Alan Brown Portrait

Alan Brown

Scottish National Party - Kilmarnock and Loudoun

First elected: 7th May 2015


Business and Trade Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 12th Sep 2023
Business and Trade Sub-Committee on National Security and Investment
28th Jun 2022 - 12th Sep 2023
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Mar 2023 - 4th Sep 2023
Energy Bill [HL]
17th May 2023 - 29th Jun 2023
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Dec 2022 - 1st Mar 2023
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Energy and Climate Change)
7th Jan 2020 - 12th Dec 2022
Pension Dashboards (Prohibition of Indemnification) Bill
19th Oct 2022 - 26th Oct 2022
Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill
9th Nov 2021 - 25th Nov 2021
Education (Careers Guidance in Schools) Bill
22nd Sep 2021 - 27th Oct 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Energy)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Transport)
20th Jun 2017 - 7th Jan 2020
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Infrastructure and Energy)
20th Jun 2017 - 1st Jul 2018
European Scrutiny Committee
28th Nov 2016 - 3rd May 2017


Oral Question
Tuesday 5th March 2024
11:30
Department of Health and Social Care
Oral Question No. 18
What steps her Department is taking to help tackle medicine shortages.
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Department Event
Thursday 7th March 2024
09:30
Department for Business and Trade
Oral questions - Main Chamber
7 Mar 2024, 9:30 a.m.
Business and Trade (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Scheduled Event
Friday 19th April 2024
Private Members' Bills - Main Chamber
State Pension Age (Compensation) Bill: Second Reading
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Department Event
Thursday 2nd May 2024
09:30
Department for Business and Trade
Oral questions - Main Chamber
2 May 2024, 9:30 a.m.
Business and Trade (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 20th February 2024
Offshore Petroleum Licensing Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 39 Scottish National Party Aye votes vs 0 Scottish National Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 44 Noes - 285
Speeches
Thursday 29th February 2024
Oral Answers to Questions
Why do this Government think it is right that Church of England bishops in the House of Lords can have …
Written Answers
Friday 1st March 2024
Israeli Settlements
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, whether he has had discussions with his Israeli counterpart …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 7th November 2023
Stewarton Tennis Club
That this House congratulates Stewarton Tennis Club on reaching its centenary year, marking 100 years of service to the local …
Bills
Wednesday 7th February 2024
State Pension Age (Compensation) Bill 2023-24
A Bill to require the Secretary of State to publish proposals for a compensation scheme for women born between 6 …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 3rd October 2022
1. Employment and earnings
30 August 2022, received £225 for a survey completed on 25 July 2022. Hours: 1 hr 30 mins. (Registered 09 …
EDM signed
Thursday 22nd February 2024
No confidence in the Speaker
That this House has no confidence in Mr Speaker.
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 21st June 2023
Banking and postal services (rural areas) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to set minimum service standards for the provision of banking and postal services in rural areas, including for …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Alan Brown has voted in 634 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Alan Brown Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Greg Hands (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
(78 debate interactions)
Andrew Bowie (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
(76 debate interactions)
Penny Mordaunt (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(41 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(141 debate contributions)
Department for Energy Security & Net Zero
(113 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(107 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Nuclear Energy (Financing) Act 2022
(21,507 words contributed)
Energy Act 2023
(20,398 words contributed)
United Kingdom Internal Market Act 2020
(3,819 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Alan Brown's debates

Kilmarnock and Loudoun Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Kilmarnock and Loudoun signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

The Government needs to take back ownership of strategic energy assets. It needs to accept that the Free Market has failed the energy sector, that it is in the national interest to renationalise our energy assets. The Government must therefore renationalise all the UK energy assets.

Air pollution kills 64,000 people in the UK every year, yet the Government provides annual fossil fuel subsidies of £10.5 billion, according to the European Commission. To meet UK climate targets, the Government must end this practice and introduce charges on producers of greenhouse gas emissions.

The SNP government appears solely intent on getting independence at any cost.


Latest EDMs signed by Alan Brown

21st February 2024
Alan Brown signed this EDM on Thursday 22nd February 2024

No confidence in the Speaker

Tabled by: William Wragg (Conservative - Hazel Grove)
That this House has no confidence in Mr Speaker.
92 signatures
(Most recent: 28 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 46
Scottish National Party: 41
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
24th January 2024
Alan Brown signed this EDM on Tuesday 20th February 2024

Postural Tachycardia Syndrome awareness

Tabled by: Cat Smith (Labour - Lancaster and Fleetwood)
That this House notes that Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (PoTS) is an autonomic nervous system abnormality where sitting, standing and exercise can cause symptoms including shortness of breath, chest pain, brain fog, dizziness, pain, fainting, vomiting and fatigue; recognises that many people suffer a combination of symptoms, which can be chronic …
20 signatures
(Most recent: 1 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 6
Plaid Cymru: 3
Scottish National Party: 3
Liberal Democrat: 3
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Conservative: 1
Alliance: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
View All Alan Brown's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Alan Brown, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Alan Brown has not been granted any Urgent Questions

2 Adjournment Debates led by Alan Brown

Monday 19th February 2024
Thursday 8th July 2021

5 Bills introduced by Alan Brown


A Bill to require the Government and Ofgem to conduct and act on a review of the electricity transmission grid and associated charges, to include consideration of abolishing charge differentials based on geographic location, incentivising renewable energy generation to maximise energy output, and minimising the passing on of charge fluctuation risk to consumers in the form of higher prices; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 18th March 2022

A Bill to require the Secretary of State to publish proposals for a compensation scheme for women born between 6 April 1950 and 5 April 1960 inclusive who have been affected by increases in the state pension age; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 7th February 2024
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 19th April 2024
Order Paper number: 10
(Unlikely to be Debated - would require unanimous consent to progress)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision about multi-employer pension schemes, including provision for the protection of unincorporated businesses, such as plumbing businesses, from certain multi-employer pension scheme liabilities; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 24th January 2018
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require the Secretary of State to review the conduct of Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd in relation to the Green Deal; to require the Secretary of State to report on the merits of a scheme guaranteed by Her Majesty’s Government to compensate persons mis-sold loans under the Green Deal; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 22nd January 2019
(Read Debate)

A Bill to make provision to safeguard, and for the release of, cash retentions in the construction industry; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 26th April 2017
(Read Debate)

961 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
47 Other Department Questions
17th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what recent estimate the Commission has made of the cost of the equipment upgrades in eight rooms of Portcullis House; and what will be included in these equipment upgrades.

Over the summer the eight rooms will receive an upgrade to:

a. Lighting

b. The controls for lighting, heating, and cooling


The cost of the upgrade to the eight rooms is £277,000.

14th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, how many incidents there have been relating to (a) leaks, (b) broken panels and (c) structural defects involving the glass atrium roof on Portcullis House in each of the last five years; and if he will provide details of those incidents.

Over the last five years, there have been 12 recorded leaks related to the glass atrium roof: three in 2021, four in 2022, and five in 2023. There have been three breakages: two in 2019 and one in July 2023.

We are currently reviewing this data as part of the Portcullis House roof project. A report on the glass atrium roof has been commissioned and is due in August 2023.

14th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the estimated cost is for the proposed Portcullis House upgrades for (a) the building’s mechanical and electrical systems, (b) the roof, (c) committee rooms, (d) AV upgrades, (e) atrium lighting and blinds and (f) refurbishment of lifts as of 14 July 2023.

I refer the hon. Member to PQ 180021 which I answered on 3 May 2023. The report on the Portcullis House roof referred to in that answer is due in August 2023.

14th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the estimated cost is for the new fire doors for Richmond House, as of 14 July 2023.

The cost for the three new fire doors is approximately £110,000. This figure includes the installation cost, including the work required to the frames and surrounding structure for the doors.

14th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the estimated cost is of the proposed new lighting installations for the Terrace to facilitate marking chosen events by lighting up the Palace façade, as on 14 July 2023.

The estimated cost of the proposed new lighting installations for the Terrace is £361,488.

Work will take place over the Summer to install LED lighting and controls on the Terrace. This will allow Parliament to mark chosen events by lighting up the Palace façade.

The current lighting system is not powerful or flexible enough, so we are required to bring in a specialist each time to do a temporary installation. This also means that we can only commit to certain events. The new system will give us flexibility and allow us to respond more speedily to emergent events, should Parliament wish to. Long term the new system will be cheaper than bringing in a consultant each time.

14th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the estimated cost is of the New Palace Yard enhancements including the security upgrades, as of 14 July 2023.

We are unable to provide the financial information publicly as it is commercially sensitive. For security reasons we do not publish capital expenditure on security mitigating projects as providing this level of detail could enable an individual to infer the extent and nature of the works, and thus the vulnerabilities which they were intended to mitigate.

14th Jul 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the estimated cost is of the wi-fi upgrades being made across the Parliamentary estate as of 14 July 2023.

The House service approved the business case for a project to significantly improve Wi-Fi services across the estate in December 2022.

The Wi-Fi project will replace end-of-life hardware and upgrade services, to provide a seamless, simpler and better managed user experience for Members and staff, particularly for personal mobile devices in the form of a new Members and Staff Wi-Fi service and Guest Wi-Fi replacement for Internet Direct. This is supported by additional security and roaming service improvements, while also reducing operational overheads. Cost efficiencies are being gained by delivering this work alongside the Emergency Services Network project.

Improvements will take place across the Parliamentary Estate, prioritising Member facing areas and key areas of procedural and parliamentary business.

A breakdown of the costs per building is listed in the table below:

Building

Palace of Westminster

Millbank House

14 Tothill Street

6/7 Old Palace Yard

Education Centre

Total

Estates Cost

£22m

£2m

£1.8m

£0.4m

£0.7m

£27m


While Parlimentary Digital Service (PDS) are actively managing WI-FI provisions for all parliamentary buildings, any buildings not listed in the table above do not require the same interventions and as such are outside of the scope of this main Wi-Fi Project, with any issues tackled on a case-by-case basis.

The estimated cost including the whole life cost of the Wi-Fi upgrades being made across the Parliamentary estate by the Network and Wireless Project as of 14 July 2023 is listed in the table attached.

To date the project spend is £4.8m in project delivery (including some PDS costs from FY23/24), operational costs and depreciation. Risk and optimism bias costs are not included as they have not been spent.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Restoration and Renewal Client Board, how much from the public purse has been spent on (a) building survey works and (b) ground investigation works for works associated with the restoration and renewal project as of 31 March 2023.

The R&R Programme is carrying out tens of thousands of hours of complex building surveys and investigations to develop even more detailed records of the Palace of Westminster. These records are being used to inform design and planning, and future decisions on the essential restoration work required.

Two of the intrusive surveys currently being undertaken, the Building Intrusive Survey and Pull Out Tests, are categorised as Building Survey Works. Third party contractor costs incurred to 31 March 2023 on these surveys are £0.3 million. Third party contractor costs incurred to 31 March 2023 on the ground investigation works are £0.6 million.

These figures do not include Delivery Authority internal staffing costs or the costs of the contractor planning and overseeing the survey programme because those costs cannot be disaggregated by individual survey.

All these surveys are ongoing and spend will continue beyond 1 April 2023.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Restoration and Renewal Client Board, what the estimated cost is for drone surveys associated with the restoration and renewal project.

The R&R Programme is carrying out tens of thousands of hours of complex building surveys and investigations to develop even more detailed records of the Palace of Westminster. These records are being used to inform design and planning, and future decisions on the essential restoration work required.

Two intrusive surveys, the Photogrammetric and Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) surveys, have recently started which contain an element of drone surveys as well as other activities such as high-resolution photography. The total estimated cost of these surveys is £1 million although this covers a number of activities.

Due to how the activity schedules in these contracts are priced it is not possible to disaggregate the costs of the drone flights from the rest of the works being undertaken. However, it is anticipated that a significant portion of the costs will relate to the contractor resource required to deliver the surveys and the processing of the images taken (rather than the cost of the drones themselves).

This figure also does not include Delivery Authority internal staffing costs or the costs of the contractor planning and overseeing the overall survey programme because those costs cannot be disaggregated by individual survey.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the cost was of the installation of rodent devices across the Estate in the last year.

The cost of rodent devices cannot be disaggregated from general pest control costs and is delivered on a bicameral basis. Pest control costs for the 2022 financial year are below:

Classification

Amount (Gross)

Amount (HoC)

Amount (HoL)

General controls

101,857

61,114

40,743

Consultancy

3,785

2,271

1,514

Bird Control

20,520

12,312

8,208

Total

126,162

75,697

50,465

1) Bird control costs vary from year to year as necessity fluctuates depending on the level of pests presenting a risk of damage to stonework.

2) General Controls include the cost of a full-time pest control technician and all traps and baits not covered elsewhere.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the budget is for the Victoria Tower project.

This complex project on the 160-year-old tower will involve the full scaffolding of the tower, repairs to the stonework which currently poses a health and safety risk, as well as all other fabric conservation works that can be meaningfully undertaken from a scaffold. Subject to further detailed analysis, it is expected to cost between £170–£250 million. A firm budget within this range will be released for approval in line with the Parliamentary Governance approval process in early 2024.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the cost was of rodent and pest control (a) measures and (b) services in each year since 2010.

Costs prior to 2012/13 are not available. The costs from 2012/13–2022/23 are provided as an attachment.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the budget is for the (a) refurbishment of Norman Shaw North and (b) new glass atrium roof to be added over the courtyard.

The budget for the refurbishment of Norman Shaw North is £321.9m, with the new glass atrium roof to be added over the courtyard costing £3.6m.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the budget is for work in Portcullis House on (a) mechanical and electrical systems, (b) the roof, (c) committee rooms, (d) AV upgrades, (e) atrium lighting and blinds and (f) refurbishment of lifts.

The budget for work in Portcullis House can be broken down as follows:

(a) mechanical and electrical systems

The latest business case for the lifecycle replacement of mechanical and electrical systems within Portcullis House presented a total project cost ranging between £129m and £143m. The project will undertake a series of lifecycle replacement works to mechanical and electrical systems within PCH, including, for example, systems linked to heating, cooling and ventilation. The scope also includes some works related to the Engineering Infrastructure Strategy which will provide benefits to the wider Northern Estate.

(b) the roof

The roof project is at the feasibility stage, investigating the defects within the glazed panel roof and the main roof. Following the investigation, options will be developed to address the findings. The project report is due mid-2023, the costs for these options are not known at this stage.

(c) committee rooms

As part of a larger Committee room project, four rooms in Portcullis House are being upgraded:

(i) Refurbishment of in-room ICT/AV infrastructure and furniture (including adaptations to furniture to accommodate new technology)

Room

Total budget, comprising:

(a) ICT/AV

(b) Furniture

Boothroyd Room

£520,000

£435,000

£85,000

Thatcher Room

£475,000

£405,000

£70,000

Wilson Room

£460,000

£390,000

£70,000


(ii) Refurbishment of staff table in the Grimond Room (ICT/AV and other furniture upgraded by previous project)

Grimond Room £5,500

The total budget for Portcullis House is £1,455,000.


(d) AV upgrade

A new bicameral audio-visual/video-conferencing facility is being implemented for all mainstream select committee rooms (the Centralised Video-Conferencing Facility (CVCF)) to provide and manage hybrid committee meetings for broadcast. It is not possible to apportion this cost by room or building. The total budget for this is £1,884,000 across both Houses.


(e) atrium lighting and blinds

25 luminaires within PCH atrium are being replaced with a budget of £57k.

There are no blinds in PCH atrium, however there is a project to replace the motors in the blinds across PCH and the cost for this is £401k.


(f) refurbishment of lifts.

The refurbishment of lifts within Portcullis House is being undertaken in 3 Stages, as part of an estate-wide programme of lift modernisation works.

Three lifts within Portcullis House (HOPs 107, 108 and 161) have been refurbished to date under Stages 1 and 2 of this programme, with a combined total budget of £1.96m.

A further five lifts within Portcullis House (HOPs 101, 102, 105, 106 and 175) are due to be refurbished under Stage 3 of this programme, with an estimated budget of £4.00m subject to final business case approval.

27th Jan 2022
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the final cost was of the cast iron roof replacement and refurbishment programme.

The programme of work was split into three separate projects. Costs to date for the Cast Iron Roofs Programme (C1488 – made up of C2036, C2037, C2038) are as follows:

C2036 £13,926,079 – FINAL
Phase 2 Project 1 – South Return, Lord Speaker’s Towers & Link Roof, River Front South.

C2037 £33,356,338 – FINAL
Phase 2 Project 2 – Roofs around Peers & Commons Inner Courts, River Front Middle, West Vent Tower, River Front Vent Tower.

C2038 £44,755,804 – FORECAST
Phase 2 Project 3 – River Front North, Speaker’s Towers & Link Roof, Star Chamber Court North, St Stephen’s Hall & Porch, West Front Roofs.

Total £92,038,221

Note: Figures include fees and VAT. Also note the figure for C2038 is still at forecast as we have not yet completed on site.

12th Jan 2022
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 11 January 2022 to Question 96953 on Big Ben: Repairs and Maintenance, what the estimated additional cost is for (a) the four-month site closure in 2020, (b) investment in covid-19 secure measures and (c) the reduced productivity on site until November 2020.

The total cost to date of covid-19 impacts on the project, including the four-month site closure in 2020, investment in covid-19 secure measures and the reduced productivity on site until November 2020, is £5.7m, including VAT. These costs are met from the approved £9m provision, listed in the answer to Question 96953.

This figure has been scrutinised by independent consultants, who are confident in the financial projections that have been developed by teams in the House Service, recognising the exceptionality of the project and its highly specific requirements.

Parliament’s teams have mitigated against the financial impact of coronavirus, working collaboratively and positively with contractors to reduce the impact to the taxpayer, and ensuring that costs paid by Parliament are proportionate to its contractual obligations. The project’s teams continue to meet the challenges posed by this complex conservation and enjoy the support of the leadership of both Houses in their delivery and approach.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the latest estimate is of the cost of the Elizabeth Tower refurbishment.

The budget for the refurbishment of Elizabeth Tower, most recently approved in early 2020, is £79.7 million.

Since then, further provision of up to £9 million has also been made to cover additional costs relating to the impact of COVID-19, which, as with almost all construction projects across the country, has affected the progress of work.

These costs arise from the four-month site closure in 2020, investment in COVID-secure measures and the necessity of reduced productivity on site until November 2020 – introduced to ensure the safety of the project’s workforce.

This figure has been scrutinised by independent consultants, who are confident in the financial projections that have been developed by teams in the House Service, recognising the exceptionality of the project and its highly specific requirements.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the cost was of the set-up, trials and tests of the temporary bell striking mechanism in the Elizabeth Tower.

The approximate cost of commissioning, out of hours attendance, set up and testing of the temporary mechanism for all the occasions during the project when Big Ben has sounded is £96,000.

The overall contract value for the project includes all the costs of initial commissioning of the temporary mechanism used for this purpose and testing and operating it on each occasion it has been used since the project started in 2017. The mechanism was used on 10 occasions, with Big Ben also being sounded several times in the run-up to each New Year’s Eve, as well as for testing in advance of each occasion that was marked.

Arrangements for striking Big Ben were coordinated round the planned works so as to minimise the impact on the project costs and to ensure there was no delay to the project. The temporary striking mechanism used during the project will be kept as an integral part of the refurbished clock mechanism’s contingency arrangements.

The Elizabeth Tower and the Great Clock are currently undergoing the most extensive conservation project ever carried out in the 160 years since the bell began to strike. The clock mechanism, which usually powers the hammer that strikes the Great Bell (Big Ben), has been dismantled and removed for refurbishment.

In 2017 the House of Commons Commission decided that during the Elizabeth Tower refurbishment project, Big Ben should only sound for Remembrance Sunday, Armistice Day and New Year's Eve, to allow the project team to schedule works around those occasions. The Commission reconfirmed the decision in 2018.

7th Dec 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what steps he taking to reach an international agreement on carbon pricing.

At COP26, the UK Presidency secured an agreement on the rules, guidance and procedures to implement Article 6 of the Paris Agreement, which gives guidance on how countries may choose to cooperate and use carbon markets to help achieve their climate objectives. Other carbon pricing mechanisms, such as carbon taxes, or carbon border adjustment mechanisms were not an agenda item at COP26.

This year the UK launched its own emissions trading scheme (ETS) and will be exploring opportunities for international cooperation. This could include the possibility of linking the UK ETS to similar systems in other countries.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
23rd Sep 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, if he will publish the projects relating to the Palace of Westminster commissioned since 2015 detailing the (a) extent of work and for completed projects, (b) estimated budget, (c) estimated timescales and (d) final cost and completion timescales.

Since 2015 a number of capital works projects have been undertaken within the Palace of Westminster, many of which remain ongoing. The majority of these projects are driven by health and safety, personnel and asset protection, or critical operational need. To provide a comprehensive list would exceed the prohibitive cost threshold for responding to a Parliamentary Question.

The overall funding for capital works is set each year by the Commission through the Medium-Term Investment Plan following advice from the Finance Committee. There is a rigorous process of financial control for all projects, overseen by the House’s Audit Committee, and the progress of all projects is monitored routinely by the Joint Investment Board* and the Finance Committees of both Houses. In addition, there is a regular flow of assurance – monitoring how projects are delivered against time, cost and quality – provided by a variety of external bodies.

*The Joint Investment Board (JIB) is a sub-committee of the House of Commons Executive Board and House of Lords Management Board. For capital works projects, JIB provides prioritisation, scrutiny and assurance, maintaining an overview of the capability and capacity of the project community. The Board escalates any concerns to the Commons Executive Board and the Lords Management Board.

23rd Sep 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 20 September 2021 to Question 49191 on Palace of Westminster: Repairs and Maintenance, what the (a) value of the stonework order is, (b) timescale for completion and (c) extent and locations of all proposed works.

As stated in the answer to question 49191, it is not possible to provide the value of the stonework order until we have completed the business case. Similarly, the extent, locations and timescales of all the repairs will also be determined by the business case. As stated in the last answer, the timescale of this business case is approximately 18 months. The repair work is driven by the need to ensure that health and safety risks are eliminated before they arise. Aside from Cloister Court, key areas identified by initial surveys carried out in 2020 are:

• Westminster Hall (North Elevation)

• The Colonnade, both internally and externally

• Peers Court

• Peers Inner Court

• St Stephen’s Hall

• Star Chamber Court

• Central Spire

14th Sep 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 10 September 2021 to Question 40981 on Palace of Westminster: Repairs and Maintenance, what the timescale is for the compilation of the business case referred to in that answer.

A mandate has just been approved for work to be carried out to stonework across the Palace. This work will target areas that cannot wait until the Restoration and Renewal Programme. Cloister Court is one of the key areas it will address. The average timescale for our business cases is 18 months.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the estimated cost is of the refurbishment of the remaining sections of cloisters close to St Stephen's Chapel.

We do not have a cost yet, as we are at the early stages of the business case process.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the cost was of the refurbishment of the trial restoration of the section of cloisters close to St Stephen's Chapel.

The cost for refurbishment of the trial restoration of the section of cloisters close to St Stephen’s Chapel was £1.4m.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the cost was of the encaustic tiles replacement programme.

The project is closing now, and the expected cost is £11.8m.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the estimated cost is of the river terrace stone restoration programme.

The river terrace stone restoration programme has approved funds of £4.6m.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what recent estimate the Commission has made of the date of completion of the refurbishment of the Elizabeth Tower.

Summer 2022 is the current date for the completion of the conservation project.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the estimated cost is of the upgrade works to the doors of Central Lobby.

The estimated cost to upgrade the doors of Central Lobby is £3.8m.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the estimated cost is of the lift refurbishment programme.

The lift programme is split into two phases.

Phase 1: £5.05m will refurbish 11 lifts in the Palace of Westminster that were identified as a priority (forecast completion 2022).

Phase 2: Has an estimated cost of £35.9m. This would refurbish 42 lifts in the Palace of Westminster and 15 lifts on other parts of the Estate. Please note – this is an estimated cost. In addition, it is still to be determined how many of these lifts will be delivered as part of this Programme or delivered as part of R&R.

The programme will deliver a full electrical and mechanical refurbishment to the lifts so that they continue to be safe to use. This will also ensure that they are compliant with current standards and legislation, including fire safety.

26th May 2021
To ask the President of COP26, pursuant to the Answer of 25 May 2021 to Question 3953 on Renewable Energy: Seas and Oceans, when he plans to confirm the final listing of Scottish Renewable Energy companies that will be utilised to promote Scotland's marine renewables sector.

The government publishes details of Ministers’ meetings with external organisations on a quarterly basis. Transparency returns for Cabinet Office Ministers can be found here.

The UNFCCC will publish a list of participants who attended COP26 at the end of the conference. An events programme and list of exhibitors within the UK Government managed Green Zone will be made available to the public in due course.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
26th May 2021
To ask the President of COP26, pursuant to the Answer of 25 May 2021 to Question 3953 on Renewable Energy: Seas and Oceans, if he will publish a list of the companies he has met.

The government publishes details of Ministers’ meetings with external organisations on a quarterly basis. Transparency returns for Cabinet Office Ministers can be found here.

The UNFCCC will publish a list of participants who attended COP26 at the end of the conference. An events programme and list of exhibitors within the UK Government managed Green Zone will be made available to the public in due course.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
20th May 2021
To ask the hon. Member for City of Chester, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 19 May 2021 to Question 2353 on Elections Scotland, if the Commission will make a comparative assessment of the (a) number of votes received by the Independent Green Voice and average number of votes received by parties with a similar level of electoral campaign spending.

The Commission's reporting on the Scottish Parliamentary election will cover the administration and delivery of the polls, and will be published in the autumn. The Commission will also publish details of campaign spending by political parties at the election, so that voters and other campaigners can see how parties spent their money at this election.

Post-poll reporting and the publication of financial returns comprise of responsibilities given to the Commission by the UK's parliaments. The number of votes recieved by individual political parties is not a factor in this work.

20th May 2021
To ask the hon. Member for City of Chester, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, whether the Commission made an assessment of the extent to which the Independent Green Voice’s description as Organic Green Scotland on the Scottish parliamentary election regional listing ballot paper represented the key objective of that party.

Parties have the option to register descriptions which can appear on the ballot paper. The Commission, as the registrar for political parties, must assess whether a party's description meet requirements set out in law. Where an application to register a description meets the legal requirements, it must be registered.

There is no requirement in law for a party's descriptions to reflect its policies and objectives. As such, this is not a consideration when the Commission assesses an application to register a description, and it is not a basis on which a description could be refused.

19th May 2021
To ask the hon. Member for City of Chester, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 19 May 2021 to Question 2352 on Elections: Scotland, what is the planned timetable for post-poll reporting.

The Commission will report formally on the delivery of the polls in the autumn, after the summer recess periods for the UK Parliament, Scottish Parliament and Senedd. Reporting will be informed by a detailed process of information gathering and evaluation.

19th May 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what recent discussions he has had with (a) the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, (b) officials in that Department and (c) industry bodies on using the COP26 climate change conference to promote the North Sea Transition Deal.

I have regular discussions with my Cabinet colleagues, including the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. The UK Government has committed to supporting its transition to clean energy through the North Sea Transition Deal.

The Deal will focus on the decarbonisation of domestic oil and gas production while using the capabilities of the sector to deliver CCS and Hydrogen production. This will support and sustain new high-quality jobs and anchor the supply chain in the UK.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
19th May 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what discussions he has had with (a) the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy and (b) industry bodies on using the COP26 UN Climate Change Conference to promote Scotland’s marine renewables sector.

I have regular discussions with Cabinet colleagues, including the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, to help promote the UK's clean energy transition. I have met with companies in the renewable energy industry in Scotland to explore how they can support a successful COP26. The Government has a long history of supporting the development and deployment of wave and tidal stream technologies in the UK, including in Scotland. Since 2003 various bodies across Government have provided innovation/R&D funding of £175m to the wave and tidal sectors (almost £80m since 2010).

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
17th May 2021
To ask the hon. Member for City of Chester, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what plans the Commission has to review the Independent Green Voice party entry and logo on the Scottish parliamentary election regional listing with regards to potential voter confusion with the Scottish Greens political party.

The Commission assesses whether applications to register a political party, and their indentity marks, meet the criteria set out in electoral law. This includes the requirement to ensure that voters would not likely be confused with already registered parties.

As part of its assessment process, the Commission publishes on its website a list of names, descriptions and emblems under consideration, to invite comments from the public and other parties.

Details were published on the Commission's website on 12 February 2021 of the application by Independent Green Voice to add a new emblem. No concerns were raised, and after a careful assessment process, the Commission authorised the application to register the emblem on 23 March.

The Commission has an ongoing duty to maintain the register of political parties including by reviewing registered indentity marks if relevant considerations change. However, as matters stand it is satisfied that there are clear and sufficent differences between the two parties' registered names, descriptions and emblems to avoid likely voter confusion.

17th May 2021
To ask the hon. Member for City of Chester, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what plans the Commission has to review the extent of electronic political content promoted without an imprint for the Scottish Parliamentary Election held on 6 May 2021; and if he will he make a statement.

The Commission welcomed the introduction of the new digital imprint requirement for all digital campaign material at the Scottish Parliamentary elections. It provides voters with a better understanding of who is trying to influence them online.

The Commission regulates compliance with the new law by registered parties, and by non-party campaigners who campaign for or against parties. The police are responsible for compliance by candidates, and non-party campaigning for or against candidates.

Ahead of the election, the Commission published guidance for campaigners on what must be included on election material. The Commission monitored compliance with the new regime closely, and will, as part of its post-poll reporting, report on the implemention and regulation of the requirements.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what plans he has to promote at COP26 (a) recycling of organic wastes and (b) other solutions to help tackle methane emissions.

We are tackling methane emissions domestically through supporting the agriculture sector to reduce its emissions further through the Agricultural Transition Plan. Through our COP26 Nature campaign, we are encouraging a global shift towards sustainable agriculture.

In the Resources and Waste Strategy, published in December 2018, we have committed to exploring policies to work towards eliminating all biodegradable waste to landfill by 2030.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
20th Jan 2021
To ask the hon. Member for City of Chester, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, whether the Committee has made an assessment of the implications for the (a) administration of elections and (b) strength of the Union of a reduction in the number of Scottish parliamentary seats.

The Electoral Commission's role relates only to aspect a) of the question.

On the administration of elections, it will provide the necessary support to the electoral community in responding to any changes made to constituency boundaries by Parliament, to ensure the continued delivery of well-run elections.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the hon. Member representing the House of Commons Commission, what assessment has been made of the adequacy of the design of the proposed temporary chamber in Richmond House to facilitate social distancing measures in the event of future coronavirus outbreaks.

The design for Richmond House as a temporary Commons Chamber has been paused. The House of Commons Commission has taken the decision to use Richmond House as temporary accommodation for Members and their staff.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the hon. Member representing the House of Commons Commission, what assessment has been made of the potential merits of reconstructing the Commons Chamber to facilitate social distancing in the event of future coronavirus outbreaks.

Strategic steers have been provided to the Sponsor Body by the management boards at the beginning of lockdown around longer-term work that may be required. These made reference to future coronavirus outbreaks or similar events, but further work is still required. The strategic review is seeking to validate the underlying assumptions.

20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2020 to Question 58080 on Gay Conversion Therapy, which company or organisation the Government has commissioned to undertake research on the scope of practices and experiences of those subjected to conversion therapy.

This government is committed to tackling the abhorrent practice of so-called ‘conversion therapy’ in the UK.

Our action will be determined by research to look at how best to define conversion therapy, where it is happening and who it is happening to.

When that is complete, we will bring forward proposals to ban conversion therapy, making sure that our measures are effective, so that innocent people no longer have to endure these vile practices.

Following a competitive tendering exercise, the Government Equalities Office has commissioned Coventry University to undertake initial research that sets out the scope of practices, where it is happening and how it affects those who have experienced it. The aims and objectives of this research, alongside it’s methodology, are included in the report, which will be published in due course.

Officials are also reviewing the legislative framework to establish the scope of conversion therapy practices that are not already unlawful. Where these dangerous practices are not already unlawful, we are examining the best ways to prevent them being conducted, without sending them underground. We will engage a wide range of stakeholders on these practices and any potential measures.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2020 to Question 58080 on Gay Conversion Therapy, if she will publish the terms of reference for the research that the Government has commissioned.

This government is committed to tackling the abhorrent practice of so-called ‘conversion therapy’ in the UK.

Our action will be determined by research to look at how best to define conversion therapy, where it is happening and who it is happening to.

When that is complete, we will bring forward proposals to ban conversion therapy, making sure that our measures are effective, so that innocent people no longer have to endure these vile practices.

Following a competitive tendering exercise, the Government Equalities Office has commissioned Coventry University to undertake initial research that sets out the scope of practices, where it is happening and how it affects those who have experienced it. The aims and objectives of this research, alongside it’s methodology, are included in the report, which will be published in due course.

Officials are also reviewing the legislative framework to establish the scope of conversion therapy practices that are not already unlawful. Where these dangerous practices are not already unlawful, we are examining the best ways to prevent them being conducted, without sending them underground. We will engage a wide range of stakeholders on these practices and any potential measures.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2020 to Question 58080 on Gay Conversion Therapy, what timescales the Government has agreed for the completion of the research that it has commissioned.

This government is committed to tackling the abhorrent practice of so-called ‘conversion therapy’ in the UK.

Our action will be determined by research to look at how best to define conversion therapy, where it is happening and who it is happening to.

When that is complete, we will bring forward proposals to ban conversion therapy, making sure that our measures are effective, so that innocent people no longer have to endure these vile practices.

Following a competitive tendering exercise, the Government Equalities Office has commissioned Coventry University to undertake initial research that sets out the scope of practices, where it is happening and how it affects those who have experienced it. The aims and objectives of this research, alongside it’s methodology, are included in the report, which will be published in due course.

Officials are also reviewing the legislative framework to establish the scope of conversion therapy practices that are not already unlawful. Where these dangerous practices are not already unlawful, we are examining the best ways to prevent them being conducted, without sending them underground. We will engage a wide range of stakeholders on these practices and any potential measures.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2020 to Question 58080 on Gay Conversion Therapy, what dangerous conversion therapy practices that are not already unlawful the Government has identified; and if she will make a statement.

This government is committed to tackling the abhorrent practice of so-called ‘conversion therapy’ in the UK.

Our action will be determined by research to look at how best to define conversion therapy, where it is happening and who it is happening to.

When that is complete, we will bring forward proposals to ban conversion therapy, making sure that our measures are effective, so that innocent people no longer have to endure these vile practices.

Following a competitive tendering exercise, the Government Equalities Office has commissioned Coventry University to undertake initial research that sets out the scope of practices, where it is happening and how it affects those who have experienced it. The aims and objectives of this research, alongside it’s methodology, are included in the report, which will be published in due course.

Officials are also reviewing the legislative framework to establish the scope of conversion therapy practices that are not already unlawful. Where these dangerous practices are not already unlawful, we are examining the best ways to prevent them being conducted, without sending them underground. We will engage a wide range of stakeholders on these practices and any potential measures.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
16th Dec 2021
To ask the Attorney General, what recent discussions she has had with Cabinet colleagues on the compatibility of the Nationality and Borders Bill with international law.

Any request for my advice is subject to the Law Officers’ Convention and this includes discussions with Cabinet colleagues on the compatibility of proposed legislation with international law.

The UK prides itself on its leadership within the international system, and that it discharges its international obligations in good faith.

Either the Solicitor General or I attend the Parliamentary Business and Legislation Committee, which scrutinises all of the government’s legislation before it reaches Parliament.

1st Feb 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what value of goods was (a) imported from and (b) exported to the Kingdom of Morocco in (i) 2021, (ii) 2022 and (iii) 2023.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

A response to the Hon gentleman’s Parliamentary Question of 1st February is attached.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
6th Sep 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total transport cost associated with the Prime Minister's trip to Balmoral was on 6 September 2022.

This information is not centrally held at this point in time.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent discussions he has had with (a) port operators, (b) HMRC and (c) transport operators on methods to speed up offloading processes for imported goods; and if he will make a statement.

Ports around the world are experiencing similar issues with container capacity and supply chains, so this is not unique to the UK.

We are working closely across government, and with the freight industry, including on HGV driver shortages, to work through the challenges some of our ports are facing at this important time of the year.

We are also in regular contact with key port and shipping operators, at Ministerial and official level, in relation to the wider global international shipping issues arising from increased disruption, demand, and supply chain matters that may be causing some delays to goods.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the quantity of goods held offshore as a result of delays in checking and approval processes for imported goods at ferry ports as at 18 October 2021; and if he will make a statement.

​There are currently no delays in Government checking and approval processes for goods being imported into the UK. Any delays in bringing goods into the UK are being caused by broader global supply chain issues.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress the Government has made on the public inquiry into the Government's response to the covid-19 pandemic, announced on 21 May 2021; and if he will make a statement.

On 12 May, the Prime Minister confirmed that a public inquiry into COVID-19 would be established on a statutory basis, with full formal powers, and that it will begin its work in spring 2022.

Further details will be set out in due course.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Specialised Committee on Fisheries has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Specialised Committee on Road Transport has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Specialised Committee on Aviation Safety has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Specialised Committee on Air Transport has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Specialised Committee on Energy has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Trade Specialised Committee on Administrative Cooperation in VAT and Recovery of Taxes and Duties has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Trade Specialised Committee on Level Playing Field for Open and Fair Competition has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) Government representatives are members of the Trade Specialised Committee on Regulatory Cooperation; and how often that committee has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Trade Specialised Committee on Public Procurement has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Trade Specialised Committee on Intellectual Property has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Trade Specialised Committee on Services, Investment and Digital Trade has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Trade Specialised Committee on Technical Barriers to Trade has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Trade Specialised Committee on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Trade Specialised Committee on Customs Cooperation and Rules of Origin has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Trade Specialised Committee on Goods has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Working Group on Medicinal Products has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Working Group on Motor Vehicles and Parts has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Working Group on Organic Products has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how often the Working Group on Social Security Coordination has met.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) Government representatives are members of the Specialised Committee on Law Enforcement and Judicial Cooperation.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) Government representatives are members of the Specialised Committee on Fisheries.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU representatives and (b) Government representatives are members of the Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Specialised Committee on Road Transport.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Specialised Committee on Aviation Safety.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 13 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Specialised Committee on Air Transport.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Specialised Committee on Energy.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Administrative Cooperation in VAT and Recovery of Taxes and Duties.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Level Playing Field for Open and Fair Competition.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Regulatory Cooperation.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Public Procurement.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Intellectual Property.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Services, Investment and Digital Trade.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Customs Cooperation and Rules of Origin.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Goods.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 12 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Trade Specialised Committee on Technical Barriers to Trade.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Working Group on Medicinal Products.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Working Group on Motor Vehicles and Parts.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Working Group on Organic Products.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU and (b) UK Government representatives sit on the Working Group on Social Security Coordination.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) establishes a Partnership Council to oversee implementation of the Agreement. The Partnership Council is supported by a network of other committees, including the Trade Partnership Committee and 18 Specialised Committees. Together, these fora enable the UK and EU to discuss the effective implementation of our trade deal.

The TCA Specialised Committee on Social Security Coordination met on 6 July. The Specialised Committee on Fisheries is scheduled for 20 July. No other TCA Committee has yet met. The EU and UK have to agree meeting dates jointly. We are currently working with the EU to agree dates for other Specialised Committee meetings. The UK and EU co-chairs of each TCA Committee and Working Group determine their respective delegations to each meeting. Numbers in each delegation will vary between meetings, depending on what agenda items are scheduled for discussion.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, when the Working Group on Social Security Coordination is due to first meet.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement establishes a standard set of committees and working groups to oversee its operation.

The Government is considering carefully the process around the establishment of these committees and working groups.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, what the selection process will be for the appointment of UK Government representatives to the Working Group on Social Security Coordination.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement establishes a standard set of committees and working groups to oversee its operation.

The Government is considering carefully the process around the establishment of these committees and working groups.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 15 of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, published on 24 December 2020, how many (a) EU representatives and (b) UK Government representatives will sit on the Working Group on Social Security Coordination.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement establishes a standard set of committees and working groups to oversee its operation.

The Government is considering carefully the process around the establishment of these committees and working groups.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what live PFI contracts his Department has; and for each of those contracts (a) what service is provided, (b) when the contract became live, (c) what the remaining term of the contract is and (d) what the annual repayments are.

The Cabinet Office has no live PFI contracts.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reasons employment and industrial relations are devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly but not to the Scottish Parliament.

The devolved nations, institutions and their respective devolution settlements are all different, reflecting their circumstances and history, and are considered as individual entities.

The Smith Commission did not recommend any change to the reserved status of employment and industrial relations policy in Scotland.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to publish Lord Dunlop's Review of UK Government Union Capability.

Since Lord Dunlop delivered his report, the Government has been carefully considering its recommendations on how departments can work most effectively to realise fully all the benefits of being a United Kingdom.

The Government is grateful for the work that Lord Dunlop has undertaken.

24th Jun 2020
To ask the hon. Member for Perth and North Perthshire, representing the House of Commons Commission, what recent assessment the Commission has made of the effectiveness of changes implemented on the parliamentary estate in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The House of Commons Commission has ensured that the House Service has implemented the Working safely during coronavirus guidance and meets the requirements to be defined as a covid-secure workplace. The Commission is satisfied that the steps taken appear to be working, but these will be kept under constant review and changes made when needed.

15th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will take steps to ensure that representatives of the environmental horticulture industry are included in her Department's Domestic Advisory Group.

The UK has established two Domestic Advisory Groups to meet the requirements of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) and several trade and sustainability chapters within our FTAs. The organisational membership of the UK TCA Domestic Advisory Group, and the Trade and Sustainable Development (TSD) Domestic Advisory Group, includes representative bodies from both the agricultural and environmental sectors in the UK.

The membership of the UK TCA and TSD Domestic Advisory Groups will be reviewed in 2024 and 2025 respectively. DBT and the FCDO will consider new applications during this process and encourage interested organisations to apply.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2023 to Question 196337 on Batteries: Factories, for what reason the financial support figure to Tata was not set out in the previous answer.

The Government continues to work with investors through our Automotive Transformation Fund (ATF) to progress plans to build a globally competitive electric vehicle supply chain in the UK.

We are engaging with a number of other companies to secure investment into the UK, so it would not be appropriate to reveal commercially sensitive figures.

We will publish details of any subsidy on the UK Subsidy Database (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/view-subsidies-awarded-by-uk-government), in line with our statutory obligations, in due course.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how much from the public purse will be spent on support for the proposed Tata Group gigafactory.

Details of our support to Tata Group will be published in due course as part of our regular transparency data.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade) (jointly with the Cabinet Office)
5th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment she has made of the impact of different levies for gas and electricity on heating bills.

Several crucial environmental and social policy costs are funded ('levied') through consumer bills to reduce the burden on the taxpayer. These schemes are vital to developing domestic sources of low-carbon electricity to reduce our exposure to volatile global fossil fuel markets and protect consumers in the long term.

A list of the current schemes that are funded through households and business energy bills is on the Ofgem website. https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/environmental-and-social-schemes

For households on default tariffs, Ofgem's published methodology for the price cap sets out how these costs should be passed to consumers, for instance the split between electricity and gas. https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/energy-price-cap

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
2nd Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent discussions she has had with EDF on (a) the adequacy of its capital funding for the completion of the Hinkley Point C Nuclear Power Station and (b) China General Nuclear's payment contributions beyond their contractual cap.

HPC is not a Government project. The financing of HPC is a matter for EDF and its shareholders and has not been the subject of discussion with the Secretary of State.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps her Department is taking to support the (a) development of and (b) private investment in marine energy technologies; and whether she has made an assessment of the implications for her policies of the announcement of Horizon Europe Programme funding for the EURO-TIDES multi-turbine tidal energy project.

The Government continues to support the development of marine energy technologies through research funding. This is on top of the unprecedented 94MW of tidal stream capacity that has been secured through the Contracts for Difference scheme.

The Department continues to engage with the Department for Business and Trade on maximising private investment opportunities for the marine energy sector.

The recent success of UK tidal stream developers in securing Horizon Europe funding will be of great benefit to the UK and is representative of the UK’s strength in the tidal sector.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what target her Department has set for the level of private equity finance to be raised for Sizewell C; how much equity has been committed (a) in total and (b) by EDF; what deadline there is for the conclusion of the private equity-raising process; and whether her Department has set a maximum level of equity that it will commit to this project.

The equity raise process for the Sizewell C process is ongoing and commercially sensitive – the Government cannot comment on these matters at this stage.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many Green Deal Scheme appeal cases in each Scottish constituency have been waiting for a final decision for (a) six to 11 months and (b) 12 months or longer since referral.

The numbers of complainants who have been waiting for six-to-eleven months or twelve months or longer, by Scottish Parliamentary Constituency, are as follows:

Parliamentary constituency

Six-to-eleven months

Twelve months or longer

Airdrie and Shotts

0

3

Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock

0

5

Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk

0

2

Central Ayrshire

0

9

Coatbridge, Chryston and Bellshill

0

4

Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East

0

9

East Dunbartonshire

0

2

East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow

0

10

East Lothian

0

2

East Renfrewshire

0

2

Edinburgh East

0

2

Edinburgh North and Leith

0

2

Edinburgh South

0

2

Falkirk

0

4

Glasgow Central

0

1

Glasgow East

0

2

Glasgow North

0

5

Glasgow North East

0

8

Glasgow North West

0

4

Glasgow South

0

1

Glasgow South West

0

1

Glenrothes

0

2

Inverclyde

0

5

Kilmarnock and Loudoun

0

12

Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath

0

5

Linlithgow and East Falkirk

0

2

Livingston

0

3

Midlothian

0

1

Motherwell and Wishaw

0

3

North Ayrshire and Arran

0

4

Ochil and South Perthshire

0

1

Paisley and Renfrewshire North

0

19

Rutherglen and Hamilton West

0

10

West Dunbartonshire

0

8

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many intention notices her Department has issued in response to complaints about the mis-selling of Green Deal loans by HELMS; and how many intention notices remain outstanding.

The Department has received 348 complaints about Green Deal loans by the former Green Deal provider, Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Limited (HELMS). Intention Notices – setting out the Secretary of State’s proposed decision – have been issued in 214 cases and final decisions have been issued for 170 cases. One hundred HELMS cases are yet to pass through the intention notice stage. Following final decisions, a total of 21 decisions have been appealed to the First-tier Tribunal.

Under the Green Deal Framework Regulations, the Secretary of State has the power to cancel or reduce loans where there has been a breach of the relevant rules, and she is satisfied that the consumer has suffered, or is likely to suffer, a substantive loss.

Cancellation or reduction has been proposed in respect of 135 complaints about mis-selling by HELMS. There is no formal step under the Regulations of ‘accepting’ or ‘rejecting’ proposed sanctions, but affected parties may make representations in response to Intention Notices. A total of 58 have made representations in response to proposed decisions on HELMS mis-selling complaints.

A small number of complaints about mis-selling by HELMS have been withdrawn but we do not hold data on the reasons why (it is not always made evident by the complainant). We therefore do not hold data on numbers of complainants who have decided to accept offers from the Green Deal Finance Company instead of pursuing their complaint with the Department.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many Green Deal loan appeals in respect of HELMS her Department has received; and how many such appeals have been completed.

The Department has received 348 complaints about Green Deal loans by the former Green Deal provider, Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Limited (HELMS). Intention Notices – setting out the Secretary of State’s proposed decision – have been issued in 214 cases and final decisions have been issued for 170 cases. One hundred HELMS cases are yet to pass through the intention notice stage. Following final decisions, a total of 21 decisions have been appealed to the First-tier Tribunal.

Under the Green Deal Framework Regulations, the Secretary of State has the power to cancel or reduce loans where there has been a breach of the relevant rules, and she is satisfied that the consumer has suffered, or is likely to suffer, a substantive loss.

Cancellation or reduction has been proposed in respect of 135 complaints about mis-selling by HELMS. There is no formal step under the Regulations of ‘accepting’ or ‘rejecting’ proposed sanctions, but affected parties may make representations in response to Intention Notices. A total of 58 have made representations in response to proposed decisions on HELMS mis-selling complaints.

A small number of complaints about mis-selling by HELMS have been withdrawn but we do not hold data on the reasons why (it is not always made evident by the complainant). We therefore do not hold data on numbers of complainants who have decided to accept offers from the Green Deal Finance Company instead of pursuing their complaint with the Department.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many offers of compensation have been made by her Department to consumers as a result of mis-selling by HELMS; and how many of those offers were (a) accepted and settled and (b) rejected by consumers in favour of their original offer of compensation from the Green Deal Finance Company.

The Department has received 348 complaints about Green Deal loans by the former Green Deal provider, Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Limited (HELMS). Intention Notices – setting out the Secretary of State’s proposed decision – have been issued in 214 cases and final decisions have been issued for 170 cases. One hundred HELMS cases are yet to pass through the intention notice stage. Following final decisions, a total of 21 decisions have been appealed to the First-tier Tribunal.

Under the Green Deal Framework Regulations, the Secretary of State has the power to cancel or reduce loans where there has been a breach of the relevant rules, and she is satisfied that the consumer has suffered, or is likely to suffer, a substantive loss.

Cancellation or reduction has been proposed in respect of 135 complaints about mis-selling by HELMS. There is no formal step under the Regulations of ‘accepting’ or ‘rejecting’ proposed sanctions, but affected parties may make representations in response to Intention Notices. A total of 58 have made representations in response to proposed decisions on HELMS mis-selling complaints.

A small number of complaints about mis-selling by HELMS have been withdrawn but we do not hold data on the reasons why (it is not always made evident by the complainant). We therefore do not hold data on numbers of complainants who have decided to accept offers from the Green Deal Finance Company instead of pursuing their complaint with the Department.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps her Department is taking to build on the last tidal stream auction for the forthcoming Allocation Round 6; and what the timescale is for publishing the final parameters for that round.

In November 2023 the Government published the core parameters for the sixth Contracts for Difference (CfD) allocation round (AR). The Government is currently developing the full auction parameters for AR 6 and will publish details of the full parameters ahead of the round opening in March 2024.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her Department (a) plans to ringfence tidal stream in future Contracts for Difference allocation rounds and (b) has made an assessment of the impact of ringfencing budget for tidal stream on levels of private investment in that energy supply.

Parameters for each allocation round of Contracts of Difference are set on an annual basis ahead of the round opening. They take into account evidence of the pipeline of available projects, as well as adherence to the scheme’s statutory objectives. The Government will publish details of the parameters ahead of Allocation Round 6 in March 2024.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the oral contribution of 24 June 2023 by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero in the eighteenth sitting of the Public Bill Committee on the Energy Bill [Lords], Official report column 544, when she plans to provide an update on the next steps on community energy generation.

Following Minister Bowie’s commitment on 24 June 2023 to update on next steps, on 11 August 2023 the Government announced the £10m Community Energy Fund, which enables rural and urban communities across England to access grant funding to develop local renewable energy projects for investment.

The fund is England only as the devolved nations have their own support schemes for community energy.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much money has been recovered from previous periods under the energy price cap by each energy company.

The setting of the energy price cap is a matter for the independent regulator Ofgem.

Ofgem remains the sole decision-maker over how it is calculated and has consulted extensively on its methodology for determining the cap level. Ofgem sets out its methodology and details the costs and impacts here: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/energy-price-cap-default-tariff-1-october-31-december-2023.

The Government has confidence in Ofgem, as the expert independent regulator, to set the cap at a level that reflects the underlying efficient costs of supplying energy.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much funding the Government has provided for the development of Sizewell C nuclear power station, broken down by (a) funding stream and (b) government department.

As a shareholder in Sizewell C, the Government announced an investment of £679 million in November 2022 and made available further amounts of £170 million and £341 million this year to continue driving forward the project’s development, towards the aim of making a final investment decision on a large-scale nuclear project this Parliament. The Government’s investment in Sizewell C has been funded from the Department's capital budgets agreed at the Autumn Statement 2022. This investment came on top of £100 million invested by EDF in Sizewell C in January 2022 which was provided by the Government through the Combined Option Agreement, this used departmental budgets in the financial year 2021/2022.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her Department has taken recent steps to help develop supply chains to meet the heat network development objectives set out in the Energy Bill.

The Department is working with industry and local authorities through the Heat Networks Delivery Unit to build a pipeline of Heat Network projects and is investing £500m in funds and programmes in the heat network sector through the Heat Network Transformation Programme.

The £288 million Green Heat Network Fund, launched in March 2022, requires applicants to show what actions they can take as part of their projects to enable growth within the supply chain that will provide lasting benefit to the wider market.

Through the £5 million Heat Training Grant the Government is further improving the skills and understanding of people working across the heat network sector.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her Department is taking steps with heat network businesses to increase skills in local government for heat network zoning.

Zoning will transform the development of district heat networks in towns and cities across England, aiming to increase private sector investment in the sector significantly. The government is working with industry and local authorities – investing half a billion pounds in funds and programmes – to build the heat network pipeline and prepare for implementation of regulation and heat network zoning.

A joint project has just commenced with the Danish government and agencies to provide mentoring support to more local authorities. Heat networks have also been included in the £5 million Heat Training Grant to build capability in the sector. The Government will consider further proposals for how to ready local authorities for this responsibility as part of the consultation on heat network zoning planned for this Autumn.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
19th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much funding his Department has allocated for the (a) design and (b) construction of nuclear small modular reactors.

In 2020, the Government committed up to £385m to an Advanced Nuclear Fund. Of this £385m, the Government has awarded up to £210m to support development of the Rolls Royce Small Modular Reactor (SMR) design.

The Government has also set up Great British Nuclear (GBN) to drive delivery of new nuclear projects. GBN has launched a Technology Selection Process (TSP) to select the best SMR technologies. We will offer funding to support technology development and site-specific design; a close partnership with GBN, which will be ready and able to provide developer capability; and support in accessing sites. The total level of development funding will be subject to future Spending Reviews.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2023 to Questions 192706 and 192707 on Hydroelectric Power: Electricity Generation, for what reasons his Department has not listed the dates when Department has met with representatives from (a) SSE and (b) Drax.

Ministers regularly meet with external stakeholders. Details of ministerial meetings with external organisations are published quarterly and can be found on GOV.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-energy-security-and-net-zero. Data covering the 1 January 2023 until 31 March 2023 is due to be published shortly. In line with Cabinet Office guidance, organisations are listed instead of individuals.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
11th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent assessment he has made of the whether retail energy companies are implementing remedies determined by the Energy Ombudsman within the 28-day compliance period.

Under the Energy Ombudsman’s Terms of Reference agreed with Ofgem, if an energy company fails to implement remedies determined by the Ombudsman and accepted by the consumer and the company within 28 days, the Ombudsman can refer the company to Ofgem and notify the consumer of their rights to pursue the implementation of the remedy directly, by asking the court to enforce it

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
11th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department holds data on the estimate of the cost of the proposed NuScale small modular reactor in the United States.

The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero regularly engages with a variety of Small Modular Reactor vendors about their technologies.

The Government is not able to disclose any cost estimates for vendors beyond what is already in the public domain, given that this is commercially sensitive information.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will list the (a) dates when and (b) venues where he has met representatives from Drax to discuss the Cruachan Dam extension pumped storage hydro scheme.

Ministers and officials meet with energy companies including SSE on a regular basis to discuss a wide range of department issues, including storage.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will list the (a) dates and (b) locations when his Department has met with representatives from SSE to discuss the (i) Coire Gas pumped hydro storage scheme and (ii) cap and floor revenue mechanism for electricity generation from pumped hydro storage.

Ministers and officials meet with energy companies including SSE on a regular basis to discuss a wide range of department issues, including storage.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many (a) outages and (b) other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Sizewell B power station in each year since 2010.

.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues. A certain level of outage is to be expected and demonstrative of a very well regulated and safe technology.

In 2021, nuclear power stations generated 46 TWh of electricity which was 15% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet is ageing and has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

In addition to the AGR fleet, Sizewell B will continue operating until at least 2035 and we have set out our ambition for a new generation of nuclear power stations, providing up to 24GW of electricity by 2050. The new reactor designs are very efficient. This includes new large-scale nuclear power stations like Hinkley Point C which alone will provide 3.2GW for around 60 years, and the next generation of small and advanced reactors are expected to be more efficient.

2010 – 2023 (June): Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

365

0

365

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

2022

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

82

2

53

2

57

2

122

5

109

3

63

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

20

2

20

1

14

1

24

2

22

2

96

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Sizewell B R1

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

2

15

1

36

5

143

1

196

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

4

19

2

64

4

13

2

53

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

2

88

0

0

0

0

4

83

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

4

17

1

48

1

12

1

47

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

18

3

109

3

79

1

46

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

2

86

1

4

0

0

0

0

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

1

1

16

1

4

1

62

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

2

1

65

1

63

1

58

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

5

86

1

90

2

4

0

30

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

0

0

1

257

0

0

1

65

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

1

6

0

271

0

0

1

2

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

4

72

2

71

4

142

1

127

2022

3

19

1

11

N/A

N/A

0

0

4

81

3

115

1

4

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

40

3

32

1

91

Notes on Table

  • Days non-operational represents days where a reactor did not generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is greater than 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2023 is until June 2023 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available due to no longer generating and transitioning to defueling as planned.
Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many (a) outages and (b) other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Torness power station in each year since 2010.

.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues. A certain level of outage is to be expected and demonstrative of a very well regulated and safe technology.

In 2021, nuclear power stations generated 46 TWh of electricity which was 15% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet is ageing and has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

In addition to the AGR fleet, Sizewell B will continue operating until at least 2035 and we have set out our ambition for a new generation of nuclear power stations, providing up to 24GW of electricity by 2050. The new reactor designs are very efficient. This includes new large-scale nuclear power stations like Hinkley Point C which alone will provide 3.2GW for around 60 years, and the next generation of small and advanced reactors are expected to be more efficient.

2010 – 2023 (June): Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

365

0

365

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

2022

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

82

2

53

2

57

2

122

5

109

3

63

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

20

2

20

1

14

1

24

2

22

2

96

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Sizewell B R1

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

2

15

1

36

5

143

1

196

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

4

19

2

64

4

13

2

53

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

2

88

0

0

0

0

4

83

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

4

17

1

48

1

12

1

47

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

18

3

109

3

79

1

46

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

2

86

1

4

0

0

0

0

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

1

1

16

1

4

1

62

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

2

1

65

1

63

1

58

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

5

86

1

90

2

4

0

30

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

0

0

1

257

0

0

1

65

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

1

6

0

271

0

0

1

2

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

4

72

2

71

4

142

1

127

2022

3

19

1

11

N/A

N/A

0

0

4

81

3

115

1

4

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

40

3

32

1

91

Notes on Table

  • Days non-operational represents days where a reactor did not generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is greater than 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2023 is until June 2023 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available due to no longer generating and transitioning to defueling as planned.
Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many (a) outages and (b) other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Hunterston B power station in each year since 2010.

.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues. A certain level of outage is to be expected and demonstrative of a very well regulated and safe technology.

In 2021, nuclear power stations generated 46 TWh of electricity which was 15% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet is ageing and has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

In addition to the AGR fleet, Sizewell B will continue operating until at least 2035 and we have set out our ambition for a new generation of nuclear power stations, providing up to 24GW of electricity by 2050. The new reactor designs are very efficient. This includes new large-scale nuclear power stations like Hinkley Point C which alone will provide 3.2GW for around 60 years, and the next generation of small and advanced reactors are expected to be more efficient.

2010 – 2023 (June): Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

365

0

365

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

2022

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

82

2

53

2

57

2

122

5

109

3

63

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

20

2

20

1

14

1

24

2

22

2

96

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Sizewell B R1

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

2

15

1

36

5

143

1

196

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

4

19

2

64

4

13

2

53

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

2

88

0

0

0

0

4

83

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

4

17

1

48

1

12

1

47

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

18

3

109

3

79

1

46

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

2

86

1

4

0

0

0

0

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

1

1

16

1

4

1

62

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

2

1

65

1

63

1

58

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

5

86

1

90

2

4

0

30

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

0

0

1

257

0

0

1

65

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

1

6

0

271

0

0

1

2

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

4

72

2

71

4

142

1

127

2022

3

19

1

11

N/A

N/A

0

0

4

81

3

115

1

4

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

40

3

32

1

91

Notes on Table

  • Days non-operational represents days where a reactor did not generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is greater than 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2023 is until June 2023 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available due to no longer generating and transitioning to defueling as planned.
Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many (a) outages and (b) other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Hinkley Point B power station in each year since 2010.

.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues. A certain level of outage is to be expected and demonstrative of a very well regulated and safe technology.

In 2021, nuclear power stations generated 46 TWh of electricity which was 15% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet is ageing and has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

In addition to the AGR fleet, Sizewell B will continue operating until at least 2035 and we have set out our ambition for a new generation of nuclear power stations, providing up to 24GW of electricity by 2050. The new reactor designs are very efficient. This includes new large-scale nuclear power stations like Hinkley Point C which alone will provide 3.2GW for around 60 years, and the next generation of small and advanced reactors are expected to be more efficient.

2010 – 2023 (June): Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

365

0

365

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

2022

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

82

2

53

2

57

2

122

5

109

3

63

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

20

2

20

1

14

1

24

2

22

2

96

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Sizewell B R1

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

2

15

1

36

5

143

1

196

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

4

19

2

64

4

13

2

53

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

2

88

0

0

0

0

4

83

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

4

17

1

48

1

12

1

47

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

18

3

109

3

79

1

46

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

2

86

1

4

0

0

0

0

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

1

1

16

1

4

1

62

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

2

1

65

1

63

1

58

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

5

86

1

90

2

4

0

30

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

0

0

1

257

0

0

1

65

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

1

6

0

271

0

0

1

2

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

4

72

2

71

4

142

1

127

2022

3

19

1

11

N/A

N/A

0

0

4

81

3

115

1

4

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

40

3

32

1

91

Notes on Table

  • Days non-operational represents days where a reactor did not generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is greater than 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2023 is until June 2023 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available due to no longer generating and transitioning to defueling as planned.
Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many (a) outages and (b) other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Heysham 2 power station in each year since 2010.

.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues. A certain level of outage is to be expected and demonstrative of a very well regulated and safe technology.

In 2021, nuclear power stations generated 46 TWh of electricity which was 15% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet is ageing and has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

In addition to the AGR fleet, Sizewell B will continue operating until at least 2035 and we have set out our ambition for a new generation of nuclear power stations, providing up to 24GW of electricity by 2050. The new reactor designs are very efficient. This includes new large-scale nuclear power stations like Hinkley Point C which alone will provide 3.2GW for around 60 years, and the next generation of small and advanced reactors are expected to be more efficient.

2010 – 2023 (June): Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

365

0

365

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

2022

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

82

2

53

2

57

2

122

5

109

3

63

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

20

2

20

1

14

1

24

2

22

2

96

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Sizewell B R1

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

2

15

1

36

5

143

1

196

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

4

19

2

64

4

13

2

53

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

2

88

0

0

0

0

4

83

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

4

17

1

48

1

12

1

47

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

18

3

109

3

79

1

46

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

2

86

1

4

0

0

0

0

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

1

1

16

1

4

1

62

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

2

1

65

1

63

1

58

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

5

86

1

90

2

4

0

30

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

0

0

1

257

0

0

1

65

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

1

6

0

271

0

0

1

2

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

4

72

2

71

4

142

1

127

2022

3

19

1

11

N/A

N/A

0

0

4

81

3

115

1

4

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

40

3

32

1

91

Notes on Table

  • Days non-operational represents days where a reactor did not generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is greater than 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2023 is until June 2023 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available due to no longer generating and transitioning to defueling as planned.
Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many (a) outages and (b) other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Hartlepool power station in each year since 2010.

.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues. A certain level of outage is to be expected and demonstrative of a very well regulated and safe technology.

In 2021, nuclear power stations generated 46 TWh of electricity which was 15% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet is ageing and has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

In addition to the AGR fleet, Sizewell B will continue operating until at least 2035 and we have set out our ambition for a new generation of nuclear power stations, providing up to 24GW of electricity by 2050. The new reactor designs are very efficient. This includes new large-scale nuclear power stations like Hinkley Point C which alone will provide 3.2GW for around 60 years, and the next generation of small and advanced reactors are expected to be more efficient.

2010 – 2023 (June): Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

365

0

365

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

2022

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

82

2

53

2

57

2

122

5

109

3

63

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

20

2

20

1

14

1

24

2

22

2

96

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Sizewell B R1

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

2

15

1

36

5

143

1

196

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

4

19

2

64

4

13

2

53

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

2

88

0

0

0

0

4

83

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

4

17

1

48

1

12

1

47

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

18

3

109

3

79

1

46

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

2

86

1

4

0

0

0

0

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

1

1

16

1

4

1

62

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

2

1

65

1

63

1

58

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

5

86

1

90

2

4

0

30

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

0

0

1

257

0

0

1

65

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

1

6

0

271

0

0

1

2

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

4

72

2

71

4

142

1

127

2022

3

19

1

11

N/A

N/A

0

0

4

81

3

115

1

4

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

40

3

32

1

91

Notes on Table

  • Days non-operational represents days where a reactor did not generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is greater than 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2023 is until June 2023 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available due to no longer generating and transitioning to defueling as planned.
Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many (a) outages and (b) other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Dungeness B power station in each year since 2010.

.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues. A certain level of outage is to be expected and demonstrative of a very well regulated and safe technology.

In 2021, nuclear power stations generated 46 TWh of electricity which was 15% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet is ageing and has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

In addition to the AGR fleet, Sizewell B will continue operating until at least 2035 and we have set out our ambition for a new generation of nuclear power stations, providing up to 24GW of electricity by 2050. The new reactor designs are very efficient. This includes new large-scale nuclear power stations like Hinkley Point C which alone will provide 3.2GW for around 60 years, and the next generation of small and advanced reactors are expected to be more efficient.

2010 – 2023 (June): Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

365

0

365

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

2022

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

82

2

53

2

57

2

122

5

109

3

63

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

20

2

20

1

14

1

24

2

22

2

96

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Sizewell B R1

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

2

15

1

36

5

143

1

196

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

4

19

2

64

4

13

2

53

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

2

88

0

0

0

0

4

83

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

4

17

1

48

1

12

1

47

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

18

3

109

3

79

1

46

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

2

86

1

4

0

0

0

0

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

1

1

16

1

4

1

62

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

2

1

65

1

63

1

58

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

5

86

1

90

2

4

0

30

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

0

0

1

257

0

0

1

65

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

1

6

0

271

0

0

1

2

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

4

72

2

71

4

142

1

127

2022

3

19

1

11

N/A

N/A

0

0

4

81

3

115

1

4

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

40

3

32

1

91

Notes on Table

  • Days non-operational represents days where a reactor did not generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is greater than 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2023 is until June 2023 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available due to no longer generating and transitioning to defueling as planned.
Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many (a) outages and (b) other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Heysham power station in each year since 2010.

.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues. A certain level of outage is to be expected and demonstrative of a very well regulated and safe technology.

In 2021, nuclear power stations generated 46 TWh of electricity which was 15% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet is ageing and has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

In addition to the AGR fleet, Sizewell B will continue operating until at least 2035 and we have set out our ambition for a new generation of nuclear power stations, providing up to 24GW of electricity by 2050. The new reactor designs are very efficient. This includes new large-scale nuclear power stations like Hinkley Point C which alone will provide 3.2GW for around 60 years, and the next generation of small and advanced reactors are expected to be more efficient.

2010 – 2023 (June): Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

365

0

365

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

2022

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

82

2

53

2

57

2

122

5

109

3

63

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

20

2

20

1

14

1

24

2

22

2

96

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Sizewell B R1

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

2

15

1

36

5

143

1

196

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

4

19

2

64

4

13

2

53

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

2

88

0

0

0

0

4

83

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

4

17

1

48

1

12

1

47

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

18

3

109

3

79

1

46

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

2

86

1

4

0

0

0

0

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

1

1

16

1

4

1

62

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

2

1

65

1

63

1

58

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

5

86

1

90

2

4

0

30

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

0

0

1

257

0

0

1

65

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

1

6

0

271

0

0

1

2

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

4

72

2

71

4

142

1

127

2022

3

19

1

11

N/A

N/A

0

0

4

81

3

115

1

4

2023

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

2

40

3

32

1

91

Notes on Table

  • Days non-operational represents days where a reactor did not generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is greater than 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2023 is until June 2023 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available due to no longer generating and transitioning to defueling as planned.
Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the letter from the National Infrastructure Commission and Climate Change Committee to the Deputy Prime Minister entitled Improving infrastructure resilience and adapting to the change in climate, dated 26 April 2023, whether his Department is taking steps to improve critical infrastructure preparedness by supporting radio spectrum access for the energy system.

The Department initiated a technical project that will calculate the financial costs of a range of radio communication options to support the use cases that will emerge alongside the transition to Net Zero. This study will inform, and be informed by, Ofcom’s review of the future communication needs of the utilities (electricity, gas, and water) that is due for publication in Q1 2023-2024.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
25th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has had recent discussions with the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology on taking steps to provide radio spectrum access for the energy networks industry to implement smart grid technologies.

The Department initiated a technical project that will calculate the financial costs of a range of radio communication options to support the further development of a smart grid. This study will inform, and be informed by, Ofcom’s review of the future communication needs of the utilities (electricity, gas, and water) that is due for publication in Q1 2023-2024.

The Department will draw on the recommendations of that report and, if a spectrum solution is recommended, work with the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology to assist industry partners in securing the relevant spectrum allocation.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the policy paper entitled Powering up Britain, published on 30 March 2023, what estimate he has made of when policies aimed at rebalancing gas and electricity costs will result in a reduction in (a) electric heat and (b) transport costs.

The Government has committed to outlining a clear approach to ‘rebalancing’ by the end of 2023/24, and to have made significant progress affecting relative prices by the end of 2024.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
16th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what the total capacity of offshore windfarm generation connected to the grid is as of 16 May 2023; and what estimate he has made of that capacity in each year between 2024 and 2030.

As reported in Energy Trends published in March 2023, the UK’s installed capacity was 13.9GW at the end of December 2022. The figure for May 2023 will be published in September 2023.

There is currently 7.7GW of Offshore Wind under construction and 6.2GW finalising procurement and preparing for construction. Additional capacity comes forward through each annual Contracts for Difference Allocation Round.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, pursuant to the Answer of 24 April 2023 to Question 180681 on Electricity Generation, what the constraint payment total was in each year from 2105 to 2019.

The total cost of constraint payments for each year are: £370 million in 2015, £349 million in 2016, £481 million in 2017, £514 million in 2018 and £585 million in 2019. These costs are nominal for each respective year. These data are publicly available at https://data.nationalgrideso.com/balancing/constraint-breakdown.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many people have not taken up their entitlement to energy bills support scheme vouchers for prepayment meters in (a) Scotland, (b) England and (c) Wales as of 2 May 2023.

The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero (DESNZ) collects information about the payments made under the Energy Bills Support Scheme GB (EBSS GB) in England, Wales and Scotland. Transparency data on Energy Bills Support Scheme GB payments made by electricity suppliers to customers is reported monthly and can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-payments-made-by-electricity-suppliers-to-customers.

Between October-February, 986,790 vouchers were issued and 735,620 were redeemed in Scotland (251,170 unredeemed). Between October-February, 7,422,090 vouchers were issued and 5,520,140 were redeemed in England (1,901,950 unredeemed). Between October-February, 458,070 vouchers were issued and 355,060 were redeemed in Wales (103,010 unredeemed).

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
2nd May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many people in Scotland have not taken up their entitlement to energy bills support scheme vouchers for prepayment meters as of 2 May 2023, broken down by Parliamentary constituency.

The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero collects information about the payments made under the Energy Bills Support Scheme GB (EBSS GB) in England, Wales and Scotland. Transparency data on Energy Bills Support Scheme GB payments made by electricity suppliers to customers is reported monthly and can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-bills-support-scheme-payments-made-by-electricity-suppliers-to-customers.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
27th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, which (a) companies and (b) organisations have made representations to his Department on the adequacy of the eligibility criteria for the ECO4 scheme; and how many and what proportion of those representations relate to difficulties in identifying properties suitable to progress to installations under that scheme.

The Government has been made aware of difficulties in delivering ECO4 by energy suppliers and energy efficiency organisations and is currently investigating these.

The Government previously consulted on some smaller changes to the scheme that seek to make delivery easier in some specific cases. The proposed amendments were covered in the consultation for the GB Insulation Scheme, and the Government Response to this was published on 30 March.

The Government continues to monitor the delivery of ECO4 and will consider changes if necessary. Changes to the policy details of the scheme would require public consultation and regulatory change.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what proportion of houses assessed for upgrades under (a) ECO3 and (b) ECO4 were eligible to meet the requirements of that scheme.

The Government does not carry out assessments for house upgrades, nor hold data on the number of assessments carried out by suppliers or installers.

While Government sets the eligibility requirements for ECO, the decision on which measures to install and to whom are made by the energy suppliers or installers. These parties may base their assessment on the suitability of the homes from a practical perspective and the cost effectiveness of installing there.

Under ECO3, 1,117,900 measures were installed in around 597,800 unique households.

It is estimated that around 800,000 measures in 450,000 homes will be delivered under ECO4.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether he has made a comparative assessment of the cost assumptions for the ECO4 scheme with those set out in the Great British Insulation scheme consultation; if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of uprating the cost assumptions for the ECO4 scheme; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is monitoring the delivery of ECO4 against the current cost assumptions and will consider changes if necessary. Changing the cost assumptions may require either a change to the overall energy bill reduction target, the estimated funding, policy details of the scheme, or a combination of all three. Such changes would require public consultation and regulatory change.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department has set a target for the average number of energy efficiency installations under the ECO4 scheme; how many have been installed on average in each month since July 2022; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Energy Security and Net Zero expects that 800,000 measures in around 450,000 homes will be delivered under ECO4.

Information on the number of energy efficiency measures installed monthly in homes through ECO4 since July 2022 can be found in the Household Energy Efficiency statistics by visiting https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/household-energy-efficiency-national-statistics.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
26th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if he will publish a monthly breakdown of the number of (a) installations and (b) homes with energy efficiency measures under ECO4.

The monthly breakdown of energy efficiency measures installed under ECO4 is published in the Household Energy Efficiency Statistics, which can be found by visiting: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/household-energy-efficiency-statistics-headline-release-april-2023.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether the tidal stream ringfence can increase following the closure of the Qualification Assessment Window.

The CfD application window will close on 24 April 2023, following which the Electricity Market Reform Delivery Body (National Grid Electricity Systems Operator) will assess applications and provide my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State with a valuation of all qualifying applicants. The Secretary of State may then consider whether to increase the budget for the allocation round.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when his Department plans to respond to the letter of 7 March 2023 from the hon. Member for Kilmarnock and Loudoun on nuclear power.

I wrote to the hon. Member on 17 April about nuclear power.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much funding his Department has allocated to the Track 2 Carbon Capture Usage and Storage clusters.

The Government launched Track-2 of the CCUS Cluster Sequencing Process in March to identify two additional clusters, contributing to the Government's ambition to capture 20-30 million tonnes CO2 per year across the economy by 2030.

The Government has supported industrial clusters (including potential Track 2 clusters) since 2019 to develop their Front End and Engineering Design (FEED) studies for the deployment of CCUS and other decarbonisation infrastructure, by providing £171 million of funding via the UKRI-led Industrial Decarbonisation Challenge (IDC).

On 15 March 2023, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced an unprecedented £20 billion investment in the early development of CCUS to help meet the Government’s climate commitments. This funding is not currently allocated to specific projects or tracks.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much funding his Department has allocated to the succesful Track-1 carbon capture, usage and storage projects.

My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced £20bn of funding to store as much carbon and create as many jobs as possible through Track-1 and beyond.

Track 1 Projects have only been shortlisted at this point and are not guaranteed funding until negotiations are complete.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what money has been allocated to the (a) Acorn, (b) Hynet and (c) East Coast carbon capture scheme cluster.

The Government is supporting industrial clusters to develop their Front End and Engineering Design (FEED) studies, for the deployment of CCUS and other decarbonisation infrastructure, through the provision of £171 million of funding via the UKRI-led Industrial Decarbonisation Challenge (IDC). This includes:

  • HyNet: c. £32.8m;
  • Acorn: c. £31.3m;
  • ECC: c. £86.2m.
Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how much has been paid in in constraint payments each year since 2015.

National Grid ESO compares the cost of constraint payments and of building new network to ensure efficient investment decisions are made. National Grid ESO publishes constraint payments in its ‘Monthly Balancing Services Summary’ available at https://data.nationalgrideso.com/balancing/mbss.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps his Department are taking to encourage consumers to use (a) electric vehicle charging points and (b) heat pumps at off-peak hours.

The Government is facilitating flexibility from technologies such as smart charging of electric vehicles and flexible heating systems by delivering the Government’s Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan.

The Electric Vehicle Smart Charge Point Regulations 2021 require that domestic and workplace charge points have smart functionality.

The Government is also introducing a smart mandate which will require electric heating appliances with the greatest flexibility potential, including heat pumps, to have smart functionality. These measures will ensure consumers are able to use their charge points and heat pumps in a smart and flexible way, should they choose to.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of working with (a) energy network companies and (b) other relevant stakeholders to find solutions to connection queues at the distribution level.

The Government is working with Ofgem, electricity network companies and connection stakeholders to release network capacity and improve the network connection process to reduce connection timescales. This includes participating in the Energy Network Association Strategic Connections Group, which is addressing distribution network connection issues, including connection queues.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that investment in the energy grid infrastructure will help to support its net zero targets.

The electrification of transport, heating and other sectors, to improve energy security and meet net zero, will increase demand on the electricity network. Government is committed to transforming the electricity network to meet this demand, as set out, jointly with Ofgem, in the Electricity Networks Strategic Framework.

The amount network operators can invest is regulated by Ofgem. In its current distribution network price control, Ofgem has allowed £3.1bn for distribution network upgrades to support the uptake of low-carbon technologies. Ofgem has also set out approximately £20bn worth of transmission network projects to be accelerated.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether his Department has had recent discussions with network operators on preparing for potential changes in network capacity arising from the electrification of the UK energy system.

The electrification of transport, heating and other sectors, to improve energy security and meet net zero, will increase demand on the electricity network. Government is committed to transforming the electricity network to meet this demand, as set out, jointly with Ofgem, in the Electricity Networks Strategic Framework.

The amount network operators can invest is regulated by Ofgem. In its current distribution network price control, Ofgem has allowed £3.1bn for distribution network upgrades to support the uptake of low-carbon technologies. Ofgem has also set out approximately £20bn worth of transmission network projects to be accelerated.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps his Department is taking to reduce electricity network capacity constraints at the distribution and transmission level.

The electrification of transport, heating and other sectors, to improve energy security and meet net zero, will increase demand on the electricity network. Government is committed to transforming the electricity network to meet this demand, as set out, jointly with Ofgem, in the Electricity Networks Strategic Framework.

The amount network operators can invest is regulated by Ofgem. In its current distribution network price control, Ofgem has allowed £3.1bn for distribution network upgrades to support the uptake of low-carbon technologies. Ofgem has also set out approximately £20bn worth of transmission network projects to be accelerated.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, how many designs for small modular reactors have been submitted for Generic Design Assessment to the Office of Nuclear Regulation; and if he will list the (a) date of submission, (b) stage of assessment process and (c) anticipated programme for each to get to design approval.

In April 2022, the nuclear regulators began a Generic Design Assessment (GDA) looking at the safety, security, and environmental impact of the Rolls-Royce SMR Ltd reactor design, which is the first Small Modular Reactor design to be assessed in the UK.

The Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR) publishes and maintains information on current and completed Generic Design Assessments on their website, which can be found at the following link: https://www.onr.org.uk/new-reactors/assessment.htm.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to the BBC Panorama programme entitled The Green Energy Scandal Exposed, whether Ofgem is (a) investigating or (b) auditing Drax Group PLC for that company's compliance with sustainability regulations.

Ofgem undertakes regular audits of Drax’s adherence to their obligations under the Renewables Obligation scheme. As part of ongoing scheme compliance monitoring, an additional assurance audit is underway.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
22nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, when his Department last provided a policy and position paper to Ofgem; and when his Department plans next to provide a policy and position paper to Ofgem.

The power to designate a Strategy and Policy Statement (SPS) for energy policy, that Ofgem must have regard to, was enacted by the Energy Act 2013.

The Government has consulted Scottish and Welsh Ministers on a draft SPS and taken their comments into account. The Government intends to publicly consult on an updated draft soon.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of classifying nuclear power as green energy on the ability of non-nuclear renewable energy sources to receive green energy funding.

The Government has stated its intention to include nuclear in the UK Green Taxonomy, subject to consultation, incentivising private investment in this important technology alongside renewables. The Government will provide a further update on the taxonomy as part of its publication of the Green Finance Strategy in the coming weeks.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what recent discussions he has had with EDF on Hinkley Point C and (a) the cap limit for CGN, (b) whether CGN will provide further capital, (c) what additional capital EDF can provide and (d) other capital financing issues; and if he will make a statement.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State has not had discussions with EDF on the financing of Hinkley Point C. Financing of the project is a matter for EDF and its co-developer CGN. Any additional costs incurred during construction are the responsibility of EDF and its partners and will not fall on taxpayers and consumers.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
23rd Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of EDF's estimate that Hinkley Point C will cost £33 billion; and what recent estimate he has made of the cost of Sizewell C.

The delivery of Hinkley Point C is a matter for EDF and its co-developer CGN. Any additional costs incurred during construction are the responsibility of EDF and its partners and will not fall on taxpayers and consumers.

For Sizewell C, following the Government investment into the project in November 2022 to become a project shareholder, project development is ongoing with EDF and the project company. Details of these developments are commercially sensitive.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps his Department is taking to help support (a) investment and (b) growth of tidal stream companies in coastal communities in (i) Scotland and (ii) the UK.

Tidal stream companies are eligible to apply for the Contracts for Difference (CfD) scheme, the UK’s main mechanism for supporting low-carbon generation. Over 40MW of new tidal stream power was secured in Scotland and Wales by four developers last year. The next CfD round, including tidal stream, will take place in March 2023.

Since 2003 Government has provided innovation funding of £175m to the wave and tidal sectors. Tidal stream projects are also eligible for a suite of research funding programmes including the UK Research and Innovation matched Horizon funding.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
27th Apr 2023
When she plans to publish her Department's semiconductor strategy.

Our forthcoming National Semiconductor Strategy will set out an ambitious approach to grow the UK’s world-leading expertise in this critical sector.

Developed through extensive engagement with industry experts and like-minded international partners, it will directly contribute to long-term prosperity as well as our efforts to shape the emerging global digital and technology order.

We will publish our strategy as soon as possible.

15th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the findings of the Government’s 2022 Research and innovation workforce survey report.

On 2 March the Government published the results of the first sector wide UK Research and Innovation workforce survey. The UK Science and Technology Framework outlines the Government’s strategic vision and actions for Talent and Skills. This report will support the Government’s work to make the UK the best place in the world to work in research and innovation. It will address evidence gaps related to skills, sectoral and geographical mobility and diversity and inclusion. The publication of the report is a key milestone in delivering the Government’s R&D People and Culture Strategy and will help us to create an attractive, inclusive and diverse working environment for top talent in research and innovation.
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether she plans to take steps to work with the EU and the Horizon programme on research and innovation projects; and if she will make a statement.

The Government has been tirelessly pushing the EU to implement the UK’s association to Horizon Europe. The EU has continued to delay UK association to the detriment of researchers and businesses in both the UK and EU.

During these delays the Government introduced the Horizon Europe guarantee, which was recently extended to cover all Horizon calls that close on or before 31 March 2023, enabling UK researchers to participate in international R&I projects.

If the EU’s delay continues, the Government is ready with a set of alternative programs to deploy funds set aside for Horizon fund to honour the R+D ringfence commitment made by the Chancellor at CSR21 to strengthen UK International R+D.

13th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Strikes (Minimum Service Levels) Bill, whether he has launched the consultation on adequate minimum service levels for fire, ambulance and rail services; which stakeholders he will consult with; and when he plans for that consultation to conclude.

The Government will consult shortly on minimum service levels for fire, ambulance, and rail services, recognising the severe disruption that the public faces when these services are impacted by strikes, especially the immediate risk to public safety when blue light services are disrupted.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to review the shared ownership provisions in the Infrastructure Act 2015 (Section 38, Schedule 6) as required by that Act; and what assessment he has made of the potential contribution of shared ownership and community energy in producing an increase in locally supported onshore wind to achieve net zero and meet the UK’s decarbonisation targets.

The Government wants to ensure that local communities are able to participate in, and benefit from, onshore wind developments as the UK increases renewable deployment to reach net zero. The Government is aware of the requirement to review the provisions in Section 38 and Schedule 6 of the Infrastructure Act 2015 and will do so as soon as is reasonably practicable. The Government will also consult in Spring 2023 on local partnerships for communities who wish to host new onshore wind infrastructure in return for benefits.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made a recent assessment of whether the transmission grid would be capable of handling the proposed output from Sizewell C power station.

Network companies are responsible for ensuring that there is sufficient network capacity to support generation and demand on the grid. Ofgem, as the independent regulator, is responsible for incentivising them to do so efficiently through the electricity network price control.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent progress has been made on the construction of the Hinkley Connection Project; if he will make an estimate of the completion date for that project; and if he will make a statement.

The Hinkley Connection Project is led by National Grid Electricity Transmission (NGET), the electricity transmission owner in England and Wales. Ofgem, as the independent energy regulator, is responsible for the regulation of network projects. NGET sets the associated allowances, timelines and incentives through the electricity transmission network price control.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate his Department has made of the cost of the Hinkley Connection Project.

The Hinkley Connection Project is led by National Grid Electricity Transmission (NGET), the electricity transmission owner in England and Wales. Ofgem, as the independent energy regulator, is responsible for the regulation of network projects. NGET sets the associated allowances, timelines and incentives through the electricity transmission network price control.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that all regions of the UK benefit from hydrogen investment.

In the Energy Security Strategy, the Government doubled its ambition from 5GW to up to 10GW of low carbon production capacity by 2030, including a commitment to host yearly electrolytic allocation funding rounds for projects across the UK. Together with a clear policy and regulatory environment, the Government expects to mobilise over £9 billion of private investment in hydrogen production alone across all regions of the UK by 2030.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to help ensure that the low-carbon hydrogen production pipeline develops outside of the UK’s industrial clusters.

The Government is aware of a potential pipeline of almost 20GW of projects across the UK in every corner of the Union. The Government launched the first joint Hydrogen Production Business Model and Net Zero Hydrogen Fund allocation round to support electrolytic projects across the UK this year, with the aim to award contracts in 2023. Transport and storage (T&S) will also be essential to grow the hydrogen economy, including outside of industrial clusters. Government will publish a response to its consultation on T&S business models next year.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential economic benefits of increasing the UK’s production of low-carbon hydrogen.

The UK’s hydrogen ambition – up to 10GW of production capacity by 2030 – offers significant economic opportunities across the country. Government analysis suggests the sector could be worth over £900m and support 12,000 jobs by 2030, unlocking over £9bn in private investment in production alone.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to help increase the production of low-carbon hydrogen in the UK.

The Government has doubled its ambition to up to 10GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030, subject to affordability and value for money.

The UK's increased ambition will drive significant private sector investment, delivered by a strong investable proposition through the Hydrogen Production Business Model, which will help to address the key barrier to deployment, the cost gap compared to fossil fuels. The Net Zero Hydrogen Fund will also provide up to £240 million to 2025 to support the development and construction of new low carbon hydrogen production plants.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
7th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the role of hydrogen blending in encouraging investment in the hydrogen sector.

The Government intends to reach a decision in 2023 on whether to allow blending of up to 20% hydrogen (by volume) into gas distribution networks. Blending may help to bring forward investment and support early growth of the hydrogen economy. BEIS recently considered the potential value of blending through a consultation on hydrogen transport and storage infrastructure business models and regulation and is currently reviewing the submitted responses. The Government is working with industry and regulators to assess the associated costs and risks of blending, which will need to be carefully managed if permitted.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether a backstop date has been agreed between the Low Carbon Contracts Company and EDF for the purposes of (a) possible contract termination and (b) the start of the Hinkley Point C Contract for Difference.

The Longstop Date in the Hinkley Point C (HPC) contract, the point at which the Contract for Difference (CfD) may be terminated for non-completion, has moved from 1 November 2033 to 1 November 2036. The extension reflects the work of the Low Carbon Contracts Company with the HPC project to understand the impacts of COVID-19, and the outcome of BEIS’ negotiations with China General Nuclear and EDF on Sizewell C. It has no impact on the project’s anticipated delivery date and consumers will pay nothing towards HPC until the project starts generating electricity.

The Longstop Date is the latest possible date that the CfD could start. EDF is targeting commencement of electricity generation at HPC, and therefore the start of the CfD, in June 2027.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what is the current estimated strike rate for Hinkley Point C for the estimated operational year of 2027 based on the annual RPI increases since the 2013 agreed strike rate of £92.50 and future estimates of annual inflation.

The Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC) is the counterparty to the Contracts for Difference (CfD) with the Developer of Hinkley Point C. The LCCC does not forecast the future strike price but does update the strike price annually based on actual inflation (CPI) data (and other parameters) in line with the CfD contractual requirements.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what is the estimated strike rate for Hinkley Point C based on the annual RPI increases since the 2013 agreed strike rate of £92.50.

The current strike price published by the Low Carbon Contracts Company (LCCC) is £106.12£MWh.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the oral evidence given to the Science and Technology Committee on 2 November 2022, on Delivering Nuclear Power, HC 626, what stake the Government plans to take in Sizewell C nuclear power station.

The Government aims to conclude negotiations this month, subject to final approvals for the investment. Further details will be announced in due course.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
21st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what size stake in the Sizewell C nuclear power station the Government expects to take as a result of the funding of up to £700 million it has announced for that project.

The Government aims to conclude negotiations this month, subject to final approvals for the investment. Further details will be announced in due course.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will provide a breakdown of the number of Green Deal Loans put in place by the company HELMS by constituency to which those loans applied.

The number of Green Deal plans provided by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) in each constituency in the UK is shown in the attached table.

To manage the risk of revealing personal or commercial data, the Government approach is not to release non-zero counts of fewer than five for a small geographic area.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 21 June 2022 to Question 19632, and pursuant to the Answer of 23 September 2022 to Question 51767, whether China General Nuclear still remains a shareholder of NNB.

China General Nuclear has a 20 percent stake in the Sizewell C project. The Government has been in commercial negotiations on the project since January 2021. No decision, including on a final configuration of investors, has been made.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the report by Panorama, aired on 3 October 2022 on Drax power station and the burning of wood from primary forests; and what steps he is taking to ensure that biomass complies with strict sustainability criteria.

The regulator, Ofgem, is responsible for auditing the sustainability of biomass used by biomass electricity generators who receive support under the Renewables Obligation and has a process in place for this. As is routine, Ofgem is establishing whether the sustainability criteria have been met by the generator. Sustainability information is publicly available on Ofgem’s website, with the latest dataset accessible here: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/biomass-sustainability-dataset-2019-20.

The forthcoming Biomass Strategy will set out recommendations for enhancing the UK’s stringent biomass sustainability criteria even further.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with his US counterpart on the fines levied on Drax as part of their wood pellet operations, which supplies pellets for Drax's Power plant.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State has not met with his US counterpart to discuss this issue specifically. UK Government officials continue to liaise with their US counterparts on biomass sourcing from the US, including on the regulatory requirements wood pellet producers are required to adhere to and any associated issues.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 21 June 2022 to Question 19632, what discussions he has had with (a) EDF and (b) NNB holding company limited on configuration of its investors; and whether China Nuclear remains a shareholder in that company.

The Government has been in commercial negotiations with both EDF and the Sizewell C project company since January 2021. These negotiations are ongoing and commercially sensitive.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the impact assessment BEIS039(F) for the Nuclear Energy (Financing) Act 2022, if he will make a comparative assessment of the equity of utilising a 9 per cent hurdle rate to estimate the cost of a new nuclear power station to be constructed under a Contract for Difference and a maximum 6 per cent hurdle rate for the cost of constructing new nuclear power station under a RAB model.

The Impact Assessment (IA) calculated the difference in the cost of building and financing an illustrative large-scale nuclear plant, funded by the Regulated Asset Base (RAB) or Contracts for Difference (CfD) model. Several assumptions were made to reflect uncertainty around project cost and likely hurdle rate for investors.

The RAB enables lower cost of finance, by providing a revenue stream to the developer during construction. The IA shows that RAB results in better value for consumers over the project lifetime and reduces total project costs. Paragraphs 58-61 https://bills.parliament.uk/bills/3057/publications explain the different hurdles rates assumed under a CfD compared to RAB.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Prime Minister's oral contribution on 8 September 2022, Official Report, column 398, if he will set out the green levies to be suspended from energy bills; and if he will provide (a) the total value per household bill of suspending those levies and (b) how those levies will be funded.

The green levies to be temporarily suspended from household energy bills are the Energy Company Obligation (ECO), Feed in Tariff (FiT), Green Gas Levy (GGL), Renewable Obligation (RO), and the Warm Home Discount (WHD). The total value per household of average usage of suspending these levies is equivalent to £150 a year and the funding of these levies will be met by the Government through the Energy Price Guarantee during the temporary suspension.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the (a) service and (b) shareholding stakes procured in the NNB Holding Company for the development of Sizewell C power station from the £700 million announced by the Prime Minister on 1 September 2022.

The Sizewell C Project could play an important role in our ambitions for nuclear new build and delivery of energy security and, subject to the outcome of negotiations, the Government is prepared to invest up to £700m at this stage in its development. Negotiations over the Project are ongoing and are commercially sensitive.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes were upgraded to energy performance certificate band C in each year since 2010.

Estimates of the number of dwellings by EPC band are made for England in the English Housing Survey headline report annex table 2.8. The table below collates the time series requested:

Estimated Number of Dwellings in England by Energy Efficiency Rating (Thousands)

A-C

D-G

Number of homes improved to Band A-C[1]

2009

2,595

19,740

2010

2,971

19,573

167

2011

3,348

19,406

167

2012

4,141

18,577

829

2013

5,373

17,881

696

2014

6,125

17,246

635

2015

6,700

16,843

403

2016

7,049

16,684

159

2017

7,214

16,736

-52

2018

8,290

15,883

853

2019

9,854

14,560

1,323

2020

10,856

12,678

1,881

Source: English Housing Survey

[1] The estimate of homes upgraded to band A-C from D-G has been derived by subtraction of the previous year’s estimate of D-G homes.

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/english-housing-survey-2020-to-2021-headline-report.

It should be noted that it is difficult to make accurate year on year comparisons and there have been slight changes in the methodology used to derive EPC ratings over time. Overall, the number of dwellings in England is increasing and so the total increase in band A-C dwellings is higher than the number of D-Gs improved to band A-C due to new dwellings.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether risk assessments have been undertaken to assess the risk of Torness nuclear power station having to go offline before 2028.

Torness, like other Advanced Gas-Cooled reactor power stations, is subject to graphite cracking, which limits its safe operational life.

Operational dates of the nuclear fleet are kept under constant review by EDF and the Office for Nuclear Regulator (ONR) with any extensions being agreed between them. The Department is in regular communication with EDF and the ONR but has no formal role in these decisions.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an estimate of the amount of electricity generated in GW by (a) onshore and (b) offshore wind projects in Scotland that will be subject to price controls for gas distribution and electricity transmission under RIIO-2 in each of the next seven years.

Ofgem regulates gas and electricity distribution and transmission network companies through the RIIO price control framework. The current price control RIIO-T2 provides up to £40bn for investment in the network between now and 2026 that will support our net zero and energy security ambitions while protecting consumers. Electricity generation is not subject to the price control process.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what data he holds on the number of (a) new and (b) existing homes in which energy efficiency measures were installed in each year since 2010.

Information regarding the number of existing households receiving energy efficiency measures through Government funded schemes from 2013 are in Table 9.1 accompanying the Household Energy Efficiency Statistics, detailed report 2021 here.

The Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT) and Community Energy Saving Programme (CESP) were Government schemes prior to 2013. More information can be found here and here.

The Government does not hold information on installations in new households as these schemes are aimed towards retrofitting households. Information on energy performance of new dwellings is included in the statistics on Energy Performance of Buildings Certificates here and as Open Data here.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
5th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his most recent estimate is of the cost of decommissioning the existing nuclear sites within the remit of the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority; when that estimate was made; and when he next plans to review that estimate.

The Nuclear Provision is updated by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) as part of its Annual Report. The Nuclear Provision represents the best estimate of the NDA’s long-term mission to decommission its nuclear sites. The latest estimate is £149bn undiscounted (£237bn in present value terms).

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with (a) EDF and (b) the Low Carbon Contracts Company about an extension of EDF's deadline for generating electricity from reactor one at Hinkley Point C nuclear plant while continuing to access the full 35 year contractual period of the Contract for Difference.

The Government, the Low Carbon Contract Company (LCCC) and EDF maintain regular contact on the Hinkley Point C Contract for Difference (CfD).

In their role as counterparty to the CfD, the LCCC have recognised that COVID-19 is capable of being a Force Majeure event and discussions on this are ongoing.

HPC is a private, developer-led project and any cost overruns during construction are borne by the developer.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many gigawatts of energy the Electricity System Operator plans to allow from future connections from offshore wind projects in (a) Scotland and (b) England and Wales in the context of the Government's increased target of up to 50 GW of operating offshore wind capacity by 2030.

For projects expected to connect by 2030 that are not already operational, 26GW of capacity will connect in England and Wales, and 18GW of capacity will connect in Scotland.

Projects that are expected to connect before 2030 but do not yet have an indicative landing point have been excluded from the figures above.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 22 June 2022 to Question 18947, what assessment he has made of the capacity of the UK hydrogen sector to deliver hydrogen to both the (a) UK and (b) overseas markets; and if he will make a statement.

The UK Government is increasing production to meet its ambition of 10GW domestic hydrogen production by 2030. The UK has strong potential as a future exporter of hydrogen and will continue to ensure its approach realises the greatest opportunities for the UK while supporting the maintenance of sufficient supplies for domestic use.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 22 June 2022 to Question 18947, whether it is Government policy to allocate public funds to support the export of hydrogen.

The Government funding schemes, the Net Zero Hydrogen Fund and Hydrogen Business Model, are primarily aimed at supporting domestic production. While projects exporting hydrogen could benefit from business model support, the specific volumes exported would not be eligible for support payments. This is to avoid subsidising hydrogen that will not contribute to decarbonisation in the UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 22 June 2022 to Question 18947, whether it is his policy to encourage the export of hydrogen.

The Government’s Energy Security Strategy doubled the UK’s hydrogen production ambition, aiming for up to 10GW by 2030. This will open up greater opportunities for exporting hydrogen, particularly to continental Europe, where the Government sees increasing hydrogen demand alongside established energy trading and interconnection with the UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 16 May 2022 to Question 312 on British Airways: Redundancy, what mechanisms exist for employees to identify whether HR1 forms have been submitted.

Employee representatives are required to be consulted regarding any proposed redundancies and a copy of the notification should be sent to them.

20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 20 June 2022 to Question 18947 on Hydrogen: Exports, how much funding has been provided to companies to produce and export green hydrogen to date; and what future funding streams have been set aside.

The Government expects up to 1GW of electrolytic hydrogen capacity to be in operation or construction in the UK by 2025. Support to date has come through innovation programmes, including the £33m Hydrogen Supply competition and its £60m successor. This year, electrolytic projects may apply for capital co-funding, through the £240m Net Zero Hydrogen Fund and revenue support through the first hydrogen business model allocation round. The Government expects the UK industry to be well placed to capitalise on opportunities from the emerging global hydrogen economy as they arise.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
16th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what level of share ownership does China General Nuclear have within NNB Holding Company Limited, for the construction of Sizewell C Power Station.

China General Nuclear (CGN) is a 20 percent shareholder in the Sizewell C project. Commercial negotiations on the project are ongoing and no decisions, including on a final configuration of investors, have been made. The project is also subject to an ongoing application for development consent, entirely separate from the commercial negotiations.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
16th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the predicted flood risk frequency is for the proposed location of the Sizewell C nuclear station when taking into account the impact of climate change on sea levels.

Sizewell C is a live planning application. Given the Department’s statutory responsibility for determining individual planning applications for energy projects, I am therefore unable to comment on the specifics of this case.

The Energy National Policy Statements, to which the Secretary of State must have regard when considering applications for new nuclear power stations, make clear that Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects must be resilient to the impacts of climate change, including sea level rise.

15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps he has taken to help support businesses that export hydrogen.

The Government is working with industry to assess strengths and capabilities in UK supply chains to help them benefit from the emerging global hydrogen economy and capitalise on export opportunities as they arise. In its British Energy Security Strategy, the Government doubled the UK’s hydrogen production ambition to up to 10GW installed capacity by 2030, driven by policies including the Hydrogen Business Model and Net Zero Hydrogen Fund. The primary objective of these policies is to kickstart the UK’s low carbon hydrogen economy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department will spend on support for businesses that export hydrogen in the next 12 months.

BEIS is working with industry to assess strengths and capabilities in UK supply chains to help them benefit from the emerging global hydrogen economy. This will ensure UK businesses are well prepared to capitalise on export opportunities as they arise.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether it is his policy to support the export of hydrogen from the UK to Europe; and if he will make a statement.

BEIS is working with industry to assess strengths and capabilities in UK supply chains to help them benefit from the emerging global hydrogen economy. This will ensure UK businesses are well prepared to capitalise on export opportunities as they arise.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 13 June 2022 to Question 9043 on Heat Pumps, what the process is for installers to be certified under the Microgeneration Certification Scheme; and what checks are made to ensure quality of work by installers once accredited.

The Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) is an independent quality assurance organisation. MCS sets out the process for installers to become certified on their website. MCS Certification Bodies are responsible for carrying out checks on installers and are accredited by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) to assess products and installers to the MCS Standards, within the ISO/IEC17065 accreditation framework.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals for ECO 4 before the summer recess; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is working quickly to lay regulations as early as possible. A Written Ministerial Statement will be issued once the ECO4 regulations are laid.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many households have prepayment meters or (a) electricity and (b) gas; and what proportion of each category has smart meters.

Official statistics show that, at the end of 2021, 14% of households had a prepayment service; the proportion is the same for both gas and electricity. The latest statistics on Quarterly Energy Prices are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/quarterly-energy-prices-march-2022.

The Government’s official statistics on the rollout of smart meters show that, at the end of 2021, 13% of all smart meters were in prepayment mode, broadly in line with levels of prepayment meters in the market. These statistics are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/smart-meters-in-great-britain-quarterly-update-december-2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of households which (a) are in fuel poverty at present and (b) his Department expects to be in fuel poverty if the energy price cap rises to the anticipated level in October.

The latest fuel poverty statistics and estimated projections for fuel poverty in England in 2022 can be found through GOV.UK.

The Government’s published projection for the number of households in England that are in fuel poverty for the year 2022 is 3.03 million households (12.5%).

Fuel Poverty is a devolved issue in Scotland.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential role of hydrogen transport in delivering the increased hydrogen production target set out in the British energy security strategy.

Hydrogen will be fundamental to achieving the full decarbonisation of UK transport. The UK has increased its ambition for up to 10GW of low carbon hydrogen production capacity by 2030. Government analysis, set out in the UK Hydrogen Strategy, shows that transport will be a leading early market for low carbon hydrogen, with up to 6TWh demand in 2030 and up to 45TWh demand in 2035. The Government is exploring all options for low carbon hydrogen use across road freight, buses, trains, maritime and aviation to support the development of a thriving UK hydrogen sector – including through the recently announced £200m Zero Emission Road Freight Demonstrator programme and £206m UK Shipping Office for Reducing Emissions (UK SHORE).

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what accreditation processes are in place for contractors installing heatpumps under the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive scheme.

The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (DRHI) scheme closed to new applications on 31 March 2022. In order to be eligible under that scheme, installations needed to be completed by installers that were certified by the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS).

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has had discussions with the Secretary of State for Transport on ensuring that the provision of hydrogen refuelling infrastructure for transport is considered in the development of new hydrogen production facilities.

The Department continues to work closely with the Department for Transport on the role of hydrogen in decarbonising transport. Government support has included £30m for refuelling infrastructure, which helps support the deployment of 124 hydrogen fuel cell buses.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on taking steps to encourage investment in the manufacturing of hydrogen vehicles.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy regularly meets his Cabinet colleagues to discuss measures to support the transformation of the road transport sector to net zero, including investment opportunities in hydrogen vehicles.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the revised estimated dates are for the commissioning of Hinkley Point C (a) reactor one and (b) reactor two; and whether there is any estimated additional programme risk on these dates.

EDF updated the forecast cost and schedule for Hinkley Point C on 19 May 2022. The forecast shows a Unit 1 Commercial Operation Date (COD) of June 2027 (12 months later than the current baseline schedule). Unit 2 is forecast to start 12 months after Unit 1. EDF estimate the risk of COD delay to both Units 1 and 2 is 15 months.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
16th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the impact assessment of the Nuclear Energy (Financing) Act 2022 published on 26 October 2021, if his Department has updated its assessment of the cost of building and financing a nuclear power plant under a Regulatory Asset Base (RAB) model.

The Government has not updated the analysis presented in the Impact Assessment for the Nuclear Energy (Financing) Act.

Individual projects being considered for RAB funding under the Act will be subject to Value for Money assessment both at the point of its designation, and as part of wider Government approvals.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
16th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his Department's Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan published on 20 July 2021, what his timeframe is for bringing forward legislative proposals to amend the Electricity Act 1989 to define electricity storage as a distinct subset of generation.

In the 2021 Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan, the Government committed to defining electricity storage as a distinct subset of generation in primary legislation, when parliamentary time allows.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
16th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to introduce a legal definition of energy storage in the context of battery storage technology.

In the 2021 Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan, the Government committed to defining electricity storage as a distinct subset of generation in primary legislation when parliamentary time allows.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his timescale is for bringing forward legislative proposals for the 2022-2023 Warm Home Discount scheme.

The Regulations for the Warm Home Discount in England and Wales were laid in Parliament on Wednesday 12 May.

The consultation on the future scheme in Scotland is currently open and will close on Sunday 22 May. After this, the Government will publish its response and lay the supporting Regulations for a scheme to be in place from winter 2022/23.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will list the dates of submission of HR1 forms by British Airways in the last three years.

The information requested under the statutory advanced notification of redundancy scheme is commercially confidential and to publish it would prejudice the commercial interests of those employers. Management information on the volume of notifications received under the scheme is published by the Insolvency Service on GOV.UK.

25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Review of Electricity Market Arrangements (REMA) stated in the Energy Security Strategy will include the assessment of locational marginal price in Scotland.

As part of the REMA programme we intend to consider a full spectrum of policy options, including locational marginal pricing. We look forward to receiving evidence from stakeholders following the publication of our consultation in the summer which will help us evaluate them, as well as bring other policy options to our attention.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions the Government has had with representatives of Scotland’s renewable energy industry on the proposed locational marginal pricing system.

The Government will set out the case for long-term reform of British electricity market arrangements as well as an initial assessment of policy options in a summer consultation: Review of Electricity Market Arrangements (REMA), as announced in the British Energy Security Strategy,

REMA will consider a wide range of options for reform to electricity markets and policies; at this point in time no options have been proposed by the Government.

The Government is discussing REMA with the Devolved Administrations and will continue to engage closely as policy options develop under the programme.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason the locational marginal pricing system for grid charges is being proposed before a resolution to the impact of the TNUoS transmission charging regime on Scotland has been achieved.

The Government will set out the case for long-term reform of British electricity market arrangements as well as an initial assessment of policy options in a summer consultation: Review of Electricity Market Arrangements (REMA), as announced in the British Energy Security Strategy,

REMA will consider a wide range of options for reform to electricity markets and policies; at this point in time no options have been proposed by the Government.

The Government is discussing REMA with the Devolved Administrations and will continue to engage closely as policy options develop under the programme.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the proposed locational marginal pricing system on renewable deployment in Scotland.

The Government will set out the case for long-term reform of British electricity market arrangements as well as an initial assessment of policy options in a summer consultation: Review of Electricity Market Arrangements (REMA), as announced in the British Energy Security Strategy,

REMA will consider a wide range of options for reform to electricity markets and policies; at this point in time no options have been proposed by the Government.

The Government is discussing REMA with the Devolved Administrations and will continue to engage closely as policy options develop under the programme.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 March 2022 to Question 143735 on Diesel Fuel: Russia, when Digest of UK Energy Statistics figures containing data for 2021 will be available.

The Digest of UK Energy Statistics (DUKES) containing 2021 data will be published on the 28th July 2022. As of the 31st March 2022, data on Russian imports of diesel (including data for 2021) are also available in new Energy Trends table 3.14, Imports of primary oil and petroleum products by country of origin.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of permanent full-time employees at Dungeness nuclear power station that (a) were employed to operate the station prior to its closure, in the latest period for which figures are available and (b) will be required for the decommissioning phase.

BEIS has not made any estimates of employee numbers at any of the Hinkley Point B, Sizewell B, Torness, Heysham A and B, Hartlepool, Hunterson B or Dungeness nuclear power stations, which are owned and operated by EDF. However, BEIS does understand from information supplied by EDF that each of the stations currently employs around 500 staff each, supplemented by staff from supply chain partners, at specific times.

BEIS has also not made any forecast estimates of the number of individuals that will be employed in the future as those stations close and enter into a phase where the nuclear fuel is removed (defueled) and then decommissioned. The Dungeness B and Hunterston B stations have already permanently ceased generation and the changes in staff numbers during the defueling phase are being considered by EDF currently.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK civil nuclear industry has the required skills to deliver on its existing decommissioning requirements together with supporting the proposed programme of additional nuclear power generation capacity.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of permanent full-time employees at Hunterston B nuclear power station that (a) were employed to operate the station prior to its closure, in the latest period for which figures are available and (b) will be required for the decommissioning phase.

BEIS has not made any estimates of employee numbers at any of the Hinkley Point B, Sizewell B, Torness, Heysham A and B, Hartlepool, Hunterson B or Dungeness nuclear power stations, which are owned and operated by EDF. However, BEIS does understand from information supplied by EDF that each of the stations currently employs around 500 staff each, supplemented by staff from supply chain partners, at specific times.

BEIS has also not made any forecast estimates of the number of individuals that will be employed in the future as those stations close and enter into a phase where the nuclear fuel is removed (defueled) and then decommissioned. The Dungeness B and Hunterston B stations have already permanently ceased generation and the changes in staff numbers during the defueling phase are being considered by EDF currently.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK civil nuclear industry has the required skills to deliver on its existing decommissioning requirements together with supporting the proposed programme of additional nuclear power generation capacity.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of permanent full-time employees at Torness nuclear power station in the latest period for which figures are available.

BEIS has not made any estimates of employee numbers at any of the Hinkley Point B, Sizewell B, Torness, Heysham A and B, Hartlepool, Hunterson B or Dungeness nuclear power stations, which are owned and operated by EDF. However, BEIS does understand from information supplied by EDF that each of the stations currently employs around 500 staff each, supplemented by staff from supply chain partners, at specific times.

BEIS has also not made any forecast estimates of the number of individuals that will be employed in the future as those stations close and enter into a phase where the nuclear fuel is removed (defueled) and then decommissioned. The Dungeness B and Hunterston B stations have already permanently ceased generation and the changes in staff numbers during the defueling phase are being considered by EDF currently.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK civil nuclear industry has the required skills to deliver on its existing decommissioning requirements together with supporting the proposed programme of additional nuclear power generation capacity.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of permanent full-time employees at Sizewell nuclear power station in the latest period for which figures are available.

BEIS has not made any estimates of employee numbers at any of the Hinkley Point B, Sizewell B, Torness, Heysham A and B, Hartlepool, Hunterson B or Dungeness nuclear power stations, which are owned and operated by EDF. However, BEIS does understand from information supplied by EDF that each of the stations currently employs around 500 staff each, supplemented by staff from supply chain partners, at specific times.

BEIS has also not made any forecast estimates of the number of individuals that will be employed in the future as those stations close and enter into a phase where the nuclear fuel is removed (defueled) and then decommissioned. The Dungeness B and Hunterston B stations have already permanently ceased generation and the changes in staff numbers during the defueling phase are being considered by EDF currently.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK civil nuclear industry has the required skills to deliver on its existing decommissioning requirements together with supporting the proposed programme of additional nuclear power generation capacity.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of permanent full-time employees at Hartlepool nuclear power station in the latest period for which figures are available.

BEIS has not made any estimates of employee numbers at any of the Hinkley Point B, Sizewell B, Torness, Heysham A and B, Hartlepool, Hunterson B or Dungeness nuclear power stations, which are owned and operated by EDF. However, BEIS does understand from information supplied by EDF that each of the stations currently employs around 500 staff each, supplemented by staff from supply chain partners, at specific times.

BEIS has also not made any forecast estimates of the number of individuals that will be employed in the future as those stations close and enter into a phase where the nuclear fuel is removed (defueled) and then decommissioned. The Dungeness B and Hunterston B stations have already permanently ceased generation and the changes in staff numbers during the defueling phase are being considered by EDF currently.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK civil nuclear industry has the required skills to deliver on its existing decommissioning requirements together with supporting the proposed programme of additional nuclear power generation capacity.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of permanent full-time employees at Heysham nuclear power station in the latest period for which figures are available.

BEIS has not made any estimates of employee numbers at any of the Hinkley Point B, Sizewell B, Torness, Heysham A and B, Hartlepool, Hunterson B or Dungeness nuclear power stations, which are owned and operated by EDF. However, BEIS does understand from information supplied by EDF that each of the stations currently employs around 500 staff each, supplemented by staff from supply chain partners, at specific times.

BEIS has also not made any forecast estimates of the number of individuals that will be employed in the future as those stations close and enter into a phase where the nuclear fuel is removed (defueled) and then decommissioned. The Dungeness B and Hunterston B stations have already permanently ceased generation and the changes in staff numbers during the defueling phase are being considered by EDF currently.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK civil nuclear industry has the required skills to deliver on its existing decommissioning requirements together with supporting the proposed programme of additional nuclear power generation capacity.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the number of permanent full-time employees at Hinkley Point (B) nuclear power station in the latest period for which figures are available.

BEIS has not made any estimates of employee numbers at any of the Hinkley Point B, Sizewell B, Torness, Heysham A and B, Hartlepool, Hunterson B or Dungeness nuclear power stations, which are owned and operated by EDF. However, BEIS does understand from information supplied by EDF that each of the stations currently employs around 500 staff each, supplemented by staff from supply chain partners, at specific times.

BEIS has also not made any forecast estimates of the number of individuals that will be employed in the future as those stations close and enter into a phase where the nuclear fuel is removed (defueled) and then decommissioned. The Dungeness B and Hunterston B stations have already permanently ceased generation and the changes in staff numbers during the defueling phase are being considered by EDF currently.

The Government is committed to ensuring the UK civil nuclear industry has the required skills to deliver on its existing decommissioning requirements together with supporting the proposed programme of additional nuclear power generation capacity.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 March 2022 to question 143735 Diesel Fuel: Russia, whether imports of DERV from Russia will be prohibited under plans to prohibit imports of Russian oil.

The UK has committed to phasing out Russian oil by the end of 2022. The Government established a new joint taskforce with industry to work together in an orderly transition.

In the case of diesel, UK demand is met by a combination of domestic production and imports from a diverse range of reliable suppliers beyond Russia including the Netherlands, Saudi Arabia and the USA.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the quantity of Russian produced diesel that is utilised for transport in the UK.

Annual data on the imports of diesel from Russia are published in the Digest of UK Energy Statistics (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/petroleum-chapter-3-digest-of-united-kingdom-energy-statistics-dukes). In 2020 Russian imports of diesel totalled 3,608 thousand tonnes. All of UK demand for diesel is for transport.

The UK is a significant producer of both crude oil and petroleum products, and in the case of diesel, UK demand is met by a combination of domestic production and imports from a diverse range of reliable suppliers beyond Russia including Norway, Saudi Arabia and the USA.

The Government is working closely with industry to ensure that the UK will phase out imports of Russian oil in response to Vladimir Putin's illegal invasion of Ukraine by the end of the year.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing financial support packages for small and medium sized companies who (a) choose to stop trading with Russia or (b) have to stop trading to comply with sanctions.

The UK and our international partners have stood united in condemning the Russian Government in response to its invasion of Ukraine. We have imposed an unprecedented package of sanctions to inflict maximum and lasting pain on the Russian Government.

The Government is not imposing any legal requirement on companies to go further, and businesses should make their own choices about trade outside of the current sanctions. But as raised by my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer in his recent statement, we welcome the commitments already made by firms and investors to divest away from Russia, and we should applaud those who have chosen to take that extra step for the people of Ukraine.

Where businesses seek to break contracts with Russian entities, we recommend seeking independent legal advice. The Department for International Trade have expanded its Export Support Service (ESS) to act as a single point of enquiry for businesses and traders with questions relating to the situation in Ukraine and Russia. Any business that has question about trading with Ukraine or Russia, can visit https://www.gov.uk/ask-export-support-team, or call our helpline using the number 0300 303 8955.

The Government is already providing support worth around £21 billion during this year, and next, to help people with the cost of living and we will continue to monitor the economic impact of the conflict.

24th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the cost to date is of the legal fees associated with defending the Green Deal in the First Tier Tribunal proceedings brought by Citizens Advice Scotland.

The Government has incurred £82287.80 in legal fees associated with defending the Green Deal in the First Tier Tribunal proceedings brought by appellants who have been assisted by Citizens Advice Scotland. The level of involvement from Citizens Advice Scotland varies on a case-by-case basis.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the findings of the recent study by Aurora Energy Research that 24GW of long-duration electricity storage will be needed by 2035 to reduce reliance on imported gas and support the Government’s commitment to deliver affordable, clean and secure electricity, if he will (a) publish the Government's response to the call for evidence into large-scale and long-duration electricity storage by the end of March 2022, (b) make it his policy to introduce support to facilitate the deployment of home-grown long-duration electricity storage technologies, specifically an adapted cap and floor mechanism and (c) give clear direction to Ofgem to progress work on the cap and floor mechanism, including a timeline for when it will be established.

The Government is reviewing the responses to the Call for Evidence on large-scale, long-duration electricity storage, alongside analysis. The Government commissioned on the role of this type of storage in the electricity system and is aiming to publish a response in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
4th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what impact assessment has been undertaken of the numbers of households which will be classed as being in fuel poverty due to the energy cap rise (a) without any mitigation measures and (b) with the mitigation measures announced on 3 February 2022.

The next fuel poverty statistics are due to be published on the 24th February. The report will include data for 2020 on the number of households living in fuel poverty in England and analysis of the composition of fuel poor households, as well as projections of the number of households in fuel poverty in 2021 and 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what social, environmental and other levies currently added to electricity bills are due to expire in each of next 10 years; and if he will set out the (a) value and (b) policy detail of each of those levies.

Under current arrangements, no social and environmental levies on electricity bills are due to expire in the next 10 years. According to Ofgem, social, environmental, and other levies totalled 25.48 percent on electricity bills in 2020. The policy detail of each of these levies can be found published on Ofgem’s website: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/environmental-and-social-schemes

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the estimated additional cost is to consumer bills of the financial commitments aligned with the Contracts for Difference Round 4 auction.

The Government is committed to minimising energy costs for businesses and consumers. Contracts for Difference offer value-for-money to consumers and continue to deliver low prices. For example, between the first allocation round in 2015 and the most recent round in 2019, the price per unit (MWh) of offshore wind fell by around 65%.

Competitive auctions are proven to be effective in helping to keep costs down, and this year’s auction has been designed to keep the allocation process highly competitive. The impact will be dependent on the outcome of the competitive auction process, its expectation is that this year’s round will have a relatively small impact on household bills.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of a shared network infrastructure to support a liquid UK hydrogen market.

The Government recognises that network infrastructure will provide the link between production and demand, and is essential to the development of the hydrogen economy. Further work is needed to determine what the optimal hydrogen network looks like, and this will cover both pipeline and non-pipeline distribution. In the UK Hydrogen Strategy, the Government sets out a commitment to undertake a review of systemic hydrogen network requirements in the 2020s. This review is underway, and the Government has committed to provide an update on systemic hydrogen network requirements early this year.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the potential for Direct Air Capture to contribute to the UK's (a) 2050 net zero target and (b) 2030 5MtCO2 per year Greenhouse Gas Removals target.

The Net Zero Strategy identifies greenhouse gas removal methods, such as Direct Air Capture as essential to meet the UK’s 2050 net zero target. These technologies will compliment ambitious decarbonisation across the UK economy, compensating for residual emissions in the most difficult to decarbonise sectors. By 2050, its anticipated that deployment of engineered removals will be between 75 and 81 MtCO2/year. Governmental analysis in the Net Zero Strategy showed that the potential contribution of Direct Air Carbon Capture and Sequestration could range from 18-29MtCO2 in 2050.

The Government will consult on preferred support mechanisms to incentivise investment in ‘First of a Kind’ Greenhouse Gas Removal technologies in spring 2022 to underpin our 2030 ambition. The Government is also investing £100 million of innovation funding for research, development and piloting of promising new Greenhouse Gas Removal techniques.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to help support the commercialisation of Direct Air Capture technology in the UK.

In the Net Zero Strategy, the government committed to developing markets and incentives for investment in greenhouse gas removal technologies including Direct Air Capture. The Government will consult on business models to incentivise investment in greenhouse gas removal technologies in spring 2022. This is in line with government’s ambition to deploy at least 5MtCO2 per year of engineered removals by 2030. This builds on the commitment to invest £100 million in innovation, research and development for greenhouse gas removal technologies which will support the construction of pilot plants for a range of promising technologies to help them achieve commercial realisation – including BEIS’s Direct Air Capture and Greenhouse Gas Removal Programme.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish his response to his Department's joint consultation with Ofgem on proposals for a Future System Operator.

The Energy Future System Operation consultation closed on the 28th of September 2021 and received a high volume of responses. The Department and Ofgem are considering these responses and will publish a response in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with EDF on the operation of Torness nuclear power station; and what the latest estimated shutdown date is.

The decision taken by EDF regarding the end of generation/closure dates for Torness nuclear power stations is a matter for EDF in consultation with the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR).

The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) Fleet has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation. The original expected closure date for Torness was 2023, in 2016 this was extended to 2030. Following a recent review, the extended date has been revised to 2028.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will list which energy retail companies have become insolvent in 2021; on which date each of those companies stopped trading; how many customers were transferred as result of those insolvencies; how many customers remain to be transferred as result of those insolvencies; how much consumer credit has been transferred or returned to customers; what administration costs were associated with the transfer of those customers; what other costs were associated with those insolvencies and transfer of customers; and what the value is of any outstanding renewables obligations connected to those insolvencies.

Data on the energy retail companies that have become insolvent during 2021, including the date they stopped trading and the number of affected customers is available on Ofgem’s website at https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/news-and-views/blog/how-youre-protected-when-energy-firms-collapse. All affected customers’ credit balances have been protected. Administrative and additional insolvency costs are a commercial matter for the businesses involved. Ofgem will publish 2021 data for Renewables Obligation payments in 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many outages or other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Torness power station in each year since 2010.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

In 2020, nuclear power stations generated 50 TWh of electricity, which was 16% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues.

2010 – 2021: Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear Advanced Gas Cooled (AGR) power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

346

0

346

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

1

36

5

143

2

15

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

2

64

4

13

4

19

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

0

0

0

0

2

88

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

1

48

1

12

4

17

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

109

3

79

3

18

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

1

4

0

0

2

86

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

16

1

4

1

1

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

65

1

63

1

2

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

1

90

2

4

5

86

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

1

257

0

0

0

0

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

0

271

0

0

1

6

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

2

71

4

142

4

72

Notes on Table

  • Days non operational represents days where a reactor didn’t generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is > 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2021 is until 12th December 2021 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available.
Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many outages or other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Hunterston (B) power station in each year since 2010.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

In 2020, nuclear power stations generated 50 TWh of electricity, which was 16% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues.

2010 – 2021: Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear Advanced Gas Cooled (AGR) power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

346

0

346

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

1

36

5

143

2

15

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

2

64

4

13

4

19

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

0

0

0

0

2

88

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

1

48

1

12

4

17

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

109

3

79

3

18

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

1

4

0

0

2

86

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

16

1

4

1

1

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

65

1

63

1

2

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

1

90

2

4

5

86

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

1

257

0

0

0

0

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

0

271

0

0

1

6

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

2

71

4

142

4

72

Notes on Table

  • Days non operational represents days where a reactor didn’t generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is > 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2021 is until 12th December 2021 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available.
Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many outages or other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Hinkley Point (B) power station in each year since 2010.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

In 2020, nuclear power stations generated 50 TWh of electricity, which was 16% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues.

2010 – 2021: Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear Advanced Gas Cooled (AGR) power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

346

0

346

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

1

36

5

143

2

15

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

2

64

4

13

4

19

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

0

0

0

0

2

88

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

1

48

1

12

4

17

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

109

3

79

3

18

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

1

4

0

0

2

86

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

16

1

4

1

1

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

65

1

63

1

2

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

1

90

2

4

5

86

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

1

257

0

0

0

0

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

0

271

0

0

1

6

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

2

71

4

142

4

72

Notes on Table

  • Days non operational represents days where a reactor didn’t generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is > 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2021 is until 12th December 2021 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available.
Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many outages or other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Heysham II power station in each year since 2010.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

In 2020, nuclear power stations generated 50 TWh of electricity, which was 16% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues.

2010 – 2021: Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear Advanced Gas Cooled (AGR) power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

346

0

346

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

1

36

5

143

2

15

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

2

64

4

13

4

19

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

0

0

0

0

2

88

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

1

48

1

12

4

17

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

109

3

79

3

18

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

1

4

0

0

2

86

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

16

1

4

1

1

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

65

1

63

1

2

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

1

90

2

4

5

86

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

1

257

0

0

0

0

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

0

271

0

0

1

6

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

2

71

4

142

4

72

Notes on Table

  • Days non operational represents days where a reactor didn’t generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is > 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2021 is until 12th December 2021 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available.
Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many outages or other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Heysham power station in each year since 2010.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

In 2020, nuclear power stations generated 50 TWh of electricity, which was 16% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues.

2010 – 2021: Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear Advanced Gas Cooled (AGR) power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

346

0

346

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

1

36

5

143

2

15

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

2

64

4

13

4

19

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

0

0

0

0

2

88

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

1

48

1

12

4

17

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

109

3

79

3

18

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

1

4

0

0

2

86

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

16

1

4

1

1

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

65

1

63

1

2

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

1

90

2

4

5

86

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

1

257

0

0

0

0

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

0

271

0

0

1

6

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

2

71

4

142

4

72

Notes on Table

  • Days non operational represents days where a reactor didn’t generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is > 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2021 is until 12th December 2021 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available.
Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many outages or other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Hartlepool power station in each year since 2010.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

In 2020, nuclear power stations generated 50 TWh of electricity, which was 16% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues.

2010 – 2021: Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear Advanced Gas Cooled (AGR) power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

346

0

346

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

1

36

5

143

2

15

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

2

64

4

13

4

19

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

0

0

0

0

2

88

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

1

48

1

12

4

17

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

109

3

79

3

18

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

1

4

0

0

2

86

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

16

1

4

1

1

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

65

1

63

1

2

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

1

90

2

4

5

86

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

1

257

0

0

0

0

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

0

271

0

0

1

6

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

2

71

4

142

4

72

Notes on Table

  • Days non operational represents days where a reactor didn’t generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is > 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2021 is until 12th December 2021 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available.
Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many outages or other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been per reactor, in days, at Dungeness (B) power station in each year since 2010.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

In 2020, nuclear power stations generated 50 TWh of electricity, which was 16% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK’s Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Fleet has performed beyond original expectations providing extra years of generation.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues.

2010 – 2021: Annual number of outages and non-operational days at UK nuclear Advanced Gas Cooled (AGR) power stations

Dungeness B R21

Dungeness B R22

Hartlepool R1

Hartlepool R2

Heysham 1 R1

Heysham 1 R2

Heysham 2 R7

Heysham 2 R8

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

0

230

4

101

3

49

3

86

2

152

3

119

1

5

1

251

2011

4

260

3

249

6

129

2

50

2

22

4

24

2

82

3

32

2012

5

172

2

181

3

47

2

37

4

71

5

133

4

63

0

0

2013

5

102

8

182

4

48

4

133

2

141

7

50

1

28

2

74

2014

9

179

6

106

3

122

4

144

3

246

3

138

0

0

1

1

2015

4

44

3

129

2

79

4

79

3

77

2

136

2

70

0

0

2016

4

41

7

57

5

132

3

79

2

46

3

47

0

0

1

65

2017

6

153

5

92

2

26

4

29

2

98

3

75

3

9

0

0

2018

4

127

3

140

2

109

3

29

3

31

1

71

3

89

1

4

2019

0

365

0

365

6

41

3

117

2

39

5

86

0

0

2

5

2020

0

366

0

366

2

29

3

62

3

130

3

71

1

9

2

82

2021

0

346

0

346

2

114

3

135

4

129

6

95

3

193

5

65

Hinkley Point B R3

Hinkley Point B R4

Hunterston B R3

Hunterston B R4

Torness R1

Torness R2

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

Outages

Days non operational

2010

2

54

4

44

2

14

1

36

5

143

2

15

2011

2

36

3

90

3

42

2

64

4

13

4

19

2012

4

86

3

20

1

60

0

0

0

0

2

88

2013

1

9

1

23

0

0

1

48

1

12

4

17

2014

1

33

0

0

3

25

3

109

3

79

3

18

2015

1

6

1

85

3

69

1

4

0

0

2

86

2016

4

77

1

6

3

27

1

16

1

4

1

1

2017

3

28

3

51

2

27

1

65

1

63

1

2

2018

2

18

1

64

3

301

1

90

2

4

5

86

2019

2

96

1

3

0

365

1

257

0

0

0

0

2020

2

248

1

314

0

243

0

271

0

0

1

6

2021

2

147

1

130

2

64

2

71

4

142

4

72

Notes on Table

  • Days non operational represents days where a reactor didn’t generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is > 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2021 is until 12th December 2021 only.
  • Dungeness moved into its defueling phase in June 2021, having been in an extended outage since September 2018
  • N/A means not available.
Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many outages or other periods of unavailability of electricity generation there have been, in days, at Sizewell (B) power station in each year since 2010.

Nuclear power continues to be an important and proven source of reliable, clean energy, and as a result of this strong baseload provision, we have been able to move faster on a number of our key net zero objectives.

In 2020, nuclear power stations generated 50 TWh of electricity, which was 16% of the electricity generated in the UK. The UK has one Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) at Sizewell B, which is expected to operate until at least 2035.

A proportion of the nuclear generating capacity is likely to be unavailable at any given point due to routine inspections, maintenance, energy systems management and technical issues.

2010 – 2021: Annual number of outages and non-operational days at the UK’s Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power station

Sizewell B

Outages

Days non operational

2010

1

196

2011

2

53

2012

4

83

2013

1

47

2014

1

46

2015

0

0

2016

1

62

2017

1

58

2018

0

30

2019

1

65

2020

1

2

2021

1

127

Notes on Table

  • Days non operational represents days where a reactor didn’t generate at all during a day.
  • If output in a day is > 0, then the day is counted as an operational day.
  • Outages represent the number of occurrences where a reactor was non-operational.
  • 2021 is to 16 December 2021 only.
Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Green Deal Scheme appeal cases have been waiting for a final decision for (a) six to 11 months and (b) 12 months or longer since referral, by Scottish constituency.

The table below provides details of how many complaints about the Green Deal, that have been referred to the Secretary of State, have been waiting for a final decision for (a) six to 11 months and (b) 12 months or longer since referral, by Scottish constituency, at 10th December 2021.

Months outstanding

Parliamentary Constituency

Six-to-eleven

Twelve or longer

Airdrie and Shotts

0

4

Ayr, Carrick and Cumnock

1

3

Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk

0

1

Central Ayrshire

5

10

Coatbridge, Chryston and Bellshill

0

5

Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East

1

9

Dunfermline and West Fife

0

2

East Ayrshire, Scotland

0

1

East Dunbartonshire

1

2

East Kilbride, Strathaven and Lesmahagow

2

12

East Lothian

1

1

East Renfrewshire

0

2

Edinburgh East

0

2

Edinburgh South

1

0

Falkirk

1

3

Glasgow Central

0

1

Glasgow East

0

3

Glasgow North

1

3

Glasgow North East

3

9

Glasgow North West

1

3

Glasgow South West

1

2

Glenrothes

0

4

Inverclyde

0

5

Kilmarnock and Loudoun

3

11

Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath

1

4

Linlithgow and East Falkirk

1

0

Livingston

0

6

Midlothian

0

1

Motherwell and Wishaw

0

5

North Ayrshire and Arran

0

6

Ochil and South Perthshire

0

2

Paisley and Renfrewshire North

3

20

Paisley and Renfrewshire South

0

6

Perth and North Perthshire

0

3

Rutherglen and Hamilton West

1

12

Stirling

1

1

West Dunbartonshire

1

7

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to finalise hydrogen business models; and when he plans to publish those models.

The Government has consulted on a business model to provide revenue support to low carbon hydrogen production plants. Revenue support is needed to close the cost gap between producing low carbon hydrogen and counterfactual higher carbon fuels to unlock investment in hydrogen projects.

The Government is analysing stakeholder responses to the consultation and aims to publish the Government response in Q1 2022 alongside indicative Heads of Terms for the business model contract. The Government aims to finalise the business model in 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of placing all credible hydrogen production projects under Track-1 of the Cluster Sequencing Process.

The Cluster Sequencing process will bring forward the UK’s first full-chain carbon capture and storage proposals. The Track-1 decision has identified the HyNet and East Coast Cluster proposals as those with the potential to pioneer this technology in the UK, including through the deployment of CCS-enabled low carbon hydrogen capacity. Phase-2 of this process, which opened in November, focuses on individual projects and is open to submissions from any hydrogen production project based in the UK provided they can demonstrate they have a CO2 transport solution and access to a Track-1 or reserve cluster CO2 store and meet the other eligibility criteria.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when the Government plans to bring forward its planned consultation on the implementation of a net-zero-consistent cap for the UK emissions trading scheme.

As set out in November’s Net Zero Strategy we will consult in the coming months on an appropriate cap consistent with net zero. The cap will be aligned with a net zero consistent trajectory by January 2024 at the latest.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to launch a consultation on mandating hydrogen-ready boilers.

In the Heat and Building Strategy, the Government committed to consulting shortly on the case for enabling, or requiring, new gas boilers to be readily convertible to hydrogen (‘hydrogen-ready’) by 2026, to prepare homes for a potential hydrogen conversion.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to help ensure that a decision on blending 20 per cent hydrogen into the gas grid is delivered in 2023.

BEIS is working closely with the Health and Safety Executive, Ofgem and industry to understand the safety case, operability and value for money case for blending hydrogen into the grid. We are following emerging evidence from industry trials such as HyDeploy. We will be able to make a decision once there is sufficient evidence on both technical safety and financial viability.Although we will be prioritising the economic assessmentof hydrogen blending, we envisage the end of 2023 being the earliest point a decision could be made.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the outcome of the consultation on designing a UK low carbon hydrogen standard.

The Government consultation on a Low Carbon Hydrogen Standard closed on 25 October. The Government intends to publish its response, confirming the design of the standard, in early 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to finalise the development of comprehensive regulatory frameworks for hydrogen.

In line with the commitments made in the Hydrogen Strategy, the Government is working with industry and regulators to consider the regulatory frameworks required to support the development of the hydrogen value chain, including where change may be necessary. This engagement will be formalised through the Hydrogen Regulators Forum, which will meet for the first time in January 2022. The Forum will have representation across the relevant regulatory areas (environmental, safety, markets, competition and planning).

Initial conclusions, proposals and next steps on regulation will be published as part of the Hydrogen Strategy progress update in early 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will consult on expanding the UK Emissions Trading Scheme to incorporate the 67 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions that are not currently covered by that scheme.

The Government reiterated its commitment to explore further expansion of the UK ETS to activities not yet covered, and to providing a further update in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Green Deal Scheme appeal cases from Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency have been with her Department since referral for (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four, (e) five, (f) six, (g) seven, (h) eight, (i) nine, (j) 10, (k) 11 and (l) 12 months or longer without a final decision having been made.

There are currently 15 outstanding complaints about the Green Deal that have been referred to the Secretary of State from households in the Kilmarnock and Loudoun constituency (outstanding is defined as meaning that the Secretary of State’s final decision has not been issued or, if it has, there has been a subsequent appeal to the First-tier Tribunal). The table below provides details of the age of these complaints.

Months outstanding

Number of complaints

1 or under

0

2

0

3

1

4

0

5

1

6

1

7

1

8

0

9

0

10

0

11

0

12

0

Longer than 12 months

11

We are progressing cases as quickly as possible, and looking at ways to speed up the review process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many Green Deal loan appeals in respect of HELMS his Department has received; and of those how many have been completed.

As of 30 November 2021, there have been 308 complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS). Of these a total of 81 have been completed, defined as meaning that the Secretary of State’s final decision has been issued and there has been no subsequent appeal to the First-tier Tribunal, or that the case has been withdrawn. 13 cases have been appealed to the Tribunal and are not yet resolved.

A total of 105 complainants have received Intention Notices. Of these, 85 have also received final decision letters. 20 have received Intention Notices that have not yet been followed by final decision letters (and therefore may be taken as outstanding).

Of the final decisions issued, 81 have been to impose sanctions, these being either the reduction or cancellation of loans. We do not hold data on how many are “rejected” by the complainant in favour of an offer from the Green Deal Finance Company. Once the sanction has been imposed, there is no further action for the Department under the Green Deal Framework Regulations, unless the complainant decides to appeal to the First-tier Tribunal. If there is no such appeal within twenty-eight days of the date of the decision letter, the Department considers the case to be complete.

The table below provides numbers of complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by HELMS in each month since January 2020.

Month

Number of complaints about mis-selling by HELMS

2020

January

7

February

14

March

7

April

1

May

4

June

8

July

7

August

11

September

5

October

6

November

3

December

1

2021

January

7

February

5

March

5

April

6

May

1

June

7

July

2

August

6

September

3

October

3

November

0

We are progressing cases as quickly as possible, and looking at ways to speed up the review process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many offers of compensation have been made by her Department to consumers as a result of mis-selling by HELMS; and of those offers how many were (a) accepted and settled and (b) rejected by consumers in favour of their original offer of compensation from the Green Deal Finance Company.

As of 30 November 2021, there have been 308 complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS). Of these a total of 81 have been completed, defined as meaning that the Secretary of State’s final decision has been issued and there has been no subsequent appeal to the First-tier Tribunal, or that the case has been withdrawn. 13 cases have been appealed to the Tribunal and are not yet resolved.

A total of 105 complainants have received Intention Notices. Of these, 85 have also received final decision letters. 20 have received Intention Notices that have not yet been followed by final decision letters (and therefore may be taken as outstanding).

Of the final decisions issued, 81 have been to impose sanctions, these being either the reduction or cancellation of loans. We do not hold data on how many are “rejected” by the complainant in favour of an offer from the Green Deal Finance Company. Once the sanction has been imposed, there is no further action for the Department under the Green Deal Framework Regulations, unless the complainant decides to appeal to the First-tier Tribunal. If there is no such appeal within twenty-eight days of the date of the decision letter, the Department considers the case to be complete.

The table below provides numbers of complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by HELMS in each month since January 2020.

Month

Number of complaints about mis-selling by HELMS

2020

January

7

February

14

March

7

April

1

May

4

June

8

July

7

August

11

September

5

October

6

November

3

December

1

2021

January

7

February

5

March

5

April

6

May

1

June

7

July

2

August

6

September

3

October

3

November

0

We are progressing cases as quickly as possible, and looking at ways to speed up the review process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many new complaints his Department has received on the mis-selling of Green Deal loans by HELMS in each month since January 2020.

As of 30 November 2021, there have been 308 complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS). Of these a total of 81 have been completed, defined as meaning that the Secretary of State’s final decision has been issued and there has been no subsequent appeal to the First-tier Tribunal, or that the case has been withdrawn. 13 cases have been appealed to the Tribunal and are not yet resolved.

A total of 105 complainants have received Intention Notices. Of these, 85 have also received final decision letters. 20 have received Intention Notices that have not yet been followed by final decision letters (and therefore may be taken as outstanding).

Of the final decisions issued, 81 have been to impose sanctions, these being either the reduction or cancellation of loans. We do not hold data on how many are “rejected” by the complainant in favour of an offer from the Green Deal Finance Company. Once the sanction has been imposed, there is no further action for the Department under the Green Deal Framework Regulations, unless the complainant decides to appeal to the First-tier Tribunal. If there is no such appeal within twenty-eight days of the date of the decision letter, the Department considers the case to be complete.

The table below provides numbers of complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by HELMS in each month since January 2020.

Month

Number of complaints about mis-selling by HELMS

2020

January

7

February

14

March

7

April

1

May

4

June

8

July

7

August

11

September

5

October

6

November

3

December

1

2021

January

7

February

5

March

5

April

6

May

1

June

7

July

2

August

6

September

3

October

3

November

0

We are progressing cases as quickly as possible, and looking at ways to speed up the review process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many intention notices have been issued by his Department in response to complaints about the mis-selling of Green Deal loans by HELMS; and how many intention notices remain outstanding.

As of 30 November 2021, there have been 308 complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS). Of these a total of 81 have been completed, defined as meaning that the Secretary of State’s final decision has been issued and there has been no subsequent appeal to the First-tier Tribunal, or that the case has been withdrawn. 13 cases have been appealed to the Tribunal and are not yet resolved.

A total of 105 complainants have received Intention Notices. Of these, 85 have also received final decision letters. 20 have received Intention Notices that have not yet been followed by final decision letters (and therefore may be taken as outstanding).

Of the final decisions issued, 81 have been to impose sanctions, these being either the reduction or cancellation of loans. We do not hold data on how many are “rejected” by the complainant in favour of an offer from the Green Deal Finance Company. Once the sanction has been imposed, there is no further action for the Department under the Green Deal Framework Regulations, unless the complainant decides to appeal to the First-tier Tribunal. If there is no such appeal within twenty-eight days of the date of the decision letter, the Department considers the case to be complete.

The table below provides numbers of complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by HELMS in each month since January 2020.

Month

Number of complaints about mis-selling by HELMS

2020

January

7

February

14

March

7

April

1

May

4

June

8

July

7

August

11

September

5

October

6

November

3

December

1

2021

January

7

February

5

March

5

April

6

May

1

June

7

July

2

August

6

September

3

October

3

November

0

We are progressing cases as quickly as possible, and looking at ways to speed up the review process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many appeals to the First-tier Tribunal have been made as a result of sanction notices issued in response to complaints of Green Deal mis-selling by HELMS.

As of 30 November 2021, there have been 308 complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS). Of these a total of 81 have been completed, defined as meaning that the Secretary of State’s final decision has been issued and there has been no subsequent appeal to the First-tier Tribunal, or that the case has been withdrawn. 13 cases have been appealed to the Tribunal and are not yet resolved.

A total of 105 complainants have received Intention Notices. Of these, 85 have also received final decision letters. 20 have received Intention Notices that have not yet been followed by final decision letters (and therefore may be taken as outstanding).

Of the final decisions issued, 81 have been to impose sanctions, these being either the reduction or cancellation of loans. We do not hold data on how many are “rejected” by the complainant in favour of an offer from the Green Deal Finance Company. Once the sanction has been imposed, there is no further action for the Department under the Green Deal Framework Regulations, unless the complainant decides to appeal to the First-tier Tribunal. If there is no such appeal within twenty-eight days of the date of the decision letter, the Department considers the case to be complete.

The table below provides numbers of complaints to the Secretary of State about mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by HELMS in each month since January 2020.

Month

Number of complaints about mis-selling by HELMS

2020

January

7

February

14

March

7

April

1

May

4

June

8

July

7

August

11

September

5

October

6

November

3

December

1

2021

January

7

February

5

March

5

April

6

May

1

June

7

July

2

August

6

September

3

October

3

November

0

We are progressing cases as quickly as possible, and looking at ways to speed up the review process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to paragraph 1.38 of the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021, what services will be procured from the £1.7 billion allocated to enabling a large-scale nuclear plant to achieve a final investment decision this Parliament.

The 2020 Energy White Paper sets out the Government’s commitment to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project to a final investment decision (FID) this Parliament, subject to clear value for money and all relevant approvals. In order to enable a FID, the Government announced up to £1.7 billion funding in the Spending Review 2021. This funding would continue the development of the Sizewell C project. It is not a final decision on the project itself, which will be made subject to the success of ongoing commercial negotiations, further assessments and all necessary approvals.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish details of (a) spending on the development of nuclear energy projects since 2010 and (b) funding streams that are available for the development of nuclear energy projects as of 9 November 2021.

Since 2008 the policy framework for the development of new nuclear projects has been designed to support private developers to fund projects. It was on this basis that the Government gave the go-ahead to Hinkley Point C in 2016, which is funded by EDF, CGN and their investment partners. For projects after Hinkley, the Government has been considering options for providing direct funding. The Spending Review announced up to £1.7bn to support large-scale nuclear this Parliament alongside a new £120m Future Nuclear Enabling Fund, further details on which will be announced in due course. On 9 November, the Government announced £210m for Rolls-Royce’s SMR design, which forms part of the £385m Advanced Nuclear Fund set out in the Energy White Paper.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much public funding has his Department allocated to the development of wave electricity generation in each year since 2010.

The table below sets out the level of state support for research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) received by tidal and wave energy technologies in each year since 2010. These figures do not include the sizeable revenue support provided by schemes such as the Renewables Obligation.


UK Government(s) Total Research, Development and Demonstration Spend

YEAR

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Tidal energy specific

..

..

..

£2m

£2.9m

£1.5m

£1.3m

£900k

..

£2m

£3.3m

..

Wave energy specific

..

..

..

£4.5m

£4m

£8.7m

£650k

£450k

£8.5m

£11.5m

£8.3m

..

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much public funding has his Department allocated to the development of tidal stream technology in each year since 2010.

The table below sets out the level of state support for research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) received by tidal and wave energy technologies in each year since 2010. These figures do not include the sizeable revenue support provided by schemes such as the Renewables Obligation.


UK Government(s) Total Research, Development and Demonstration Spend

YEAR

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Tidal energy specific

..

..

..

£2m

£2.9m

£1.5m

£1.3m

£900k

..

£2m

£3.3m

..

Wave energy specific

..

..

..

£4.5m

£4m

£8.7m

£650k

£450k

£8.5m

£11.5m

£8.3m

..

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 27 October 2021 to Question 60444, on Carbon Capture and Storage: Grants, if he will publish the scores allocated to each cluster under the assessment process.

The sequencing decision was made following a robust, specialist-led assessment based on the criteria presented when the Government launched this process in May. This is outlined in the Government’s answer on 27th October (60444). Officials have provided feedback directly to relevant clusters, while respecting commercial sensitivity. However, it would be unsuitable for the Department to publish the scores allocated to each cluster, because: the Cluster Sequencing process is ongoing; the Government needs to respect the commercial sensitivity of the clusters’ information.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much public funding has his Department allocated to the development of pumped storage hydro projects in each year since 2010.

The 2021 Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan set out the Government’s approach to electricity storage, including pumped hydro storage, which centres on creating a best-in-class regulatory framework. The actions in the Plan aim to remove regulatory and policy barriers and ensure that markets reflect the value that these assets provide to the energy system.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much public funding has his Department allocated to the development of hydro power projects in each year since 2010.

The table below illustrates the level of state support for research, development, and demonstration received by hydro power projects each year since 2010. These figures do not include any revenue support provided by the Renewables Obligation and Feed-in Tariffs schemes.

In 2020, the Department allocated £234,000 of support to hydro power projects, through Innovate UK and the UK's contribution to the International Climate Fund.


UK Government Total Research, Development and Demonstration Spend

YEAR

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Total Hydroelectricity

..

£144k

£56k

£22k

£92k

£133k

£8.8m

£331k

..

..

£234k

..

Key

.. = value not available

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
21st Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Written Statement of 19 October 2021, HCWS325, when he plans to publish the (a) assessment and scoring criteria for the carbon capture, usage and storage bids and (b) award process for the Track 1 clusters.

When the Government launched the CCUS Cluster Sequencing process in May this year, full details were published of both the criteria against which cluster submissions would be assessed, and the process by which these criteria would be applied by our assessors. These evaluation criteria were, in order of weighting:

- Deliverability (30%)

- Emissions Reduction Potential (25%)

- Economic Benefits (20%)

- Cost Considerations (15%)

- Learning and Innovation (10%)

This information is available on gov.uk in the Cluster Sequencing Phase-1 launch document (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cluster-sequencing-for-carbon-capture-usage-and-storage-ccus-deployment-phase-1-expressions-of-interest).

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of SSEN Transmission’s recent stakeholder survey on TNUoS, which found that 93 per cent of industry stakeholders would support reform of the current transmission charging regime.

Transmission charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent regulator. Having held discussions with industry parties, and received evidence including Scottish & Southern Energy Networks’ Transmission Charging Stakeholder Survey Feedback Report, Ofgem published a call for evidence on possible transmission charging reforms on 1 October 2021. It is available at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/tnuos-reform-call-evidence.

The Government will continue to engage closely as Ofgem progresses this work, to understand how any decisions can help support delivery of a secure, net zero energy system at lowest cost to consumers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to Ofgem's consultation on Access and Forward-looking Charges Significant Code Review, when Ofgem and the Government plan to publish further details of a proposed holistic review of wider transmission charges.

Transmission charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent regulator. Having held discussions with industry parties, and received evidence including Scottish & Southern Energy Networks’ Transmission Charging Stakeholder Survey Feedback Report, Ofgem published a call for evidence on possible transmission charging reforms on 1 October 2021. It is available at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/tnuos-reform-call-evidence.

The Government will continue to engage closely as Ofgem progresses this work, to understand how any decisions can help support delivery of a secure, net zero energy system at lowest cost to consumers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the (a) scope and (b) timescales are for the holistic review of transmission charges; and whether (i) industry and (ii) wider stakeholders will be able to inform that review.

Transmission charging is a matter for Ofgem as the independent regulator. Ofgem published a call for evidence on possible transmission charging reforms on 1 October 2021, which is available at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/tnuos-reform-call-evidence . The call for evidence provides all interested parties with an opportunity to submit views and evidence on: the extent to which reform is needed; priority areas that should be looked at; how any reform programme might be delivered; and timescales within which any change is needed. It runs until 12 November 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will list the (a) value, (b) date of award, (c) proposed outcome and (d) spend profile for each funding allocation to a carbon capture and storage cluster.

Details of these awards are publicly available, including both the size of the awards and the nature of the projects we are supporting:

https://www.ukri.org/news/ukri-awards-171m-in-uk-decarbonisation-to-nine-projects/.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 2 July 2021 to Question 21213 on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, whether delays to the publication of the Hydrogen Strategy and the Heat and Buildings Strategy will affect the timescales for the publication of the Net Zero Strategy; and if he will make a statement.

The Government plans to publish a Net Zero Strategy ahead of COP that will set out the Government’s vision for transitioning to a net zero economy and outline our path to meet net zero by 2050.

The Government published the Hydrogen Strategy on 17 August 2021 and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-hydrogen-strategy.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reasons publication of the Heat and Buildings Strategy has been delayed until after the Parliamentary summer recess; what the timescales are for the completion of the remaining work required for the publication of that strategy; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in due course. The strategy will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings, as well as our approach to the key strategic decisions needed to achieve a mass transition to low-carbon heat.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan 2021, published in July 2021, what estimate he has made of the total costs of constraint payments made to electricity producers under that plan; and what long-duration storage technologies will be utilised by the Government to reduce constraint payments and overall energy system costs.

National Grid Electricity System Operator modelled future constraint costs in its 2020/21 Network Options Assessment (NOA).

As outlined in the 2021 Smart System and Flexibility Plan, the Electricity System Operator is carrying out analysis to understand how storage can cost effectively manage network constraints, which is expected to be completed by December 2021; and Government has commissioned external analysis, which considers the system need for large-scale, long-duration storage including its role in reducing constraint payments and overall costs.

The Government and Ofgem intend to publish an electricity networks strategy later in the year, which will consider ways in which electricity network infrastructure can be built and used more efficiently to lessen the issue of constraints.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan 2021, published in July 2021, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of a requirement to provide contract periods beyond the current two-year award periods to incentivise the construction of new long duration storage technologies; and if he will make a statement.

Alongside the 2021 Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan, we published a call for evidence on large-scale, long-duration electricity storage designed to help us build our understanding of the specific challenges faced, and gather information about potential ways to address them, including which interventions (if any) would be most appropriate to support the deployment of such storage. We will continue to work closely with industry and other stakeholders as we consider the challenges and opportunities of different options for intervention.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan 2021, published July 2021, what plans he has to adapt current contract reward mechanisms from a singular approach of contracting services such as balancing, ancillary, inertia, voltage and frequency regulation to a more holistic approach of rewarding contracts to technologies according to the entirety of services they provide to the Grid.

Markets which reflect the value of flexibility will be key to achieving a smart, flexible energy system. Our approach in the 2021 Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan centres on creating a best-in-class regulatory framework by removing regulatory and policy barriers and ensuring that markets reflect the value of flexibility to the system. We have set out actions to ensure that flexibility technologies are rewarded for the services they provide to the system including commitments on the Electricity System Operator (ESO) to deliver reforms to its suite of balancing services to enable the transition to a sustainable energy system.

We expect the ESO to maintain the pace of reform needed to operate a net-zero system and facilitate participation from all technologies to unlock the full value of flexibility being offered.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Smart Systems and Flexibility Plan 2021, published in July 2021, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of the requirement for long-duration flexible storage solutions to be incorporated in the Grid; and what technologies have been evaluated as possible options.

We have commissioned external analysis to improve understanding of the role that large-scale, long-duration electricity storage will play in the electricity system, how much may be required at different points in time, and the benefits of different durations of storage. It includes a range of different technologies such as pumped hydro storage and less established long duration storage technologies like hydrogen storage and compressed air energy storage. This analysis will inform how we address the barriers to deployment that such storage faces. We aim to publish the results of this analysis in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with representatives of EDF on the closure of the Taishan EPR nuclear power plant for safety reasons; and if he will make a statement.

BEIS officials are engaged regularly with representatives from both EDF Energy and the Office for Nuclear Regulation (the ONR) on a wide range of matters relating to nuclear reactors, including Taishan nuclear power plant in China.

As the independent regulator, the ONR will ensure that events at Taishan, and any associated learning, forms part of its ongoing scrutiny of the EPR at Hinkley Point C.

In the design and construction of any nuclear site in Great Britain, licensees (operators) must demonstrate the highest standards with regards to oversight of their key suppliers and components, and the ONR will hold them to account against those requirements. If the ONR judged that any reactor was unsafe it would not allow it to be built or to operate.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making a heat pump sector deal; and will he make a statement.

The UK Government is working closely with the heat pump industry to collaboratively address sector-specific issues and remove barriers to the deployment of heat pumps across the UK.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of (a) the potential merits of a larger number of Power Purchase Agreements in the UK electricity market and (b) the effect of those agreements on (i) Government subsidies provided to renewable energy generators through the Contract for Difference scheme and (ii) electricity cost for consumers; and if he will make a statement.

The Government recognises that achieving our 2050 net zero target will require increased deployment across a range of renewable technologies. The UK's main support mechanism is the Contracts for Difference Scheme (CfD), which has been hugely successful at bringing forward large-scale renewable generation at low costs to the consumer.

Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) can improve the financial viability of renewable projects built without Government support. PPAs of this nature do not add to consumer levy costs, have the potential to create additional renewable generation capacity and can reduce overall demands on the grid if meeting the needs of large energy users. All routes to deploy cost effective low carbon generation are welcome and given our highly ambitious carbon budget and net zero targets, we anticipate that PPAs will be an important part of the landscape to complement Government mechanisms such as the CfD.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he plans to take in order for the UK Government to assume a leadership role for Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs); whether he plans to arrange workshops and other forums to encourage corporate entities to adopt and increase renewable electricity procurement; and what steps he is taking to encourage the disclosure of PPA strategies pursued by corporate entities.

Everyone has a role to play in achieving the UK’s ambitious decarbonisation targets. In November, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister appointed my Hon. Friend the Member for Arundel and South Downs (Andrew Griffith MP) as the UK’s Net Zero Business Champion to support the country’s business community to make credible plans to reach net zero by 2050 or earlier.

Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) are one approach businesses can take to contribute to their decarbonisation effort. We urge corporates to consider ways to make their energy consumption greener. This includes through the uptake and disclosure of ambitious PPA strategies. Given our highly ambitious carbon budget and net zero targets, we anticipate that PPAs will be an important part of the landscape to complement Government mechanisms such as the Contracts for Difference scheme. Officials are investigating whether government can play a role in encouraging further growth in the PPA market.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he plans to take to support renewable electricity procurement clubs to have shared Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) within the context of existing competition law; and what plans he has to bring forward changes to competition law in relation to common electricity procurement.

The UK has robust competition laws, which protect consumers from harmful behaviour and promote competitive markets. There is published guidance on how competition law can apply to cooperation between businesses, including joint purchasing agreements, which ensures that the current rules do not prevent innovative and pro-competitive behaviour. My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State recently wrote to the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) to request its advice on how the UK can better use the tools available under competition law to achieve our Net Zero and sustainability goals. The CMA will provide its advice in early 2022.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to announce a payment mechanism for the storage of carbon dioxide relative to carbon capture and storage.

The Government’s Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution sets out our aim to establish CCUS in at least two industrial sites by the mid-2020s and a further two by 2030 at the latest.

In December 2020 and May 2021, we published details on a Transport and Storage business model and we will publish a further update in Q4 2021. Our aim is to finalise all CCUS business models in 2022.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 16 July 2021 to Question 29075 on Hinkley Point C Power Station, what the latest date estimate was from EDF for unit 1 to be commissioned beyond the revised target date of June 2026.

On 27 January 2021, the developer of Hinkley Point C (HPC) announced Reactor One has moved from December 2025 to June 2026. There is a risk that Reactor 1 will be delayed by a further 15 months and Reactor 2 by a further 9 months. This risk of delay has been consistent since it was first reported in July 2017.  We understand that the developer is currently managing the schedule for the construction of Unit 2 to follow approximately one year behind that of Unit 1.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department holds information on how many Renewable Heat Incentive applications have been rejected for biomass boilers installed by the company VIRO.

Ofgem, as the scheme administrator hold data on how many applications to the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive have been awarded, terminated and rejected for biomass boilers installed by VIRO. This data is not held for applications to the Non-domestic Renewable Heat Incentive.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department hold information on how many Renewable Heat Incentive contracts have been terminated for biomass boilers installed by the company VIRO.

Ofgem, as the scheme administrator hold data on how many applications to the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive have been awarded, terminated and rejected for biomass boilers installed by VIRO. This data is not held for applications to the Non-domestic Renewable Heat Incentive.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department holds information on how many Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) awards have been made for biomass boilers installed by the company VIRO.

Ofgem, as the scheme administrator hold data on how many applications to the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive have been awarded, terminated and rejected for biomass boilers installed by VIRO. This data is not held for applications to the Non-domestic Renewable Heat Incentive.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 25 June 2021 to Question 21949 EU Grants and Loans: East Ayrshire, what discussions he has had with the Scottish Government on the allocation of funding to replace the European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF) Scotland that Scotland previously received.

The Department regularly meets with the Scottish Government to discuss a range of issues.

15th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will set out a strategy for developing a UK based supply chain to support delivery of the target of deploying 1GW of floating offshore wind by 2030.

One of the key priorities of this government is putting in place policies to support a significant growth of offshore wind to 2030 and beyond. Within this, we are committed to supporting the development of floating offshore wind, as reflected by our ambitious target of 1GW of floating wind by 2030 and ensuring the UK captures the economic benefits of deploying such technology.

Floating offshore wind projects will be eligible to bid in the next Contract for Difference allocation round, which will open in December 2021. We are committed to developing a strong supply chain for floating offshore wind in parallel with growing deployment and are working with industry and other stakeholders on this. Our approach to the next CfD allocation round will provide the foundation for investment in a sustainable, competitive UK based supply chain from which we will learn to help plan our future approach and the feasible scale of ramp up of deployment, building on the success of fixed bottom wind, which has this year delivered supply chain investments in blades, monopiles and transition pieces, creating and safeguarding over 1,800 direct jobs by 2030.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the Heat and Buildings Strategy.

The Government is planning to publish a Heat and Buildings Strategy in due course. The strategy will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings, as well as our approach to the key strategic decisions needed to achieve a mass transition to low-carbon heat.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will adopt the Committee on Climate Change’s recommendation in their 2021 progress report and set a 2030 target for onshore wind.

The Government will respond formally to the Committee on Climate Change’s recommendations by October.

Achieving our ambitious 2050 Net Zero target will require significant increases in renewable electricity generation, and we will need to increase deployment across a range of technologies, including onshore wind. Our recent Energy White Paper stated that we will need sustained growth in the capacity of onshore wind over the next decade alongside solar and offshore wind.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 2 July 2021 to Question 21957 on Hinkley Point C Power Station, what the reason was for the delay reported by EDF in the project update statement.

The COVID-19 health crisis has had a significant impact on progress for Hinkley Point C, although construction work has continued on site. In January 2021, EDF carried out a detailed review of the schedule to estimate the impact due to the pandemic so far. The review concluded that the start of electricity generation from the first unit at Hinkley Point C is now expected in June 2026, compared to the end of 2025 as announced by EDF in 2016.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jul 2021
If he will provide further support to energy transition projects in Scotland.

The Government is intending to support the development of at least two Carbon Capture Usage and Storage (CCUS) clusters to support the energy transition at industrial sites across the UK. This process is ongoing with an announcement expected later this year.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2021 to Question 8655 on European Marine Energy Centre: Finance, whether she plans to hold discussions with the European Marine Energy Centre on the requirement for replacement funding following the end of EU funding.

We do not currently have plans to hold talks with the European Marine Energy Centre on replacement funding for previous EU funding. EMEC was established through support from the UK Government in 2003 in Orkney. The Government has a long history of supporting the development and deployment of wave and tidal stream technologies in the UK. Since 2003 various bodies across Government have provided innovation/R&D funding of £175m to the wave and tidal sectors (almost £80m since 2010).

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 28 May 2021 to Question 3949 on Water Power: Finance, when she plans to publish specific allocation round parameters.

We are currently developing parameters for Allocation Round 4 and will publish these well in advance of the next auction in December 2021.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the level of EU structural funding allocated to East Ayrshire since 2010.

The management of European Structural & Investment Funds (ESIF) in Scotland is a devolved matter and therefore the responsibility of the Scottish Government.

24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the planned shutdown date for Heysham II nuclear power station; what estimate his Department has made of the average the electricity generation capacity of that power station; and what plans his Department has to replace that capacity.

The decision to close a nuclear power station is a matter for the operator and the Office for Nuclear Regulation.

EDF Energy’s published closure dates and the generating capacity for power stations is set out in the following table.

Power station

EDF Energy’s published closure date

Generating capacity

Dungeness B

June 2021

No longer generating

Hinkley Point B

July 2022

965 MW

Hartlepool

2024

1,185 MW

Heysham 1

2024

1,060 MW

Torness

2030

1,200 MW

Heysham 2

2030

1,240 MW

The Government confirmed in the Energy White Paper that it aims to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project beyond Hinkley Point C to a Final Investment Decision by the end of this Parliament (subject to clear value-for-money and all relevant approvals), and that it will provide up to £385m in an Advanced Nuclear Fund (subject to future Spending Reviews) for the next generation of nuclear technology aiming, by the early 2030s, to develop a Small Modular Reactor design and to build an Advanced Modular Reactor demonstrator.

The Capacity Market ensures security of electricity supply by providing all forms of capacity the right incentives to be on the system and to deliver electricity when needed. It secures the capacity we need, including new capacity to replace aging power stations as they retire, through auctions held four-and one-year ahead of delivery (T-4 and T-1). The Capacity Market has brought forward over 13 GW of new build generation and interconnectors to date.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the planned shutdown date for Torness nuclear power station; what estimate his Department has made of the average electricity generation capacity of that power station; and what plans his Department has to replace that capacity.

The decision to close a nuclear power station is a matter for the operator and the Office for Nuclear Regulation.

EDF Energy’s published closure dates and the generating capacity for power stations is set out in the following table.

Power station

EDF Energy’s published closure date

Generating capacity

Dungeness B

June 2021

No longer generating

Hinkley Point B

July 2022

965 MW

Hartlepool

2024

1,185 MW

Heysham 1

2024

1,060 MW

Torness

2030

1,200 MW

Heysham 2

2030

1,240 MW

The Government confirmed in the Energy White Paper that it aims to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project beyond Hinkley Point C to a Final Investment Decision by the end of this Parliament (subject to clear value-for-money and all relevant approvals), and that it will provide up to £385m in an Advanced Nuclear Fund (subject to future Spending Reviews) for the next generation of nuclear technology aiming, by the early 2030s, to develop a Small Modular Reactor design and to build an Advanced Modular Reactor demonstrator.

The Capacity Market ensures security of electricity supply by providing all forms of capacity the right incentives to be on the system and to deliver electricity when needed. It secures the capacity we need, including new capacity to replace aging power stations as they retire, through auctions held four-and one-year ahead of delivery (T-4 and T-1). The Capacity Market has brought forward over 13 GW of new build generation and interconnectors to date.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the planned shutdown date for Dungeness (B) nuclear power station; what estimate his Department has made of the average electricity generation capacity of that power station; and what plans his Department has to replace that capacity.

The decision to close a nuclear power station is a matter for the operator and the Office for Nuclear Regulation.

EDF Energy’s published closure dates and the generating capacity for power stations is set out in the following table.

Power station

EDF Energy’s published closure date

Generating capacity

Dungeness B

June 2021

No longer generating

Hinkley Point B

July 2022

965 MW

Hartlepool

2024

1,185 MW

Heysham 1

2024

1,060 MW

Torness

2030

1,200 MW

Heysham 2

2030

1,240 MW

The Government confirmed in the Energy White Paper that it aims to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project beyond Hinkley Point C to a Final Investment Decision by the end of this Parliament (subject to clear value-for-money and all relevant approvals), and that it will provide up to £385m in an Advanced Nuclear Fund (subject to future Spending Reviews) for the next generation of nuclear technology aiming, by the early 2030s, to develop a Small Modular Reactor design and to build an Advanced Modular Reactor demonstrator.

The Capacity Market ensures security of electricity supply by providing all forms of capacity the right incentives to be on the system and to deliver electricity when needed. It secures the capacity we need, including new capacity to replace aging power stations as they retire, through auctions held four-and one-year ahead of delivery (T-4 and T-1). The Capacity Market has brought forward over 13 GW of new build generation and interconnectors to date.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the planned shutdown date for Heysham nuclear power station; what estimate his Department has made of the average electricity generation capacity of that power station; and what plans his Department has to replace that capacity.

The decision to close a nuclear power station is a matter for the operator and the Office for Nuclear Regulation.

EDF Energy’s published closure dates and the generating capacity for power stations is set out in the following table.

Power station

EDF Energy’s published closure date

Generating capacity

Dungeness B

June 2021

No longer generating

Hinkley Point B

July 2022

965 MW

Hartlepool

2024

1,185 MW

Heysham 1

2024

1,060 MW

Torness

2030

1,200 MW

Heysham 2

2030

1,240 MW

The Government confirmed in the Energy White Paper that it aims to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project beyond Hinkley Point C to a Final Investment Decision by the end of this Parliament (subject to clear value-for-money and all relevant approvals), and that it will provide up to £385m in an Advanced Nuclear Fund (subject to future Spending Reviews) for the next generation of nuclear technology aiming, by the early 2030s, to develop a Small Modular Reactor design and to build an Advanced Modular Reactor demonstrator.

The Capacity Market ensures security of electricity supply by providing all forms of capacity the right incentives to be on the system and to deliver electricity when needed. It secures the capacity we need, including new capacity to replace aging power stations as they retire, through auctions held four-and one-year ahead of delivery (T-4 and T-1). The Capacity Market has brought forward over 13 GW of new build generation and interconnectors to date.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the planned shutdown date for Hartlepool nuclear power station; what estimate his Department has made of the average electricity generation capacity of that power station; and what plans his Department has to replace that capacity.

The decision to close a nuclear power station is a matter for the operator and the Office for Nuclear Regulation.

EDF Energy’s published closure dates and the generating capacity for power stations is set out in the following table.

Power station

EDF Energy’s published closure date

Generating capacity

Dungeness B

June 2021

No longer generating

Hinkley Point B

July 2022

965 MW

Hartlepool

2024

1,185 MW

Heysham 1

2024

1,060 MW

Torness

2030

1,200 MW

Heysham 2

2030

1,240 MW

The Government confirmed in the Energy White Paper that it aims to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project beyond Hinkley Point C to a Final Investment Decision by the end of this Parliament (subject to clear value-for-money and all relevant approvals), and that it will provide up to £385m in an Advanced Nuclear Fund (subject to future Spending Reviews) for the next generation of nuclear technology aiming, by the early 2030s, to develop a Small Modular Reactor design and to build an Advanced Modular Reactor demonstrator.

The Capacity Market ensures security of electricity supply by providing all forms of capacity the right incentives to be on the system and to deliver electricity when needed. It secures the capacity we need, including new capacity to replace aging power stations as they retire, through auctions held four-and one-year ahead of delivery (T-4 and T-1). The Capacity Market has brought forward over 13 GW of new build generation and interconnectors to date.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the planned shutdown date for Hinkley Point (B) nuclear power station; what estimate his Department has made of the average electricity generation capacity of that power station; and what plans his Department has to replace that capacity.

The decision to close a nuclear power station is a matter for the operator and the Office for Nuclear Regulation.

EDF Energy’s published closure dates and the generating capacity for power stations is set out in the following table.

Power station

EDF Energy’s published closure date

Generating capacity

Dungeness B

June 2021

No longer generating

Hinkley Point B

July 2022

965 MW

Hartlepool

2024

1,185 MW

Heysham 1

2024

1,060 MW

Torness

2030

1,200 MW

Heysham 2

2030

1,240 MW

The Government confirmed in the Energy White Paper that it aims to bring at least one large-scale nuclear project beyond Hinkley Point C to a Final Investment Decision by the end of this Parliament (subject to clear value-for-money and all relevant approvals), and that it will provide up to £385m in an Advanced Nuclear Fund (subject to future Spending Reviews) for the next generation of nuclear technology aiming, by the early 2030s, to develop a Small Modular Reactor design and to build an Advanced Modular Reactor demonstrator.

The Capacity Market ensures security of electricity supply by providing all forms of capacity the right incentives to be on the system and to deliver electricity when needed. It secures the capacity we need, including new capacity to replace aging power stations as they retire, through auctions held four-and one-year ahead of delivery (T-4 and T-1). The Capacity Market has brought forward over 13 GW of new build generation and interconnectors to date.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his recent estimate is of the commissioning date for Hinkley Point C (a) Unit 1 and (b) Unit 2.

EDF is the lead investor in Hinkley Point C. The schedule for the construction of Hinkley Point C is the responsibility of the developer and its investors, and not the Government. On 27 January 2021, EDF published a notice saying that Unit 1 is expected to start generating electricity in June 2026. We understand that the developer is currently managing the schedule for the construction of Unit 2 to follow approximately one year behind that of Unit 1.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Stra