Peter Bottomley

Conservative - Worthing West

14,823 (27.1%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 26th June 1975


32 APPG memberships (as of 13 May 2024)
12 Step Recovery, Afrikan Reparations, Ageing and Older People, Austria, Carbon Monoxide, Citizens' Rights, Closing the Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility, Dark Skies, Democracy and Human Rights in the Gulf, Dentistry and Oral Health, Ethnic Minority Business Owners, Extraordinary Rendition, Frozen British Pensions, Haemophilia and Contaminated Blood, Haiti, Immigration Detention, Leasehold and Commonhold Reform, Limits to Growth, Public Accountability, Race and Community, Sexual and Reproductive Health in the UK, Single Parent Families, Small and Micro Business, Social Integration, Social Science and Policy, South Africa, Transport Safety, United Nations, Western Sahara, Wine and Spirits, Women in Transport, Zimbabwe
134 Former APPG memberships
Adult Education, Archaeology, Artificial Intelligence, Arts and Heritage, Bahrain, BBC, Bees and Pollinators, Best Brexit, Betting Terminals, Black Maternal Health, Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Business Owners, British Muslims, British Overseas Territories, Burma, Charity Retail, Children in Police Custody, Citizens Rights, Commonwealth, Community Development, Community Development in Europe, Croatia, Cycling and Walking, Dalits, Disability, Domestic Violence, Domestic Violence and Abuse, Equitable Life, Equitable Life Policyholders, Ethnicity Transplantation and Transfusion, European Citizenship Rights, Explosive Threats, Fatherhood, Film and Broader Screen, Fire Safety and Rescue, Fixed Odds Betting Terminals, Flags and Heraldry, Formula One, Foster Care Work, Freedom of Movement, Future of Transport, Gambling Related Harm, Gasworks Redevelopment, Global Security and Non-Proliferation, Governance and Inclusive Leadership, Guantanamo Bay, Gypsies, Travellers and Roma, Hate Crime, Health, Hillsborough Disaster, Holocaust Memorial, Hospice and End of Life Care, Housing and Planning, Insurance and Financial Services, Inter-Faith, Interfaith, Internet, Communications and Technology, Ireland and the Irish in Britain, Irish in Britain, Korea, Kosovo, Leasehold Reform, Lipoedema, Listed Properties, Liver Health, London's Planning and Built Environment, Longevity, Manufacturing, Maternity, Mayflower 400, Mayflower Pilgrims, Media, Media Freedom, Metaverse and Web 3.0, Miscarriages of Justice, Music, Muslim Women, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), National Parks, National Trust, Night Time Economy, No Recourse to Public Funds, Olympic and Paralympic Games, Opera, Oracy, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Overseas Territories, Park Homes, Patient and Public Involvement in Health and Social Care, Performing Arts Education and Training, Period Equality, Photography, Plastic Waste, Queen’s Platinum Jubilee 2022, Race Equality in Education, Refugees, Religion in the Media, Religious Education, Republic of Korea, Retail Crime, Reuniting Britain Post-Brexit, Road Freight and Logistics, Rowing, Runaway and Missing Children and Adults, Scientific, Scotch Whisky, Sex Equality, Sexual and Reproductive Health, Social Enterprise, Social Work, South East, St George's Day, Statistics, Sustainable Finance, Tibet, Twelve Steps Recovery Programme from Addiction, UK Islands, Ukraine, United Nations Women, Vascular and Venous Disease, Vascular Disease, Venezuela, Veterans, Votes at 16, Water, Sanitation and Hygiene, Wellbeing Economics, Western Rail Link to Heathrow, White Ribbon UK, Wine and Spirit Group, Wine of Great Britain, Women and Work, Women in the Penal System, Yoga in Society, Youth Affairs, Youth Hostelling
Co-operatives, Mutuals and Friendly Societies Bill
23rd Nov 2022 - 30th Nov 2022
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
31st Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
28th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
High Speed Rail (London - West Midlands) Bill (Commons)
29th Apr 2014 - 22nd Feb 2016
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
26th Oct 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Draft Defamation Bill (Joint Committee)
24th Mar 2011 - 12th Oct 2011
Unopposed Bills (Panel)
17th Oct 2001 - 6th May 2010
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
6th Jul 2005 - 8th Apr 2010
Constitutional Affairs
28th Jan 2003 - 12th Jul 2005
Ecclesiastical Committee (Joint Committee)
31st Jan 2002 - 5th May 2005
Standards and Privileges
25th Jun 1997 - 4th Mar 2002
Transport Committee
27th Apr 1992 - 21st Mar 1997
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
4th Jul 1989 - 28th Jul 1990
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Jan 1986 - 24th Jul 1989
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Employment)
11th Sep 1984 - 23rd Jan 1986
Overseas Development
1st Nov 1978 - 4th Apr 1979
Violence in the Family
8th Mar 1976 - 25th May 1977


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Peter Bottomley has voted in 756 divisions, and 31 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 253
30 Sep 2020 - Town and Country Planning - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 325 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 208 Noes - 329
26 Apr 2021 - Financial Services Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 355 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 355 Noes - 271
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
20 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative No votes vs 265 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 204
3 Nov 2021 - Committee on Standards - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative No votes vs 242 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 248 Noes - 221
3 Dec 2021 - Copyright (Rights and Remuneration of Musicians, etc.) Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 59 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 28 Noes - 59
7 Feb 2022 - Social Security and Pensions - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 297 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 29
30 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 72 Conservative Aye votes vs 175 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 188
20 Apr 2022 - Building Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 305 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 316 Noes - 188
20 Apr 2022 - Building Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 189
20 Apr 2022 - Building Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 310 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 317 Noes - 190
20 Apr 2022 - Building Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 311 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 188
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 291 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 294 Noes - 242
20 Apr 2022 - Nationality and Borders Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 301 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 235
12 Dec 2022 - Standards: Code of Conduct and Guide to the Rules - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 235 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 135 Noes - 241
28 Jun 2023 - Holocaust Memorial Bill: Committal - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 238 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 11 Noes - 379
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 286 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 242
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 284 Noes - 242
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 285 Noes - 243
11 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 273 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 234
17 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 289 Noes - 220
17 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 227
17 Jul 2023 - Illegal Migration Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 280 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 284 Noes - 226
17 Oct 2023 - Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 292 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 197
17 Oct 2023 - Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 292 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 157
4 Dec 2023 - Victims and Prisoners Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 22 Conservative Aye votes vs 238 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 246 Noes - 242
27 Feb 2024 - Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 293 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 179 Noes - 294
27 Feb 2024 - Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 297 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 14 Noes - 304
22 May 2024 - Holocaust Memorial Bill - View Vote Context
Peter Bottomley voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 179 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 11 Noes - 182
View All Peter Bottomley Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(80 debate interactions)
Rosie Winterton (Labour)
(30 debate interactions)
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(25 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(81 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(42 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Holocaust Memorial Bill 2022-23
(8,347 words contributed)
Building Safety Act 2022
(3,134 words contributed)
Leasehold and Freehold Reform Act 2024
(2,487 words contributed)
Media Act 2024
(1,256 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Peter Bottomley's debates

Worthing West Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the government to take action and create a Visa scheme that allows Palestinian individuals affected by war, to be allowed into the UK. Just like we did for Ukraine.

This petition calls for the Government to allocate Parliamentary time for assisted dying to be fully debated in the House of Commons and to give MPs a vote on the issue. Terminally ill people who are mentally sound and near the end of their lives should not suffer unbearably against their will.

The Government must exercise its power under s.23 of the Gender Recognition Act to modify the operation of the Equality Act 2010 by specifying the terms sex, male, female, man & woman, in the operation of that law, mean biological sex and not "sex as modified by a Gender Recognition Certificate"

It has been reported that the Government may amend the Equality Act to "make it clear that sex means biological sex rather than gender." The Government has previously committed to not remove legal protections for trans people, an already marginalised group, but this change would do so.

Make it illegal for retailers and services to decline cash payments.

All businesses (excepting internet-based ones) and public services in which monetary transactions take place should be required by law to accept cash as a method of payment

The Government should create an emergency fund to deal with the massive waiting lists for autism & ADHD assessments for children AND adults. This would provide resources for local health services deal with current waiting lists and new patients.

The Government should commission a review of how Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) assessments are managed by the NHS, including through Shared Care Agreements, and increase funding to reduce waiting times.

The Government should bring forward legislation to allow assisted dying for adults who are terminally ill and have mental capacity. It should be permitted subject to strict upfront safeguards, assessed by two doctors independently, and self-administered by the dying person.

Ensure any ban fully includes trans people and all forms of conversion therapy.


Latest EDMs signed by Peter Bottomley

21st May 2024
Peter Bottomley signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Monday 20th May 2024

Promoter’s Response to the First Special Report of the Holocaust Memorial Bill Select Committee

Tabled by: Peter Bottomley (Conservative - Worthing West)
That this House notes the Promoter’s Response to the Select Committee’s First Special Report of Session 2023-24, CP 1086; regrets that the promoter has failed to understand the justified requests for a detailed comparison of the present unsatisfactory scheme with the alternatives studied by the Government’s consultants; further regrets the …
1 signatures
(Most recent: 20 May 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 1
16th May 2024
Peter Bottomley signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Thursday 16th May 2024

The Venerable Tricia Hillas

Tabled by: Peter Bottomley (Conservative - Worthing West)
That this House congratulates the Venerable Tricia Hillas who has been nominated to serve as the next Bishop of Sodor and Man; and thanks her for being Canon Steward and Archdeacon of Westminster since 2021 and for serving as Chaplain to the Speaker of the House of Commons since 2020 …
2 signatures
(Most recent: 23 May 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 1
View All Peter Bottomley's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Peter Bottomley, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Peter Bottomley

Peter Bottomley has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Peter Bottomley


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require certain authorities to maintain a register of the destination of recycled materials; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 30th November 2010

18 Bills co-sponsored by Peter Bottomley

Same Sex Marriage (Church of England) Bill 2022-23
Sponsor - Ben Bradshaw (Lab)

Electricity Supply (Vulnerable Customers) Bill 2022-23
Sponsor - Sam Tarry (Lab)

Cladding Remediation Works (Code of Practice) Bill 2022-23
Sponsor - Tom Hunt (Con)

Vehicle Registration Offences (Penalty Points) Bill 2019-21
Sponsor - Andrew Griffith (Con)

Tibet (Reciprocal Access) Bill 2019-21
Sponsor - Tim Loughton (Con)

Tibet (Reciprocal Access) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Tim Loughton (Con)

Gambling (Industry Levy Review and Protections for Vulnerable People) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Richard Graham (Con)

Sky Lanterns (Prohibition) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Ruth George (Lab)

Election Expenses (Authorisation of Free or Discounted Support) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Craig Mackinlay (Con)

Multi-employer Pension Schemes Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Alan Brown (SNP)

Bus Drivers (Working Hours on Local Routes) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Matt Western (Lab)

Freehold Properties (Management Charges and Shared Facilities) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Helen Goodman (Lab)

Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement and Education) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Jim McMahon (LAB)

Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Peter Kyle (Lab)

Leasehold Reform Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Justin Madders (Lab)

Public Authority (Accountability) Bill 2016-17
Sponsor - Andy Burnham (Lab)

Rail Ombudsman Bill 2016-17
Sponsor - Tim Loughton (Con)

Diplomatic Service (United Kingdom Wines and Sparkling Wines) Bill 2016-17
Sponsor - None ()


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
13th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether gender identity is a protected characteristic and what training material on the Civil Service learning platform for civil servants states that the precise definition of discrimination in the Equality Act 2010 includes gender identity.

The relevant protected characteristic in the Equality Act 2010 is ‘gender reassignment’. The Equality and Human Rights Commission website explains that: “To be protected from gender reassignment discrimination, you do not need to have undergone any specific treatment or surgery to change from your birth sex to your preferred gender. This is because changing your physiological or other gender attributes is a personal process rather than a medical one. You can be at any stage in the transition process – from proposing to reassign your gender, to undergoing a process to reassign your gender, or having completed it.”

The Civil Service training course ‘Inclusion in the Civil Service’ gives an explanation of the Equality Act 2010 as follows:

The Equality Act provides specific protection for people who have the following characteristics:

  • Age
  • Disability
  • Gender reassignment
  • Marriage and Civil Partnerships
  • Pregnancy and Maternity
  • Race
  • Religion and belief
  • Sex
  • Sexual orientation

However, the training does reference ‘gender identity’ as an area that could lead to discrimination. The current training is shortly being replaced with a new product called “Civil Service Expectations” which will more clearly reflect the legislation.

9th Feb 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether she has made an assessment of the potential merits of commissioning the Law Commission to consider draft proposals to change the criminal law relating to certain conversion practices.

Our focus is on developing a new robust policy and legislative ban which protects all LGBT people from this abhorrent practice. We continue to work closely with a range of stakeholders, including various criminal justice experts and the Ministry of Justice.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Jul 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what guidance his Department issues to Heads of Departments on meeting with the Civil Service Sex Equality and Equity Networks; and if if he will make a statement.

The Civil Service has not developed or issued any specific guidance to Heads of Departments on their engagement with the Civil Service networks, including the Sex Equality and Equity Network.

The Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2022 outlines a focus on the delivery of inclusion, to support our key priorities as outlined in the Declaration on Government Reform.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, on what date following the publication in September 2015 of the Holocaust Memorial Foundation briefing entitled Search for a Central London site did their Department become aware of the plan to site the memorial in Victoria Tower Gardens.

Responsibility for delivering the Government’s manifesto commitment to construct the UK Holocaust Memorial rests with the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities.

18th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department's departmental and public agency spending on (a) services provided by and (b) contracts with Stonewall reconcile with the figures given in that charity's accounts.

There are currently no publicly available accounts from Stonewall for 2020/21 which we can compare with the Cabinet Office published accounts.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether a person with a birthday between the date they completed the census form and the census date can confirm an age that will not be correct.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which tenure type a residential commonholder or leaseholder should select in a census return.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

12th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps her Department is taking to promote Scotch whisky in international markets.

The Department for Business and Trade (DBT) offers a comprehensive package of support for whisky exporters, from our export academy which supports ‘new to export’ smaller businesses through to dedicated trade missions to key markets, inward buyer visits and a UK presence at major food and drink trade shows such as Prowein, Germany.

Moreover, DBT has staff in over 100 markets globally, contactable via our Export Support Service, a team of agriculture attachés in 11 markets focused on eliminating barriers for the food and drink industry and a dedicated team in Scotland focusing on support for Scottish exporters, including the Scotch whisky sector.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will make it her policy to make the approval of wood-burning power stations to be built after 2027 contingent on parliamentary approval.

Ensuring the electricity system is reliable, as well as net zero consistent, means variable renewables, such as wind and solar, need to be complemented by technologies which can provide dispatchable or baseload power.

Biomass electricity generation can provide this flexibility and plays a key role in delivering a more secure, clean energy sector in Britain.

Parliamentary approval was granted for the updated energy National Policy Statements on 17 January 2024. This covers the use of biomass in electricity generation at the scale of Nationally Significant Infrastructure under the Planning Act (which applies to projects in England and Wales).

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she plans to seek approval from Parliament before taking a decision on burning of wood in UK power stations after 2027.

Government is currently consulting on potential arrangements to help facilitate the transition of large-scale biomass generation to power bioenergy with carbon capture and storage. Responses to the consultation will help to inform government policy on this matter. As set out in the consultation, a potential support mechanism is expected to require secondary legislation which would be brought to Parliament as part of the legislative process.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will reopen the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding scheme to enable households that were eligible for that scheme and did not apply to access that support; and if he will make an estimate of the number of households that have not yet received that support.

The Government currently does not have any plans to reopen the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding. The Government estimated that there were around 900,000 households eligible for the scheme, and the current application figures can be found on GOV.UK - https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-alternative-fund-gb-ni-and-alternative-fuel-payment-alternative-fund-applications-made-by-customers.

I recommend that any household who was not able to access the EBSS AF visits the ‘Help for Households’ webpage on GOV.UK to view what other support they may be able to receive - https://helpforhouseholds.campaign.gov.uk/.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps he is taking in response to comments made by the Chair of the Energy Security and Net Zero Committee on 15 July 2023 on the effectiveness of the Energy Bill Support Scheme Alternative Funding.

The Government understands the concerns expressed regarding the take-up of the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding. However, the scheme is now closed to new applications. The scheme was open for applications from end February to end May. During that time, the Government used a variety of communication methods to ensure as many eligible households as possible could apply for their support. This included press notices, roundtables with key stakeholders, and a request for local authorities to write to care homes and park home sites in their area.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much and what proportion of the funding allocated to the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding scheme was not paid to eligible vulnerable households; and how much and what proportion of that funding will be (a) retained by his Department and put to alternative uses and (b) returned to the Treasury.

The department was allocated £362m to deliver the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Over £60m has been paid to eligible households who have made a successful application, and any remaining budget will be returned to HM Treasury.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st May 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of hosting a global summit on human-specific technologies for scientists and policymakers to discuss the transition to these methodologies.

The UK works closely with international partners and key organisations such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to promote the development and uptake of animal replacement technologies. There are currently no plans to host a summit on the matter.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
21st May 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what steps her Department is taking to help support scientists to transition to animal-free, human-specific technologies through (a) practical support, (b) the provision of training and (c) other means.

The Government, via UK Research & Innovation, funds the development of techniques that replace, reduce and refine the use of animals in research through the National Centre for 3Rs (NC3Rs). The NC3Rs encourages researchers’ to use non-animal methods (NAMs) in a number of ways, including supporting the skills base by funding PhD students to work only on the development of NAMs, and dedicated funding allowing researchers to test methods alongside existing animal studies. NC3Rs recently launched a network to bring researchers from academia, industry and regulatory authorities together to share knowledge on the use of NAMs methods for safety testing.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with (a) Scouts UK and (b) other charities on increased energy costs; and what steps he is taking to support those organisations with those costs.

Discussions have taken place with a number of charities regarding increased energy costs. The Government is fully aware of the impact this is having on the voluntary sector.

This is why the Energy Bill Relief Scheme has been introduced, with legislation coming into force on 1 November, shielding charities across the United Kingdom from soaring energy prices and saving some around half of their wholesale energy costs. The scheme applies to energy usage from 1 October 2022 for an initial 6-month period.

24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding from the public purse has been authorised and over what time period to subsidise burning wood products at Drax; what the range of future public liabilities is for Drax's operations; and if he will make a statement.

I refer my Hon. Friend to the answer given by my Rt. Hon. Friend the then Minister of State for Business, Energy and Clean Growth to the Hon. Member for Liverpool, Riverside on 21st January 2022 to Question 103693.

26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will consult Parliament on whether to extend Government funding for the burning of pellets for fresh wood at Drax beyond 2027.

There are no intentions to extend any contracts under the Renewables Obligation or Contracts for Difference schemes. In November 2021 the Government announced it would develop a business model to support bio-based power generation with carbon capture and storage. Any implementation of this would be subject to the appropriate parliamentary procedures.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the potential maximum annual amount of CO2 that captured in the UK (a) bioenergy with carbon capture, use and storage and (b) that technology operating at Drax power station by 2050.

Through the Biomass Strategy, which will be published later this year, the UK will establish the role of Bioenergy with Carbon Capture & Storage (BECCS) in reducing carbon emissions across the economy and set out how the technology could be deployed.

The Net Zero Strategy, outlined the UK’s ambition of 5MtCO2/year of engineered removals by 2030 and included illustrative ranges of 22-23MtCO2/year of engineered removals by 2035 and 75- 81MtCO2/year by 2050. Power BECCS projects have the potential to play a role in reaching these ambitions.

The UK is currently assessing the potential for carbon capture at existing UK biomass plants, however no decision has been made on future BECCS deployment or the award of power BECCS contracts.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to arrange the meeting requested by the hon. Member for Worthing West to discuss burning north American wood products at UK power stations.

My office will be in contact shortly to arrange a suitable date for this meeting.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of the wood burnt in the Drax power station is sourced from the (a) UK and (b) rest of the world.

This information is reported by suppliers to OFGEM. The latest dataset can be accessed here: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/biomass-sustainability-dataset-2019-20.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make a statement on the decision of S&P Global Dow Jones to remove Drax from its Global Clean Energy Index.

The decision of S&P Global Dow Jones to remove Drax from its Global Clean Energy Index is a commercial decision for S&P Global Dow Jones.

The Government only supports biomass usage that complies with strict sustainability criteria.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will instruct the Royal Parks to adjust the barriers at the Buxton Memorial Fountain in Victoria Tower Gardens to allow access to the east of the Fountain by the Thames wall.

The Royal Parks have full operational responsibility for the Buxton Memorial Fountain and the barriers which have been erected for the duration of essential repairs to it. A temporary footpath has been constructed around the memorial, so that access to the Embankment path remains.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department holds information on when barriers were erected around the Buxton memorial in Victoria Tower Gardens; for what reason those barriers were erected; and how long they will remain in place.

Barriers were erected around the Buxton memorial in April 2023, in order to protect the monument ahead of and during essential structural repairs needed to maintain it. They will remain in place until completion of the repairs, which has an estimated date of July 2024.

6th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much public funding the English National Opera received in each of the last 15 years; and what discussions his Department had with Arts Council England on funding that organisation (a) over the next three years and (b) in the long term; and if she will make a statement.

Records of the level of public funding for English National Opera are available in its annual accounts, which are published online on the Companies House website.

Following Arts Council England’s decisions relating to English National Opera and its 2023–26 Investment Portfolio, which are taken at arm’s length from the Government, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is helping to convene relevant parties and support them to find a way forward. I am keen that Arts Council England and English National Opera work together on the future of the organisation.

All decisions on which organisations to fund through the 2023–26 Investment Programme, and by how much, have been taken by Arts Council England in line with the long-standing principle that Arts Council England makes such decisions at arm’s length from the Government. The Chief Executive of Arts Council England, Darren Henley, answered questions from the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee on these issues on 8 December 2022.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, on what date following the publication in September 2015 of the Holocaust Memorial Foundation briefing entitled Search for a Central London site did their Department become aware of the plan to site the memorial in Victoria Tower Gardens.

UK Holocaust Memorial Foundation member Lord Andrew Feldman wrote to the then Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, the Rt Hon John Whittingdale, on 26 October 2015 proposing that the Holocaust Memorial be located in Victoria Tower Gardens.

Following investigations into the feasibility of this site, the Foundation recommended Victoria Tower Gardens to the Government in January 2016 as the best choice of site. The then Prime Minister accepted this recommendation and announced Victoria Tower Gardens as the chosen site on Holocaust Memorial Day 2016.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Prime Minister will instruct each relevant Department to authorise the National Archive to make available access to all the material requested by Rupert Burgess and Clive Stafford-Smith in relation to the investigation and prosecution of the Hosein brothers for killing Mrs Muriel McKay; and if she will make a statement.

The National Archives has not received a direct request for information from Mr Clive Stafford-Smith for access to material relating to the investigation and prosecution of the Hosein brothers.

The National Archives received a Freedom of Information (FOI) request on 02 June 2021 on behalf of one of the parties named for access to ten Crown Prosecution Service records (DPP 2/4806-4815) and one Attorney General’s Office record (LO 2/192).

The Freedom of Information (FOI) Act 2000 gives applicants the right to know whether a public authority holds the information requested and to have it communicated to them, subject to any exemptions, which may apply. Some of the information contained within the requested files has been made accessible to the public, however the majority remained closed because the information is exempt under sections 38 (1) (a) and 40 (2) (by virtue of section 40 (3A) personal data exemption) of the Freedom of Information (FOI) Act. As exemptions apply, The National Archives cannot make these records available to the applicant or to the public in general.

The FOI process is not subject to Ministerial or Prime Ministerial approval. There is, however, an appeals process in which any application of FOI exemptions/closure can be re-reviewed.

Outside of the FOI process, individual government departments may allow discretionary access to their historic files, having first recalled them from The National Archives for the purposes of review, as permitted by the Public Records Act (1958).

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many responses to the Channel 4 consultation have been received as of 16 December 2021; how many have been considered; and whether those responses are affecting the Government's position on the comparative merits of (a) maintaining the present ownership of Channel 4 and (b) alternatives.

The Government has consulted on the best ownership model to support Channel 4 for years to come. Our public consultation closed on 14 September. We have received around 60,000 responses, and we are carefully considering all the views and evidence we have received to inform the government’s policy-making and final decision.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what regulatory barrier prevents non-public broadcasters adopting any or all of Channel 4's obligations and methods of operating.

The government wants Channel 4 to remain a public service broadcaster. Public service broadcasters - publicly and privately owned - have both benefits and obligations. Our consultation document outlines that we see the value in many of these obligations.

Channel 4’s ability to make distinctive content, and its work with independent producers are precisely the strengths we would protect and expect any potential buyer to look to develop and nurture, should we decide to proceed with a sale. We do not therefore subscribe to a false binary choice between public service remit and privatisation.

Indeed, we already have two privately-owned - and very successful - public service broadcasters in the examples of ITV and Channel 5. Both continue to deliver public service objectives.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential impact on (a) inclusiveness and (b) diversity of a possible sale of Channel 4.

Our consultation document outlines that the government sees the great value delivered to society through the obligations placed on Channel 4 to broadcast content appealing to diverse audiences. We have sought views on whether to retain or increase such obligations through our consultation.

We consider that Channel 4’s ability to reach a diverse range of audiences is a strength to be celebrated and maintained into its future, and that this is not at odds with private investment - in fact, this is an important facet of Channel 4’s brand that is likely to be an attractive asset to nurture and develop for any potential buyer.

We have consulted on the best ownership model to support Channel 4 for years to come.

Our public consultation closed on 14 September. We are carefully considering the views and evidence we have received to inform the government’s policy-making and final decision.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what is her assessment of the impact on the intellectual property of independent producers from a possible sale of Channel 4.

Channel 4 has played an important role in supporting independent production in the UK. The sector is now flourishing and increasingly less reliant on income from UK PSBs. Total UK production sector revenues increased by more than 30% over the five years to 2019, reaching £3.3 billion in 2019. The export market for UK content has continued to grow with the sector’s international revenues exceeding £1 billion in 2019, 30% more than the previous year.

Channel 4’s strengths in working with independent producers are precisely the kinds of attributes we would expect to be attractive to a buyer, and that we would expect any buyer to be likely to nurture and develop through new investment.

We have consulted on the best ownership model to support Channel 4 for years to come. Our public consultation closed on 14 September. We are carefully considering the views and evidence we have received to inform the government’s policy-making and final decision.

Whatever decision we make about the future ownership model of Channel 4 will not compromise this government’s commitment to the independent production sector and to the wider creative economy.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to assess the potential impact on (a) advertisers and (b) prospective consumers of a possible sale of Channel 4.

Channel 4 is one of this country’s greatest broadcasting assets but we must think long-term about the challenges ahead and make sure it has the capital it needs to continue to contribute to the UK’s success in public service broadcasting.

We have consulted on the best ownership model to support Channel 4 into the future. Our public consultation closed on 14 September. We are carefully considering the views and evidence we have received, including from advertising stakeholders, to inform the government’s policy-making and final decision.

Whatever decision is made about Channel 4’s ownership model, any reforms will not compromise our commitment to the wider creative economy.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of a possible sale of Channel 4 on (a) advertisers and (b) prospective consumers.

Channel 4 is one of this country’s greatest broadcasting assets but we must think long-term about the challenges ahead and make sure it has the capital it needs to continue to contribute to the UK’s success in public service broadcasting.

We have consulted on the best ownership model to support Channel 4 into the future. Our public consultation closed on 14 September. We are carefully considering the views and evidence we have received, including from advertising stakeholders, to inform the government’s policy-making and final decision.

Whatever decision is made about Channel 4’s ownership model, any reforms will not compromise our commitment to the wider creative economy.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 10 September 2021 to Question 41606 on National Holocaust Memorial Centre and Learning Service, for what reason the Answer did not indicate the timetable for announcing the detailed arrangements for the management of Victoria Tower Gardens after the construction of the Holocaust Memorial.

No Ministerial direction relating to the proposed National Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre has been requested.

In regard to future management arrangements for Victoria Tower Gardens, the Government intends to let a long lease.

Detailed arrangements for the management of Victoria Tower Gardens will be announced in due course.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 10 September 2021 to Question 41606 on National Holocaust Memorial Centre and Learning Service, what plans the Government has to let all or part of Victoria Tower Gardens on a lease exceeding five years following the construction of the Holocaust Memorial.

No Ministerial direction relating to the proposed National Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre has been requested.

In regard to future management arrangements for Victoria Tower Gardens, the Government intends to let a long lease.

Detailed arrangements for the management of Victoria Tower Gardens will be announced in due course.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Permanent Secretary has asked for an instruction relating to the proposed National Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre.

No Ministerial direction relating to the proposed National Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre has been requested.

In regard to future management arrangements for Victoria Tower Gardens, the Government intends to let a long lease.

Detailed arrangements for the management of Victoria Tower Gardens will be announced in due course.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what plans he has for the management of the parts of Victoria Tower Gardens not required for the proposed Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre; and what his timetable is for announcing detailed arrangements.

The site will continue to be owned by Government. We are in discussion with the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government and The Royal Parks about the future management arrangements for Victoria Tower Gardens.

3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what plans he has for the ownership of Victoria Tower Gardens following the proposed construction of the Holocaust Memorial and Learning Centre.

The site will continue to be owned by Government. We are in discussion with the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government and The Royal Parks about the future management arrangements for Victoria Tower Gardens.

14th May 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what funding her Department has allocated to support teachers of (a) maths and numeracy, (b) English and literacy, (c) science, (d) music, (e) history and (f) religious education through (i) subject knowledge enhancement courses for trainees, (ii) Oak National Academy Resources (A) planned and (B) existing (iii) subject hubs, (iv) support for level 3 provision, (v) bursaries and (vi) other support for continuing professional development in each of the last five years.

Raising standards is at the heart of this government’s agenda and, since 2010, the number of schools rated ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ has risen to 90% from 68%. The Progress in International Reading Study (PIRLS) 2021 showed that English primary school children are the best in the western world and were ranked 4th out of 43 comparable countries. While the pandemic affected the study, the Programme for International School Assessment 2022 also showed that 15 year old pupils in England performed above the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and development (OECD) average and are now 11th in maths and 13th in reading and science. This was up from 27th in maths, 25th in reading and 16th in science in 2009.

The department has invested significantly to provide a world class education system, ensuring an excellent teacher for every child, high standards of curriculum attendance and behaviour, targeted support for every child that needs it and a stronger and fairer schools system. The overall core schools budget, including the recently announced additional pensions funding, will total £60.7 billion in 2024/25, which is the highest ever level in real terms per pupil. This means school funding will have risen by £11 billion by 2024/25 compared to 2021/22.

The funding breakdown requested since 2019/20 is included below. Figures for the 2023/24 financial year are subject to ongoing data collection and reconciliation and therefore we have not included this year in the table. The department reviews Initial Teacher Training (ITT) bursaries each year to determine the offer for trainees starting ITT the following academic year. In doing this, the department takes into account a number of factors including historic recruitment, forecast economic conditions and teacher supply need in each subject. The department focuses its funded Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) courses in its highest priority subjects with the greatest sufficiency challenges.

In addition to the funding outlined in the table below, the department also offers national professional qualifications (NPQs), including specialist NPQs in leading literacy and leading primary mathematics. Details on scholarship funding available for autumn 2024 is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/funding-for-national-professional-qualifications-npqs.

The quality of teaching is the single most important, in-school factor for improving pupil outcomes and it is particularly important for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds. The department is creating a world-class teacher development system, which builds from ITT, through to early career support, specialisation and onto school leadership.

Financial year

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

Subject Knowledge Enhancement Courses1

£28m

£24m

£14m

£10m

Oak National Academy resources2

N/A

£4m

£4m

£7m

Subject hubs3

English Hubs

£11m

£11m

£19m

£24m

Maths Hubs

£27m

£25m

£16m

£28m

Science Hubs

£9m

£9m

£8m

£9m

Music Hubs

£76m

£76m

£76m

£76m

ITT Bursaries and Scholarships 4

Maths and Numeracy

£35m

£50m

£53m

£41m

English and literacy

£33m

£31m

£10m

£0m

Science5

£72m

£77m

£52m

£33m

Music

£2m

£3m

£1m

£0m

History

£11m

£14m

£4m

£0m

Religious Education

£3m

£4m

£2m

£0m

1. Due to the way the department allocated funding, it does not have historic data on SKE spending by subject. This total includes all SKE funding, regardless of subject

2. Oak was incubated by The Reach Foundation and predominantly funded through a department grant until 31 August 2022. The 2023/24 financial year is Oak’s arm’s length body allocated budget as 2023/24 actuals are not yet available. The funding for Oak National Academy covers the creation of curriculum resources across all national curriculum subjects for Key Stages 1 to 4

3. Where subject hubs are part of a contract with a supplier, we have included all contract costs, including those not directly for subject hubs but for other Career Progress Development (CPD) or central programme management. The department changed the way Maths Hubs were funded in the 2021/22 academic year, resulting in a visual drop by financial year but not across the academic years. The department also has subject hubs in computing and languages which are not shown in these figures but are included in total subject hub figures set out in WPQ 20499

4. ITT bursaries are paid and assured by academic year rather than financial year. The figures provided for each financial year have been calculated by prorating the total spend for the relevant academic years that the financial year spans. Academic years 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 are subject to ongoing data collection and reconciliation and the figures provided may therefore be subject to change

5. Trainees on general science ITT courses are not eligible for bursaries. However, bursaries are available for biology, chemistry, and physics specialism courses. The figures provided for science are the total spend across the three individual sciences.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
26th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what funding her Department has allocated to support teachers through (a) subject knowledge enhancement courses for trainees, (b) Oak National Academy Resources (i) planned and (ii) existing, (c) subject hubs, (d) support for level 3 provision and (d) bursaries and other support for continuing professional development for (A) maths and numeracy, (B) English and literacy, (C) science, (D) music, (E) history and (F) Religious Education in the last five years.

Teachers are the foundation of the education system; there are no great schools without great teachers. The quality of teaching is the single most important in-school factor for improving pupil outcomes. This is particularly important for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The department is creating a world class teacher development system, which builds from Initial Teacher Training (ITT), through to early career support, specialisation, and onto school leadership. The funding breakdown requested over the last five years is included in the attached table. The department is providing support across a range of subjects via a network of hubs that help build teacher capability and pupil access to subjects. This focuses on support for teachers in schools and extends to sixth form provision in some schools.

In addition to this funding, in 2021, as part of the government’s long term recovery plan, £184 million of new funding was allocated to enable teachers employed at state-funded organisations to access fully funded training scholarships for National Professional Qualifications (NPQs) for three years until the end of the 2023/24 academic year. This includes two specialist NPQs in Leading Literacy (NPQLL) and the NPQ in Leading Primary Mathematics (NPQLPM). In March 2024, the government announced scholarship funding for NPQs for the October 2024 cohort. This includes a guarantee that the NPQLPM will be fully funded until October 2025 to further expand teaching of mathematics mastery approaches through primary education.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
26th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make it her policy to publish additional non-statutory guidance on religious education syllabus content in schools.

Religious education (RE) is an important part of a school’s curriculum and can contribute to a young person’s personal, social, and academic development. When done well, it can develop children’s knowledge of British values and traditions, help them better understand those of other countries, and refine pupils’ ability to construct well-informed, balanced, and structured arguments. This is why RE remains a compulsory subject in all state-funded schools in England for each pupil up to the age of 18.

The department has no plans to publish additional non-statutory guidance on RE syllabus content in schools. The department’s policy is to allow RE curricula to be designed at a local level, whether this is through a locally agreed syllabus conference or by individual schools and academy trusts developing their own curricula. The department feels this is the most appropriate way for local demographics to be accounted for.

The department does however welcome the work that the Religious Education Council has done to assist curriculum developers by publishing its National Content Standard for RE in England.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
11th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what her Department's expected timeline is for determining the location of the new primary SEND school in West Sussex .

The department is currently pursuing negotiations with West Sussex County Council for the department’s preferred location for the new special school, in West Durrington. Subject to this agreement, the department will be in a position to begin the process of acquiring the site. The department will ensure that the project director continues to keep my hon. Friend, the member for Worthing West updated as things progress.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department (a) is taking and (b) plans to take steps to increase the number and proportion of teachers trained in religious education teaching.

One of our top priorities is to ensure that the department continues to attract, retain and develop the highly skilled teachers we need to inspire the next generation. There are now over 468,000 full time equivalent (FTE) teachers in state-funded schools in England, which is an increase of 27,000 (6%) since 2010. This makes it the highest FTE of teachers since the School Workforce Census began in 2010.

The department understands there is further to go to improve recruitment in some subjects. That is why the department has put in place bursaries worth £10,000 tax-free to encourage talented trainee teachers to teach Religious Education (RE).

The 2023/24 pay award means that teachers and leaders in maintained schools received the highest pay award in over thirty years and it delivers our manifesto commitment of at least a £30,000 starting salary for school teachers in all regions of the country in all subjects, including RE.

RE is an essential part of a school’s curriculum and remains a compulsory subject in all state-funded schools, including academies, to all pupils up to the age of 18.

Whilst no detailed assessment of primary teacher’s confidence in teaching RE has taken place, it is right that teachers feel confident in delivering the content for this subject. To ensure high standards and confidence in RE teaching, RE resources are being procured by Oak National Academy as part of the second tranche of its work. Oak will work closely with the sector and utilise sector experience when producing new materials for RE. This will ensure that high quality lessons are available nationwide, benefitting both teachers and pupils. These resources will begin to be available from Autumn 2024 and be fully available by September 2025

Data on numbers of qualified RE teachers are available on a national scale only. Using the Teacher Workforce Census there were 15,721 RE teachers in state-funded secondary schools nationally in 2022/23, which represents an increase from 15,529 in 2021/22 (up 192 teachers or 1.2%).

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
4th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make an assessment of the adequacy of levels of confidence among primary school teachers in teaching religious education.

One of our top priorities is to ensure that the department continues to attract, retain and develop the highly skilled teachers we need to inspire the next generation. There are now over 468,000 full time equivalent (FTE) teachers in state-funded schools in England, which is an increase of 27,000 (6%) since 2010. This makes it the highest FTE of teachers since the School Workforce Census began in 2010.

The department understands there is further to go to improve recruitment in some subjects. That is why the department has put in place bursaries worth £10,000 tax-free to encourage talented trainee teachers to teach Religious Education (RE).

The 2023/24 pay award means that teachers and leaders in maintained schools received the highest pay award in over thirty years and it delivers our manifesto commitment of at least a £30,000 starting salary for school teachers in all regions of the country in all subjects, including RE.

RE is an essential part of a school’s curriculum and remains a compulsory subject in all state-funded schools, including academies, to all pupils up to the age of 18.

Whilst no detailed assessment of primary teacher’s confidence in teaching RE has taken place, it is right that teachers feel confident in delivering the content for this subject. To ensure high standards and confidence in RE teaching, RE resources are being procured by Oak National Academy as part of the second tranche of its work. Oak will work closely with the sector and utilise sector experience when producing new materials for RE. This will ensure that high quality lessons are available nationwide, benefitting both teachers and pupils. These resources will begin to be available from Autumn 2024 and be fully available by September 2025

Data on numbers of qualified RE teachers are available on a national scale only. Using the Teacher Workforce Census there were 15,721 RE teachers in state-funded secondary schools nationally in 2022/23, which represents an increase from 15,529 in 2021/22 (up 192 teachers or 1.2%).

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the longest length of time a primary school has been waiting for a response from Edenred relating to a query about free school meal vouchers since the beginning of the covid-19 outbreak.

As my right hon. Friends the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have both made clear, the government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by Covid-19.

During this period, we are asking schools to support pupils eligible for benefits-related free school meals by providing meals or food parcels through their existing food providers wherever possible. However, we recognise that providing meals and food parcels is not a practicable option for all schools. That is why, on 31 March, we launched a national voucher scheme as an alternative option, with costs covered by the Department for Education.

Voucher codes are being processed and many thousands of families are redeeming them. As of 28 April, Edenred have indicated that over 16,500 schools have placed orders for codes under this scheme. As of Friday 7 May, Edenred reported that over £58 million worth of voucher codes have been redeemed into supermarket e-gift cards by schools and families.

Schools can contact Edenred using either the email address or phone number setup specifically for the Department of Education’s national voucher scheme (freeschoolmeals@edenred.com or 0333 400 5932). We do not hold details of the time taken to respond to individual queries. We are working closely with Edenred regarding the performance of the voucher scheme and their engagement with queries from schools.

We are working tirelessly with Edenred to resolve any outstanding technical problems so that children eligible for free schools meals are supported quickly. As always, we thank schools for their patience while we expand the system to meet the high demand and for ensuring that the families who are most in need continue to receive the support that they require.

These are rapidly developing circumstances and we will continue to keep the situation under review and to keep Parliament updated accordingly.

29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether arrangements are in place to allow schools to purchase free school meal vouchers direct from local supermarkets during the covid-19 lockdown.

As both my right hon. Friends the Prime Minister and Chancellor of the Exchequer have made clear, the government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID-19.

Our latest guidance on providing free school meals at this time is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance/covid-19-free-school-meals-guidance-for-schools.

Through the national voucher scheme, schools and families could initially access eGift cards for Morrisons, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Asda, Waitrose and M&S. On Monday 27 April Aldi were added to this scheme and on Wednesday 29 April McColl’s were also added. As of the 7th May, Edenred report that £58 million has been converted into supermarket vouchers by families and schools. We recognise that it may not be convenient or possible for some families to visit one of these supermarkets and we are continuing to work to see if additional supermarkets can be added to this list.

If families are not able to access any of the supermarkets which are part of the national voucher scheme, schools are able to purchase vouchers directly for alternative supermarkets. Schools can be reimbursed for the cost of these alternatives through the schools coronavirus exceptional costs fund, up to £15 per pupil per week. This funding covers unavoidable additional costs incurred due to the COVID-19 outbreak that cannot be met from their existing resources.

These are rapidly developing circumstances; we continue to keep the situation under review and will keep Parliament updated accordingly.