Robert Neill Portrait

Robert Neill

Conservative - Former Member for Bromley and Chislehurst

First elected: 29th June 2006

Left House: 30th May 2024 (Dissolution)


Liaison Committee (Commons)
20th May 2020 - 30th May 2024
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
11th May 2020 - 30th May 2024
Justice Committee
29th Jan 2020 - 30th May 2024
Employment Relations (Flexible Working) Bill
30th Nov 2022 - 7th Dec 2022
Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
30th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Justice Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
10th Sep 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Justice Committee
18th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
National Security Strategy (Joint Committee)
30th Nov 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Political and Constitutional Reform Committee
10th Dec 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Vice-Chair, Conservative Party
1st Sep 2012 - 30th Mar 2015
Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (Substitute Member)
15th Jan 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Justice Committee
5th Nov 2012 - 11th Feb 2013
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Communities and Local Government) (Planning)
17th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government)
3rd Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Justice Committee
6th Nov 2007 - 6th May 2010
Deputy Chair, Conservative Party
1st Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Constitutional Affairs
11th Dec 2006 - 5th Nov 2007


Division Voting information

Robert Neill has voted in 3083 divisions, and 60 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 253
19 Jan 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 344 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 353 Noes - 277
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
2 Sep 2020 - Recall of MPs (Change of Party Affiliation) - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Conservative No votes vs 47 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 52
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 240 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 242
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 257 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 261 Noes - 163
20 May 2020 - Liaison (Membership) - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 316 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 323
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
1 Apr 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Conservative Aye votes vs 264 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 277
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 236 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 273 Noes - 276
27 Mar 2019 - Business of the House - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 33 Conservative Aye votes vs 272 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 331 Noes - 287
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 94 Conservative No votes vs 157 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 160 Noes - 400
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 37 Conservative Aye votes vs 225 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 188 Noes - 283
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 200 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 377
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 234 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 264 Noes - 272
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 122 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 139 Noes - 422
25 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 30 Conservative Aye votes vs 281 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 329 Noes - 302
25 Mar 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Conservative Aye votes vs 280 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 300
14 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 112 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 412 Noes - 202
13 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 66 Conservative No votes vs 149 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 164 Noes - 374
9 Jan 2019 - BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE (SECTION 13(1)(b) OF THE EUROPEAN UNION (WITHDRAWAL) ACT 2018) (NO. 2) - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 17 Conservative Aye votes vs 285 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 308 Noes - 297
8 Jan 2019 - Finance (No. 3) Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 20 Conservative Aye votes vs 282 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 296
4 Dec 2018 - Business of the House (European Union (Withdrawal) Act) - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 25 Conservative Aye votes vs 282 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 299
17 Jul 2018 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 289 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 301
17 Jul 2018 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 291 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 307
16 Jul 2018 - Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 302
16 Jul 2018 - Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 300
16 Mar 2018 - Refugees (Family Reunion) (No.2) Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 42 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 129 Noes - 42
31 Jan 2018 - Restoration and Renewal (Report of the Joint Committee) - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 66 Conservative Aye votes vs 164 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 236 Noes - 220
31 Jan 2018 - Restoration and Renewal (Report of the Joint Committee) - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 68 Conservative Aye votes vs 166 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 234 Noes - 185
13 Dec 2017 - European Union (Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 293 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 309 Noes - 305
7 Feb 2017 - European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 312 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 293 Noes - 326
11 Mar 2015 - Ark Pension Schemes - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 122 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 113
24 Nov 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 71 Conservative Aye votes vs 85 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 119 Noes - 193
5 Mar 2014 - Judgments - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 360 Noes - 104
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of Births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative No votes vs 124 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 363 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 84 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 365 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 79 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 368 Noes - 98
10 Feb 2014 - Children and Families Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 99 Conservative No votes vs 127 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 376 Noes - 107
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 75 Conservative Aye votes vs 96 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 267
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 291 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 294 Noes - 242
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 236
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 234
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 293 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 296 Noes - 184
25 Apr 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 276 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 278 Noes - 182
26 Apr 2022 - Judicial Review and Courts Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 294 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 168
26 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 282 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 288 Noes - 212
18 Jan 2023 - Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 286 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 242 Noes - 295
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 286 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 242
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 284 Noes - 242
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 285 Noes - 243
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 273 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 234
13 Sep 2023 - Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 267 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 276 Noes - 210
25 Oct 2023 - Economic Crime and Corporate Transparency Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 267 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 208 Noes - 274
30 Jan 2024 - Media Bill - View Vote Context
Robert Neill voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 277 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 195 Noes - 284
View All Robert Neill Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Robert Buckland (Conservative)
(98 debate interactions)
John Bercow (Speaker)
(62 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(54 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Justice
(522 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(118 debate contributions)
Home Office
(116 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(112 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Robert Neill's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Robert Neill

12th July 2023
Robert Neill signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Wednesday 12th July 2023

Senior Courts

Tabled by: Robert Neill (Conservative - Bromley and Chislehurst)
That the Civil Procedure (Amendment No. 2) Rules 2023 (S.I., 2023, No. 572), dated 22 May 2023, a copy of which was laid before this House on 24 May 2023, be revoked.
2 signatures
(Most recent: 12 Jul 2023)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 1
Conservative: 1
24th October 2022
Robert Neill signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Monday 24th October 2022

World Stroke Day

Tabled by: Robert Neill (Conservative - Bromley and Chislehurst)
That this House recognises World Stroke Day, which takes place on 29 October; understands that over 100,000 strokes happen every year in the UK; is aware of thrombectomy, a game-changing treatment that significantly reduces disability after stroke; notes that emergency response time is crucial to the survival and recovery of …
27 signatures
(Most recent: 9 Jan 2023)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 10
Scottish National Party: 5
Conservative: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Liberal Democrat: 3
Independent: 2
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
View All Robert Neill's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Robert Neill, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Robert Neill has not been granted any Urgent Questions

6 Adjournment Debates led by Robert Neill

Thursday 28th January 2016
Friday 17th January 2014
Tuesday 21st May 2013
Wednesday 30th March 2011
Wednesday 14th July 2010

1 Bill introduced by Robert Neill


A Bill to make provision for the holding of a referendum in the United Kingdom and Gibraltar on the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 17th October 2014

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether provisions in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement allow for (a) a short supplementing agreement or a Joint Declaration and (b) other bilateral agreements.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) imposes reciprocal obligations on the Parties to the Agreement. The TCA also includes some provisions – common in international agreements of this kind – which impose specific obligations on a particular Party.

There is no general non-discrimination provision applicable to all current and future EU Member States in the TCA.

The TCA does not prohibit either the UK or EU from entering into future agreements with each other. Article COMPROV.2 of the TCA includes information on how to treat future UK-EU agreements. The UK and EU Member States are free to make bilateral agreements with each other in principle. However, whether the EU Member States can enter into an agreement with the UK depends on the subject matter and the competence position under EU law.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the provisions agreed in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement are reciprocal and include a binding non-discrimination clause covering all current and future EU member states.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) imposes reciprocal obligations on the Parties to the Agreement. The TCA also includes some provisions – common in international agreements of this kind – which impose specific obligations on a particular Party.

There is no general non-discrimination provision applicable to all current and future EU Member States in the TCA.

The TCA does not prohibit either the UK or EU from entering into future agreements with each other. Article COMPROV.2 of the TCA includes information on how to treat future UK-EU agreements. The UK and EU Member States are free to make bilateral agreements with each other in principle. However, whether the EU Member States can enter into an agreement with the UK depends on the subject matter and the competence position under EU law.

13th Jul 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government is taking to ensure overseas electors receive ballot papers in time to vote in elections.

In the last Parliament, the Government amended legislation to make it easier for overseas electors and Armed Forces personnel to vote by post at elections and referendums in the UK. The electoral timetable was lengthened and the restriction on issuing postal votes ahead of the postal vote application deadline removed.

We continue to keep under review the practical operation of the postal voting process and meet with electoral administrators and their suppliers to identify ways to provide a more effective service, including expediting the delivery of postal votes to overseas electors.

24th Mar 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the success of the One Public Estate Programme in increasing co-ordination across the public sector on the use of public land and buildings; and what plans he has to expand that programme in the next Parliament.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

29th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether he has had recent discussions with Royal Mail on the steps it is taking to tackle delays in delivery to the BR7 postcode area.

It is for Ofcom to set and monitor Royal Mail's service standards with powers to investigate and take enforcement action where there are reasonable grounds for concluding Royal Mail has failed to achieve its obligations.

I am aware that Royal Mail continues to have particular service challenges in some postcode areas. I note that Royal Mail management accepts its performance needs to be much better and has started to address this, for example, by recruiting an additional 3,000 postmen and women so far with a further 500 permanent delivery positions a week going forwards.

Kevin Hollinrake
Shadow Secretary of State for Business and Trade
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions the Government has had EU Member States on cultural exemptions for work permits for musicians and other creative professionals seeking paid work in the EU.

This government recognises the importance of our world leading creative and cultural industries. That is why the UK took an ambitious approach during negotiations that would have ensured that touring musicians, performers and their support staff did not need work-permits to perform in the EU. Regrettably, our proposals were rejected by the EU, but our door remains open if the EU wants to reconsider its position.

A bespoke visa waiver agreement with the EU would require the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) to be renegotiated. The TCA is the basis of our trading relations with the EU, and this is not going to be renegotiated.

The Commission would be likely to argue that any EU-wide visa waiver agreement can only be part of a wider package with a binding non-discrimination clause and a reciprocal visa waiver agreement covering all current and future Member States. This was what the Commission proposed in the negotiations and would be incompatible with our manifesto commitment to retain control of our borders.

It should also be noted that while the EU has visa-waiver deals with some other third countries, this does not bind Member States and many continue to apply visas on paid activity, while some Member States offer the same waiver regime to those with whom they don’t have deals.

However, we will imminently be engaging with Member States to improve their guidance around their entry and work requirements. DCMS is working closely with the FCDO and other government departments on an engagement strategy with EU Member States, and DCMS Ministers will speak to our Heads of Missions in EU countries shortly. Should Member States be willing to change their rules to match the UK’s significantly more generous arrangements for touring professionals, then we will have those discussions and encourage them to do so.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with cabinet colleagues on the potential merits of negotiating a bespoke visa waiver agreement with the EU exempting touring musicians, performers, creative teams and crews from needing to obtain a visa when seeking paid work.

This government recognises the importance of our world leading creative and cultural industries. That is why the UK took an ambitious approach during negotiations that would have ensured that touring musicians, performers and their support staff did not need work-permits to perform in the EU. Regrettably, our proposals were rejected by the EU, but our door remains open if the EU wants to reconsider its position.

A bespoke visa waiver agreement with the EU would require the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) to be renegotiated. The TCA is the basis of our trading relations with the EU, and this is not going to be renegotiated.

The Commission would be likely to argue that any EU-wide visa waiver agreement can only be part of a wider package with a binding non-discrimination clause and a reciprocal visa waiver agreement covering all current and future Member States. This was what the Commission proposed in the negotiations and would be incompatible with our manifesto commitment to retain control of our borders.

It should also be noted that while the EU has visa-waiver deals with some other third countries, this does not bind Member States and many continue to apply visas on paid activity, while some Member States offer the same waiver regime to those with whom they don’t have deals.

However, we will imminently be engaging with Member States to improve their guidance around their entry and work requirements. DCMS is working closely with the FCDO and other government departments on an engagement strategy with EU Member States, and DCMS Ministers will speak to our Heads of Missions in EU countries shortly. Should Member States be willing to change their rules to match the UK’s significantly more generous arrangements for touring professionals, then we will have those discussions and encourage them to do so.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Government will provide an emergency funding package for the performing arts sector to mitigate the costs associated with touring in Europe and new visa and work permits rules.

The Government recognises the world-leading position of the UK performing arts sector and the rich breadth of artistic talent across the UK.

Leaving the EU has always meant that there would be changes to how creative professionals operate in the EU. UK performing artists are still able to tour and perform in the EU. However, we understand the concerns about the new arrangements and we are committed to supporting the sectors as they get to grips with the changes to systems and processes.

We are now working urgently across government and in collaboration with the performing arts and wider creative industries, including through the DCMS-led working group, on plans to support the creative sectors tour in Europe. This includes producing new guidance to help artists understand what's required in different countries, and looking carefully at proposals for a new Export Office that could provide further practical help.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress his Department has made on producing guidance for the performing arts sector on the visa and work permit requirements for each EU Member State.

While UK performing artists are still able to tour and perform in the EU, being outside the European Union means practical changes on both sides of the Channel that will require understanding and adaptation. We recognise this, and that is why we are working urgently across government to ensure guidance is clear, up to date and accessible for the performing arts sector travelling to the EU.

To date, we have published guidance on GOV.UK, signposting to official information provided by EU countries about their business travel routes. We will continue to enhance guidance for businesses to support travel for work purposes under our new trading relationship with the European Union, and we will publish business traveller summaries for each Member State in April. We are also developing sector specific “landing pages” for GOV.UK.

We will imminently be engaging with EU Member States to improve their guidance, specifically around their entry and work permit requirements, to ensure this is as clear and accessible as possible. Where there are issues around the clarity of Member States’ immigration rules, we will also raise these with the European Commission.

And through the DCMS-led Working Group, we are working closely with sector bodies - several of whom have already produced excellent guidance in this area - to help distil and clarify the new rules further.

13th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has plans to work with the Mayor of London to create a chief digital officer to oversee and champion the Capital's broadband needs.

We work closely with all devolved authorities on their Broadband needs. The appointment of a chief digital officer for London is a matter for the new Mayor of London.

7th Sep 2020
What steps his Department is taking to support the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people as they return to school as covid-19 restrictions are eased.

Getting children and young people back into education, with settings devoting time to supporting wellbeing, will play a fundamental part in supporting children and young people’s mental health. The return to school will allow social interaction with peers, carers and teachers, which benefits wellbeing. The department has now published detailed plans?for all children and young people to return to full-time education from September. The guidance for schools is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

We have been working hard to ensure that all pupils and learners will return to a full high-quality education programme in September. Our £1 billion Covid catch-up package, with £650 million shared across schools over the 2020-21 academic year, will support education settings to put the right catch-up and pastoral support in place. More information is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/billion-pound-covid-catch-up-plan-to-tackle-impact-of-lost-teaching-time.

As pupils return to school, staff need to be equipped to understand that some children and young people may be experiencing feelings in such as anxiety, stress or low mood as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, and that these are normal responses to an abnormal situation. Our Mental Health and Behaviour in Schools Advice includes information about what to look for in terms of underlying mental health issues, linked to the graduated response and the support that might be suitable. More information is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mental-health-and-behaviour-in-schools--2.

From September, the Government is investing £8 million to launch the new Wellbeing for Education Return training programme, which will provide schools and colleges all over England with the knowledge and practical skills they need to support teachers, students and parents, to help improve how they respond to the emotional impact of the coronavirus pandemic. This is additional to?longer term work to improve support, including?the?new?mental health support teams that we are rolling out?across the country,?linked to schools and colleges. More information is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/8m-programme-to-boost-pupil-and-teacher-wellbeing.

The department in collaboration with Public Health England and NHS England, delivered two webinars in July to provide further mental health support. The first webinar was for schools and colleges?to support?teachers in?promoting?and supporting?the?mental wellbeing?of children and young people?during the COVID-19 outbreak.?The second event was for?stakeholders?across the local system?to?support?strengthening of local partnerships?to?further?support?children and young people’s mental health as they return to school. We had around 10,000 sign up to the first webinar and around 1,300 to the second, and they are now available online for wider use.

We continue to working in partnership across education, health, the voluntary sector and local authorities to ensure that children and young people, parents and carers, and the professionals supporting them:

  • can access good-quality resources
  • are confident in supporting children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing (as well as their own) and
  • ensure access to specialist services when they’re needed.

Access to mental health support is more important than ever during the COVID-19 outbreak. NHS mental services remain open. All NHS mental health trusts are providing 24/7 open access telephone lines to support people of all ages. The Government has also provided over £9 million to mental health charities to ensure they can continue to support people experiencing mental health challenges throughout the outbreak.

17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to make it easier for people in receipt of benefits to train as HGV drivers.

The Government has taken 32 specific measures to deal with the shortage of HGV drivers. These include the Large Goods Vehicle Driver apprenticeship standard with a funding band of £7,000 and the Urban Driver apprenticeship with a funding band of £5,000. The Government has also extended its £3,000 incentive payment for every apprentice a business hires to 31 January 2022.

The Department for Education is investing £34 million in skills bootcamps to train just over 11,000 more people to become HGV drivers. An additional 1,000 people are expected to be trained through the Government’s adult education budget.

The Department for Work and Pensions and Jobcentre Plus are supporting an HGV driver training pilot scheme. Jobcentre Plus is also able to make Flexible Support Fund grants available to those who are unemployed or are in receipt of Universal Credit. It can be used to help those that hold an HGV licence but need to renew their Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC).

6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the adequacy of the availability of call handlers at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

Throughout the pandemic the DVLA’s contact centre has actively managed its operation and flexed the services for customers in line with the available resources. This has included procuring the use of an additional building to increase the number of staff able to take calls within the social distancing guidelines. Remote working has been increased with staff handling email, webchat, social media and more recently telephone customer contacts.

6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to reduce licensing backlogs at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

The quickest and easiest way to make an application to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is by using its extensive suite of online services. There are no delays in successful online applications and customers should receive their documents within a few days.

However, many people still choose or have to make a paper application. The DVLA receives around 60,000 items of mail every day and industrial action by members of the Public and Commercial Services union has led to delays for customers. Throughout the pandemic DVLA has also been working with a significantly reduced number of staff on site to ensure social distancing in line with Welsh Government requirements. The current increased demand for the DVLA’s services has also contributed to delays with paper applications.

Paper driving licence applications are currently taking between six and ten weeks to process. There may be additional delays in processing more complex transactions, for example if medical investigations are needed. The latest information on turnaround times for paper driving licence applications can be found here.

The DVLA continues to explore opportunities to reduce turnaround times and has introduced new online services and recruited additional staff. The DVLA is exploring the possibility of securing extra office space to accommodate more staff to work predominantly on drivers’ medical casework and queries. This will be surge capacity accommodation and resource to help reduce backlogs while providing future resilience and business continuity.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will reinstate emergency driving tests for critical workers.

To help stop the spread of coronavirus, routine driving tests have been suspended in all areas of England, Scotland and Wales.

In England and Wales, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) will respond to requests for driving tests from organisations on behalf of frontline mobile emergency workers, who require a driving licence to carry out duties in their employment role. This service is restricted to candidates working in health and social care, and public bodies providing a service in the national interest. The DVSA will contact eligible organisations.

Approved driving instructors and trainers can return to work only for the purpose of supporting a mobile emergency worker with a booked test.

7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to reduce delays for new licence applications and renewals at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) has a range of services available online offering quick and easy ways of transacting. The DVLA’s online services have worked well and as normal throughout the pandemic. Over 36 million online driver and vehicle transactions have been processed since March with nearly two million driving licences issued.

The DVLA’s 6,000 staff are largely based at a single site in Swansea and to adhere to Welsh social distancing requirements the number of staff onsite has been greatly reduced. This has impacted on the time taken to process applications sent by post as these have to be dealt with in person.

The DVLA has reconfigured its accommodation to maximise staff numbers whilst meeting the requirement in Wales to maintain the two-metre social distancing and ensure it remains Covid secure.

Additionally, drivers with a licence that expires between 1 February and 31 December 2020 have been given an automatic extension from the date of expiry. This means they will not need to renew their entitlement to drive until 11 months after the original expiry date.

The DVLA has also accelerated the development of additional online services to further reduce paper applications and supported their take up through a publicity campaign.

3rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to extend the two-year period in which the driving theory test is valid in response to the effect of covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

The two-year validity period of the theory driving test certificate is set in legislation. The Government has no plans to lay further legislation to extend it.

19th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to extend the ultra-low emission but scheme to coach operators.

At present there are no plans to extend the ultra-low emission bus scheme to coach operators. However, the Clean Air Fund is available for those local authorities with a significant NO2 exceedance. Measures which the fund could support include retrofitting solutions for coaches to help operators reduce their emissions.

19th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made an assessment of the extent to which coach travel contributes to improvements in air quality; and if he will make a statement.

Coaches can reduce congestion and associated emissions. Local Authorities with a significant NO2 exceedance have conducted feasibility studies assessing the impact of road transport on local emissions, including from coaches. The £220m Clean Air Fund is available for these local authorities to help improve air quality, including measures such as coach retrofitting to reduce emissions. Furthermore, the Government has funded the Low Carbon Vehicle Partnership’s Clean Vehicle Retrofit Accreditation Scheme, which has been extended to support retrofit solutions for coaches.

19th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, in which local authority areas in (a) London and (b) England outside London the number of bus journeys per head of population has increased since 2011.

According to the Department’s annual survey of local bus operators the following local authority areas saw an increase in passenger journeys on local bus service per head between 2011/12 and 2016/17:

  • Bath and North East Somerset
  • Brighton and Hove
  • Bristol, City of
  • Halton
  • Hertfordshire
  • Isle of Wight
  • Luton
  • Milton Keynes
  • North Somerset
  • Oxfordshire
  • Poole
  • Reading
  • South Gloucestershire
  • Southampton
  • Thurrock
  • West Berkshire
  • Wokingham

The Department does not hold data on passenger journeys per head in individual London authorities. However, overall passenger journeys per head on local bus services in London fell from 283 in 2011/12 to 255 in 2016/17.

Mid-year population estimates from the Office for National Statistics are used to calculate the per head figures but this does not account for bus passengers using the bus outside the local authority in which they reside.

19th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, on how many buses free Wi-Fi is available (a) in London and (b) elsewhere in England.

According to the Department’s annual survey of local bus operators there were approximately 10,200 buses used on local bus services in London as at 31 March 2017, of which 3 per cent had free Wi-Fi. No buses on routes run under contract to TfL have free Wi-Fi. However, some buses on non-TfL bus routes in London do have free Wi-Fi.

In England outside London there were approximately 24,700 buses used on local bus services as at 31 March 2017, of which 34 per cent had free Wi-Fi.

19th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the importance of the Bus Service Operators Grant on the stability of local bus services.

No specific assessment has been made regarding Bus Service Operators Grant (BSOG) and the stability of bus services. But departmental assessments of the £250m of BSOG (in England outside London) suggest that it helps to keep fares lower by 3%, service levels 6.7% higher, and patronage 4.4% higher.

29th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how his Department plans to meet growth in aviation passenger demand before the completion of a new runway in the South East.

Whilst Heathrow is operating at capacity today, the Airports Commission recognised that there is still spare capacity in the South East. The Government will be progressing work on a new Aviation Strategy which will consider how we can make best use of existing capacity.

15th May 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will hold discussions with the Association of Optometrists on the adequacy of funding for the special schools' eye care service.

NHS England has committed to invest up to £12.7 million annually on the provision of sight tests and associated optical vouchers in special educational settings. This represents an approximate 87% increase compared to the current budget. This additional investment has the potential to increase coverage from 4% of special educational settings to 100%. NHS England has already engaged with the Optical Fees Negotiating Committee, which includes the Association of Optometrists.

15th May 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that the special schools eye care service has adequate funding to enable the long-term commissioning of those services.

NHS England has committed to invest up to £12.7 million annually on the provision of sight tests and associated optical vouchers in special educational settings. This represents an approximate 87% increase compared to the current budget. This additional investment has the potential to increase coverage from 4% of special educational settings to 100%. NHS England has already engaged with the Optical Fees Negotiating Committee, which includes the Association of Optometrists.

15th May 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if she will hold discussions with the Association of Optometrists on the adequacy of funding for the special schools eye care service.

NHS England has committed to invest up to £12.7 million annually on the provision of sight tests and associated optical vouchers in special educational settings. This represents an approximate 87% increase compared to the current budget. This additional investment has the potential to increase coverage from 4% of special educational settings to 100%. NHS England has already engaged with the Optical Fees Negotiating Committee, which includes the Association of Optometrists.

3rd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken with Cabinet colleagues to ensure that the NHS Workforce Plan contains a detailed analysis of the long-term funding allocations required to develop a healthcare workforce capable of delivering recommended levels of care into the future.

The Government has and will continue to prioritise investment into the National Health Service. We worked closely with NHS leadership to agree £3.3 billion per year of new funding for the NHS in England at the autumn statement. This is on top of the historic funding settlement that the NHS received at the last spending review.

The work of the Long Term Workforce Plan will be used to inform future Government work on how to best meet the needs of patients and the NHS workforce. Funding plans will be subject to business and financial planning and investment decisions once the work has been completed. Funding plans beyond the current Spending Review period will be subject to the outcome of future Spending Reviews.

13th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the merger of Health Education England and NHS England will not impact the implementation of the NHS long-term workforce plan.

The NHS Long Term Workforce Plan has been developed jointly by NHS England and Health Education England (HEE), reflecting their close working relationship irrespective of the merger. The merger builds on cooperation and joint working between HEE and NHS England and will help ensure that the merged organisation performs its functions as effectively as possible, including on the implementation of the Long-Term Workforce Plan.

The Department will continue to monitor and track the performance of the new NHS England through the NHS England mandate.

13th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the actions required to ensure that the NHS long-term workforce plan can be implemented efficiently with regards to establishing (a) governance structures and (b) accountability checks.

The Government has committed to publishing the long term workforce plan this year. Further information on governance arrangements will be set out in due course.

13th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the terms of reference are for the joint NHS and Health Education England diagnostic workforce board; whether there is an imaging subgroup of the board; what role the diagnostic workforce board has had in shaping the NHS long-term workforce plan; and what role the board will have in the implementation of the NHS long-term workforce plan.

A copy of the Terms of Reference for the joint NHS England and Health Education England Diagnostic Workforce Board is attached. There is an imaging workforce sub-group of this board.

Individual members of the Diagnostic Workforce Board have had an opportunity to feed into the development of the Long Term Workforce Plan for the National Health Service at appropriate stages and in the capacity of their roles. In line with the Terms of Reference, the board will have a role in supporting implementation of the workforce plan.

7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the NHS plan entitled Delivery plan for recovering urgent and emergency care services published on 30 January 2023, if he will hold discussions with the Community Rehabilitation Alliance on (a) expanding and (d) developing the rehabilitation workforce.

Our ministers are planning to have a discussion with the Community Rehabilitation Alliance to discuss the rehabilitation workforce soon.

7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he plans to take to improve access to stroke rehabilitation after discharge from hospital when discharge funding for step down care ends on 31st March 2023.

NHS England have invested in the Stroke Quality Improvement in Rehabilitation (Squire) programme. Regional Squire managers in collaboration with integrated stroke delivery networks and newly formed integrated care boards are working to improve access to community-based stroke rehabilitation

The Government is making available up to £1.6 billion of additional funding to reduce delayed discharges in 2023/24 and 2024/25. This is on top of the £500 million Adult Social Care Discharge Fund already announced for 2022/23. NHS England recommends that stroke survivors access specialist community-based stroke rehabilitation services, which facilitate transfer of care from hospital to home and provide specialist rehabilitation in their home or place of residence.

Helen Whately
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
7th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to the letter of 9 December 2022 from 33 health and care organisations on the rehabilitation workforce and the NHS long-term workforce plan.

My Rt Hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care received the letter of 9 December 2022 and will respond in due course.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many eye care professionals are delivering the NHS Special School Eye Care Service under Primary Ophthalmic Service contracts.

As of November 2022, there are 40 optometrists and 33 dispensing opticians contributing to the delivery of the NHS Special Schools Eye Care Service, under Primary Ophthalmic Services contracts. However, the number providing the service in schools will vary from month to month.

The Department regularly discusses eyecare services with NHS England, which has commissioned an independent evaluation of the special schools' proof-of-concept pilot programme to inform future National Health Service commissioning decisions. The Department will discuss future plans for the service with NHS England once the evaluation has concluded early in 2023.

21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions his Department has had with NHS England on its plans for the NHS Special Schools Eye Care Service.

As of November 2022, there are 40 optometrists and 33 dispensing opticians contributing to the delivery of the NHS Special Schools Eye Care Service, under Primary Ophthalmic Services contracts. However, the number providing the service in schools will vary from month to month.

The Department regularly discusses eyecare services with NHS England, which has commissioned an independent evaluation of the special schools' proof-of-concept pilot programme to inform future National Health Service commissioning decisions. The Department will discuss future plans for the service with NHS England once the evaluation has concluded early in 2023.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Royal College of Radiologists’ Clinical radiology census report 2021, what assessment he has made of the conclusion that 55 per cent of clinical directors reported that they do not have enough interventional radiologists to deliver safe and effective patient care.

No specific assessment has been made. Individual employers are responsible for ensuring the appropriate staff are available and trained to undertake their duties. There has been an increase of 63% in entry points in clinical radiology specialty training places from 2016 to 2021. In addition, through the Spending Review there has been an increase in funding for ST6 year for interventional radiologists for 20 places in 2021/22 and 2022/23.

As of July 2022, there were 5,040 full-time equivalent (FTE) doctors working in the National Health Service in England in the sub-specialism of clinical radiology. This is an increase of 5.7% since July 2021 and 55.4% since July 2010 and includes doctors in training grades, specialists and doctors on other contracts. The consultant clinical radiologist workforce has increased by 4.3% since July 2021 and 53.7% since July 2010. Health Education England is implementing the priorities identified in the cancer workforce plan phase 1 and is investing an additional £50 million in 2022/23 to expand the cancer and diagnostics workforce, including postgraduate medical training of cancer-related medical professions, such as interventional radiologists.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the 28 per cent shortfall of interventional radiology consultants as identified in the Royal College of Radiologists’ clinical radiology workforce census 2021.

No specific assessment has been made. Individual employers are responsible for ensuring the appropriate staff are available and trained to undertake their duties. There has been an increase of 63% in entry points in clinical radiology specialty training places from 2016 to 2021. In addition, through the Spending Review there has been an increase in funding for ST6 year for interventional radiologists for 20 places in 2021/22 and 2022/23.

As of July 2022, there were 5,040 full-time equivalent (FTE) doctors working in the National Health Service in England in the sub-specialism of clinical radiology. This is an increase of 5.7% since July 2021 and 55.4% since July 2010 and includes doctors in training grades, specialists and doctors on other contracts. The consultant clinical radiologist workforce has increased by 4.3% since July 2021 and 53.7% since July 2010. Health Education England is implementing the priorities identified in the cancer workforce plan phase 1 and is investing an additional £50 million in 2022/23 to expand the cancer and diagnostics workforce, including postgraduate medical training of cancer-related medical professions, such as interventional radiologists.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of interventional radiology services and thrombectomy services in trusts and health boards in 2021.

Individual National Health Service employers are responsible for ensuring the appropriate staff are trained and competent to undertake mechanical thrombectomy. A credential for mechanical thrombectomy has now been agreed with the General Medical Council to allow interventional radiologists, cardiologists, neurosurgeons and stroke physicians to be trained to deliver medical treatment for stroke.

From 2016 to 2021 there has been a 63% increase in entry points in clinical radiology specialty training places. As of July 2022, there were 5,040 full-time equivalent (FTE) doctors working in the NHS in England in the sub-specialism of clinical radiology, an increase of 5.7% since July 2021 and 55.4% since July 2010. This includes doctors in training grades, specialists and doctors on other contracts. The consultant clinical radiologist workforce has also increased by 4.3% since July 2021 and 53.7% since July 2010.

Helen Whately
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Answer of 20 December 2021 to Question 89536 on Mechanical Thrombectomy, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of the number of whole time equivalent interventional neuroradiologists identified as practising in England in the Royal College of Radiologists Clinical radiology census report 2021.

Individual National Health Service employers are responsible for ensuring the appropriate staff are trained and competent to undertake mechanical thrombectomy. A credential for mechanical thrombectomy has now been agreed with the General Medical Council to allow interventional radiologists, cardiologists, neurosurgeons and stroke physicians to be trained to deliver medical treatment for stroke.

From 2016 to 2021 there has been a 63% increase in entry points in clinical radiology specialty training places. As of July 2022, there were 5,040 full-time equivalent (FTE) doctors working in the NHS in England in the sub-specialism of clinical radiology, an increase of 5.7% since July 2021 and 55.4% since July 2010. This includes doctors in training grades, specialists and doctors on other contracts. The consultant clinical radiologist workforce has also increased by 4.3% since July 2021 and 53.7% since July 2010.

Helen Whately
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether (a) his Department and (b) NHS England have held recent discussions with (i) neuroradiologists and (ii) other professionals involved in thrombectomy services on the development of a stoke workforce plan.

A credential for mechanical thrombectomy has now been agreed with the General Medical Council to allow interventional radiologists, cardiologists, neurosurgeons and stroke physicians to be trained to deliver medical treatment for stroke. From 2016 to 2021 there has been a 63% increase in entry points in clinical radiology specialty training places.

Helen Whately
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to invest in the interventional neuroradiology workforce to help the treatment medical conditions such as stroke.

A credential for mechanical thrombectomy has now been agreed with the General Medical Council to allow interventional radiologists, cardiologists, neurosurgeons and stroke physicians to be trained to deliver medical treatment for stroke. From 2016 to 2021 there has been a 63% increase in entry points in clinical radiology specialty training places.

Helen Whately
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the NHS Long Term Plan, what recent progress his Department has made towards (a) the target for 10 per cent of stroke patients to receive a mechanical thrombectomy and (b) other targets within that plan for stroke care.

Thrombectomy is available in 24 centres in England and two non-neuroscience centres are currently under development. The latest available data shows that 3.1% of patients are receiving a thrombectomy following a stroke. The Sentinel Stroke National Audit Programme reported that between April 2021 and March 2022, 75% of patients spent at least 90% of their hospital stay on a specialist stroke unit.

Helen Whately
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact of average ambulance response times in 2022 on (a) stroke survival rates, (b) rates of permanent disability following a stroke and (c) timely access to mechanical thrombectomy for stroke patients.

Category 2 calls are ‘emergency’ calls, including serious time-sensitive incidents such as strokes and heart attacks.

There is evidence that mechanical thrombectomy performed within six hours of the onset of symptoms can reduce brain damage and prevent or limit long-term disability. NHS England has allocated an additional £150 million for ambulance services in 2022/23, supporting improvements to response times through additional call handler recruitment, retention and other funding requirements.

NHS England is implementing video triage in ambulances for stroke patients. This provides a video consultation from home or in an ambulance with a hospital-based stroke clinician to advise paramedics on the appropriate action for the patient, such as thrombectomy or the relevant hospital for treatment.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure hospitals offer 24/7 access to interventional radiology services.

In England, 34 National Health Service acute trusts currently provide 24 hours a day, seven days a week access to interventional radiology (IR) services. Where necessary, patients are diverted to trusts which deliver these services. National IR services are supported by an imaging network, which will develop alongside services as provision increases.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Answer of 20 December 2021 to Question 89536 on Mechanical Thrombectomy, how many of the 150 whole time equivalent interventional neuroradiologists required to deliver resilient and sustainable thrombectomy services have been recruited since 20 December 2021.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Helen Whately
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much capital investment funding has been allocated to expanding mechanical thrombectomy services in each of the last 5 years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Helen Whately
Shadow Secretary of State for Transport
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason there is no policy lead for stroke within his Department; and if he will appoint that role.

The Department's NHS Quality, Safety and Investigations Directorate is responsible for the oversight of policy related to strokes.