurrences are on the rise. We consider that the current offences which apply to cases of pet theft are appropriate.

Sentencing is a matter for the Courts and should take into account the circumstances of each case. When deciding on an appropriate sentence, the Courts may consider aggravating and mitigating factors, in line with sentencing guidelines issued by the Sentencing Council. In February 2016 the Sentencing Council updated its guidelines in relation to sentencing for theft offences. The guidelines take account of the emotional distress, and therefore harm, that theft of a pet can have on the victim, and accordingly the guidelines recommend higher penalties for such offences.

If someone causes an animal to suffer in the course of stealing it they are also liable to prosecution under the Animal Welfare Act 2006. The existing maximum custodial penalty for causing animal cruelty is 6 months' imprisonment. Legislation is currently before Parliament - the Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill - which when passed will increase the maximum penalty to 5 years' imprisonment. This will be the highest penalty for animal cruelty in Europe. The Government will support this Bill as it makes its way through Parliament.

As I said at the recent Westminster Hall debate on pet theft, we continue to keep the situation under review and are keen to explore ways to address pet theft that will be effective and have a meaningful impact. That includes working with interested parties, including the police and animal welfare organisations to try and get messages across to pet owners to help them keep their pets safe.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to (a) the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 16 June 2021, Official Report, column 287, (b) the oral contribution of the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs of 12 January 2021, Official Report, column 162, (c) the Answer of 25 June 2021 to Question 16783 on Import Controls: China, (d) the Answers of 5 July 2021 to Questions 24880 and 24881, (e) the Answer of 12 July 2021 to Question 28048 and (f) in accordance with the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 7 July 2021, Official Report, column 901, if she will clarify whether the UK (i) has or (ii) plans to implement import controls on goods made in China believed to be the product of forced labour.

HM Government is committed to tackling the issue of forced labour in global supply chains, including through strengthening the Modern Slavery Act, and the introduction of financial penalties for businesses that fail to meet their statutory obligations.

Whilst we do not have plans to place import controls on goods from China, we have announced a range of other measures, including a comprehensive review of export controls. We are working closely with international partners too. Last month, under our G7 Presidency, G7 leaders committed to work together to make sure that global supply chains are free from the use of forced labour.

16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the oral contribution of the Prime Minister of 16 June 2021, Official Report, what progress her Department has made on implementing import controls on goods from China to the UK which are believed to be the product of forced labour including in the supply chain.

On 12th January, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary announced a series of measures to help make sure that British businesses and the public sector are in no way complicit in violations of rights and responsibilities in Xinjiang.

This included a review of export controls to make sure we are doing all we can to prevent the export of goods that may contribute to such violations. This review is ongoing and we will report its outcome to Parliament in due course.

Import controls and export controls are governed by different processes and legislation. HM Government has only announced plans to review export controls. We do not have plans to place import controls on goods from China at present.

25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment has her Department made of the barriers facing people with complex disabilities looking to work more hours to meet the rising cost of living.

There are a range of DWP initiatives that support disabled people and people with health conditions to live independent lives and start, stay and succeed in employment. These include the Intensive Personalised Employment Support programme, Access to Work, Disability Confident and support in partnership with the health system, including Employment Advisers in NHS Improving Access to Psychological Therapy services.

The Green Paper explored how the benefits system can better meet the needs of claimants now and in the future, by improving claimant experience of our services, enabling independent living, and improving employment outcomes. We remain committed to responding to this Green Paper consultation with a White Paper later this year.

25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits for people with complex disabilities of an exceptional uprating of benefits in line with the current inflation rate.

The Secretary of State undertakes an annual review of benefits and pensions. The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) is the main measure of UK inflation. CPI in the year to September (published by the Office for National Statistics in October) is the latest figure that the Secretary of State can use to allow sufficient time for the required legislative and operational changes before new rates can be introduced at the start of the new financial year. From April 2022 benefits and pensions increased by 3.1%, in line with the CPI.

In addition, claimants will also get one-off support worth up to £1,200 this year including a new £650 cost of living payment for people on means-tested benefits and £150 for people on disability benefits to help them with their additional costs. These payments will be exempt from tax, will not count towards the benefit cap, and will not have any impact on existing benefit awards.

20th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to Question 158772 tabled by the Rt hon. Member for Chingford and Woodford Green on 06 March 2023 on Hikvision Cameras.

I refer the Rt. hon. Member to the answer I gave on 21 March 2023 to Question 158772.

6th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Hikvision products are in use in his Department; and whether he plans to remove the Hikvision cameras.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is not Government policy to comment on the security arrangements of Government buildings. Specific details regarding the make and model of security systems are withheld on national security grounds. The Department is reviewing its CCTV systems following the written statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 24 November 2022.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Hikvision products are in use in (a) his Department and (b) the NHS.

There are 82 Hikvision products in use in the Department. Information on the usage of Hikvision products by the National Health Service is not collected centrally.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of using trained covid detection dogs to identify covid-19 infections; and if he will urgently set out a timescale for deployment of those dogs.

The Department has been funding a clinical trial investigating whether COVID-19 can be detected by dogs. This work has been undertaken by a coalition including the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the charity Medical Detection Dogs.

We have received the results from phase one of the trial.

NHS Test and Trace is engaging with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Medical Detection Dogs about potential next phases of the trial.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the delivery of £2.5 billion from the sale of Chelsea Football Club.

The proceeds from the sale of Chelsea FC are currently frozen in a UK bank account while independent experts establish a foundation to manage and distribute the money. A licence from the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation will then be needed to move the funds to the foundation. We want this money to reach Ukraine as quickly as possible and remain open to any arrangement that clearly delivers this.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of (a) enabling Parliament to exercise oversight of sanctions policy and (b) imposing a duty on His Majesty's Government to lay an annual report before Parliament on sanctions and other related measures adopted on the basis of a relevant human rights purpose as defined by the Sanctions and Money Laundering Act 2018 Section 1(f).

UK sanctions regimes are established through secondary legislation and are subject to Parliamentary oversight via the scrutiny processes set out in the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018 ("SAMLA").

Ministers are also routinely held accountable for the UK's sanctions policy through select committees and Parliamentary Questions. The government will shortly publish a Post-Legislative Scrutiny Memorandum for SAMLA, following the publication of the UK's first sanctions strategy in February 2024.

In 2022, Parliament amended SAMLA to streamline some of the processes SAMLA originally established, including for reporting.

We have set out the UK government's approach to using sanctions as a foreign and security policy tool in our strategy published on 22 February (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/deter-disrupt-and-demonstrate-uk-sanctions-in-a-contested-world-uk-sanctions-strategy). The strategy explains how we continue to strengthen our sanctions to deter and disrupt malign activity and to protect the UK.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, whether he has had discussions with his counterpart in China on changes to the M503, W122 and W123 flight paths around Taiwan Strait.

The UK has regular discussions within the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) regarding the importance of communication and coordination in the protection of air safety, especially when it comes to changes to airspace such as this.

We do not support any unilateral attempts to change the status quo in the Taiwan Strait and have underscored the importance of peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait alongside partners in previous G7 Foreign and Development Ministers' and Leaders' communiques.

The UK's longstanding policy on Taiwan has not changed. We consider the Taiwan issue one to be settled peacefully by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait through constructive dialogue, without the threat or use of force or coercion.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of the recent changes to the M503, W122, and W123 flight paths around Taiwan.

The UK has regular discussions within the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) regarding the importance of communication and coordination in the protection of air safety, especially when it comes to changes to airspace such as this.

We do not support any unilateral attempts to change the status quo in the Taiwan Strait and have underscored the importance of peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait alongside partners in previous G7 Foreign and Development Ministers' and Leaders' communiques.

The UK's longstanding policy on Taiwan has not changed. We consider the Taiwan issue one to be settled peacefully by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait through constructive dialogue, without the threat or use of force or coercion.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what discussions he has had with the International Civil Aviation Organisation on changes to the M503, W122 and W123 flight paths in the Taiwan Strait.

The UK has regular discussions within the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) regarding the importance of communication and coordination in the protection of air safety, especially when it comes to changes to airspace such as this.

We do not support any unilateral attempts to change the status quo in the Taiwan Strait and have underscored the importance of peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait alongside partners in previous G7 Foreign and Development Ministers' and Leaders' communiques.

The UK's longstanding policy on Taiwan has not changed. We consider the Taiwan issue one to be settled peacefully by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait through constructive dialogue, without the threat or use of force or coercion.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what assessment he has made on the implications for his policies of the press release of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights entitled, Hong Kong SAR: UN expert warns against admission of evidence, allegedly secured through torture, in Jimmy Lai case, published on 31 January 2024; and when he last made representations to the Hong Kong authorities on the Jimmy Lai case.

We are aware of media reports and a submission to the UN Special Rapporteur on Cruel, Inhumane, Degrading Treatment or Punishment alleging mistreatment of Andy Li while he was detained in mainland China. We take all allegations of torture and mistreatment very seriously and are looking into this further. Article 15 of the Convention against Torture, which China has ratified, prohibits the use of statements established to have been made as a result of torture in court proceedings. Diplomats from our Consulate-General are attending Mr Lai's court proceedings as the trial continues. The Foreign Secretary raised Jimmy Lai's case with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi on 5 December.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, whether he has had recent discussions with his Ukrainian counterpart on religious freedom in the context of the decision to prohibit the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

We are deeply disturbed by the impact of Russia's illegal war on Freedom of Religion or Belief (FoRB) in Ukraine. This includes widespread destruction of religious sites, and the imposition of restrictive Russian laws in the temporarily controlled territories. The UK is carefully tracking the development of the draft law on religious organisations. The British Embassy in Kyiv continues to actively engage with Ukrainian religious organisations and representatives on the issue. We welcome the Ukrainian Government's assurances that the law is not aimed at restricting FoRB, and their ongoing consultation with religious communities in Ukraine on the terms of the law.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, whether he has made recent representations to his Chinese counterpart on (a) the naming of the former Consul General to Hong Kong, Andy Heyn, during the trial of Jimmy Lai and (b) the labelling of Bill Browder and Luke de Pulford as co-conspirators in the same proceedings.

Jimmy Lai's case is a priority for the Government. The Foreign Secretary has called for his release and has urged the authorities to end their prosecution and repeal the National Security Law. We continue to engage with the Chinese and Hong Kong authorities on his case and have raised the inclusion of British nationals by the prosecution. UK diplomats carry out their duties overseas in accordance with the Vienna Conventions on Diplomatic and Consular Relations.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, if he will make an assessment of the implications for UK diplomatic representation in (a) China and (b) Hong Kong of the naming of a British Consul General in Hong Kong by the prosecution in the trial of Jimmy Lai.

Jimmy Lai's case is a priority for the Government. The Foreign Secretary has called for his release and has urged the authorities to end their prosecution and repeal the National Security Law. We continue to engage with the Chinese and Hong Kong authorities on his case and have raised the inclusion of British nationals by the prosecution. UK diplomats carry out their duties overseas in accordance with the Vienna Conventions on Diplomatic and Consular Relations.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, with reference to the Written Statement of 9 January 2023 on Diplomatic Passport Policy, HCWS173, what his Department’s policy is on the (a) eligibility for and (b) use of (i) diplomatic and (ii) official passports; and how long such passports last once issued.

Policy remains that diplomatic or official passports (linked to the nature of accreditation), are issued to UK civil servants and qualifying dependants on postings to UK diplomatic missions or consular posts.

These passports are normally valid for:

  • Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office staff - 10 years;
  • Other HMG staff - 6 years;
  • Other HMG staff on loan to the FCDO - posting length + 6 months.

They should generally be used only to enter and exit the country/countries of accreditation or for duty travel to some countries operating restrictive visa regimes, or where using such a passport would exempt the need for a visa.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, with reference to the Written Statement of 9 January 2023 on Diplomatic Passport Policy, HCWS173, if he will list individuals with (a) a diplomatic and (b) an official passport other than members of HM Diplomatic Service and their families.

Diplomatic passports are issued to UK civil servants (and their families) accredited overseas with diplomatic or consular status. Official passports are given to those with administrative and technical status.

A limited number of exceptions have been made to issue diplomatic passports to officials travelling on government business for security reasons.

Some military personnel have received short-validity official passports or, more rarely, diplomatic passports where these are required to fulfil their functions.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential implications for his Department's policies of the reported forced repatriation of people from China back to North Korea; whether he has made an assessment of the potential risks to these people; whether he has made representations to his counterpart in China on this topic; and whether his Department has made an assessment of the compatibility of these reported forced repatriations with international law.

We are aware of reports that China is forcibly repatriating refugees to North Korea. The UK actively promotes the implementation of the 1951 UN Refugee Convention which asserts that a refugee should not be returned to a country where they face serious threats to their life or freedom. We emphasise directly to the Chinese authorities that they should not be detaining and forcefully repatriating North Korean refugees. At the 17 August UN Security Council meeting on the human rights situation in the DPRK, the UK called on all states to abide by the principle of non-refoulement.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many British citizens are in prison in China; and how many have been in prison for longer than (a) two, (b) five and (c) ten years; and what proportion are awaiting trial.

On the 1st June 2023, the FCDO was providing on-going consular assistance to 17 British citizens detained in China.

On the 1st June 2023, the FCDO was providing on-going consular assistance to 20 British citizens detained in Hong Kong.

It is not possible to provide further details on individual cases.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Rhodium Group report entitled The Global Economic Disruptions from a Taiwan Conflict, published on14 December 2022, what assessment he has made of the impact of a potential blockade or invasion of Taiwan by the People’s Republic of China on the UK economy; and if he will make a statement.

The UK has a clear interest in peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait. We consider the Taiwan issue one to be settled peacefully by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait through constructive dialogue, without the threat or use of force or coercion. As the Foreign Secretary set out in his Mansion House speech, no country could shield itself from the economic repercussions should peace and stability fail in the Taiwan Strait. It's therefore essential that no party takes unilateral action to change the status quo.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Pakistani counterpart on the release of Murad Akbar in Pakistan.

We are aware of reports of detainments in Pakistan and continue to monitor the situation closely. Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, Minister for South Asia, spoke to the High Commissioner for Pakistan to the UK, Moazzam Ahmad Khan, on 9 May and to Hina Rabbani Khar, Pakistan's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, on 10 and 13 May, where he emphasised the importance of peaceful democratic rights, including the right to protest, adherence to the rule of law, and transparency in legal processes. Where there are allegations of human rights violations, we expect these to be fully investigated in line with international human rights law.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to his oral evidence to the House of Lords Protocol in Ireland/Northern Ireland Sub Committee on 16 May 2023, if he will set out under what statutory authority the introduction of Not for EU labelling in Great Britain is being made; and whether the Government plans to introduce new legislative proposals to give effect to that labelling regime.

There will be proportionate arrangements for the labelling of products, including product-level labelling for a subset of high-risk products, to ensure that internal trade moving in the green lane stays within the United Kingdom. Labelling requirements will apply to a targeted category of goods. These will be introduced in a phased way and we will support businesses in adapting to these new arrangements. These requirements will ensure that the same goods are on the shelves across the whole United Kingdom. This is the right approach to support and safeguard the functioning of the UK internal market. That is why, as noted in the Command Paper, we intend for these labelling requirements to apply UK-wide from October 2024. We will continue to work closely with industry in advance of those changes taking effect.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to his oral evidence on 16 May to the House of Lords Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland Sub Committee, whether he plans to consult UK retailers based in Great Britain over the introduction of Not for EU labels in Great Britain; and if he will make a statement.

There will be proportionate arrangements for the labelling of products, including product-level labelling for a subset of high-risk products, to ensure that internal trade moving in the green lane stays within the United Kingdom. Labelling requirements will apply to a targeted category of goods. These will be introduced in a phased way and we will support businesses in adapting to these new arrangements. These requirements will ensure that the same goods are on the shelves across the whole United Kingdom. This is the right approach to support and safeguard the functioning of the UK internal market. That is why, as noted in the Command Paper, we intend for these labelling requirements to apply UK-wide from October 2024. We will continue to work closely with industry in advance of those changes taking effect.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to his oral evidence on 16 May to the House of Lords Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland Sub Committee, whether he has made an assessment of the potential cost to UK industry of the introduction of Not for EU labelling in Great Britain.

There will be proportionate arrangements for the labelling of products, including product-level labelling for a subset of high-risk products, to ensure that internal trade moving in the green lane stays within the United Kingdom. Labelling requirements will apply to a targeted category of goods. These will be introduced in a phased way and we will support businesses in adapting to these new arrangements. These requirements will ensure that the same goods are on the shelves across the whole United Kingdom. This is the right approach to support and safeguard the functioning of the UK internal market. That is why, as noted in the Command Paper, we intend for these labelling requirements to apply UK-wide from October 2024. We will continue to work closely with industry in advance of those changes taking effect.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to his oral evidence on 16 May to the House of Lords Protocol on Ireland/Northern Ireland Sub Committee, whether he has plans to introduce Not for EU labelling for goods produced in Northern Ireland for sale in Northern Ireland or Great Britain or in Great Britain for sale in Great Britain or Northern Ireland; and if he would make a statement.

There will be proportionate arrangements for the labelling of products, including product-level labelling for a subset of high-risk products, to ensure that internal trade moving in the green lane stays within the United Kingdom. Labelling requirements will apply to a targeted category of goods. These will be introduced in a phased way and we will support businesses in adapting to these new arrangements. These requirements will ensure that the same goods are on the shelves across the whole United Kingdom. This is the right approach to support and safeguard the functioning of the UK internal market. That is why, as noted in the Command Paper, we intend for these labelling requirements to apply UK-wide from October 2024. We will continue to work closely with industry in advance of those changes taking effect.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what his policy is on (a) the status of Taiwan as a state and (b) peace in Taiwan.

The UK's longstanding position on Taiwan has not changed. The UK acknowledges the position of the Chinese Government that Taiwan is a province of China. The UK has no diplomatic relations with Taiwan but a strong, unofficial relationship, based on deep and growing ties in a wide range of areas, and underpinned by shared democratic values. The UK has a clear interest in peace and stability in the Taiwan Strait. We consider the Taiwan issue one to be settled peacefully by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait through constructive dialogue, without the threat or use of force or coercion. We do not support any unilateral attempts to change the status quo.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what diplomatic privileges will be available to officials from Hong Kong visiting the UK in April 2023.

Visiting officials, including from Hong Kong, who are not members of a mission or consular post in the UK are not covered under the Vienna Conventions on Diplomatic and Consular Relations.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the (a) Global Human Rights Sanctions and (b) Global Anti-Corruption Sanctions regimes for imposing Magnitsky sanctions in the context of the Government making no designations under either regime since January 2022.

The UK has continued to impose sanctions on human rights violators and abusers to maximum effect, as well as corrupt actors. We will continue to use our Magnitsky sanctions regimes to pursue designations in response to human rights violations, abuses and serious corruption, and are currently investigating targets for further sanctions this autumn. Since the UK Magnitsky regimes were put in place in 2020 and 2021, we have sanctioned 81 persons under Global Human Rights and 27 under our Global Anti-Corruption regime.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Freedom from Torture report entitled UK partnerships with Chinese policing institutions linked to crimes against humanity in Xinjiang, dated 17 May 2022, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of reports of collaboration between the London Policing College, which is a partner of the Metropolitan Police, and Xinjiang Police College, China’s Ministry of Public Security and the People’s Public Security University of China.

The Government has robust processes in place to ensure that all projects funded by UK aid meet our human rights obligations and values. This includes publicly available HMG guidance (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/583304/OSJA_Guidance_2017.pdf) that sets out the human rights risks that must be considered prior to providing any justice or security sector assistance.

We are aware of concerns raised by a recent report from Freedom from Torture regarding a British Council partnership with London Policing College (LPC). This project was part of a regional programme that included efforts to reduce human rights violations and other malpractice through better policing. Neither the Xinjiang Policing College, nor the People's Public Security University of China participated in the project, and no funds were distributed to any overseas institutions. The LPC have now ceased all programme partnerships in China.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether UK aid funding via the British Council China was allocated to the London Police College during its historic partnership with Xinjiang Police College.

The Government has robust processes in place to ensure that all projects funded by UK aid meet our human rights obligations and values. This includes publicly available HMG guidance (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/583304/OSJA_Guidance_2017.pdf) that sets out the human rights risks that must be considered prior to providing any justice or security sector assistance.

We are aware of concerns raised by a recent report from Freedom from Torture regarding a British Council partnership with London Policing College (LPC). This project was part of a regional programme that included efforts to reduce human rights violations and other malpractice through better policing. Neither the Xinjiang Policing College, nor the People's Public Security University of China participated in the project, and no funds were distributed to any overseas institutions. The LPC have now ceased all programme partnerships in China.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what information she holds on whether the London Police College which is funded by UK aid money previously had links to the People's Public Security University of China.

The Government has robust processes in place to ensure that all projects funded by UK aid meet our human rights obligations and values. This includes publicly available HMG guidance (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/583304/OSJA_Guidance_2017.pdf) that sets out the human rights risks that must be considered prior to providing any justice or security sector assistance.

We are aware of concerns raised by a recent report from Freedom from Torture regarding a British Council partnership with London Policing College (LPC). This project was part of a regional programme that included efforts to reduce human rights violations and other malpractice through better policing. Neither the Xinjiang Policing College, nor the People's Public Security University of China participated in the project, and no funds were distributed to any overseas institutions. The LPC have now ceased all programme partnerships in China.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of her Department's compliance with its guidance to UK companies, issued in January 2011, to safeguard UK businesses and public bodies from any involvement or links with violations of human rights in the context of US sanctions on the Xinjiang Police College.

Her Majesty's Government (HMG) have robust processes in place to ensure that all projects funded by UK aid meet our human rights obligations and values. This includes publicly available HMG guidance that sets out the human rights risks that must be considered prior to providing any justice or security sector assistance.

We are aware of concerns raised by a recent report from Freedom from Torture regarding a British Council partnership with London Policing College (LPC). This project was part of a regional programme that included efforts to reduce human rights violations and other malpractice through better policing. This project did not involve the Xinjiang Policing College or any other public security entities in Xinjiang, and no funds were distributed to any overseas institutions.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will undertake a full review of UK aid funding to determine whether any such funding is being used to support organisations guilty of human rights violations in the People's Republic of China.

Her Majesty's Government (HMG) have robust processes in place to ensure that all projects funded by UK aid meet our human rights obligations and values. This includes publicly available HMG guidance that sets out the human rights risks that must be considered prior to providing any justice or security sector assistance.

We are aware of concerns raised by a recent report from Freedom from Torture regarding a British Council partnership with London Policing College (LPC). This project was part of a regional programme that included efforts to reduce human rights violations and other malpractice through better policing. This project did not involve the Xinjiang Policing College or any other public security entities in Xinjiang, and no funds were distributed to any overseas institutions.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of US sanctions on the Xinjiang Police College for human rights violations.

Her Majesty's Government (HMG) have robust processes in place to ensure that all projects funded by UK aid meet our human rights obligations and values. This includes publicly available HMG guidance that sets out the human rights risks that must be considered prior to providing any justice or security sector assistance.

We are aware of concerns raised by a recent report from Freedom from Torture regarding a British Council partnership with London Policing College (LPC). This project was part of a regional programme that included efforts to reduce human rights violations and other malpractice through better policing. This project did not involve the Xinjiang Policing College or any other public security entities in Xinjiang, and no funds were distributed to any overseas institutions.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
10th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 9 June 2022 to Question 9828 and with reference to Answer of 23 February to Question 124950 and correspondence sent by the Biometrics and Surveillance Camera Commissioner to Hikvision on 16 July 2021 on The UK’s Responsibility to Act on Atrocities in Xinjiang and Beyond, if she will review her Department's use of Hikvision cameras in response to the concerns raised in that correspondence.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is not government policy to comment on the security arrangements of government buildings.

26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 23 May 2022 to Question 4453 and with reference to the Answer of 23 February 2022 to Question 124950, if she will review her response of 23 May; and whether she plans to remove any Hikvision cameras in use at her Department.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is not government policy to comment on the security arrangements of government buildings. Specific details regarding the make and model of security systems are withheld on national security grounds.

The National Cyber Security Centre and the Centre for Protection of National Infrastructure provide guidance on the use of IP-connected cameras and cyber-connected physical security systems. Security measures within departments are tailored to protect each site, proportionate to the level of threat, aligned with the HMG Minimum Security Standards and, take into account the building risk categorisation and the physical composition of the site.

18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many Hikvision products are in use in her Department.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is not Government policy to comment on the security arrangements of Government buildings. Specific details regarding the make and model of security systems are withheld on national security grounds.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps she has taken in response to reports that HSBC has invested in Xinjiang Tianye Ltd, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps, which was sanctioned by the US for slave labour and genocide.

The Government has taken a number of measures to help ensure that no British organisations are profiting from or contributing to human rights violations against the Uyghurs or other minorities. We have introduced new guidance for UK businesses on the risks of doing business in Xinjiang - supported by a programme of Ministerial engagement - and announced enhanced export controls, as well as a commitment to introduce financial penalties for non-compliance with section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act. Our overseas business risk guidance makes clear to UK companies the risks of operating in Xinjiang, and urges them to conduct appropriate due diligence and consider their corporate responsibilities when making investment decisions.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to (a) his oral contribution of 16 June 2021, Official Report, column 287, (b) the oral contribution of the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs of 12 January 2021, Official Report, column 162, (c) the Answer of 25 June 2021 to Question 16783 on Import Controls: China and (d) the Answers of 5 July 2021 to Questions 24880 and 24881, whether import controls are in place on goods made in China, believed to be the product of forced labour.

As set out in our response of 5 July, the Foreign Secretary announced on 12 January a review of existing export controls as they apply to Xinjiang to identify whether we can bring into scope any additional goods which could be used for internal repression or human rights violations in the region. This review is ongoing and the Government will report back to Parliament on the outcome. Import and export controls are governed by different processes and legislation, and the Foreign Secretary's announcement on 12 January referred only to export controls. The Government has serious concerns about the situation in Xinjiang and we keep our policy response under close review.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to (a) the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 16 June 2021, Official Report, column 287 and (b) his oral contribution of 12 January 2021, Official Report, column 162, and pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2021 to Question 16783 on Import Controls China: whether the Government plans to implement (i) import and (ii) export controls on goods made in China, believed to be the product of forced labour.

On 12 January, the Foreign Secretary announced a review of existing export controls as they apply to Xinjiang to identify whether we can bring into scope any additional goods which could be used for internal repression or human rights violations in the region. This review is ongoing. Import and export controls are governed by different processes and legislation, and the Foreign Secretary's announcement on 12 January referred only to export controls. The Government has serious concerns about the situation in Xinjiang and we keep our policy response under close review.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to (a) the Prime Minister's oral contribution of 16 June 2021, Official Report, column 287 and (b) his oral contribution of 12 January 2021, Official Report, column 162, and pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2021 to Question 16783 on Import Controls: China, whether the Government has import controls on goods made in China, believed to be the product of forced labour.

On 12 January, the Foreign Secretary announced a review of existing export controls as they apply to Xinjiang to identify whether we can bring into scope any additional goods which could be used for internal repression or human rights violations in the region. This review is ongoing. Import and export controls are governed by different processes and legislation, and the Foreign Secretary's announcement on 12 January referred only to export controls. The Government has serious concerns about the situation in Xinjiang and we keep our policy response under close review.

24th Jan 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Government has provided funding for the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) is a multilateral development bank with 106 approved and prospective members globally. It invests in infrastructure and other productive sectors to foster sustainable economic development, create wealth, and improve infrastructure connectivity in Asia.

Alongside other members, the UK provided an initial financial contribution in return for AIIB shares. More details can be found in the AIIB Capital Order 2015.

In addition, the UK contributed to the AIIB’s Project Preparation Special Fund, which provides grant support for the preparation of high-quality projects for AIIB Members, especially less developed Members.

The Government works closely with the AIIB and other shareholders to ensure its investments are in line with international standards and best practice.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons HMRC did not enforce the agency rules under (a) section 134 of the Income and Corporation Taxes Act 1988 and (b) section 44 of the Income Tax (Earnings and Pensions) Act 2003.

Under section 44 of the Income Tax (Earnings and Pensions) Act 2003, and previously section 134 of the Income and Corporation Taxes Act 1988, most agency workers must be treated as employees for Income Tax and National Insurance contributions (NICs) purposes by the agencies that pay them. These agencies are required to make deductions of Income Tax and employee NICs, where these are due, from the workers’ pay in the same way and at the same level as with direct employees. The agencies will also be liable to pay employer NICs, where these are due, in respect of payments to the workers.

HMRC has a risk-based approach towards compliance activities and will investigate evidence of non-compliance or avoidance. Where HMRC finds that an agency has failed to account for tax and NICs, it will seek to recover unpaid amounts due.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
9th Jun 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answers of 6 June 2022 to Question 9826 on Treasury: Hikvision and of 6 April 2022 to Question 124950 on Hikvision, and with reference to the Biometrics and Surveillance Camera Commissioner's recommendations regarding the use of Hikvision cameras by Government departments, what steps is his Department taking in response to those recommendations.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is not government policy to comment on the security arrangements of government buildings.

The National Cyber Security Centre and the Centre for Protection of National Infrastructure provide guidance on the use of IP-connected cameras and cyber-connected physical security systems.

Security measures within departments are tailored to protect each site, proportionate to the level of threat, aligned with the HMG Minimum Security Standards and, take into account the building risk categorisation and the physical composition of the site.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 23 May 2022 to Question 4454 and with reference to the Answer of 23 February 2022 to Question 124950, if he will review his response of 23 May; and whether he plans to remove any Hikvision cameras in use at his Department.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is not government policy to comment on the security arrangements of government buildings. Specific details regarding the make and model of security systems are withheld on national security grounds.

The National Cyber Security Centre and the Centre for Protection of National Infrastructure provide guidance on the use of IP-connected cameras and cyber-connected physical security systems.

Security measures within departments are tailored to protect each site, proportionate to the level of threat, aligned with the HMG Minimum Security Standards and, take into account the building risk categorisation and the physical composition of the site.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many Hikvision products are in use in his Department.

As has been the case under successive administrations, it is not government policy to comment on the security arrangements of government buildings. Specific details regarding the make and model of security systems are withheld on national security grounds.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th May 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment the Government has made of the scale of illegal money lending in England.

HM Treasury regularly monitors developments in the consumer credit market, including those regarding illegal money lending, as part of its normal process of policy development.

However, it does not conduct research regarding the scale of illegal money lending in England. Instead, HMT draws on the research of various stakeholders, including the England Illegal Money Lending (IMLT) team, consumer groups and thinktanks, to inform policy development.

HM Treasury recognises the risks posed by illegal lenders and the harmful impacts they cause to their victims and communities.

That is why, in financial year 2022/23, the Government will provide over £6.7 million of funding to IMLTs across the UK, an increase of over 5% compared to 2021/22. This funding enables IMLTs to investigate and prosecute loan sharks and use their legal powers to tackle the wider criminality they inflict on communities, such as violence and blackmail.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he has had recent discussions with businesses which operate in China on their legal obligations under the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Home Office Ministers have not met with businesses which operate in China to discuss the Modern Slavey Act 2015.

Under Section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act, commercial businesses who operate in the UK and have a turnover of £36m or more are required to report annually on the steps they have taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains. The aim of the requirement is to provide transparency, allowing consumers, investors, and civil society to scrutinise business action.

In 2021 the Government launched the modern slavery statement registry to bring together modern slavery statements on a single platform and make the data readily available for investors, civil society and consumers. Since launching the online modern slavery statement registry in March 2021, over 12,500 modern slavery statements covering over 43,000 organisations have been submitted to the registry on a voluntary basis.

The Government does not routinely review the quality of individual modern slavery statements.

Laura Farris
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
6th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if his Department will review declarations by UK companies on (a) slave and (b) forced labour in their supply chains.

Home Office Ministers have not met with businesses which operate in China to discuss the Modern Slavey Act 2015.

Under Section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act, commercial businesses who operate in the UK and have a turnover of £36m or more are required to report annually on the steps they have taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains. The aim of the requirement is to provide transparency, allowing consumers, investors, and civil society to scrutinise business action.

In 2021 the Government launched the modern slavery statement registry to bring together modern slavery statements on a single platform and make the data readily available for investors, civil society and consumers. Since launching the online modern slavery statement registry in March 2021, over 12,500 modern slavery statements covering over 43,000 organisations have been submitted to the registry on a voluntary basis.

The Government does not routinely review the quality of individual modern slavery statements.

Laura Farris
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
26th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of reports that a Russian intelligence agent has entered the UK under the Homes for Ukraine scheme; and if her Department will review the security vetting process for people coming to the UK through the Homes for Ukraine Scheme.

These reports are misleading and inaccurate.

Since February 2022, Russian nationals applying for any UK visa route have been subject to robust additional security checks. The UK Government is proud of the support we have given to Ukrainians fleeing Putin’s illegal invasion of Ukraine, with over 200,000 Ukrainian nationals and their families either arriving, or extending their existing leave, in the UK to secure sanctuary on our Ukraine Schemes.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the implications for her policies of the findings in the 2022 report, Dangerous Liaisons: UK partnerships with Chinese policing institutions linked to crimes against humanity in Xinjiang, published by Freedom from Torture, on the extent to which required processes for oversight of human rights risk were undertaken by four police forces and the Joint International Police Hub before engaging with London Policing College’s China policing projects.

The London Policing College (LPC) is an independent organisation which includes retired officers from the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) and is independent to the Home Office and UK Government. The Home Office has no formal relationship with the LPC.

The Home Office International Police Assistance Service (IPAS) replaced the JIPH in January 2022 and continues to act as the central coordination point for overseas, non-operational policing deployments.

IPAS do not hold information on the International Police Assistance Brief (IPAB) platform with regards to London Policing College’s China policing projects. IPAS advise that Overseas Security and Justice assistance (OSJA) assessments are carried out where appropriate.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the guidance by her Department entitled Overseas Business Risk: China, published on 11 March 2022, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of the London Policing College's partnership with Hunan Police Academy on unintentionally facilitating or being otherwise complicit in human rights violations in Xinjiang.

In 2019, the British Council awarded funding to the London Policing College (LPC) as part of a regional programme to improve international teaching standards in police education in target countries. This included efforts to reduce human rights violations. The London Policing College is an external, private company.

The British Council have confirmed that they have never funded any activities involving Xinjiang security bodies and LPC have confirmed that no Xinjiang security bodies were involved in the programme. LPC have never engaged with institutions of any nature from the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region and they have now ceased all programme partnerships with China.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the adequacy of the working relationship between the London Police College (LPC) and the Metropolitan Police Service, in the context of historic LPC programmes in China with potential links to organisations that have been accused of human rights violations.

The London Policing College (LPC) is an independent organisation which includes retired officers from the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) and is independent to the Home Office and UK Government. The Home Office has no formal relationship with the LPC.


In 2019, the British Council awarded funding to LPC as part of a regional programme to improve international teaching standards in police education in the target countries. This included efforts to reduce human rights violations.


The British Council have confirmed that they have never funded any activities involving Xinjiang security bodies. LPC have also confirmed that no Xinjiang security bodies were involved in the programme and that they have now ceased all programme partnerships with China.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he will respond to Question 4451 tabled on 18 May 2022 by the Rt hon. Member for Chingford and Woodford Green on Sanctions: Russia.

The response for UIN 4451 was given on 30 May 2022.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
18th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she intends to use seized Russian assets frozen under sanctions for the benefit of victims in Ukraine.

Law enforcement agencies are currently able to freeze and seize foreign assets with links to criminality or unlawful conduct, by making use of powers granted under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 21 January 2022 to Question 105332 on HSBC: Xinjiang Tianye, what plans she has to investigate the veracity of HSBC’s Modern Slavery Statement in response to reports that the company holds shares in Xinjiang-based companies alleged to have perpetrated mass atrocity crimes against the Uyghurs and others; and if she will make a statement.

The Government has serious concerns about the gross human rights violations being perpetrated against Uyghurs and other minorities in Xinjiang. The Government’s overseas business risk guidance makes clear to UK companies the risks of operating in Xinjiang, and urges them to conduct appropriate due diligence and consider their corporate responsibilities when making investment decisions.

With regard to transparency reporting on modern slavery, the UK was the first country in the world to require businesses to report on the steps they have taken to tackle modern slavery. The landmark provision in section 54 of the Modern Slavery Act 2015 requires organisations, including financial institutions, with a turnover of £36m or more, to report annually on the steps they have taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains.

The prevalence of modern slavery and complexity of global supply chains means that it is highly unlikely that any sector or company is immune from the risks of modern slavery. Section 54 therefore does not require organisations to certify that their supply chains are ‘slavery free’ or require the Government to verify the content of modern slavery statements. The Government expects companies to report transparently about how they are mitigating modern slavery risks and to use their modern slavery statements to demonstrate year on year progress. This enables consumers, shareholders and civil society to scrutinise the efforts being made.

Anyone with concerns about an organisation’s modern slavery statement should write to the Board of Directors (or equivalent) as the Act requires a modern slavery statement to be approved by the Board and signed by a Director (or equivalent) to ensure senior level accountability for modern slavery. Senior leaders are responsible for ensuring that their statements reflect the circumstances and action their organisation is taking.

Under the current provisions of section 54, if an organisation does not comply with their legal requirements in relation to producing a modern slavery statement, the Home Secretary can apply for an injunction to enforce compliance. To enhance the impact of transparency and accelerate action to prevent modern slavery, the Government committed to strengthening the reporting requirements contained in section 54 and to introduce financial penalties for organisations that fail to meet their statutory obligation to publish modern slavery statements. These measures require primary legislation and will be introduced when parliamentary time allows.

22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, in the context of the Written Ministerial Statement made on 24 November 2022 by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster entitled Security Update on Surveillance Equipment, HCWS386, what assessment he has made of the potential security implications of the decision by the Defence and Security Accelerator to exhibit at the Safer Streets: Protect and Deter 2023 conference which will be partly funded by Hikvision, a company owned by the Chinese state.

Any events the Defence and Security Accelerator (DASA) attends or exhibits at are carefully planned for and assessed in order to mitigate security risks.

For this particular event, contact has been directly with the organisers of the event (the CCTV User Group) and limited solely to attendance at the event and administration for the stand. DASA has not shared any official documents or technology contacts with the organisers. DASA has robust plans in place to ensure that, at events such as these, no material or information is made available that is not already in the public domain.

Alex Chalk
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
18th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what assessment he has made of the implications for the Hong Kong BNO integration programme of reports that the leadership of the Wai Yin Society is linked to the Chinese Communist Party.

We continually assess potential threats in the UK, and take protection of individuals' rights, freedoms, and safety in the UK very seriously. Any attempt by any foreign power to intimidate, harass or harm individuals or communities in the UK via third parties will not be tolerated. I would be happy to discuss this further with my Rt. Hon. Friend.