Heidi Allen Portrait

Heidi Allen

Liberal Democrat - Former Member for South Cambridgeshire

Work and Pensions Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Acting Leader, Change UK
18th Apr 2019 - 4th Jun 2019
Public Accounts Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 20th Feb 2018
Work and Pensions Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Division Voting information

Heidi Allen has voted in 769 divisions, and 24 times against the majority of their Party.

29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 294 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 17 Conservative Aye votes vs 294 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 17 Conservative Aye votes vs 295 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 310
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Conservative No votes vs 297 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 317 Noes - 301
15 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 118 Conservative No votes vs 196 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 202 Noes - 432
9 Jan 2019 - BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE (SECTION 13(1)(b) OF THE EUROPEAN UNION (WITHDRAWAL) ACT 2018) (NO. 2) - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 17 Conservative Aye votes vs 285 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 308 Noes - 297
8 Jan 2019 - Finance (No. 3) Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 20 Conservative Aye votes vs 282 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 296
8 Jan 2019 - Finance (No. 3) Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Conservative Aye votes vs 289 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 292 Noes - 303
4 Dec 2018 - Business of the House (European Union (Withdrawal) Act) - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 25 Conservative Aye votes vs 282 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 299
24 Oct 2018 - Northern Ireland (Executive Formation and Exercise of Functions) Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 45 Conservative Aye votes vs 102 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 207 Noes - 117
23 Oct 2018 - Abortion - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 108 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 208 Noes - 123
17 Jul 2018 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 289 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 301
17 Jul 2018 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 291 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 307
16 Jul 2018 - Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 302
16 Jul 2018 - Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 300
20 Jun 2018 - European Union (Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 304 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 319
13 Dec 2017 - European Union (Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 293 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 309 Noes - 305
7 Mar 2017 - Children and Social Work Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 281 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 267 Noes - 287
7 Feb 2017 - European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 312 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 293 Noes - 326
9 Mar 2016 - Enterprise Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 25 Conservative Aye votes vs 281 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 317 Noes - 286
2 Mar 2016 - Welfare Reform and Work Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 309 Noes - 274
2 Mar 2016 - Welfare Reform and Work Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 309 Noes - 275
9 Nov 2015 - Scotland Bill - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 283 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 191 Noes - 341
3 Nov 2015 - Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill (Money) - View Vote Context
Heidi Allen voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative No votes vs 280 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 281 Noes - 227
View All Heidi Allen Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Heidi Allen's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Heidi Allen

28th October 2019
Heidi Allen signed this EDM on Monday 28th October 2019

People's Vote

Tabled by: Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat - East Dunbartonshire)
That this House calls on the Government to bring forward legislation to hold a People’s Vote on whether the United Kingdom should remain a member of the European Union or should leave the European Union on the final terms agreed between the Government and the European Union.
25 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Nov 2019)
Signatures by party:
Liberal Democrat: 19
Labour: 4
Plaid Cymru: 1
Independent: 1
15th October 2019
Heidi Allen signed this EDM on Tuesday 15th October 2019

Barclays's withdrawal from the banking framework with Post Office Ltd

Tabled by: Ed Davey (Liberal Democrat - Kingston and Surbiton)
That this House expresses alarm on learning that Barclays bank has decided to withdraw from a key element of the banking framework agreement with Post Office Ltd, which allows personal and business customers to access their bank accounts via 11,500 post office locations across the UK; notes that the banking …
32 signatures
(Most recent: 24 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Liberal Democrat: 17
Labour: 8
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Independent: 1
Conservative: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
View All Heidi Allen's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Heidi Allen, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Heidi Allen has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Heidi Allen has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Heidi Allen


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to require employers to offer workers on zero hours contracts the option of guaranteed minimum hours; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Monday 15th July 2019
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

A Bill to equalise the assessment and enforcement of child maintenance arrangements of children of self-employed parents with those of children of other employed parents; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 28th November 2017
(Read Debate)

A Bill to require information to be made available to prospective undergraduate students about what is provided to students for the tuition fees charged, how tuition fee resources are expended and what is expected of students; to establish transparency in how tuition fees are spent; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 24th June 2015

130 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
11 Other Department Questions
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, on which dates the Board of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (a) discussed and (b) approved the abolition of the post of Disability Commissioner; and whether the decision was (i) voted on, (ii) approved unanimously or (iii) subject to a majority vote.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission is an independent public body and decisions about the roles and responsibilities of its Board members, and how these are communicated within the organisation, are matters for the Commission itself. I have therefore asked the Commission’s Chief Executive Officer to write to the my hon. Friend with the information requested. I will place a copy of the letter in the libraries of both Houses.

17th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether the decision to abolish the post of Disability Commissioner in 2017 was taken outside of an Equality and Human Rights Commission board meeting; whether the standard procedure for the board to make decisions outside of board meetings was followed; what electronic or hard copy records exist of communications relating to (a) the possibility of abolishing and (b) the decision to abolish the post of Disability Commissioner in 2017 (i) from or to individual board members and (ii) by any employees of the Equality and Human Rights Commission; and if she will place a copy of those records in the Library.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission is an independent public body and decisions about the roles and responsibilities of its Board members, and how these are communicated within the organisation, are matters for the Commission itself. I have therefore asked the Commission’s Chief Executive Officer to write to the my hon. Friend with the information requested. I will place a copy of the letter in the libraries of both Houses.

17th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what process the board of the Equality and Human Rights Commission uses to take decisions outside of formal board meetings.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission is an independent public body and decisions about the roles and responsibilities of its Board members, and how these are communicated within the organisation, are matters for the Commission itself. I have therefore asked the Commission’s Chief Executive Officer to write to the my hon. Friend with the information requested. I will place a copy of the letter in the libraries of both Houses.

17th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, on what dates in 2017 the Board of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (a) discussed and (b) approved the abolition of the post of Disability Commissioner and whether that decision was (i) voted on, (ii) approved unanimously and (iii) made by a majority vote.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission is an independent public body and decisions about the roles and responsibilities of its Board members, and how these are communicated within the organisation, are matters for the Commission itself. I have therefore asked the Commission’s Chief Executive Officer to write to the my hon. Friend with the information requested. I will place a copy of the letter in the libraries of both Houses.

17th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, on what dates (a) the Chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, (b) the Deputy Chair, (c) the Chief Executive, (d) any other member of the Board of the Commission, (e) any member of the Equality and Human Rights Commission Disability Advisory Committee and (f) any employee of the Commission were first made aware (i) verbally, (ii) electronically and (iii) by any other means of the appointment of Lord Shinkwin to the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission is an independent public body and decisions about the roles and responsibilities of its Board members, and how these are communicated within the organisation, are matters for the Commission itself. I have therefore asked the Commission’s Chief Executive Officer to write to the my hon. Friend with the information requested. I will place a copy of the letter in the libraries of both Houses.

13th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether the Equality and Human Rights Commission's Disability Advisory Committee was (a) consulted and (b) informed in advance of the abolition of the role of disability commissioner in June 2017.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission is an independent public body and decisions about the roles and responsibilities of its Board members, and how these are communicated within the organisation, are matters for the Commission itself.

I have therefore asked the Commission’s Chief Executive Officer to write to my hon. Friend with the information requested. I will place a copy of the letter in the libraries of both Houses.

13th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, (a) how and (b) when the decision to abolish the role of disability commissioner was communicated to the Equality and Human Rights Commission's Disability Advisory Committee.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission is an independent public body and decisions about the roles and responsibilities of its Board members, and how these are communicated within the organisation, are matters for the Commission itself.

I have therefore asked the Commission’s Chief Executive Officer to write to my hon. Friend with the information requested. I will place a copy of the letter in the libraries of both Houses.

13th Jul 2017
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether the decision to abolish the role of disability commissioner was taken outside of a Equality and Human Rights Commission Board meeting; and when that decision was made.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission is an independent public body and decisions about the roles and responsibilities of its Board members, and how these are communicated within the organisation, are matters for the Commission itself.

I have therefore asked the Commission’s Chief Executive Officer to write to my hon. Friend with the information requested. I will place a copy of the letter in the libraries of both Houses.

9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, whether community support for large-scale solar farms is a requirement in determining applications for such farms; and what grade of agricultural land is acceptable for the development of such farms.

Approval for large scale solar farms does not strictly depend on either community support or on grade of agricultural land.

The National Planning Policy Framework provides guidance to local planning authorities on the issues which they should take into account in considering applications for solar PV (including on agricultural land). Further guidance on solar PV was published in the “Planning practice guidance for renewable and low carbon energy” document. These documents can be found at the following locations:

In 2014 we took action to close the RO to ground mounted solar PV larger than 5MW. We expect to publish our response to the consultation, which ran over the summer, on closing the RO to smaller solar installations,

24th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps he plans to take to encourage large businesses to trade more fairly with small businesses.

The Government is clear that all large companies should trade fairly with small suppliers.

That is why we will shortly consult on proposals to establish a Small Business Conciliation Service to help small businesses resolve disputes.

13th Sep 2018
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the Answer of 28 February 2018 to Question 129098, how many reports of hare coursing were received in each year since 2014; and how many (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions there have been relating to hare coursing in 2018 to date.

Offences of hare coursing may be prosecuted using offences created by the Game Act 1831, the Night Poaching Act 1828 and the Hunting Act 2004.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not hold any record of the number of reports of hare coursing offences made to the police.

The CPS does not maintain a central record of the number of prosecutions for offences of hare coursing. This information could only be obtained by examining CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

29th Jun 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that devolution settlements take account of the implications of the UK leaving the EU for everyone in the UK.

The Government is committed to ensuring that withdrawal from the EU is a successful and smooth process for the whole of the UK and that no new barriers to living and working within our union are created. The Repeal Bill will take account of devolution as it prepares us to leave the EU.

25th Jun 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that people without access to technology are not adversely affected by the increased use of IT to deliver public services.

We want as many people as possible to have a chance to benefit from the digital revolution in public services. For those who can’t get online, we’ve introduced more support and for those who want to get online, we will continue to make sure the right help is in place.

3rd Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he is taking steps to ensure that the level of regulation applied to fracking sites on the permanent monitoring of noise emissions applies also to (a) the wind industry, (b) wind turbines and (c) all wind farm sites; and if he will make a statement.

Planning authorities are responsible for applying and enforcing any conditions attached to the planning permission for a fracking or wind turbine development, and this must be assessed on a case-by-case basis. This may include monitoring of noise levels.

9th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to reduce (a) energy consumption and (b) energy production from biomass fuel after the UK leaves the EU; and what steps his Department is taking to encourage other forms of renewable energy through subsidies.

For business energy consumption we outlined in the Government’s Clean Growth Strategy, published in 2017, our goal to enable businesses and industry to improve energy efficiency by at least 20 per cent by 2030. This will contribute to overall economic growth by reducing the amount of energy required per unit of output.

Sustainable, low carbon bioenergy has helped the UK move to a low-carbon energy mix, increase our energy security and keep costs down for consumers. We see the use of biomass as a transitional technology and have announced that support for all coal to biomass conversions will end in 2027.

The Contracts for Difference scheme is our main mechanism for supporting new renewable energy generation projects. The Clean Growth Strategy announced up to £557m of annual support for future Contracts for Difference auctions, providing developers with the confidence they need to invest in bringing forward new projects.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 12 September 2017, Official Report, column 635, if he will provide an update on the Government's monitoring of the effect on human health of wind turbine low-frequency sound and infrasound; and what assessment his Department has made of those findings.

Government commissioned WSP/Parsons Brinckerhoff to review the available evidence on the human response to Amplitude Modulation (AM) noise produced by wind turbines. The final report of the review was published on 25 October 2016 [1].

We encourage Local Authorities and developers to apply the recommendations of the report as appropriate when considering planning applications for new sites to protect local residents from excessive AM noise.

To date, no evidence has been brought to the Department’s attention that changes the recommendations of the report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-evidence-on-the-response-to-amplitude-modulation-from-wind-turbines

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to remove the process of constraint payments whereby wind turbine operators are recompensed at times of surplus generation and attempted stabilisation of the grid.

The Government has no plans to remove the longstanding arrangements for managing transmission constraints, under which various types of generation are compensated in order to change their planned output.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans his Department has to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings this year.

I refer the Hon member to the answer to written question 224816, answered on 28th February.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether departmental guidance on the implementation of the Digital Economy Act 2017 will make it clear that section 106 encompasses all methods of mass online harvesting of tickets.

Section 106 of the Digital Economy Act 2017 provides the power for government to introduce a criminal offence in order to address the purchase of tickets for a recreational, sporting or cultural event in excess of the maximum permitted where this has been undertaken by the use of automated software ('bots'). The precise nature of the regulations is being developed in consultation with relevant stakeholders and they will be tabled in due course.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the change to eligibility groups in the pilot scheme introduced by the International Federation for Intellectual Impairment Sport (INAS) on encouraging more people with Down's syndrome and autism to enter the 2017 INAS World Swimming Championships.

We welcome the efforts of international bodies, like the International Federation for Intellectual Impairment Sport, to make their events more inclusive. The government supports efforts that aim to encourage disabled people, including those with Down's syndrome and autism, to become active and to fulfil their sporting potential. The government's sport strategy, Sporting Future: A Strategy for an Active Nation (published in Dec 2015), places a focus on encouraging activity amongst those less likely to be active, including disabled people.

Government is not involved in the selection of the British team for the INAS World Swimming Championships - British entries are sanctioned by the UK Sport Association for People with Learning Disability (UKSA). It is for them to liaise with organisations like Down's Syndrome Swimming GB about British entries into the event.

4th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions her Department has had with disability sports organisations on classing Down's syndrome athletes as a separate and discreet class and excluding such athletes from participation opportunities in national disability sports events.

We have not been approached about this issue and no recent discussion has taken place. Sport England is currently in discussions with National Disability Sports Organisations, about the role they can play to support the delivery of Government's strategy for sport and physical activity, Sporting Future, which is focused on tackling inactivity in priority groups, such as disabled people. This includes discussions with Special Olympics GB and Mencap about the work that they do with people with disabilities.

6th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what progress he has made on setting targets for on-demand broadcasters to provide subtitles and audio description for people with sensory loss.

The government is committed to seeing an improvement in the levels of provision of accessibility services for video-on-demand (VoD) services. We have been monitoring progress of the provision of access services for VoD content since 2013 through engagement with the Authority for Television On Demand (ATVOD), platform operators and content providers. We will work with them - and use information from the April 2015 paper by Action on Hearing Loss, Sense and RNIB - to define a target that we will expect providers to reach by mid-2016. If ATVOD's 2015 annual survey of VoD services indicates that significant progress has not been made then, as we stated in the Connectivity, Content and Consumers paper (July 2013), we will consider legislation in 2016.

24th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to support (a) schools and (b) local authorities in providing additional services to help young people with early signs of mental ill health.

​The Department is working with NHS England and Department of Health and Social Care to help schools and colleges provide support for children and young people with emerging mental health issues and secure specialist treatment where it is needed.

The NHS Long Term Plan set out that by 2023/24 an extra 345,000 children and young people in England aged up to 25 will receive mental health support via NHS-funded mental health services including new Mental Health Support Teams linked to groups of schools and colleges. The teams will work with groups of schools and colleges to provide swift access to support for children and young people, especially those with emerging, mild and moderate needs. Teams will also support referrals to more specialist treatment. Roll-out is starting with a trailblazer programme to test how teams can be effectively delivered, including how they can work effectively with local authority services to provide coordinated support for children and young people. Staff for the new teams are currently be being trained and the first 59 teams will be fully operational in 25 areas of the country by the end of the year.

Directors of Children’s Services and Directors of Public Health in Local Authorities will play an important role in supporting local implementation of the new teams. The Department for Education is working with Public Health England to ensure that local authorities are kept informed and are invited to contribute to local plans for implementation.

31st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to increase the national funding rate for sixth form students.

The departmental budget for spending on sixth form funding in England from 2015-16 to 2019-20 was set in the 2015 Spending Review. As with other areas of departmental spending, sixth form funding from 2020 onwards will be considered as part of the next Spending Review.

We have protected the base rate of funding for 16 to 19 year olds for all types of providers until the end of the current spending review period in 2020 and overall, the government plans to invest nearly £7 billion during 2018-19, to ensure there is a place in education or training for every 16 to 19 year old who wants one. We are considering the efficiency and resilience of the sector and are assessing how far the current funding and regulatory structures enable high quality provision for young people.

The department works closely with HM Treasury in considering sixth form funding at ministerial and official level, and will continue to do so in the lead-up to the Spending Review.

31st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the adequacy of the national funding rate for sixth form students.

The departmental budget for spending on sixth form funding in England from 2015-16 to 2019-20 was set in the 2015 Spending Review. As with other areas of departmental spending, sixth form funding from 2020 onwards will be considered as part of the next Spending Review.

We have protected the base rate of funding for 16 to 19 year olds for all types of providers until the end of the current spending review period in 2020 and overall, the government plans to invest nearly £7 billion during 2018-19, to ensure there is a place in education or training for every 16 to 19 year old who wants one. We are considering the efficiency and resilience of the sector and are assessing how far the current funding and regulatory structures enable high quality provision for young people.

The department works closely with HM Treasury in considering sixth form funding at ministerial and official level, and will continue to do so in the lead-up to the Spending Review.

31st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the national funding rate for sixth form students.

The departmental budget for spending on sixth form funding in England from 2015-16 to 2019-20 was set in the 2015 Spending Review. As with other areas of departmental spending, sixth form funding from 2020 onwards will be considered as part of the next Spending Review.

We have protected the base rate of funding for 16 to 19 year olds for all types of providers until the end of the current spending review period in 2020 and overall, the government plans to invest nearly £7 billion during 2018-19, to ensure there is a place in education or training for every 16 to 19 year old who wants one. We are considering the efficiency and resilience of the sector and are assessing how far the current funding and regulatory structures enable high quality provision for young people.

The department works closely with HM Treasury in considering sixth form funding at ministerial and official level, and will continue to do so in the lead-up to the Spending Review.

12th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the (a) number and (b) proportion of teachers that are on the (i) main, (ii) upper, and (iii) leadership pay scales in South Cambridgeshire constituency.

Please see the attached table which provides the number and proportion[1],[2] of full and part-time regular teachers in service in state funded schools who are paid on the main, upper, leadership, other and unknown pay ranges in South Cambridgeshire constituency and in England in November 2017. Within the table, the ‘Other’ column includes the leading practitioners[3] and unqualified teachers[4] pay ranges and the ‘Unknown’ column relates to invalid codes entered by schools during the collection process that were not amended by the schools after being identified as invalid.

[1] Excludes centrally employed staff.

[2] Figures 3 or less have been suppressed.

[3] Leading practitioners are qualified teachers who are employed in posts that the relevant body has determined have the primary purpose of modelling and leading improvement of teaching skills.

[4] Unqualified teachers are teachers who are not a qualified teacher and who is prescribed by Order under section 122(5) of the Act as a school teacher for the purposes of that section.

[5] Includes leading practitioner and unqualified pay ranges.

8th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to Autumn Budget 2017, what the criteria is for the allocation of the £34 million fund for teaching construction skills.

The department will publish criteria for the fund early next year. The fund will help to build construction training facilities attached to housing developments, and will support adult students to retrain as construction workers. We will welcome bids from colleges and developers from across the country.

The funding for construction skills was announced in the Budget, as part of the National Retraining Scheme. Most of the funding will be a construction skills fund for England, which will support government’s ambition to build new homes during the Parliament.

There will also be £5 million for construction skills in the West Midlands, as part of the second devolution deal.

30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of Family Hubs.

We welcome the development of family hubs. We know that many areas are already moving towards this model of support for children and families.

However, it is up to local councils to decide how to organise and commission services in their areas. Local councils are best placed to understand local needs and how best to meet them, and they should be the ones to determine the effectiveness of their services to children and families.

30th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress her Department is making on updating relationship and sex education guidance.

We want to help all schools to deliver high quality Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education and Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) Education so that all young people are equipped to have healthy and respectful relationships, and leave school with the knowledge to prepare them for adult life.

The Department is currently conducting thorough and wide-ranging engagement with stakeholders, which will help us to reach an evidence-based decision on PSHE, as well as to determine the content of the regulations and statutory guidance.

We will consult on draft regulations and guidance and the regulations will then be laid in the House allowing for a full and considered debate. We are working towards schools teaching the new subjects from September 2019.

25th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Oral contribution of the Minister of State for Education of 18 July 2017, Official Report, column 713, what discussions her Department has had with HM Revenue and Customs to resolve the issues identified with the digital childcare service; and what progress her Department has made on steps identified in those discussions to resolve those issues.

As of 31 August, over 216,000 30 hours eligibility codes have been issued for the Autumn term. Whilst the majority of parents applied with no issue, some parents experienced difficulties. HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are working with National Savings & Investments (and their supplier Atos) to make a range of improvements to the childcare service. The department maintains continuous contact with HMRC and are involved in key discussions.

HMRC put in place arrangements to ensure parents were able to access a place in the Autumn term. For example, they provided 30 hours free childcare codes manually to all parents who reported experiencing difficulties applying through the digital route. The department then encouraged all local authorities to fund 30 hours places for the autumn term where the parent applied on 31 August or before, but received their code after the deadline.

We are committed to working with colleagues to ensure we continue to improve the customer experience as we deliver this important programme nationally.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many full-time disabled students were registered on higher education courses in (a) 2015-16 and (b) 2016-17.

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) collects and publishes data on students enrolled at UK Higher Education Institutions. Statistics on numbers of students with disabilities are published as part of the Statistical First Release on higher education student enrolments and qualifications obtained at higher education providers, which can be found at the following link:

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/news/12-01-2017/sfr242-student-enrolments-and-qualifications.

Statistics for the 2016/17 academic year will be available from HESA in January 2018.

16th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps she is taking to close the deprivation attainment gap in South Cambridgeshire constituency.

We are committed to making this a country where everyone has a fair chance to go as far as his or her talent and hard work will allow. The pupil premium provides schools with significant additional funding - £2.5bn this year alone – to raise the achievement of their disadvantaged pupils and so close the attainment gap. Our guarantee to maintain current per-pupil funding levels for the rest of this Parliament will ensure schools continue to have the support they need to improve disadvantaged pupils’ outcomes.

This year, disadvantaged pupils in South Cambridgeshire will benefit from £2.6 million in pupil premium funding.

16th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of recent changes to the National Funding Formula on the deprivation attainment gap in schools.

The Government is committed to creating a country that works for everyone, regardless of their background. We want all children to reach their full potential and to succeed in adult life.

Disadvantage has a significant impact on pupils’ attainment. This impact is seen throughout the school system and compounded in areas of disadvantage. In recognition of that, our formula recognises educational disadvantage in its widest sense, using different indicators within the deprivation factor into target funding widely. We want, in particular, to include those pupils who are not necessarily eligible for free school meals, but whose families are still struggling to get by.

1st Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate her Department has made of the number of children who are refused admission to a state funded faith school on the grounds of differing faith or belief; and if she will work with schools and faith groups to facilitate inclusive admission policies in all state funded schools.

The department does not collect data on the reasons why individual applicants are refused a place to particular schools.


It is for the relevant admission authority of a school designated with a religious character to decide whether or not to adopt faith-based oversubscription criteria. Not all schools with a faith designation choose to allocate places by faith. Some choose to allocate only a proportion of their places on the basis of faith. Where they have places available, schools with a faith designation must admit all children who apply, without reference to faith.


The government is committed to ensuring that new faith-designated academies and free schools provide additional places not just for pupils of their own faith, but also for other local children regardless of their faith. New provision academies and free schools with a faith designation must give priority to at least 50 per cent of their intake without reference to faith, where they are oversubscribed.

4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 11 April 2011 to Question HL14975, what the timeframe is for his Department to conclude its consideration of the UNICEF report entitled Healthy Air for Healthy Children; whether he plans to publish a response to that report; and what steps he is taking to ensure that personal air quality (a) monitors and (b) messaging systems will be made available to inform the public.

The Department is aware of the Healthy Air for Healthy Children report. There are no plans to formally review the methodology and conclusions nor publish a response to the report.

Through the Air Quality Grant more than £3 million of government funding has been awarded to 28 innovative projects to improve air quality across local authorities in England. This includes funding to trial new technology to test the effectiveness of low-cost sensors to better understand the air quality data they produce.

Air Quality forecasts and information are already published on the Defra UKAIR website. We are undertaking further work to understand the range of different audiences for air quality information, the differing requirements of those audiences, and how air quality information needs to be tailored to meet those different audiences’ needs.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has plans to introduce a nationwide diesel scrappage scheme; and what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect on air quality resulting from the introduction of any such scheme.

No, the previous national car scrappage scheme was undertaken to support the car industry and for any nationwide scrappage schemes there are concerns over deliverability and value for money. However, we have not restricted the types of measures eligible local authorities could bid for funding for from the Clean Air Fund.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
4th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on climate change of hydrofluorocarbon refrigerants; and what plans he has to improve arrangements for the (a) management, (b) recycling and (c) disposal of such refrigerants.

The Government estimates that hydrofluorocarbon emissions from refrigeration and air conditioning made up around 2.5% of all UK greenhouse gas emissions in 2017, when gases are compared using their global warming potentials (GWPs). The UK greenhouse gas inventory uses the GWPs for individual hydrofluorocarbons from table 2.14 of Volume One (the Physical Science Basis) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report 4, as agreed by decision 9/CP.2 of the Conference of Parties.

The UK was one of the earliest countries to ratify the 2016 Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol relating to hydrofluorocarbons and regulations are already in place regarding the phase down of their usage as well as controls on their management, disposal and recycling. A review is expected in 2022.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect on animal welfare of it not being a mandatory requirement for a local authority to have an animal welfare inspector with responsibility for enforcement of Animal Welfare Act 2006; and what representations his Department has received in the last 12 months from (a) the Home Office and (b) police forces on the costs of taking steps to protect animal welfare where a local authority animal welfare inspector is not in place.

Anyone is able to take out a prosecution under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 and it is on this basis that the RSPCA investigate calls and prosecute hundreds of people each year for offences under the Act. Local authorities also have enabling powers under the Act and make decisions on their approach to the Act based on local needs and resource priorities and the arrangements that work best for them, working as necessary in partnership with others where helpful. Defra is in regular discussion with the police and Home Office on animal welfare issues and we have received no specific representations from them in the last 12 months on the costs to them of protecting animal welfare where a local authority animal welfare inspector is not in place.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 21 January 2019 to Question 209299 on Lead: Ammunition, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his polices of the European Chemicals Agency report on regulation of the use of lead ammunition; and whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to restrict or ban the use of lead ammunition.

The Government is aware of the European Chemicals Agency report on the regulation of the use of lead ammunition. The European Union Regulation on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation & Restriction of Chemicals (EU REACH) committee is considering this report and will shortly make recommendations to the European Commission about the current regulation on the use of lead in gunshot over wetlands.

We will review our position once we have seen proposals from EU REACH.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the role of public advice in the effective delivery of the proposed new Environmental Land Management Schemes.

We will be introducing a new Environmental Land Management (ELM) system that will pay land managers for delivering environmental public goods.

The government will work with farmers and land managers who wish to improve the environment by entering into multi-annual ELM contracts in which land managers commit to take certain actions to deliver environmental goods and benefits in return for funding.

We believe that those managing the land are best placed to decide how to deliver the environmental benefits they have signed up to provide. We propose that land managers should have access to the information and advice they need to enable them to develop holistic management plans for their land.

Evidence from previous agri-environment schemes suggests that the effectiveness of measures and the quality of environmental benefits can depend on the quality and extent of advice from trusted advisers. We propose that an approved specialist adviser should be readily available to help the land manager to deliver desirable environmental outcomes. We want land managers to establish trusted relationships with their adviser. We are therefore exploring the role that third party advisers could play. For example, an adviser could be an agronomist who a farmer has worked with in the past and trusts, or an adviser from a local organisation who can advise on local conditions. We expect that these advisers would need to be approved to demonstrate their level of capability and to ensure sufficient protection for the spending of public money. The appetite for existing advisers training to deliver advice within ELM, and the market for delivering this training, is being tested through a combination of policy development, Testing and Trials and social science involvement, with an intelligence assessment in development.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with the European Commission on the timing of the publication of the updated controllers of trade in endangered species regulations on wildlife trade; and what steps her Department is taking to ensure sentencing guidelines for wildlife trade offences are put in place.

The updated and consolidated Control of Trade in Endangered Species (Enforcement) Regulations (COTES) that the Department is taking forward concern the domestic implementation of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species controls. As such we have not discussed the timing of their publication with the European Commission.

As part of the review of COTES legislation Defra has held discussions on guidelines for prosecutors with the Crown Prosecution Service, and sentencing guidelines with the Sentencing Council.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
27th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what representations she has made to the International Whaling Commission on Japan's resumption of whaling in the South Atlantic.

The UK Government raises its opposition to Japan’s continued whaling at every appropriate opportunity, including at meetings of the International Whaling Commission (IWC). Most recently, I raised the issue with the Japanese Fisheries Minister during an official visit to Japan.

We will continue to work closely with countries opposing Japan’s programme of whaling in the build-up to the next IWC meeting in October this year, and will ensure that the UK’s strong opposition is reiterated. Parliamentary business permitting, the UK will again be represented at the Ministerial level, as has been the case at previous IWC meetings.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
27th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government plans to take at the International Whaling Commission meeting in Slovenia in October 2016 related to Japan's resumption of its whaling programme in the South Atlantic.

The UK Government raises its opposition to Japan’s continued whaling at every appropriate opportunity, including at meetings of the International Whaling Commission (IWC). Most recently, I raised the issue with the Japanese Fisheries Minister during an official visit to Japan.

We will continue to work closely with countries opposing Japan’s programme of whaling in the build-up to the next IWC meeting in October this year, and will ensure that the UK’s strong opposition is reiterated. Parliamentary business permitting, the UK will again be represented at the Ministerial level, as has been the case at previous IWC meetings.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
27th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government will be represented at ministerial level at the International Whaling Commission meeting in Slovenia in October 2016.

The UK Government raises its opposition to Japan’s continued whaling at every appropriate opportunity, including at meetings of the International Whaling Commission (IWC). Most recently, I raised the issue with the Japanese Fisheries Minister during an official visit to Japan.

We will continue to work closely with countries opposing Japan’s programme of whaling in the build-up to the next IWC meeting in October this year, and will ensure that the UK’s strong opposition is reiterated. Parliamentary business permitting, the UK will again be represented at the Ministerial level, as has been the case at previous IWC meetings.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment she has made of the situation of refugees affected by conflict in Syria and Iraq.

We are deeply concerned about the humanitarian situation in Syria, Iraq and the region. The UN estimates that 7.6 million people are internally displaced in Syria and a further 2.9 million people are internally displaced in Iraq. There are over 3.9 million Syrian refugees in neighbouring countries.

4th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the level of discrimination faced by disabled people when travelling by taxi.

The Disabled Persons’ Transport Advisory Committee (DPTAC) have a statutory duty to advise Ministers on the transport needs of disabled passengers, and we have discussed with them the challenges that disabled people face when using taxis and private hire vehicles (PHVs).

Ministers are considering the recommendations made in the report of the Chair of the Task and Finish Group on Taxi and Private Hire Vehicle Licensing, including those intended to improve accessibility. A Government response will be issued in due course.

We also intend to commission research to understand more clearly the experience of passengers who have been refused service by taxi and PHV drivers on account of using a wheelchair or assistance dog, and the levers available to Government to help eliminate such unacceptable behaviour.

4th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions his Department has had with bus companies to ensure that the required level of disability awareness training is undertaken by all bus drivers.

Bus and coach operators must ensure that drivers subject to the EU Regulation 181/2011 requirement to complete disability awareness training receive appropriate instruction. As part of the 2018 annual bus statistics survey, we sought data on whether operators were compliant with these new duties, and results will be published on January 30th. We also intend to publish best practice guidance on disability awareness training in the spring.

We are committed to developing a framework for the monitoring and enforcement of relevant training requirements, and continue to liaise with Regulators and the bus industry to ensure that operators understand fully their responsibilities.

4th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps are being taken to ensure that baggage handlers at UK airports have the required training to handle wheelchairs.

The Government seeks to ensure equal access to air travel for all. Through the recently launched Aviation 2050 consultation the Department is considering a new Passenger Charter that will raise standards and enhance services for passengers, including disabled people and those with reduced mobility. This includes increased uptake of disability awareness training programmes for ground handlers, and addressing the difficulties faced when stowing wheelchairs in the hold of a plane.

27th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of Govia Thamelink Railway's preparations for the winter timetable update starting on 10 December 2018.

To supplement the separate internal assurance processes within Train Operators and Network Rail, since May, industry has established new assurance processes to look at timetable implementation on a network wide basis. This has included setting up a cross industry Programme Management Office (PMO) within Network Rail to carry out this role. They have worked with industry as a whole to develop an informed view of risks, including those related to infrastructure, operator readiness and staffing.

As well as the industry PMO processes set out above, GTR has also remained subject to Industry Readiness Board assessment. The Department has had ongoing discussions with GTR about their readiness to deliver in December, including senior weekly calls with the operator to discuss progress.

While no option is risk-free, the industry’s approach to the December 2018 timetable offers the greatest possible level of operational confidence. The Department is taking the implementation of the timetable extremely seriously and will be monitoring performance closely.

30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of backdating universal credit payments to reduce the five week wait for a first payment.

Universal Credit new claim advances provide access to a payment for those in financial need, which can be accessed urgently, until their first regular Universal Credit payment is due. Claimants can access up to 100% of the total expected monthly award, which they can pay back over a period of up to 12 months. We have announced that from October 2021, the repayment period for these advances will be extended further, to 16 months.

The Department has delivered a number of improvements to support claimants during their first assessment period, such as removing waiting days and paying those claimants moving from Housing Benefit onto Universal Credit a two week ‘transitional housing payment’. We are also introducing a two-week run on for eligible claimants of Income Support, Jobseeker’s Allowance and Employment and Support Allowance from July 2020.

Claims may be backdated, by up to one calendar month, in limited circumstances for vulnerable claimants who may be delayed in claiming Universal Credit through no fault of their own. Claims may also be backdated in specific circumstances when a couple separates to ensure that there is no gap in entitlement between the couple claim and the new claim made by a single claimant.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of establishing an independent commission to review the value of benefits to ensure they consistently match the cost of living.

The Secretary of State has a statutory duty to complete an annual review of benefit and pension rates to determine whether they have retained their value in relation to either prices or earnings.

If there has been an increase in prices or earnings she must increase certain benefits by at least the increase in prices or earnings, using ONS data. For other benefits she may take into account the prevailing economic conditions and other relevant factors.

Whilst organisations external to Government are free to make representations to the Secretary of State, the Department has made no assessment around the introduction of an independent commission to review the value of benefits.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of universal credit payments were subject to a deduction for child maintenance arrears.

For eligible Universal Credit claims with a payment due in May 2019 (the latest month of available data) 0.6% [11,000 claims] had a deduction for child maintenance arrears.

Notes

- Number of claims rounded to nearest 1000.

- Percentage rounded to nearest 0.1%

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect of the working age benefit freeze on the household incomes of people with (a) disabilities and (b) long term health conditions.

An Impact Assessment of the benefit freeze was published in 2015, this is available in the link below.

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/impact-assessments/IA15-006C.pdf

This benefit freeze excluded Disability Living Allowance, Personal Independence Payment, Attendance Allowance, the Support Group component of Employment and Support Allowance (for those not expected to look for work), disability premia in working-age benefits and the disabled elements of tax credits. This provides protection for those facing the additional cost of disability and long term health conditions.

11th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, in reference to research published by the MS Society in March 2019, whether her Department has plans to undertake a review the effect of the introduction of the 20-metre rule for personal independence payment on costs to other Departments.

The enhanced rate of the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) Mobility component was always intended to be for those "unable" or "virtually unable" to walk.

We believe the current PIP assessment criteria, including the 20 metres distance, are the best way of identifying those whose physical mobility is most limited.

Senior Officials are in contact with the MS Society and will be meeting them in the coming weeks to discuss the latest research.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he has made an assessment of the effect of the introduction of the 20-metre rule on the level of people's eligibility for personal independence payment compared with previous levels of eligibility for disability living allowance.

The development of the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessment has been carried out in an iterative, transparent and consultative manner. It was developed in collaboration with a wide range of experts and through comprehensive public consultation.

The consultation process confirmed there is no consensus across the health and social care community of the perfect measure of mobility and there is no evidence for one particular distance.

The 20 metre distance was introduced in PIP to distinguish those whose mobility is significantly more limited than others and who face even greater barriers on a day to day basis – those who have the highest need.

There are 104,000 PIP claimants receiving the enhanced rate of mobility who previously were not awarded the higher rate mobility in Disability Living Allowance in the period April 2013 to October 2017.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the evidential basis was for the introduction of the 20-metre rule as a criterion for mobility in the personal independence payment assessment procedure.

The development of the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessment has been carried out in an iterative, transparent and consultative manner. It was developed in collaboration with a wide range of experts and through comprehensive public consultation.

The consultation process confirmed there is no consensus across the health and social care community of the perfect measure of mobility and there is no evidence for one particular distance.

The 20 metre distance was introduced in PIP to distinguish those whose mobility is significantly more limited than others and who face even greater barriers on a day to day basis – those who have the highest need.

There are 104,000 PIP claimants receiving the enhanced rate of mobility who previously were not awarded the higher rate mobility in Disability Living Allowance in the period April 2013 to October 2017.

18th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of people with multiple sclerosis who scored 12 points under PIP mobility activity 2 moving around descriptor (e) can stand and then move more than 1 metre but no more than 20 metres, either aided or unaided were (a) new claimants and (b) reassessments in the latest period for which figures are available.

Of all Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claims cleared between April 2013 and 30th April 2018 from claimants with multiple sclerosis who scored 12 points under PIP the ‘moving around’ mobility activity descriptor (e) can stand and then move more than 1 metre but no more than 20 metres, either aided or unaided, (a) 14% were new claimants and (b) 86% were Disability Living Allowance to PIP reassessment claimants.

17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of claimants of disability living allowance with multiple sclerosis received the higher rate of mobility support as a result of being unable or virtually unable to walk because of a physical disability in the 12 months before the roll-out of personal independence payment.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.


The available information on the number of individuals in receipt of Disability Living Allowance payments by medical condition and date is published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of people with multiple sclerosis are no longer eligible for the higher rate of mobility support as a result of the transition from disability living allowance to personal independence payment since the roll-out of personal independence payment.

The table below shows the level of mobility award claimants with Multiple Sclerosis received under Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and their level of mobility award following reassessment to Personal Independence Payment (PIP).

Table: DLA to PIP Reassessment outcomes for claimants with Multiple Sclerosis

Outcome Following Reassessment to PIP

Award Received Under DLA

Enhanced Rate of Mobility

Standard Rate of Mobility

No Mobility Award

Total

Higher Rate Mobility Component

13,900(73%)

3,100(16%)

2,100(11%)

19,100

Source: PIP Computer System claimant records and DLA Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study claimant data (1st October 2013 to 31st October 2017)

Notes:

1. PIP Reassessment outcome shows the outcome of the first DWP decision on each reassessment claim (i.e. they reflect outcomes prior to any reconsideration appeal action and award review), where that decision was made between 1st October 2013 and 31st October 2017.

2. For each individual who has a PIP reassessment outcome their PIP entitlement has been compared to their DLA entitlement at the time of their PIP reassessment registration.

3. Main disabling condition used is the disability recorded on the DLA administrative system for each individual. This is used because disability information is recorded on the PIP computer systems only for the group of cases who have a PIP assessment report.

4. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which their entitlement decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics. It is possible that a reassessment claim could have a different main disabling condition recorded on the DLA and PIP systems.

5. Figures include reassessment outcomes for individuals who were aged between 16 and 64 on 8th April 2013, and include both PIP Normal Rules and Special Rules for the Terminally Ill claims.

6. Figures exclude claimants who failed to attend their assessment, were disallowed pre-referral or who withdrew their case.

7. The breakdown of data provided is unpublished data. It should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.

8. Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.

9. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

10. Table percentages are given as row percentages.

11. Great Britain only.

17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of claimants have received each length of personal independence payment award since its introduction.

The table below shows the number of people who have been awarded Personal Independence Payment (PIP) for each award length between April 2013 and 30th April 2018.

Table: PIP awards made between April 2013 and 30th April 2018, split by award length.

Type of award

Volume of claimants

Volume as a percentage of total

Ongoing Awards

323,210

18.1%

Finite Awards

1,458,250

81.8%

Of which:

1.5 years or lower

346,650

23.8%

1.5 – 2.5 years

496,260

34.0%

2.5 – 3.5 years

364,450

25.0%

3.5 – 4.5 years

92,390

6.3%

4.5 – 5.5 years

132,630

9.1%

5.5 – 6.5 years

960

0.1%

6.5 – 7.5 years

190

0.0%

7.5 – 8.5 years

950

0.1%

8.5 – 9.5 years

710

0.0%

9.5 years or more*

11,720

0.8%

Short term award

11,330

0.8%

Total Awards

1,781,470

100%

*The “9.5 years or more” group excludes ongoing awards. Source: PIP ADS

Award lengths are calculated from the date of award of PIP to the review date. At the point of preparing this response, approximately 0.06% of all cleared claims do not have a recorded review date but are not ongoing awards so have been excluded from the table above.

Figures are based on the first outcome recorded for each case and include both new claims and DLA reassessment claims assessed under normal rules. Special rules cases for the terminally ill are excluded from the above figures. Data has been rounded to the nearest 10 cases. This is unpublished data which should be used with caution and it may be subject to future revision.

A claimant can receive a short term fixed award if their condition is expected to improve in the short term. Once this award ends, the benefit ends and no award review takes place.

Ongoing awards do not have an end date, but will be subject to a light touch review at the 10 year point. We are currently amending the guidance to ensure that all those awarded the highest level of support under PIP, and who have needs which will stay the same or deteriorate, will receive and ongoing award with a light touch review at the 10 year point. The new guidance will be published later this summer.

3rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of universal credit claimants received their full payment on time for the most recent period for which information is available.

This information can be found in the ad-hoc statistics release published on 9 July 2018 at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/length-of-payment-delays-for-new-claims-to-universal-credit.

This ad hoc release provides statistics on timeliness of payment for new claims to Universal Credit due a payment in February 2018. It also contains results for the number of new claims – due a first payment in February 2018 – that received their first payment on time.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
3rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of universal credit claimants received their full payment on time in each of the last 12 months.

We plan to publish regular national statistics on Universal Credit, including payment timeliness, in the future. This data is currently going through quality assurance clearance procedures in line with the National Statistics and Official Statistics publication standard.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
8th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if his Department will bring forward legislative proposals to apply in England provisions equivalent to those of the British Sign Language (Scotland) Act 2015 .

Existing equality legislation already means employers, service providers and public bodies have to provide services in BSL and other formats when it is reasonable to do so. The Public Sector Equality Duty requires public bodies to have due regard to the needs of all those with protected characteristics, We don’t think new legislation would add to that. However, we are looking at developments in Scotland and will learn lessons in order to inform our thinking for England and Wales.

20th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Universal Credit split payment arrangement related to domestic violence cases, whether non-requesting partners are able to reverse a request via (a) their online account or (b) Jobcentre Plus.

A non-requesting partner cannot reverse a split payment arrangement. The arrangement can be reviewed if the applicant and/or their partner provide further information via their online account, face to face with a Work Coach or over the phone. However, the arrangement will only be reversed if the Secretary of State is satisfied that it is in the best interest of the household.

To help ensure people requesting reviews are acting in the interests of their household, Universal Credit agents will collect as much information as possible from the claimants. This information will include details of the mismanagement of welfare support, its effect on individual members of the household and reasons for no longer making split payments.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
13th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when he expects the universal credit landlord portal to be available in areas with full digital universal credit service.

Following successful pilots of the ‘Trusted Partner’ scheme and the ‘Landlord Portal Service’, DWP are rolling out both initiatives together. We are enrolling more landlords in stages, in tandem with the expansion of the Universal Credit Full Service. We have started with the largest landlord groups, in order to ensure the highest possible number of tenants are able to benefit from the schemes, as early as possible. This means that all Trusted Partner landlords have access to the Landlord Portal. We have also already introduced this to the landlords involved in our Trusted Partner pilot.

The Trusted Partner scheme allows social landlords to play a key role in engaging with their tenants who are Universal Credit claimants, helping those who can’t manage their housing payments to access the support available. The Landlord Portal provides social landlords with the ability to submit information directly to the Universal Credit online system, which supports timely and accurate payment of housing costs to Universal Credit claimants.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
13th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department has taken to reduce waiting times on the universal credit telephone line in advance of a potential increase in the volume as calls arising from full service rollout.

The Universal Credit Full Service was expanded to an additional 29 Jobcentre sites in July and rollout will continue this month, with new claims and changes of circumstance reported online in the vast majority of all cases. All customers have an online account, online statement and journal for interacting with their dedicated Case Manager and Work Coach.

We endeavour to resolve all enquiries from our customers at the point of contact, whether that be face-to-face, online, or on the phone. The percentage of calls being received as a proportion of our total caseload has been steadily falling this year, as customers interact more online, and we will continue to invest to make more functionality available online – for example, customers can now update their Claimant Commitments online before and after their meetings with the Work Coach, helping record job search as customers take the next steps forward into work.

Every week we match the required capacity and resources to our telephony forecast to ensure we meet demand and deliver a good service across our channels. This capacity is organised to scale up in line with new claims as the service expands further to ensure a good customer service and experience.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
13th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will bring forward the introduction of the online booking system for universal credit jobcentre appointments so that new claimants in October do not incur costs for calling the helpline.

DWP is currently running a tender process to identify a strategic appointment booking provider. In accordance with the minimum timescales set out in the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 we expect to complete this process in January 2018.

Once a strategic appointment booking provider is identified, we will need to undertake further work to build the required functionality to link the booking system to the Universal Credit Full Service.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
13th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what training his Department has provided to jobcentre work coaches to help claimants adapt to the new universal credit benefit since that benefit was introduced.

We have in place a substantial programme of learning and ongoing support for work coaches to enable them to support all customers, whatever their needs. Work coaches receive a blend of face-to-face and online learning, which focuses on both the technical delivery steps and importantly the transformational change, as well as consolidation of training post-completion.

Accreditation is also core to establishing our Work Coaches as an externally recognised professional workforce, and is central to our commitment to their continuous professional development. The learning and accreditation for Work Coaches reflects the critical role they play in the successful delivery of Universal Credit. However, we are not complacent and are investing in our people at all levels to give them the skills, knowledge and tools to deliver.

The Universal Credit Full Service has a training feature that allows our staff to experience the system. Feedback from staff on the training has been positive, particularly the ability to experience the system before their jobcentre goes live with the full service.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what evidence his Department has that (a) under the full service and (b) under the live service universal credit (i) moves people into work more quickly and (ii) supports people to stay in work longer than the previous system; and if he will set out the timescale over which that evidence was collected.

We will be publishing further research on the employment impacts of Universal Credit shortly.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
5th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of claimants on full service universal credit have not been paid in full within six weeks in each of the last two years.

We are intending to publish further data on payment timeliness in due course, but our latest internal data nationally, suggests around 80% of cases are paid in full at the end of the first assessment period.

For the remaining cases we estimate around a third have not signed up to their claimant commitment so cannot be paid until they have. The other two thirds have an outstanding verification issue, such as providing bank statements, evidence of childcare costs, or proof of rent. Many of these claimants receive a part-payment where elements of the claim have been verified.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
5th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Minister for Employment's oral contribution of 27 June 2017, Official Report, column 570, on universal credit customers' satisfaction, whether the universal credit claimants referred to were on (a) live and (b) full service; and over what period of time those claimants reported their satisfaction.

The DWP claimant satisfaction and experience survey currently only covers Universal Credit Live Service claimants. The available figures cover the financial year 2015/16.

We continue to monitor and evaluate the delivery of Universal Credit. To date there have been a number of published reports where claimants responded to surveys. As Universal Credit is rolled out to new areas of the country we will continue to involve claimants in the overall evaluation.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
5th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of claimants on full service universal credit were satisfied with the service received in the most recent period for which figures are available; and what that satisfaction rate was in (a) live and (b) full service areas.

The DWP claimant satisfaction and experience survey currently only covers Universal Credit Live Service claimants. The available figures cover the financial year 2015/16.

We continue to monitor and evaluate the delivery of Universal Credit. To date there have been a number of published reports where claimants responded to surveys. As Universal Credit is rolled out to new areas of the country we will continue to involve claimants in the overall evaluation.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what progress has been made towards introducing personalised and tailored employment support for disabled people who are looking for work.

From April 2017, as announced in the Green Paper, Improving Lives, we rolled out the new Personal Support Package (PSP) for people with health conditions. So far we have recruited 300 new Disability Employment Advisers, allocated £15 million to the Flexible Support Fund, made changes to the permitted work rules, and almost completed the roll out of the Health and Work Conversation. This is in line with our ambition to provide a support system which can be tailored to individuals’ needs.

As part of the PSP, we have been rolling out a £330m package from April 2017, delivering a broad range of employment and health support for new ESA Work Related Activity Group and UC Limited Capability for Work claimants. For those claimants, the national employment support provision has been expanded and extended so that there are spaces available on Work Choice and Specialist Employability Support. This will also apply to the Work and Health Programme when it is rolled out from November 2017. We have introduced Community Partners to Jobcentres across Great Britain, peer support Journey to Employment job clubs and deployed trained Small Employer Advisors to deliver the Small Employer Offer.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how much additional funding was allocated for loans to compensate full-time disabled students for the loss of access to employment and support allowance since the introduction of universal credit.

Most full time students in higher education do not qualify for Universal Credit. Students, including disabled students and those with health conditions, access fees and living costs support for their higher education courses through various loans and grants funded by the Department for Education.

However, Universal Credit is designed so that a person already in receipt of Universal Credit because of disability or ill health is not discouraged from taking up higher education that may help them in the future.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the introduction of universal credit on the take-up of higher education for full-time disabled students.

Most full time students in higher education do not qualify for Universal Credit. Students, including disabled students and those with health conditions, access fees and living costs support for their higher education courses through various loans and grants funded by the Department for Education.

However, Universal Credit is designed so that a person already in receipt of Universal Credit because of disability or ill health is not discouraged from taking up higher education that may help them in the future.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many full-time disabled students received disability living allowance or personal independence payment and were in the work-related activity group for income-related employment and support allowance in (a) 2015-16 and (b) 2016-17.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to progress the proposals set out in the Green Paper entitled Work, health and disability green paper: Improving Lives.

The Government is committed to improving employment and health outcomes for disabled people including delivering on the manifesto commitment to get 1 million more disabled people into work over the next 10 years. We received a very large response to the consultation on the Green Paper, with over 6000 responses. We are considering these and will set out our next steps on this important agenda in due course.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
26th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of proposed changes to the employment and support allowance work-related activity group on claimants.

The Government set out its assessment of the impacts of the welfare policies in the Bill on 20th July last year.

We are committed to transforming people’s lives by supporting more disabled people into work. We have increased funding for support for those with health conditions and disabilities by almost 15% and are bringing in a new Work and Health Programme.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
16th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what extra support his Department plans to provide to people who have not yet found employment through the Work Programme.

The Work Programme is succeeding. It is helping push long-term unemployment to its lowest level in over 5 years, and is transforming people’s lives.

But some people complete the programme without finding sustainable jobs. In April 2014 we introduced the intensive Help to Work package of support for these people. The programme is designed to quickly address claimants’ remaining barriers to work.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
8th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made on the (a) negotiations for NHS access to and (b) appraisal of Ocrelizumab as a treatment for primary progressive MS.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is the independent body responsible for developing authoritative, evidence-based guidance for the National Health Service on whether drugs and other treatments represent an effective use of NHS resources.

NICE is currently developing technology appraisal guidance on the use of ocrelizumab for treating primary progressive multiple sclerosis, with final guidance expected in June 2019. NHS England and Roche have now reached a commercial agreement and on 9 May NICE published final draft guidance which recommended ocrelizumab within its marketing authorisation, as an option for treating early primary progressive multiple sclerosis with imaging features characteristic of inflammatory activity in adults. Ocrelizumab will now be routinely available for eligible adults.

9th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to support Care Commissioning Groups that experience a disproportionate level of population growth.

NHS England is responsible for decisions on the weighted capitation formula used to allocate resources between clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). This process is independent of Government. NHS England take advice from the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation (ACRA), a group of academics and other experts.

ACRA has recommended a new approach to health inequalities which was reflected in the CCG allocations published on 10 January 2019.

Population figures for all programme allocations are based on general practitioner registered list sizes, as they have been since 2013-14. Increases for future years are based on the Office for National Statistics estimates of population trends for resident populations, which is the only consistent and robust national data set available to use for this purpose.

Full details of the CCG allocations announcements for 2019-20 to 2023-24 can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/allocations/

9th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the NHS Long Term Plan, published in January 2019, when the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation plans to start its review of the inequalities adjustment to the funding formulae.

NHS England is responsible for decisions on the weighted capitation formula used to allocate resources between clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). This process is independent of Government. NHS England take advice from the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation (ACRA), a group of academics and other experts.

ACRA has recommended a new approach to health inequalities which was reflected in the CCG allocations published on 10 January 2019.

Population figures for all programme allocations are based on general practitioner registered list sizes, as they have been since 2013-14. Increases for future years are based on the Office for National Statistics estimates of population trends for resident populations, which is the only consistent and robust national data set available to use for this purpose.

Full details of the CCG allocations announcements for 2019-20 to 2023-24 can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/allocations/

9th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the Person Based Resource Allocation formula on reducing health inequality in (a) Cambridgeshire and (b) other high-growth areas.

NHS England is responsible for decisions on the weighted capitation formula used to allocate resources between clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). This process is independent of Government. NHS England take advice from the Advisory Committee on Resource Allocation (ACRA), a group of academics and other experts.

ACRA has recommended a new approach to health inequalities which was reflected in the CCG allocations published on 10 January 2019.

Population figures for all programme allocations are based on general practitioner registered list sizes, as they have been since 2013-14. Increases for future years are based on the Office for National Statistics estimates of population trends for resident populations, which is the only consistent and robust national data set available to use for this purpose.

Full details of the CCG allocations announcements for 2019-20 to 2023-24 can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/allocations/

18th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with NICE on the (a) timeframe for the publication of decision of the NICE evaluation committee meeting held on 23 October 2018 in relation to Spinraza and (b) potential availability of Spinraza on the NHS.

Departmental Ministers and officials have spoken to colleagues at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) on a number of occasions to enquire about the progress of the technology appraisal of nusinersen for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.

On 12 November, following NICE’s second appraisal committee meeting for nusinersen on Tuesday 23 October, NICE informed registered stakeholders that it and the manufacturer Biogen were continuing to progress discussions and as a result NICE was not in a position to provide the outcome of the committee’s deliberations.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the level of geographical variation of IVF funding; and whether it is his Department's policy that clinical commissioning groups implement NICE recommendations to commission funding for three cycles of IVF.

It is the Government's policy that clinical commissioning groups should have regard to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline on the assessment and treatment of people with fertility problems when commissioning services for which they are responsible. This includes the recommendation in the guideline that three cycles of in vitro fertilisation be offered to qualifying couples where the woman is under the age of 40 and one cycle where the woman is between the ages of 40 and 42.

The NICE guideline is evidence based best practice for clinicians but is not mandatory. The availability of National Health Service funded fertility treatment is and always has been a matter for local determination. Decisions on the level of service provision are underpinned by clinical insight and knowledge of local healthcare needs and priorities.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on patient care of the requirements for routine outpatient clinics working out of a hospital to advise patients that any prescription must be brought to a regular GP to issue an FP10 prescription to then be taken to a pharmacy.

No Departmental assessment has been made. Where a patient has an immediate need for medication following outpatient attendance, the hospital must supply that medication, rather than requiring the general practitioner (GP) to issue a prescription separately. The supply must be adequate to allow time for the patient’s GP to receive up-to-date information from the hospital about the patient’s care.

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what funding he is providing for GP practices in new towns.

NHS England has a legal duty to fund the general practitioner (GP) services required to meet the reasonable needs of the population, both in old and new towns.

On 1 July, NHS England, together with Public Health England, launched an initiative to shape strong new communities that promote health and wellbeing, prevent illness and keep people independent.

The initiative is expected to include development of flexible health and care infrastructure that enables integration of GP services with other health and care provision.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions his Department has had with the Ministry of Defence on the £400 million which is reported to be due to Iran following arrangements made between the UK and Iran in the 1970s for the purchase of Chieftain tanks; and what recent discussions he has had with his Iranian counterpart on that matter.

​This is a long-standing case and relates to contracts signed over 40 years ago with the pre-revolution Iranian regime. The case is subject to a legal process, and the most recent hearing concluded on 22 May. We await the court's judgement, which will be a step forward in this complex and long-standing case. As Ministers have said in Parliament, it would be inappropriate to comment in detail while litigation continues.

16th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent representations he has made to his Israeli counterpart on the demolitions in Khan Al Ahmar.

The UK is gravely concerned by Israeli proposals to relocate the Bedouin population from the E1 area, which the United Nations have said could constitute forcible transfer. These plans could have a devastating impact on the communities concerned and will likely open the way for further settlement expansion – endangering the viability of the two-state solution.

We have been clear about our concerns with the Israeli authorities and we regularly raise this thorough our Embassy in Tel Aviv. On 3 November, I met Abu Khamis, leader of the Khan al Ahmar Bedouin community, and an official from the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, to discuss the situation of the Bedouin living in the E1 Zone of the West Bank.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what reports he has received on the case of the Syrian journalist, Zaina Erhaim.

My officials have been in contact with the UK Border Force about this case. We are aware that the passport presented by Zaina Erhaim has been retained by UK Border Force officials. The passport was listed on an international database as lost or stolen. In such circumstances the Border Force will confiscate the document. Since the passport is listed as lost or stolen, it is no longer valid for travel to the UK or elsewhere and as such the Border Force is not able to return the passport to Ms Erhaim. The passport is therefore being retained by the British authorities.

9th Jul 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to make stamp duty payable on the portion of a property that each person owns according to their tax status in the next Budget.

The Government reformed Stamp Duty Land Tax on residential properties at Autumn Statement 2014, cutting the tax for 98% of people who pay it, unless they are purchasing additional property.

The Government’s priority is to support first-time buyers. At the 2017 Autumn Budget, the Government removed SDLT for all first-time buyers purchasing properties up to £300,000, with the relief also extending to purchases worth up to £500,000. These changes will help over one million households over the next 5 years.

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to make stamp duty payable on the portion of a property that each person owns according to their tax status in the next Budget.

The Government reformed Stamp Duty Land Tax on residential properties at Autumn Statement 2014, cutting the tax for 98% of people who pay it, unless they are purchasing additional property.

The Government’s priority is to support first-time buyers. At the 2017 Autumn Budget, the Government removed SDLT for all first-time buyers purchasing properties up to £300,000, with the relief also extending to purchases worth up to £500,000. These changes will help over one million households over the next 5 years.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent representations she has received on the level of visa fees for Commonwealth UK Armed Forces personnel applying for Indefinite Leave to Remain; and if she will (a) review and (b) undertake a public consultation on the current policy.

The Home Office has listened closely to representations made by a variety of campaigns and MPs on immigration issues affecting Commonwealth members of HM Forces and their families.We have received recent representations from the Royal British Legion “stop the service charge” and are aware of a public e-petition to waive settlement fees for Commonwealth nationals who served in HM Forces.

While there are no current plans to offer an exemption from paying a settlement fee to former military personnel, this specific area of policy is regularly reviewed. There are no plans to launch a public consultation on the question of waiving settlement fees.

The Home Office remains committed to upholding our obligations under the Armed Forces Covenant. The Home Office, along with all Government Departments, recognises the outstanding service of all members of the Armed Forces, including the many service personnel who are foreign and Commonwealth nationals.

21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when he plans to provide feedback to labour providers on the effectiveness of the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Pilot Scheme.

The Seasonal Workers Pilot will test the effectiveness of our immigration system at alleviating seasonal labour shortages during peak production periods, whilst looking at the wider impacts of such a scheme.


The pilot will start in the spring of this year and will run until the end of December 2020. It will be fully evaluated.

21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment his Department has made of the effect a seasonal agricultural workers scheme would have on small labour providers.

The Seasonal Workers Pilot will test the effectiveness of our immigration system at alleviating seasonal labour shortages during peak production periods, whilst looking at the wider impacts of such a scheme.


The pilot will start in the spring of this year and will run until the end of December 2020. It will be fully evaluated.

21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans he has to extend the Youth Mobility Scheme to additional non-EEA countries after the UK leaves the EU.

We have proposed a UK-EU Youth Mobility Scheme (YMS) as part of our Mobility Framework to ensure that young people can continue to enjoy the social, cultural and educational benefits of living in the EU and the UK.

We will ensure that our future immigration system continues to support the thriving cultural exchanges that the YMS cultivates.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the powers available to the police to tackle hare coursing.

The police have a range of powers to tackle hare coursing through the game acts and the Hunting Act 2004. How these powers are used are operational matters for the police. In light of concerns raised, Home Office officials are engaging with relevant police forces to understand more about the issues.

21st Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people seeking family reunion with extended family members in the UK have (a) applied for and (b) been granted asylum in exceptional circumstances in each of the last three years.

The Home Office does not record information in such a way to be able to report on the number of people seeking family reunion with extended family members in the UK and an individual cannot apply to be considered for family reunion under the exceptional circumstance arrangements. Instead, they would apply for Family Reunion under the Immigration Rules but, if they are refused under the Rules, the Home Office would then go on to consider whether there are exceptional circumstances.

As such, the figures for applications and visas issued under the Rules and under the exceptional circumstances arrangements are as follows:

Total number of Family Reunion applications – age at the date of application -under 18

Total number of Family Reunion applications – age at date of application - over 18

Total number of Family Reunion visas issued (‘Family Other’ category)

Total number of Family Reunion visas issued under exceptional circumstances arrangements

2015

4,980

3,220

4,887

21

2016

4,811

3,701

6,098

49

2017 (up to 30 September 2017)

2,625

2,821

3,801

49

All those issued a family reunion visa are granted leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom, not asylum. The family reunion application process does not require an assessment of the applicant’s international protection needs. It is the family member in the UK that is required to have been granted refugee status or Humanitarian Protection.

21st Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many parents have been (a) granted and (b) refused a visa to join their child with either refugee leave or humanitarian protection in the UK in (i) 2015, (ii) 2016 and (iii) 2017.

The specific information you have requested is not currently published.

Published statistics on visa applications in the Family category can be found online at the following address: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/662518/entry-visas1-jul-sep-2017-tables.ods

11th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her Department's timetable is for implementing the recommendations of the Human Trafficking Foundation's Trafficking Survivor Care Standards, published in June 2015, for shelters caring for victims of modern day slavery in the UK.

The recent announcements on National Referral Mechanism (NRM) reform indicate the Government’s commitment to markedly improve the identification of, and support provided to, victims of modern slavery. This includes the adoption of the Human Trafficking Foundation’s Trafficking Survivor Care Standards as a minimum standard of victim support in all future contracts providing support to adult victims of modern slavery.

The Government is working with key stakeholders to ensure the standards reflect current best practice and to look at options for monitoring compliance. These will then be incorporated into the retendering of the Victim Care Contract in due course.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions her Department has had with its French counterpart on plans in place to provide shelter and help to refugees who may have a legal right to claim asylum in the UK who are currently residing in the Grande Synthe refugee camp in Dunkirk.

The provision of accommodation for asylum-seekers in France is a matter for the French authorities. The UK has regular engagement at ministerial and senior official level with the French authorities regarding the situation in Northern France, including the provision of accommodation for asylum-seekers. French officials are clear that everyone has the right to claim asylum in France.

In addition to the existing welcome centres across France, France has recently opened four new centres, away from the Grande Synthe area, where those wishing to claim asylum will be supported through the asylum process. There is regular transportation from Grande Synthe to these centres for those wishing to claim asylum.

Under the Dublin Regulation, France may make a request to the UK to take responsibility for an asylum claim where the relevant criteria are met. This requires an asylum claim to first be made in France and a take charge request made of the UK. We continue to work closely with the French authorities to ensure the quick and effective operation of the Dublin Regulation.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
7th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister of State, Home Office of 29 June 2017, HL 783, column 551, whether local authorities with capacity to care for a greater number of unaccompanied children than that set out under the provisions of section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016 and the Written Ministerial Statement made on 26 April 2017, HCWS 619, will be able to apply to do so.

The Government welcomes all offers from local authorities with capacity to look after unaccompanied asylum seeking children. We will continue to utilise these offers to fulfil all of our existing commitments, including ensuring a more equal allocation of unaccompanied children across the country through the National Transfer Scheme.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
20th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many citizens from other EU countries with the right to reside in the UK before 29 March 2017 do not have private medical insurance.

EU nationals have a right to reside in the UK for more than three months if they are workers, self-employed, jobseekers, self-sufficient persons or students, are a family member of an EU national or have acquired a right of permanent residence in EU law. Under EU law, self-sufficient persons and students are required to hold comprehensive sickness insurance. The Home Office does not hold any information on the number of citizens from other EU Member states who do not have comprehensive sickness insurance.

27th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what each response was from those local authorities which replied to her letter of September 2016 requesting confirmation of how many unaccompanied asylum-seeking children they could accommodate.

I wrote to local authorities on 8 September last year asking them to confirm via their Strategic Migration Partnership the number of unaccompanied children who could be placed in their local authority area. We received a range of responses from Strategic Migration Partnerships but also from local authorities directly. Based on those responses and our extensive consultation over the summer we calculated they had capacity for an additional 400 unaccompanied asylum seeking children until the end of the 2016/17 financial year. This is in addition to the many unaccompanied children already in local authority care. We estimate that at least 50 of the family reunion cases will require a local authority placement in circumstances where the reunion does not work out.

23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will confirm when the first transfers of unaccompanied refugee children from Greece and Italy will arrive in the UK under the Dubs amendment; how many children the Government plans to transfer to the UK under that amendment; and when she plans for the programme of transfers to the UK under that amendment to end.

In 2016, we transferred over 900 unaccompanied children to the UK from Europe, including more than 750 from France. Approximately 200 of these children met the criteria for section 67 of the Immigration Act.

We have seconded an expert to Greece to support efforts to transfer children from Greece under the Dublin Regulation and section 67 of the Immigration Act. Our secondee has been working closely with UNHCR, IOM and the Greek authorities to identify potentially eligible children and put in place a process to transfer children to the UK where it is in their best interests. We have a long standing secondee in Italy who is based in the Italian Dublin Unit and supports the effective functioning of the Dublin Regulation between the UK and Italy.

More eligible children will be transferred from Europe, in line with the terms of the Immigration Act, in the coming months. The Government will specify the number to be transferred, the process, and the criteria for further transfers under section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016 in due course.

The Government will continue to meet our obligations under the Dublin Regulation. We are not required to publish eligibility criteria for transfers under the Dublin Regulation, as these are set out within the Regulation.

23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress her Department has made on determining the eligibility criteria for children in Greece and Italy to be considered for transfer to the UK under the Dublin Regulations and section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016.

In 2016, we transferred over 900 unaccompanied children to the UK from Europe, including more than 750 from France. Approximately 200 of these children met the criteria for section 67 of the Immigration Act.

We have seconded an expert to Greece to support efforts to transfer children from Greece under the Dublin Regulation and section 67 of the Immigration Act. Our secondee has been working closely with UNHCR, IOM and the Greek authorities to identify potentially eligible children and put in place a process to transfer children to the UK where it is in their best interests. We have a long standing secondee in Italy who is based in the Italian Dublin Unit and supports the effective functioning of the Dublin Regulation between the UK and Italy.

More eligible children will be transferred from Europe, in line with the terms of the Immigration Act, in the coming months. The Government will specify the number to be transferred, the process, and the criteria for further transfers under section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016 in due course.

The Government will continue to meet our obligations under the Dublin Regulation. We are not required to publish eligibility criteria for transfers under the Dublin Regulation, as these are set out within the Regulation.

5th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many women recorded as pregnant have been held in immigration detention; and how many of those women left detention to be removed from the UK since the Immigration Act 2016 came into force.

Through section 60 of the Immigration Act 2016, which came into force on 12 July 2016, we have placed a 72 hour limit on the detention of pregnant women for the purposes of removal, extendable to up to a week in total with Ministerial authorisation.

It may not always be appropriate for healthcare professionals to disclose confidential medical information that the patient has asked not to be disclosed. Subject to these limitations, Home Office management information indicates that 12 pregnant women were detained in the immigration detention estate between 12 July 2016 and 30 September 2016. Of these women, 1 was removed from the UK.

The section 60 limitations, along with a new policy on adults at risk in detention, and other improvements to caseworking processes, represent a comprehensive package of safeguards for pregnant women in the immigration system.

22nd Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans his Department has to mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings this year.

This Government pays tribute to the courageous men and women who participated in and contributed to the D-Day landings and, of course, the wider Normandy Campaign. The Government, through the Ministry of Defence, and in conjunction with the Royal British Legion, are proud to be supporting and participating in a wide range of commemorative events for the 75th Anniversary of D-Day. These include the UK National event in Portsmouth on 5 June, and a series of events in Normandy.

Daks over Normandy is a privately funded event with no official participation or funding from the Government. However, we applaud and congratulate organisations such as this that are contributing to the commemoration of the events of 1944.

22nd Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what funding the Government plans to allocate to the Daks Over Normandy event taking place to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings.

This Government pays tribute to the courageous men and women who participated in and contributed to the D-Day landings and, of course, the wider Normandy Campaign. The Government, through the Ministry of Defence, and in conjunction with the Royal British Legion, are proud to be supporting and participating in a wide range of commemorative events for the 75th Anniversary of D-Day. These include the UK National event in Portsmouth on 5 June, and a series of events in Normandy.

Daks over Normandy is a privately funded event with no official participation or funding from the Government. However, we applaud and congratulate organisations such as this that are contributing to the commemoration of the events of 1944.

26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if the Royal Navy will assist in the recovery and repatriation of Argentinian sailors from the submarine San Juan.

Since the San Juan was located, the Ministry of Defence has not been appraoched by Argentina to assist in the recovery or repatriarion of the submarine's crew. If our assistance were to be requested, the UK does not currently have the capability to recover a vessel at the reported depth of the San Juan without contractor support.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress his Department has made on the plans for the use of the Bassingbourn Barracks.

No decision has been made on the future use of Bassingbourn Barracks. The site will be considered as part of the ongoing work of the Estate Optimisation Strategy which is due to report later this year.

19th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when his Department plans to publish the (a) details of what constitutes high affordability and (b) criteria used in determining how support will be allocated under the Housing Revenue Account borrowing cap announced in Autumn Budget 2017.

At Autumn Budget, the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that we will raise the Housing Revenue Account borrowing cap by a total of up to £1 billion in areas of high affordability pressure, for local authorities that are ready to start building new homes. Local authorities will be able to bid for increases in their caps from 2019/20, up to a total of £1 billion by the end of 2021/22. We will set out more details shortly.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
2nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the Government plans to allow local authorities operating joint committees, parish councils and combined authorities to hold meetings using video conferencing facilities.

The Government consulted last year on a proposal to give local authorities operating joint committees, and combined authorities, but not councils as a whole, the freedom to hold formal meetings using video conferencing facilities. We will respond in due course.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
11th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to Autumn Budget 2017, (a) how and (b) when local authorities will be able to increase their Housing Revenue Account borrowing caps.

At Autumn Budget 2017 the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that we will raise the Housing Revenue Account borrowing caps by a total of up to £1 billion. This will apply to in areas of high affordability pressure with local authorities that are ready to start building new homes. Local authorities will be able to bid for increases in their caps from 2019/20 up to a total of £1 billion by the end of 2021/22. We will set out more details shortly.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
8th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to Autumn Budget 2017, how the announced £8 billion of new guarantees to support house building will operate in practice.

The Government has provided debt guarantees to support the provision of affordable and privately rented homes since 2013. The existing guarantee schemes have supported the delivery of over 42,000 homes.

The further £8 billion guarantee capacity will ensure that the housing sector continues to be able to the access debt markets once the existing guarantee schemes have expired.

We will engage the market over the coming months as to the most effective way of deploying this new guarantee capacity.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when she expects the fair funding review for local government to be finalised.

We are undertaking the Fair Funding Review to address concerns about the fairness of current funding distributions to local authorities. There have been widespread calls for a thorough, evidence-based Review, and we will deliver this.

It is important to get funding distributions right and we have been working closely with the Local Government Association and representatives from across local government to seek views on our approach and the target date for implementation. We will shortly be bringing forward a technical consultation on the Review in which we intend to provide further certainty regarding the timeline for this important work.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to provide funding agreements for local authorities that did not sign up to the four-year funding settlement in the belief that the 100 per cent retention scheme would be implemented.

Local authorities that did not sign up to the four-year settlement deal from 2016-17 will have their allocations confirmed on an annual basis. I expect to publish the provisional settlement for 2018-19 shortly.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of adopting the recommendations of the report of the Northern Ireland Assembly's Committee for the Environment of 2015 on wind energy to replace ETSU-R-97 with a method of measuring loudness that brings wind turbine noise controls in line with other industrial controls.

The Northern Ireland Assembly Environment committee made their recommendation to revise wind turbine noise guidelines with a view to considering the noise impact on nearby resident's day to day lives. This issue has been addressed through the written statement covering wind farm applications, made by my Rt Hon Friend Greg Clark MP, the previous Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, on 18 June 2015, Official Report, column 9WS: http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-statement/Commons/2015-06-18/HCWS42/

Only if the applicant is able to demonstrate that the planning impacts identified by the affected local community have been fully addressed, including noise, can the planning authority grant permission.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
19th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what discussions his Department has had with relevant stakeholders including, housing associations, builders and developers on the need for a review of funding options for the Right-to-Buy scheme.

My officials and I have regular discussions with stakeholders on many issues including the Right to Buy.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
10th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to his oral contribution of 5 July 2017, Official Report, column 1156, on revenue-raising powers for mayors, who will disburse the new funding referred; how that funding will be disbursed; and whether that funding will be available to all local authorities across England.

The funding of £770 million, to which my Rt Hon Friend referred, is to be disbursed by government to the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Combined Authority and comprises £600 million capital investment funding to be paid at £20 million per year for 30 years, and £170 million to be made available for housing and infrastructure, £70 million being for investment in Cambridge City. In addition, the Combined Authority Mayor has powers to set a precept for 2018/19 and subsequent years, with increases subject to the council tax referendum arrangements.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
10th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he has plans to end the requirement for the consent of a spouse when entering into a change of name deed to be enrolled at the Royal Courts of Justice using form LOC020.

The Government has no current plans to end the requirement, in the Enrolment of Deeds (Change of Name) Regulations 1994, that a court should satisfy itself that the spouse or civil partner is aware when an applicant wishes to change their name through the courts by deed poll. This recognises that the change of name may have implications other than for the applicant. It is not mandatory in all cases – an applicant may seek to demonstrate to the court that there is good reason to dispense with such consent.

This process is for those who wish to have a court-based verification and validation of the change of name Under the common law, it is open to a person aged 16 or above to change their name by deed poll themselves through the ‘unenrolled’ process. This simply requires the deed to be witnessed and attested by the signature of two witnesses.

23rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Written Statement of 12 July 2018, on Justice update, HCWS853, whether the reinstatement of legal aid will apply to children located outside of the UK whose cases may fall under (a) the Dublin regulation and (b) section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016.

Children located outside of the UK who wish to challenge a decision by the UK government not to accept a request by another EU Member State to transfer their asylum claim to the UK under the Dublin Regulation can do so by means of judicial review, for which legal aid is already available.

Under section 67, participating States refer eligible children to the UK to be relocated. There is no individual application process or right to relocation if a person meets the eligibility criteria. Therefore, there is no process for which the individual could require legal aid.

We are currently consulting with stakeholders about the reinstatement of legal aid announced in the Written Statement of 12 July 2018, HCWS853, and more information about the policy will be laid out in due course.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)