Sarah Wollaston

Liberal Democrat - Former Member for Totnes

Sarah Wollaston is not a member of any APPGs
4 Former APPG memberships
Bees and Pollinators, Cycling, Human Rights, Post Offices
Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
13th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Policy Statements Sub-Committee 2017-19
13th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Health and Social Care Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
10th Sep 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Health and Social Care Committee
18th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Health and Social Care Committee
18th Jun 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Liaison Committee (Commons)
18th Jun 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Health and Social Care Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015


Division Voting information

Sarah Wollaston has voted in 1746 divisions, and 70 times against the majority of their Party.

9 Sep 2019 - Early Parliamentary General Election (No. 2) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Liberal Democrat Aye votes vs 14 Liberal Democrat No votes
Tally: Ayes - 293 Noes - 46
14 Feb 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the EU - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 303 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 93 Noes - 315
14 Feb 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the EU - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 243 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 258 Noes - 303
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 294 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 17 Conservative Aye votes vs 294 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 296 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 322
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 17 Conservative Aye votes vs 295 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 318 Noes - 310
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Conservative No votes vs 297 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 317 Noes - 301
15 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 118 Conservative No votes vs 196 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 202 Noes - 432
9 Jan 2019 - BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE (SECTION 13(1)(b) OF THE EUROPEAN UNION (WITHDRAWAL) ACT 2018) (NO. 2) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 17 Conservative Aye votes vs 285 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 308 Noes - 297
8 Jan 2019 - Finance (No. 3) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 20 Conservative Aye votes vs 282 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 296
8 Jan 2019 - Finance (No. 3) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Conservative Aye votes vs 289 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 292 Noes - 303
4 Dec 2018 - Business of the House (European Union (Withdrawal) Act) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 25 Conservative Aye votes vs 282 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 299
24 Oct 2018 - Northern Ireland (Executive Formation and Exercise of Functions) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 45 Conservative Aye votes vs 102 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 207 Noes - 117
23 Oct 2018 - Abortion - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 108 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 208 Noes - 123
17 Jul 2018 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 289 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 301
17 Jul 2018 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 291 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 307
16 Jul 2018 - Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 302
16 Jul 2018 - Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 288 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 300
20 Jun 2018 - European Union (Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 304 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 319
31 Jan 2018 - Restoration and Renewal (Report of the Joint Committee) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 66 Conservative Aye votes vs 164 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 236 Noes - 220
31 Jan 2018 - Restoration and Renewal (Report of the Joint Committee) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 68 Conservative Aye votes vs 166 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 234 Noes - 185
13 Dec 2017 - European Union (Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 293 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 309 Noes - 305
16 Dec 2015 - Petroleum - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 296 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 261
8 Dec 2015 - European Union Referendum Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 296 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 303 Noes - 253
17 Nov 2015 - Cities and Local Government Devolution Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 276 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 188 Noes - 283
16 Nov 2015 - Council of Europe - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative Aye votes vs 170 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 34 Noes - 171
3 Nov 2015 - Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill (Money) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Conservative No votes vs 280 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 281 Noes - 227
16 Oct 2015 - Access to Medical Treatments (Innovation) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 32 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 32 Noes - 19
7 Sep 2015 - European Union Referendum Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 309 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 249 Noes - 319
15 Jul 2015 - Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education (Statutory Requirement) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 10 Conservative Aye votes vs 39 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 183 Noes - 44
18 Jun 2015 - European Union Referendum Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 304 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 265 Noes - 310
23 Feb 2015 - Serious Crime Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 78 Conservative No votes vs 151 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 201 Noes - 292
24 Nov 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 47 Conservative Aye votes vs 117 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 204 Noes - 125
24 Nov 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 71 Conservative Aye votes vs 85 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 119 Noes - 193
10 Nov 2014 - Business of the House (Today) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative No votes vs 209 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 251 Noes - 242
10 Nov 2014 - Criminal Law - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative Aye votes vs 229 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 229 Noes - 272
27 Oct 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 110 Conservative Aye votes vs 135 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 166 Noes - 340
22 Jan 2014 - Transparency of Lobbying, Non-Party Campaigning and Trade Union Administration Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 264 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 311 Noes - 258
7 Jan 2014 - Mesothelioma Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 241 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 247 Noes - 286
6 Nov 2013 - Amendments to Bills (Explanatory Statements) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 94 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 23 Noes - 142
29 Aug 2013 - Syria and the Use of Chemical Weapons - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 240 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 272 Noes - 285
11 Jun 2013 - Children and Families Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 250 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 219 Noes - 303
21 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 124 Conservative Aye votes vs 134 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 161
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 99 Conservative No votes vs 121 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 150 Noes - 340
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 95 Conservative No votes vs 125 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 148 Noes - 339
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 92 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 163 Noes - 321
16 Apr 2013 - Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative No votes vs 261 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 307 Noes - 243
16 Apr 2013 - Defamation Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 248 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 230
18 Mar 2013 - Crime and Courts Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 255 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 530 Noes - 13
5 Feb 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 131 Conservative Aye votes vs 139 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 400 Noes - 175
29 Jan 2013 - Equality (Marriage) (Amendment) - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 64 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 86 Noes - 31
28 Jan 2013 - Succession to the Crown Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 174 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 38 Noes - 371
31 Oct 2012 - Multiannual Financial Framework - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 51 Conservative Aye votes vs 235 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 307 Noes - 294
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 87 Conservative No votes vs 142 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 241 Noes - 256
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 93 Conservative Aye votes vs 139 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 267 Noes - 233
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 90 Conservative Aye votes vs 123 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 280 Noes - 184
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 39 Conservative Aye votes vs 167 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 205 Noes - 228
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 40 Conservative Aye votes vs 141 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 105 Noes - 186
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative Aye votes vs 134 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 101 Noes - 166
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 29 Conservative No votes vs 132 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 203 Noes - 82
5 Dec 2011 - Ministerial Statements - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 15 Conservative Aye votes vs 195 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 119 Noes - 228
24 Oct 2011 - National Referendum on the European Union - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative Aye votes vs 209 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 111 Noes - 483
24 May 2011 - Eurozone Financial Assistance - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 28 Conservative No votes vs 220 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 267 Noes - 46
16 Feb 2011 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Conservative No votes vs 246 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 310 Noes - 231
15 Feb 2011 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 20 Conservative No votes vs 253 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 317 Noes - 247
10 Nov 2010 - Equitable Life (Payments) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 254 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 76 Noes - 301
2 Nov 2010 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Conservative Aye votes vs 264 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 31 Noes - 549
13 Oct 2010 - Public Houses and Private Members’ Clubs (Smoking) Bill - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 37 Conservative No votes vs 74 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 86 Noes - 141
15 Jun 2010 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Sarah Wollaston voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 75 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 171 Noes - 263
View All Sarah Wollaston Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Sarah Wollaston's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Sarah Wollaston

28th October 2019
Sarah Wollaston signed this EDM on Monday 28th October 2019

People's Vote

Tabled by: Jo Swinson (Liberal Democrat - East Dunbartonshire)
That this House calls on the Government to bring forward legislation to hold a People’s Vote on whether the United Kingdom should remain a member of the European Union or should leave the European Union on the final terms agreed between the Government and the European Union.
25 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Nov 2019)
Signatures by party:
Liberal Democrat: 19
Labour: 4
Plaid Cymru: 1
Independent: 1
23rd July 2019
Sarah Wollaston signed this EDM on Tuesday 3rd September 2019

PROROGATION

Tabled by: Ian Blackford (Scottish National Party - Ross, Skye and Lochaber)
That an Humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that this Parliament be not prorogued before Friday 8 November 2019.
87 signatures
(Most recent: 4 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 34
Labour: 32
Liberal Democrat: 16
Independent: 3
The Independent Group for Change: 2
Plaid Cymru: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Sarah Wollaston's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Sarah Wollaston, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Sarah Wollaston has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Sarah Wollaston has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Sarah Wollaston


A Bill to make provision for protecting persons from risks associated with stalking; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Friday 15th March 2019 and was enacted into law.


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to establish requirements in connection to the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 30th January 2019
(Read Debate)

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to introduce measures to reduce the exposure of children to the marketing of alcohol products; to make provision to establish the permitted content of marketing of alcohol products; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 30th March 2011

334 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
8 Other Department Questions
4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps he plans to take to ensure that students from lower socio-economic groups are not disincentivised from applying to university by fear of increased debt when student maintenance grants are replaced by new maintenance loan support.

We are increasing the overall amount of cash in hand we provide students to support the cost of living to the highest ever amount. For new full-time students starting their courses on or after 1 August 2016, maintenance grants will be replaced by maintenance loans. Eligible students on low incomes will qualify for a maximum maintenance loan that is 10.3% higher than the maximum maintenance grant and loan support available in 2015/16. Higher education remains free at the point of entry, with students able to fund their studies through loans which they only repay when they are earning above £21,000.

All institutions wishing to charge fees above the basic level must agree an Access Agreement with the independent Director of Fair Access. In July, the Director of Fair Access announced that he has approved 183 Access Agreements for 2016/17. Institutions expect to spend £745.5m on widening access in 2016/17, rising to £750.8m in 2019/20.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what consultation his Department plans to undertake on proposals to replace student maintenance grants with new maintenance loan support.

A formal consultation process is not normally carried out when annual changes to higher education student support are introduced.

The Government expects to lay amendments to the Education (Student Support) Regulations 2011 before Parliament later this year which will bring changes to student support into effect for the 2016/17 academic year.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what impact assessment he has conducted on the proposal to replace student maintenance grants with new maintenance loan support.

The Government expects to lay amendments to the Education (Student Support) Regulations 2011 later this year and publish an Equality Analysis when the Regulations are laid. The Equality Analysis will include an assessment of potential impacts of the changes.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps his Department took before the Summer Budget 2015 to assess and quantify the potential financial effect of the introduction of the National Living Wage on (a) publicly-funded social care and (b) other sectors.

The Government carried out an analysis of the impact of the National Living Wage, using a similar approach to that published by the Office for Budget Responsibility, which considered the implications at the business, sector and aggregate economy level.

The Government will publish a full impact assessment for the introduction of the National Living Wage alongside the implementing regulations. These regulations will be debated in both Houses of Parliament in time to come into force on 1 April 2016.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps his Department has taken since the Summer Budget 2015 to assess and quantify the potential financial effect of the introduction of the National Living Wage on (a) publicly-funded social care and (b) other sectors.

The Government carried out an analysis of the impact of the National Living Wage, using a similar approach to that published by the Office for Budget Responsibility, which considered the implications at the business, sector and aggregate economy level.

The Government will publish a full impact assessment for the introduction of the National Living Wage alongside the implementing regulations. These regulations will be debated in both Houses of Parliament in time to come into force on 1 April 2016.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what estimate his Department has made of the change in the number of people applying to study medicine in 2014 relative to previous years; and if his Department will assess what effect (a) increases in tuition fees and (b) fear of increased debt may have on such applications.

Information published by UCAS on the numbers of applications since 2009 is shown in the table. UCAS have not yet published comparable figures for 2015.

Medicine remains a very popular course that attracts many prospective students. There are no upfront fees and a progressive, income-contingent loan available for those applying for degrees.

Applications from UK domiciled applicants1 to pre-clinical medicine

Year of entry

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Applications

56,055

62,855

65,270

63,120

64,000

64,345

Source: UCAS. Numbers have been rounded to the nearest 5.

1. Each applicant can submit up to four applications for pre-clinical medicine. UCAS have not released figures showing the number of applicants who have made one or more applications to pre-clinical medicine.

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, whether the removal of the cap on student numbers applies to (a) medical students and (b) the 7.5 per cent cap on UK medical school places for international students.

For many years, the Government has controlled undergraduate entrant numbers to medicine and dentistry courses at university. The Grant letter of 29 January 2015 to the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) said that, at this stage, the Government is retaining intake targets for undergraduates on medicine and dentistry courses, reflecting the high cost of this training to the public purse.

13th Jan 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the change to the life expectancy of (a) men and (b) women at age (i) 75 and (ii) 85 in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

13th Jan 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of trends in death rates for people aged 75 and over in each of the last five years; and what steps his Department has taken to investigate the reasons for any change in such death rates.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

30th Jan 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether any officials reporting to the Chief Executive of the Civil Service are working to implement or devise policies which could affect the consumption, marketing, pricing, availability or sale of alcohol.

The Chief Executive of the Civil Service is responsible for the Government’s efficiency and reform programme, including commercial, digital, property, HR, major projects, shared services and civil service reform functions at the centre of government. No officials reporting to the Chief Executive of the civil service are working to implement or devise policies which could affect the consumption, marketing, pricing, availability or sale of alcohol.

6th Nov 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what role the new Chief Executive of the Civil Service will have in advising the Government on public health policy.

I refer the hon. Member to my answer to the hon. Member for Bishop Auckland on 7 November 2014 PQ UIN213235 and UIN213236. As Chief Executive of the Civil Service, John Manzoni has no involvement in public health policy and therefore there is no conflict of interest.

6th Nov 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what advice was received by the Government regarding any perceived conflict of interest in allowing the new Chief Executive of the Civil Service to retain his paid directorship position at SAB Miller.

I refer the hon. Member to my answer to the hon. Member for Bishop Auckland on 7 November 2014 PQ UIN213235 and UIN213236. As Chief Executive of the Civil Service, John Manzoni has no involvement in public health policy and therefore there is no conflict of interest.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made on the cost effectiveness of installing three-phase electricity supplies in (a) new and (b) existing homes.

Electricity connections and upgrades for new and existing homes are a matter for distribution network operators (DNOs) overseen by the independent regulator, Ofgem. Under the Distribution Connection and Use of System Agreement, DNOs are required to offer customers the most efficient solution to meet their requirements. In doing so, DNOs assess whether a single or three-phase supply would be appropriate.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made on the feasibility on subsidising the cost of upgrading single-phase electricity suppliers to three-phase electricity suppliers to support people to make their homes carbon neutral.

Network operators are responsible for ensuring the reliable supply of electricity and the Ofgem RIIO-2 price control framework ensures network operators invest efficiently to provide continued safe and reliable services. In doing so they will need to balance the expected reductions in demand due to improvements in home energy efficiency against projected increases in demand from charging requirements of electric vehicles and the increased installation of heat pumps.

22nd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to support rural post office branches.

While the Government sets the strategic direction for the Post Office, it allows the company the commercial freedom to deliver this strategy as an independent business.

The Government recognises the critical role that post offices play in communities and for small businesses across the UK. This is why the Government committed to safeguard the post office network and protect existing rural services. Thanks to significant Government investment of over £2 billion since 2010 the overall number of post offices across the UK remains at its most stable in decades with over 11,500 branches.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Court of Appeal judgment on Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake and Shannon v Rampersad made on 13 July 2018, what plans the Government has to bring forward legislative proposals of the pay rates for care workers on sleep-in shifts.

The Court of Appeal judgment overturns the previous interpretation of the law and means that “sleep-in” shifts, as defined by the Court of Appeal, no longer attract the National Minimum Wage. The Court of Appeal judgment applies both retrospectively and going forward. Government guidance on when “sleep-in” shifts should attract the National Minimum Wage has been updated to confirm that the Government has noted the judgment. That guidance will be updated shortly once Ministers have fully considered the implications the Court of Appeal judgment.

Over the past year Ministers from across the Government have been working closely on how “sleep-in” shifts are remunerated and will continue to do so.

Ministers from BEIS and the Department of Health and Social Care are liaising with local authorities and care commissioners to ensure that they have clarity on the legal position and on their responsibilities when commissioning care services.

HMRC’s voluntary Social Care Compliance Scheme remains open. Employers participating on the scheme should take note of the Court of Appeal judgment and review their pay practices accordingly. HMRC officers have been in contact directly with all employers enrolled on the scheme to set out next steps.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Court of Appeal judgment on Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake and Shannon v Rampersad made on 13 July 2018, what guidance the Government has issued on rates of pay for sleep in shifts to (a) local authorities and (b) care commissioners.

The Court of Appeal judgment overturns the previous interpretation of the law and means that “sleep-in” shifts, as defined by the Court of Appeal, no longer attract the National Minimum Wage. The Court of Appeal judgment applies both retrospectively and going forward. Government guidance on when “sleep-in” shifts should attract the National Minimum Wage has been updated to confirm that the Government has noted the judgment. That guidance will be updated shortly once Ministers have fully considered the implications the Court of Appeal judgment.

Over the past year Ministers from across the Government have been working closely on how “sleep-in” shifts are remunerated and will continue to do so.

Ministers from BEIS and the Department of Health and Social Care are liaising with local authorities and care commissioners to ensure that they have clarity on the legal position and on their responsibilities when commissioning care services.

HMRC’s voluntary Social Care Compliance Scheme remains open. Employers participating on the scheme should take note of the Court of Appeal judgment and review their pay practices accordingly. HMRC officers have been in contact directly with all employers enrolled on the scheme to set out next steps.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the (a) status and (b) liability for care providers that enrolled in HMRC’s Social Care Compliance Scheme.

The Court of Appeal judgment overturns the previous interpretation of the law and means that “sleep-in” shifts, as defined by the Court of Appeal, no longer attract the National Minimum Wage. The Court of Appeal judgment applies both retrospectively and going forward. Government guidance on when “sleep-in” shifts should attract the National Minimum Wage has been updated to confirm that the Government has noted the judgment. That guidance will be updated shortly once Ministers have fully considered the implications the Court of Appeal judgment.

Over the past year Ministers from across the Government have been working closely on how “sleep-in” shifts are remunerated and will continue to do so.

Ministers from BEIS and the Department of Health and Social Care are liaising with local authorities and care commissioners to ensure that they have clarity on the legal position and on their responsibilities when commissioning care services.

HMRC’s voluntary Social Care Compliance Scheme remains open. Employers participating on the scheme should take note of the Court of Appeal judgment and review their pay practices accordingly. HMRC officers have been in contact directly with all employers enrolled on the scheme to set out next steps.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Court of Appeal judgment on Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake and Shannon v Rampersad made on 13 July 2018, what plans the Government has to bring forward proposals to ensure that overnight care is subject to the National Living Wage.

The Court of Appeal judgment overturns the previous interpretation of the law and means that “sleep-in” shifts, as defined by the Court of Appeal, no longer attract the National Minimum Wage. The Court of Appeal judgment applies both retrospectively and going forward. Government guidance on when “sleep-in” shifts should attract the National Minimum Wage has been updated to confirm that the Government has noted the judgment. That guidance will be updated shortly once Ministers have fully considered the implications the Court of Appeal judgment.

Over the past year Ministers from across the Government have been working closely on how “sleep-in” shifts are remunerated and will continue to do so.

Ministers from BEIS and the Department of Health and Social Care are liaising with local authorities and care commissioners to ensure that they have clarity on the legal position and on their responsibilities when commissioning care services.

HMRC’s voluntary Social Care Compliance Scheme remains open. Employers participating on the scheme should take note of the Court of Appeal judgment and review their pay practices accordingly. HMRC officers have been in contact directly with all employers enrolled on the scheme to set out next steps.

29th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Implementation Unit Report on Shale Gas, what estimate the Government has made of the amount of unintended methane emissions at the projected (a) 17 sites by 2020, (b) 30 to 35 sites by 2022 and (c) 155 sites by 2025.

Both the 2013 report, ‘Potential Greenhouse Gas Emissions Associated with Shale Gas Extraction and Use’[1] (Mackay/Stone) and the Committee on Climate Change’s (CCC) 2016 report ‘Onshore Petroleum: The compatibility of UK onshore petroleum with meeting the UK’s carbon budgets’[2] provided analysis on the potential implications of greenhouse gas emissions from extracting shale gas in the UK.

The Mackay/Stone report concluded that the carbon footprint of UK shale gas would likely be much less than coal and comparable to imported Liquefied Natural Gas.

The CCC report concluded that shale gas production is compatible with carbon budgets if three conditions are met:

Methane emissions from shale gas production minimised and monitored.

Gas consumption remains within carbon budget limits

Any additional shale gas emissions offset by reductions elsewhere in order to meet carbon budgets

We believe that our robust regulatory regime and determination to meet our carbon budgets mean those tests can and will be met.

The Government is grant funding an environmental monitoring programme led by the British Geological Survey in the Fylde (Lancashire) and Kirby Misperton (North Yorkshire), where applications for shale gas wells have been made. This programme includes the measurement of methane emissions, and would continue after the start of shale gas extraction. The evidence gathered from this programme will inform our future estimates of unintended methane emissions from potential shale gas extraction.

During any shale gas operations the operator will be required to undertake environmental monitoring, including emissions monitoring, to demonstrate compliance with their environmental permits.

Clauses in the Infrastructure Act make it clear that any hydraulic fracturing activity cannot take place unless appropriate arrangements have been made for monitoring emissions of methane into the air. Operators will also be required to publish the results of their methane emissions reporting.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/237330/MacKay_Stone_shale_study_report_09092013.pdf

[2] https://www.gov.uk/government/news/committee-on-climate-change-report-and-government-response-on-the-compatibility-of-uk-onshore-petroleum-with-meeting-the-uks-carbon-budgets

22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Implementation Unit Report on Shale Gas, what estimate the Government has made of the potential effect on employment of the projected (a) 17 sites by 2020, (b) 30-35 sites by 2022 and (c) 155 sites by 2025.

BEIS has not made any estimates of the potential effect on employment from the future development of the shale gas industry.

22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate the Government has made of the number of jobs which will be created by the renewables industry over the next ten years.

The Government does not produce forecasts for job creation over a future time period for the renewables industry.

22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the implementation unit report on shale gas extraction, what disposal method will be used for flowback waste from (a) the 17 sites by 2020, (b) the 30 to 35 sites by 2022 and (c) the 155 sites by 2025.

It is up to the operator to agree disposal methods with the appropriate regulators as part of their planning application for any future shale gas development.

22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Implementation Unit Report on Shale Gas, what estimate the Government has made of the amount of flowback waste which would need to be disposed of for the projected (a) 17 sites by 2020, (b) 30-35 sites by 2022 and (c) 155 sites by 2025.

The Government has not made an assessment of the amount of flowback waste which would be produced from any future shale gas development.

22nd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Implementation Unit Report on Shale Gas, which disposal method is planned to be used for the projected (a) 17 sites by 2020, (b) 30-35 sites by 2022 and (c) 155 sites by 2025.

It is the operator’s responsibility to agree disposal methods with the appropriate regulators as part of their planning application for all shale gas development.

3rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to strengthen and promote the British aerospace industry.

The UK has the second largest aerospace industry globally, with strengths in some of the most technologically advanced parts of aircraft: wings, engines and advanced systems. The industry has annual turnover of around £32 billion, and exports some £30 billion.

Through the Aerospace Growth Partnership, Government is supporting action by industry to make sure the UK remains competitive, including a joint Industry/Government commitment of £3.9 billion for Research and Development activities through to 2026.

25th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans for the increase in Post Office outreach services in rural communities over the last five years to continue; and if he will make a statement.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy keeps the state of the network under review including the provision of rural services through outreaches. Outreaches are provided so Post Office can maintain access to communities, most often in rural areas, where the old post office has closed. These provide a regular part time service, with hours tailored to the levels of demand in the community. They provide a welcomed link to the network for many isolated communities.

24th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the implications for his policies are of the call by the Association of Convenience Stores for the Government to review the costs, income and viability of rural post offices on its Rural Shop Report 2017, published in January 2017.

The Government entrusts the Post Office’s management to keep the health of the network under review in order to meet the commitment we have set to maintain the network at over 11,500 branches. The commercial agreements it has with subpostmasters, rural and urban, covering costs and revenue form a key part of ensuring the health of the network. While these arrangements are commercially sensitive between both parties the evidence of their success is in the fact that that the network is at its most stable in decades.

23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of progress in securing the future of rural post offices; and if he will make a statement.

The Government understands the important role post offices play in communities across the country, especially in the more remote, rural areas. This is why in our manifesto we committed to secure the future of 3,000 rural post offices.

Thanks to Government investment the UK’s network of 11,600 branches is at its most stable in decades, with over 98% of the UK population in rural areas within 3 miles of a post office. The investment is offering real improvements to customers, including an extra 200,000 opening hours every week and over 4,200 post offices open on a Sunday.

The Government’s recent consultation will help us understand what the public and businesses expect from the Post Office and to understand more fully what subsidy is needed and what it should be used for.

27th Sep 2019
5G
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to introduce safety tests on the proposed 5G pilot projects.

Safety must always be paramount in technological developments and there is no credible evidence 5G is harmful to human health. All proposed 5G Testbeds and Trials (5GTT) projects have to comply with the guidelines published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. ICNIRP is formally recognised by the World Health Organization. Public Health England’s Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards takes the lead on public health matters associated with radiofrequency electromagnetic fields, or radio waves.

The 5GTT has strict expectations that all grant funded projects will adhere to ICNIRP guidelines. A considerable amount of research has been carried out on radio waves and per PHE’s advice we anticipate no negative effects on public health.

21st May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons children’s play is not prioritized in the five foundations for building character.

World-class education is not only about having the highest standards in academic and technical education, it also means ensuring that education builds character and resilience.

We want all children and young people to have opportunities to develop the key character traits of believing that they can achieve, being able to stick with the task in hand, seeing a link between effort today and reward in the future, and being able to bounce back from the knocks that life inevitably brings to all of us. Character must also be grounded in positive values such as kindness, generosity, fairness, tolerance and integrity.

The 5 Foundations for Building Character announced on 7 February by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education are sport, creativity, performing, volunteering and membership, and the world of work. Each of these areas covers a very wide range of activities that children and young people can enjoy doing. In developing key character traits, research suggests that high-quality delivery of the 5 foundations should take a structured approach, occur over a sustained period of time, and be self-directed by the child or young person. Through the support of teachers, coaches or other professionals, children and young people are more likely to receive a higher level of challenge and develop the traits that can help them achieve their goals.

Play can provide benefits to children and young people through physical activity and promotion of wellbeing, but the audit of the availability of out-of-school activities across the country does not currently include playing outside as that activity does not provide the structured and high quality elements that are required in character building activities as proposed in the 5 Foundations for Building Character.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
21st May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the audit of out of school activities will include playing outside.

World-class education is not only about having the highest standards in academic and technical education, it also means ensuring that education builds character and resilience.

We want all children and young people to have opportunities to develop the key character traits of believing that they can achieve, being able to stick with the task in hand, seeing a link between effort today and reward in the future, and being able to bounce back from the knocks that life inevitably brings to all of us. Character must also be grounded in positive values such as kindness, generosity, fairness, tolerance and integrity.

The 5 Foundations for Building Character announced on 7 February by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education are sport, creativity, performing, volunteering and membership, and the world of work. Each of these areas covers a very wide range of activities that children and young people can enjoy doing. In developing key character traits, research suggests that high-quality delivery of the 5 foundations should take a structured approach, occur over a sustained period of time, and be self-directed by the child or young person. Through the support of teachers, coaches or other professionals, children and young people are more likely to receive a higher level of challenge and develop the traits that can help them achieve their goals.

Play can provide benefits to children and young people through physical activity and promotion of wellbeing, but the audit of the availability of out-of-school activities across the country does not currently include playing outside as that activity does not provide the structured and high quality elements that are required in character building activities as proposed in the 5 Foundations for Building Character.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
21st May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of children with autism spectrum condition who have been (a) excluded and (b) isolated in schools in the last 12 months.

Permanent and fixed period exclusions in England: 2016-2017 can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2016-to-2017.

Permanent and fixed period exclusions by type of special educational need can be found in national table 6.

The information requested, on the number of children with autism spectrum condition who have been isolated in schools in the last 12 months, is not held centrally.

As part of Ofsted inspections, however, schools will be asked to provide records and analysis of any use of internal isolation. Ofsted inspectors will expect schools to have clear and effective behaviour policies that promote high standards of behaviour and are applied consistently and fairly. In reaching a judgement on pupils’ personal development, behaviour and welfare, inspectors will take account of a range of information, including schools’ use of internal isolation.

The Department’s behaviour and discipline guidance to schools makes clear that schools must act lawfully, reasonably and proportionately when using isolation, and must take account of any special education needs or disabilities pupils placed in isolation may have.

21st May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government is taking to ensure the effectiveness of cross-departmental work to tackle the referral of children and young people with (a) depression and (b) mental health issues.

The Department for Education has a joint programme of work with the Department of Health and Social Care, NHS England and Health Education England to deliver the proposals set out in the green paper ‘Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health Provision’. This includes setting up and running Mental Health Support Teams linked to groups of schools and colleges. The teams will be made up of additional, trained, mental health workers, supervised by suitable NHS staff working closely with other professionals such as educational psychologists, school nurses, counsellors and social workers.

The first teams will be set up in 25 trailblazer areas this year, which will be evaluated to inform the subsequent roll-out. The Department has put in place a small regional implementation team to work alongside NHS England to support delivery of the green paper commitments and lead and model effective partnership working for education and health.

The Government is also taking action to support specific vulnerable groups of children. In May 2016, Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission began inspecting local areas on their effectiveness in fulfilling the new duties on education, health and social care services to provide for children and young people who have special educational needs and disabilities (SEND). All 152 local areas in England will be inspected over a period of five years. The inspections are identifying how effectively access to mental health provision is working as part of the SEND provision locally.

The Department is also piloting new mental health assessments for looked-after children to ensure young people are assessed at the right time to support more effective access to mental health provision, with a focus on meeting their individual needs as they enter care.

21st May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the effect on children’s (a) wellbeing and (b) development of changes in the time available for break-time over the last 20 years.

The Government has no plans to assess the impact of any changes in the length of school break times. Schools have the autonomy to make decisions about the structure and duration of their school day to suit their own circumstances. However, the Department is clear that pupils should be given an appropriate break and expects school leaders to make sure this happens.

The Government recognises the importance of physical activity in schools to improve physical and mental wellbeing and support attainment. The Department’s childhood obesity strategy reflects the Chief Medical Officer’s guidelines that primary age children should get at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity a day and the aim that 30 minutes of that should be during the school day.

30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children have been fostered in England in each of the last five years.

The numbers of children looked after in foster placements at any time during the year ending 31 March in each of the last five years were published in Table B1, in the statistical release Children looked after in England including adoption: 2016 to 2017 at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2016-to-2017.

The numbers of children, who ceased to be looked after because of a special guardianship order during the year ending 31 March in each of the last five years, are shown in the attached table.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many special guardianship orders have been issued in each of the last five years.

The numbers of children looked after in foster placements at any time during the year ending 31 March in each of the last five years were published in Table B1, in the statistical release Children looked after in England including adoption: 2016 to 2017 at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2016-to-2017.

The numbers of children, who ceased to be looked after because of a special guardianship order during the year ending 31 March in each of the last five years, are shown in the attached table.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the effect of maintaining current levels of core educational funding for 16 to 18 year olds on (a) educational outcomes and (b) further education provision; and what plans she has for (i) funding and (ii) resourcing further education in the next five years.

The post-16 system is performing well and a record proportion of 16 to 18-year olds are now participating in education or apprenticeships. The results in the first of the reformed A levels were released last month, with students continuing to achieve effectively against the high standards of the qualification and demonstrating their readiness for the demands of higher education. Overall A level results this year were stable compared to last year.

A record number of 18-year olds applied for places in Higher Education this year and the entry rate for English 18-year olds from disadvantaged backgrounds is at a record high.

12th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when her Department plans to publish the careers strategy.

We will publish a careers strategy in the Autumn. The strategy will have a clear focus on improving social mobility.

14th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will publish a list of school transport plans with no mechanism for engaging schools and colleges as active stakeholders.

The statutory responsibility for transport to education and training for children of compulsory school age and for 16 to 19 year olds rests with local authorities, enabling them to make decisions which best match local needs and circumstances.

Local authorities are required to consult a range of stakeholders including schools and colleges about their post-16 transport policies. When developing transport policies for children of compulsory school age statutory guidance strongly encourages local authorities to consult.

Local authorities publish transport policies for school age children and post-16 young people on their websites. The department does not assess these to determine the extent to which local authorities meet these expectations for consultation. Links to post-16 transport policies can be found at www.gov.uk/subsidised-college-transport-16-19.

3rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate she has made of the cost of the Immigration Skills Charge to NHS and social care sponsors of Tier 2 visas in 2016-17; and if she will make a statement.

The income raised from the Immigration Skills Charge will support the provision of skills for the resident population, to address the skills gaps that employers face. Further information will be set out in due course. We have not estimated the potential annual cost to NHS and social care sponsors. The cost will depend on employer use of the Tier 2 skilled worker route.

3rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the revenue raised by the Immigration Skills Charge applied to NHS and social care sponsors of Tier 2 visas will be hypothecated for investment in apprenticeships in health and social care; and if she will make a statement.

The income raised from the Immigration Skills Charge will support the provision of skills for the resident population, to address the skills gaps that employers face. Further information will be set out in due course. We have not estimated the potential annual cost to NHS and social care sponsors. The cost will depend on employer use of the Tier 2 skilled worker route.

17th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government is taking to work with local authorities to ensure that the education provided to home educated children is effectively regulated and safeguarded.

The Department for Education has frequent contact with local authority officers and elected members on the subject of elective home education. Published guidance for local authorities is available on the GOV.UK website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/elective-home-education

17th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government has taken to assess whether the home education of children in consistent with Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

The Department for Education has published guidance on ‘Listening to and involving children and young people’, which makes clear that in keeping with Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, local authorities (LAs) should take steps to ensure that the views of children are obtained and taken into account. This published guidance is available on GOV.UK at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/listening-to-and-involving-children-and-young-people

The guidance is issued under s.176 of the Education Act 2002, which requires LAs to use guidance on consulting children when they exercise their functions in relation both to schools and to elective home education. It is for each local authority to decide how best to take account of the views of children who are being educated at home.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans she has to extend the mental health and schools link pilot scheme to post-16 further education establishments.

The Department will make a decision on how to build on the outcome of the pilot once the training workshops have been delivered and the evaluation has been completed. This pilot is currently running in 27 Clinical Commissioning Group areas.

Officials are working with the Association of Colleges to ensure that effective links are being made between the pilot areas and their local colleges, so that they are involved in the development of shared protocols and longer term planning for the provision of children’s mental health services.

4th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of statutory PSHE education on lowering the level of violence against women and girls; and if she will make a statement.

High quality Personal, Social, Health and Economic (PSHE) education has a vital role to play in ensuring that young people leave school prepared for life in modern Britain, helping them develop healthy relationships and recognise unhealthy relationships. It can also give them the skills and knowledge to help keep themselves, and each other, safe. The Government has made it clear in the introduction to the framework to the national curriculum that all schools should teach PSHE. Schools and teachers are best placed to develop their own PSHE curriculum based on the needs of their pupils, drawing on guidance provided by expert organisations such as the PSHE Association.

As stated in the Government response to the select committee report, we will take forward work with the sector to improve the quality of PSHE, and intend to make significant progress on this issue during this parliament.

17th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of statutory PSHE education for the health of school pupils; and if she will make a statement.

We want all children to lead healthy and active lives. Schools have a key role to play in supporting this; the new national curriculum sets the expectation that pupils are taught, across a variety of subjects, about the importance of leading healthy and active lives.


Schools and teachers already recognise the importance of good PSHE education and know that healthy, resilient, confident pupils are better placed to achieve academically and to be stretched further. In the introduction to the national curriculum, we have made clear that all schools should make provision for PSHE, drawing on examples of good practice.


The Secretary of State for Education has regular discussions with the Secretary of State for Health about children’s health and the role schools can play in tackling childhood obesity.

17th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Health on the Chief Medical Officer's recommendations that PSHE education be made a routine part of children's education.

We want all children to lead healthy and active lives. Schools have a key role to play in supporting this; the new national curriculum sets the expectation that pupils are taught, across a variety of subjects, about the importance of leading healthy and active lives.


Schools and teachers already recognise the importance of good PSHE education and know that healthy, resilient, confident pupils are better placed to achieve academically and to be stretched further. In the introduction to the national curriculum, we have made clear that all schools should make provision for PSHE, drawing on examples of good practice.


The Secretary of State for Education has regular discussions with the Secretary of State for Health about children’s health and the role schools can play in tackling childhood obesity.

25th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason the Final version of the Specification for Mandatory Qualifications for specialist teachers of children and young people who are deaf was revised between 6 and 13 October 2015.

Our aim is always to ensure that the Mandatory Qualifications (MQ) continue to be a high quality qualification that is flexible in its content and in its model of delivery in order to meet the needs of the sector.

We work closely with the National Sensory Impairment Partnership (NatSIP) as representatives of the sector. We ran a consultation with the sector to make sure that the MQ remained current and reflected changes in policy. As a result of the consultation we made a number of changes to the MQ specification. We published the revised specification on 7 September 2015 on GOV.uk.

After publication, we responded to advice from NatSIP and made a further amendment to the specification making it clearer that the specification reflects the minimum skills required to be a teacher of the deaf.

We have no plans to make changes to the final version of the specification; we will keep the specification under review and continue to engage with the sector through NatSIP.



25th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will revise the changes made to the Final version of the Specification for Mandatory Qualifications for specialist teachers of children and young people who are deaf between 6 and 13 October 2015.

Our aim is always to ensure that the Mandatory Qualifications (MQ) continue to be a high quality qualification that is flexible in its content and in its model of delivery in order to meet the needs of the sector.

We work closely with the National Sensory Impairment Partnership (NatSIP) as representatives of the sector. We ran a consultation with the sector to make sure that the MQ remained current and reflected changes in policy. As a result of the consultation we made a number of changes to the MQ specification. We published the revised specification on 7 September 2015 on GOV.uk.

After publication, we responded to advice from NatSIP and made a further amendment to the specification making it clearer that the specification reflects the minimum skills required to be a teacher of the deaf.

We have no plans to make changes to the final version of the specification; we will keep the specification under review and continue to engage with the sector through NatSIP.



20th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans she has for consistent monitoring of the emotional, social and physical development of children in their early years, after the Early Years Foundation Profile becomes non-compulsory in September 2016; and if she will make a statement.

It is important for parents and teachers to know how well a child is progressing. As such, communication and language, physical development and personal, social and emotional development are set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) statutory framework as prime learning areas for children from birth to age five.


As part of the wider reforms to the accountability system for primary schools and the national curriculum we have introduced the reception baseline assessment for the 2015/16 academic year.


The reception baseline forms one part of a teacher’s wider assessments in reception and we will expect early years practitioners to continue to carry out the appropriate ongoing, formative assessment of children of reception age.


The EYFS statutory framework will also still require early years practitioners to carry out a progress check against the three prime areas of learning at age two, and we are improving this check for parents by bringing it together with health visitor checks in the form of new Integrated Reviews.

13th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will implement the recommendations of the report published by the NSPCC in June 2015 entitled Achieving emotional wellbeing for looked after children, on the mental health needs of children in care.

In March my Department and the Department of Health published joint statutory guidance on promoting the health and well-being of looked-after children. This emphasises the importance of emotional well-being and mental as well as physical health. Support to vulnerable groups, including looked-after children, was also a focus of the work leading up to the publication of Future in Mind.

This report makes a valuable contribution to the development of policy and practice around how to improve the emotional wellbeing and mental health of looked-after children and care leavers. Promoting the emotional wellbeing and mental health of looked-after children is a key priority for this government. We look forward to discussing with the NSPCC and others the findings it presents and what more can be done to improve emotional and mental health outcomes for this vulnerable group.

1st Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to tackle cyber-bullying.

The Government believes that internet providers, schools and parents all have a role to play in keeping children and young people safe online.

All schools must have a behaviour policy which includes measures to prevent all forms of bullying, including cyberbullying. The ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education' guidance outlines the importance of tackling cyberbullying, which can be found online at:

http://www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk/schools-the-wider-sector/cyberbullying.aspx

Schools have the flexibility to develop their own measures to prevent and tackle bullying, but are held to account by Ofsted.

The Government recognises that educating young people about online safety is key to tackling cyberbullying. As part of changes to the new computing programmes of study which will be taught from September 2014, e-safety will be taught at all four key stages. This will empower young people to tackle cyberbullying through responsible, respectful and secure use of technology, as well as ensuring that pupils understand age-appropriate ways of reporting any concerns they may have about what they see or encounter online.

The new curriculum also offers opportunities to tackle the underlying causes of bullying; for example the new citizenship programme of study sets out a requirement for pupils to be taught about the diverse national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and the need for mutual respect and understanding.

The Department for Education is providing £4 million of funding over two years from 2013 to four anti-bullying organisations: Beatbullying, the Diana Award, Kidscape and the National Children's Bureau consortium. While this funding has been awarded to specific projects to reduce bullying in general this can, and does, include work to tackle cyberbullying.

The Department has produced case studies showing good practice in how to manage behaviour and bullying. These include a case study about how a school deals with cyber-bullying. Also through funding provided by the Department the Anti-Bullying Alliance has produced specific advice on cyberbullying for children and young people with special educational needs and or disabilities. We provide a link to this in our own advice on preventing and tackling bullying.

Government ministers have regular meetings with internet providers, social media platforms and search engines on matters related to internet safety, including cyber-bullying. Ministers from the Department for Education, Home Office and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport also co-chair the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) which brings together a range of experts across government, law enforcement, industry, academia and charities to consider the best ways to minimise the risk of harm to children when online.

In July 2013 the Prime Minister announced measures to support parents to install free and easy to use internet filters which can block access to harmful websites. The Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have now rolled out easy to use filtering to all new customers and will confirm that, by the end of 2014, 95% of all homes with an existing internet connection will be required to choose whether to switch on a whole home family friendly internet filter. The filters are constantly being refined and updated by the ISPs to keep families as safe as possible in the fast changing digital world. The ISPs have also announced a new £25 million internet safety campaign over 3 years that will reach out to millions of parents on how best to protect their children and make good use of filters.

23rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government has taken to reduce the complexity of environmental schemes for land holders.

The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) took on responsibility for Environmental Stewardship and Countryside Stewardship schemes in October 2018, and has introduced a number of measures on agri-environment schemes to make it easier for farmers and land managers to apply and make it simpler for them to administer.

The RPA has made improvements to the online service, including making more offers available to apply for online and allowing applicants to download application packs. It has simplified both the rules regarding the evidence we require and the guidance manuals. In addition the RPA has made changes to the processing cycle which has reduced completion times for applications, agreements, claims and payments.

Looking forward we are considering ways to drive further online uptake, make improvements to the information on GOV.UK, and whether there are further simplifications we can make to the scheme to support the transition to a new Environmental Land Management Scheme, subject to exit negotiations and funding.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
23rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the statement entitled Health and harmony: the future for food, farming and the environment in a green Brexit, published in September 2018, what steps his Department is taking to limit the costs for small land owners of the future environmental land management scheme.

The Agriculture Bill constitutes the first major agricultural reform in the UK for almost 50 years. It will allow us to break from the rules of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy and presents a unique opportunity to devise a new Environmental Land Management system where the Government will work with farmers, land managers, environmental experts and stakeholders to test and trial new approaches and investigate innovative mechanisms for delivery of environmental outcomes.

Small farmers and land owners will be well placed to benefit from any future scheme.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
4th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has plans to allocate funding to ensure the future of Brixham Harbour.

It is expected that the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) will continue until 2020. In the event of no deal being reached, the Chancellor announced on 24 July 2018 that all EMFF projects approved before the closure date of the current programme will be fully funded under a Treasury guarantee. On 10 December 2018, this Government announced £37.2 million of extra funding for the UK seafood sector for projects approved during 2019 and 2020 to boost the industry as we become an independent coastal state.

Applications for funding to improve infrastructure in fishing ports should be directed to the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) in England. Applications are assessed against the scheme rules. The European Grants Team in the MMO processes applications for funding and projects over £100,000 will be assessed by a selection panel.

All applications in England should be sent to:

Marine Management Organisation

Lancaster House, Hampshire Court

Newcastle Business Park

Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE4 7YH

Telephone: 0208 026 5539

Email: emff.queries@marinemanagement.org.uk

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/european-maritime-and-fisheries-fund-emff-apply-for-funding

1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has plans to direct the £10 million funding allocated to the South West announced in the 2018 Budget to (a) the fishing industry and (b) the redevelopment of Brixham harbour.

As announced in the 2018 Budget, the Government is investing £10 million from BEIS’s allocation of the National Productivity Investment Fund for Research and Development to enhance the productivity and sustainability of fisheries and seafood industries across the whole of the UK. The Seafood Innovation Fund will disburse this money and help transform the industry to ensure the UK is a world leader in safe, sustainable and productive fishing. BEIS has asked Defra and Cefas to deliver this funding on behalf of UK Research and Innovation, given the specialist knowledge and understanding required to make the most of this opportunity. Details of the design of the fund are currently being finalised to ensure value for money and we expect the fund to launch shortly.

25th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure co-operation with the EU on tackling air pollution after the UK leaves the EU.

The UK remains a signatory to the 1979 United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution, and will continue to be at the forefront of international action and cooperation to tackle transboundary air pollution alongside the EU.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
20th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the role of Natural England in helping farmers to improve their environment.

The Department regularly reviews Natural England’s performance including via formal Ministerial review. Natural England is required to report progress to Defra’s supervisory board and the Secretary of State.

Natural England plays an important role in delivering the 25 Year Environment Plan, providing advice to help farmers to improve their environment. Natural England advisers provide valuable advice on how to effectively manage wildlife and habitats, promoting nature conservation and protecting biodiversity. This includes advice to help landowners set up agri-environment agreements and aftercare advice during the lifetime of the agreements, as well as for other projects that such as the ‘Back to the Brink’ species recovery project, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and other charitable organisations.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions the Marine Management Organisation has had with Wildlife Trusts on the use of pingers on vessels in inshore fisheries.

The Marine Management Organisation recently held very constructive discussions with Cornwall Wildlife Trust on the use of pingers in the South West of England and the requirements of wildlife licences for activities that may harm marine species protected under EU and UK legislation.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) location and (b) scale of bycatch in inshore fisheries; and when he plans to publish that assessment.

The Government funds the UK bycatch monitoring programme which provides essential observer data on incidents of bycatch. Bycatch levels are broken down by gear type and area. We do not have information on the exact numbers of bycaught individuals in inshore fisheries but estimates derived from observer data can be found here:

http://randd.defra.gov.uk/Default.aspx?Menu=Menu&Module=More&Location=None&ProjectID=18535.

The Sea Mammal Research Unit has undertaken work to identify potential marine mammal bycatch hotspots in the UK and the viability of the deployment of acoustic deterrent devices in the southwest of England. This report will be published following peer review.

We are currently working with stakeholders to develop a UK Cetacean Bycatch Strategy to address the issue of unintentional capture of dolphins, whales and porpoises. The Strategy will focus on implementing practical solutions in areas where there are high levels of bycatch, initially focussing on the southwest of England.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
11th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has had discussions with his French counterpart on ensuring that information resulting from the toxicity testing of scallop fishing areas in the English Channel is made available to British fishermen in a timely manner or at the same time as to French fishermen; and if he will make a statement.

As the responsible UK body, the Food Standards Agency has reiterated to the French Authorities the importance of ensuring that communications about the opening of fisheries, where raised toxin levels in scallops have resulted in their closure, are made to all of those affected at the same time.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if the Government will consider invoking Articles 15 and 11 of the 1964 London Fisheries Convention after triggering Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

The Government is considering this issue very carefully.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
11th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with her counterparts in other EU member states on the effect of proposed changes to the minimum landing size of bass on salmon and sea trout stocks.

There have been extensive discussions with other EU Member States and the European Commission on the proposed changes to the minimum landing size of bass during the current process of agreeing bass management measures. To date these discussions have not included consideration of possible effects of these measures on salmon and sea trout stocks, although our general expectation is that any decrease in bass fishing effort will also help protect salmonids.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if the Government will conduct an assessment on the effect on salmon and sea trout stocks of an increase in the bass stock.

The Government has no plans to conduct an assessment on the effect on salmon and trout stocks of such an increase, but previous studies show that salmon have a number of predators including pike, cod, sea trout and bass.

Current assessment of the EU bass stocks indicate a rapidly declining biomass due to an extended period of poor reproduction and increasing fishing mortality. There is no obvious correlation between bass predation and salmon stocks since both have been declining.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the reasons are for the time her Department's tendering process has taken for testing cattle for tuberculosis.

Defra Network Procurement followed the procurement process defined in the Public Contract Regulations 2006 amended 2009.

To ensure that all tenderers had sufficient knowledge and information relating to the tender, five supplier engagement days were held in both Wales and England for all registered interested parties. These were held in September 2013, April 2014 and May 2014, which helped the Authority to finalise the contract specification.

In response to feedback from the veterinary profession, the tendering period of the procurement was extended from the normal period of 40 days to 60 days. The Invitation to Tender was published on 7 July 2014.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent timetable her Department has set for the tendering process for testing cattle for tuberculosis.

Defra has signed contracts with the two Delivery Partners for Wales and anticipates these services going live in April 2015. We are currently handling a legal challenge to the award of contracts in England and until such time as this has been resolved no timetable to the commencement of the service for England is available.

Until such time as Defra is able announce details on the commencement of the service for England, the current arrangements for TB testing will continue, where testing is carried out by either an official veterinarian (under the direction of the Animal and Plant Health Agency {APHA}), or a member of APHA staff.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what fees her Department has proposed for veterinarians who bid successfully in the tendering process for testing for tuberculosis in cattle.

Details of the fees payable by the successful bidders are subject to commercial confidentiality and not shared. Redacted copies of the awarded contracts will be available on Contracts Finder once these have been awarded. However, within the Invitation to Tender documentation it was clear that Defra was seeking the ability to deliver a consistent quality assured service, which would be important in identifying successful suppliers. Other factors, including the provision of a locally responsive service and the use of small businesses which otherwise support a sustainable livestock farming industry and wider rural economy, would also be important whilst cost would still be a factor. Tenderers were invited to submit tenders for each Geographical Lot based on their fees not exceeding the annual reference value of each the Geographical Lots (2013/14) and, in three Geographical Lots, the estimated value of the Total Reference Value less 10%.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she has taken to keep veterinarians informed on the timetable of her Department's tendering process for testing cattle for tuberculosis.

Since the new model for the supply of veterinary services was announced in July 2013, the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) (previously the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency) has continuously provided detailed information and progress updates through the APHA website, regular Official Veterinarian (OV) newsletter and in specific letters and briefings sent directly to OVs. This information was also provided to veterinary professional bodies such as the British Veterinary Association (BVA), the British Cattle Veterinary Association (BCVA) and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS). APHA provided open fora in both Builth Wells (Wales) and Weybridge (England) in September and October 2013.

An Invitation to Tender was published on 9 July 2014 which included a timetable leading to the announcement on contract awards in January 2015. To further aid potential suppliers, two further clarification days were held in Builth Wells and Weybridge in July and August 2014.

On 6 January 2015, prior to the award of contracts for veterinary services, APHA wrote to the BVA, BCVA and RCVS, to update them on the award process and timescales involved. On 27 January, APHA informed professional bodies and OVs of the award of contracts in Wales and will now work with the contractors to inform veterinarians in Wales of the transitional timetable and arrangements. APHA is not yet in a position to award contracts in England, as this is dependent on the outcome of an ongoing legal process, but has reaffirmed its commitment to providing ongoing information and support to the veterinary profession.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
25th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what steps he is taking in negotiations with his EU counterparts to ensure the UK’s continued membership of the European University Institute Convention.

The Government has made clear that it values international exchange and collaboration. Officials in the Department for Exiting the EU and the Department for Education have met with the EUI to hold discussions to explore options to provide continuity and ensure UK students at the EUI can complete their studies.

Should Parliament approve the deal the Prime Minister has negotiated with the EU, the UK will continue to apply the terms of the EUI Convention for the duration of the implementation period. The UK’s rights and obligations under the Convention would continue during that period, in accordance with the Withdrawal Agreement. The Political Declaration sets out that we will establish general principles, terms and conditions for UK participation in EU programmes in areas of shared interest, and wider dialogues to allow us to share best practice and act together in our mutual interest. On this basis, we will explore with the European University Institute options for future participation in its activities and we will work to ensure that UK students at the EUI will be able to complete their studies.

Furthermore, UK universities will be able to continue to collaborate with the EUI in research projects even if the UK is no longer a member of the EUI Convention.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
25th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether it remains the Government’s assessment that the UK will automatically leave the European University Institute Convention on 29 March 2019.

The European University Institute Convention (EUIC) is an agreement between the Member States of the European Union. After 29 March 2019, the United Kingdom will cease to be a Member State of the European Union and, as such, the UK’s membership of the EUIC will automatically cease. Should Parliament approve the deal the Prime Minister has negotiated with the EU, the UK will continue to apply the terms of the EUI Convention for the duration of the implementation period. The UK’s rights and obligations under the Convention would continue during that period, in accordance with the Withdrawal Agreement.


Officials in my department and in the Department for Education have met with the EUI to explore options for future participation in its activities and we will work to ensure that UK students at the EUI will be able to complete their studies. Furthermore, UK universities will be able to continue to collaborate with the EUI in research projects even if the UK is no longer a member of the EUI Convention.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
3rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what assessment he has made of the benefits and opportunities available to the British aerospace industry after the UK leaves the EU.

The UK is a world leading exporter in civil aerospace, with key strengths in some of the most complex parts of aircraft including engines, wings, and advanced systems such as landing gear. Through Government’s regular dialogue with the UK aerospace industry, we are aware of a range of opportunities the UK’s exit from the European Union may present for the sector.

To ensure the aerospace sector retains the maximum freedom to trade with and operate within European markets, we are seeking a bold and ambitious Free Trade Agreement as part of a new, deep and special partnership with the EU. The UK will continue to benefit from membership of the WTO Agreement on Trade in Civil Aircraft. Moreover, the Government will build an ambitious trade policy based on the UK’s national interest which will provide greater access to overseas markets.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
3rd Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what steps he is taking to (a) engage with and (b) protect the interests of the South West's agricultural and fishing industries during future trade negotiations with the EU.

As part of our committment to hear from every sector and region in the UK, DExEU Ministers continue to engage closely with organisations across the agriculture and fishing industries, to enable us to understand issues for the sectors and to identify potential post-exit opportunities.

We have spoken to a range of organisations including the National Federation of Fishermen's Organisations, and the National Farmers’ Union and will continue to listen to workers in the industry, trade organisations, producers and the public as negotiations progress.

Leaving the EU presents a major opportunity for the UK agriculture and fishing industries. The Government will be able to design new policies which specifically benefit British agriculture, the countryside and the fisheries, and provide better value for money to the British taxpayer.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
25th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what estimate her Department has made of the potential shortfall in funding to charities and non-governmental organisations as a result of the revocation in the US of the Presidential Memorandum of 23 January 2009 Mexico City Policy and Assistance for Voluntary Population Planning and the reinstatement of the Presidential Memorandum of 22 January 2001 Restoration of Mexico City Policy; and what plans her Department has to ensure continued access to (a) family planning advice and (b) safe termination and contraception through its programmes.

It is too early to put an exact figure on the financial impact of the restoration of the Mexico City Policy.

The UK firmly believes that supporting comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls, through proven, evidence-based public health interventions, saves lives and supports prosperity. We will continue to work with all our partners, including governments, UNFPA and civil society partners, to deliver this.

17th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to encourage its bilateral partners to adopt a co-ordinated early childhood development approach to provide nutritional, medical and educational support for children.

There is strong evidence that supporting children in their early years with health, education, nutrition and stimulation interventions maximises their learning potential and yields long term benefits. In January DFID held a high level meeting in London, bringing together Ministers and policy makers from developing countries, academic experts and development agencies to explore how to provide cross-sectoral support to young children at scale. Drawing on the evidence base, DFID is exploring with country governments how to co-ordinate early childhood support and how to adapt our existing programmes to encompass early childhood development principles.

17th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps the Government is taking to encourage other countries to donate to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

The UK is a strong supporter of global polio eradication efforts. As one of the top three donors to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, the UK leads by example. In 2013, the UK committed £300 million over six years to polio eradication, which will help vaccinate up to 360 million children.

The UK will continue to encourage countries to donate to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative to ensure that we have the required funding to successfully eradicate the disease before 2019. As a lead donor, the UK actively participates in the global Polio Oversight Board, helping to ensure cost-effective use of funds and a strong focus on results.

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
17th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions she has had with her international counterparts on the eradication of polio.

The UK is fully committed to the global eradication of polio. The Secretary of State for International Development makes the most of opportunities to raise awareness of polio eradication efforts and, wherever appropriate, discusses polio with her international counterparts. For example, last year the Secretary of State for International Development made a key note speech at Rotary International with representatives from India, Nigeria, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan and Indonesia, along with key polio campaigners and global health bodies.

The UK continues to be a strong supporter of global polio eradication efforts. In 2013, the UK committed £300 million over six years to polio eradication, which will help vaccinate up to 360 million children. The UK actively participates in the global Polio Oversight Board, helping to ensure a strong focus on results and achieving eradication. We are very close to making polio the second human disease in history to be wiped out, and it is crucial to maintain international momentum

Grant Shapps
Secretary of State for Transport
3rd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the timeframe is for the publication of the Future of Mobility regulatory review.

The Future of Mobility regulatory review is a once in a generation opportunity to ensure our regulatory framework supports transport innovation.

The first key milestone will be a call for evidence which we plan to launch in autumn this year. We will use the responses to identify where reform is needed now to address areas with a pressing need for change. The responses will also help the Government clarify where further work is necessary ahead of more substantial changes to legislation over the next few years.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment the Government has made of the increase in use of electric scooters on roads.

In the UK, powered transporters, also known as micromobility devices, are treated like any other motor vehicle under the Road Traffic Act. This includes e-scooters, and means they are subject to laws requiring them to be built and used safely, including requirements for users to have insurance, driving licences, number plates, and helmets.

It is therefore, illegal to use a powered transporter on a public road without it complying with these legal requirements. At present, it will be difficult for electric scooters to meet these requirements. It is also illegal to use a powered transporter in spaces which are set aside for use by pedestrians, cyclists, and horse-riders. This includes on the pavement and in cycle lanes.

We are currently exploring how new technologies, such as e-scooters, could help the UK benefit from changes in how people, goods and services move around and possible barriers to securing those benefits.

The Future of Mobility Urban Strategy, published on 19 March 2019 includes a Regulatory Review to address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulation are fit for the future.

24th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effects of the use of scrubber technology and marine sulphur dumping on UK coastlines.

The Government has not seen any evidence that the use of scrubbing technology would have any significant effect on marine environment.

All scrubbers must comply with mandatory Guidelines, which were developed by the International Maritime Organization, before they are allowed to become operational. The potential effects of the use of scrubber technologies on the marine environment was taken into consideration when developing the Guidelines. To be compliant, the systems collect and store any sulphur residue and solid particulate matter on-board the vessel, to be deposited at a port waste reception facility.

Some scrubbers discharge treated wash water back into the sea – which is also controlled under the IMO Guidelines. There are ongoing studies which are looking at the impact of wash water discharges within European waters, which we are monitoring. At this stage, we are not aware of any significant issues which have been found. However, we will respond appropriately at international level, if these or any other studies, conclude that further controls are needed.

24th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made on the potential effects of the use of scrubber technology and marine sulphur dumping on the English channel.

The Government has not seen any evidence that the use of scrubbing technology would have any significant effect on marine environment.

All scrubbers must comply with mandatory Guidelines, which were developed by the International Maritime Organization, before they are allowed to become operational. The potential effects of the use of scrubber technologies on the marine environment was taken into consideration when developing the Guidelines. To be compliant, the systems collect and store any sulphur residue and solid particulate matter on-board the vessel, to be deposited at a port waste reception facility.

Some scrubbers discharge treated wash water back into the sea – which is also controlled under the IMO Guidelines. There are ongoing studies which are looking at the impact of wash water discharges within European waters, which we are monitoring. At this stage, we are not aware of any significant issues which have been found. However, we will respond appropriately at international level, if these or any other studies, conclude that further controls are needed.

24th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential effects of the use of scrubber technology and marine sulphur dumping on marine life and biodiversity in UK waters.

The Government has not seen any evidence that the use of scrubbing technology would have any significant effect on marine environment.

All scrubbers must comply with mandatory Guidelines, which were developed by the International Maritime Organization, before they are allowed to become operational. The potential effects of the use of scrubber technologies on the marine environment was taken into consideration when developing the Guidelines. To be compliant, the systems collect and store any sulphur residue and solid particulate matter on-board the vessel, to be deposited at a port waste reception facility.

Some scrubbers discharge treated wash water back into the sea – which is also controlled under the IMO Guidelines. There are ongoing studies which are looking at the impact of wash water discharges within European waters, which we are monitoring. At this stage, we are not aware of any significant issues which have been found. However, we will respond appropriately at international level, if these or any other studies, conclude that further controls are needed.

24th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the International Maritime Organisation on the matter of marine sulphur pollution.

The UK is a strong supporter of taking global action to reduce pollutant emissions from shipping and has played a leading role at the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to drive global regulation in this area.

There will be a new global 0.5 per cent sulphur cap on marine fuels coming into force in 2020, which was reviewed and approved by the IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) in October 2016. The UK is actively involved with other States and industry at the IMO, to ensure the transition to the global cap for ships and fuel suppliers is as smooth as possible. This work has been progressing well, and further headway was made at the seventy third session of MEPC which met this October. The meeting considered a range of measures to support implementation including ‘ship operator implementation plans’ with further work planned at an IMO sub-committee in February 2019 to address cases of non-compliant fuel. MEPC also confirmed in October that the carriage of non-compliant fuel oil (as well as its use) should also be banned, unless the ship uses an exhaust gas cleaning system.

Additionally, the UK has been active within the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in supporting the development of guidance for shipowners. The existing standard for marine fuels (ISO 8217:2017) will continue to apply, but additional guidance will be available for companies ordering and handling these fuels from mid-2019.

24th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the (a) Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (b) Marine Management Organisation and (c) Maritime and Coastguard Agency on assessing and mitigating the risks that scrubber technology poses to UK waters and coastlines.

Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems (EGCS), or ’scrubbers’ as they are commonly known, are an internationally recognised technology which ships can use to comply with sulphur limits, providing an alternative to using low sulphur marine fuel. The systems are subject to controls at an international level through the adopted International Maritime Organization (IMO) Guidelines, which are mandatory.

The Guidelines ensure sulphur dioxide emissions from scrubbers are equivalent or better than would be obtained from using compliant fuel. They also address water quality and environmental impacts, in order to mitigate risks to the marine environment.

The Department and the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, played an active role in the development of the Guidelines at both European and international level with input from the Marine Management Organisation, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, system manufacturers, as well as approval organisations and industry stakeholders.

Ships’ installed scrubbers must be approved in accordance with the Guidelines before operating in UK waters.

9th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the economic effect on the (a) South West region and (b) UK of the lack of new rolling stock available to train companies; and if he will make a statement.

The Government and the private sector has continued to invest in new rolling stock in the South West and in other regions to provide improved services for passengers.

The market for new rolling stock in the UK has become increasingly vibrant in recent years, with a number of manufacturers competing to provide new rolling stock to the UK’s train operating companies.

Train operators are not seeing a shortage of train manufacturing companies or financiers offering new rolling stock for the UK’s rail network.

Over 1,900 new vehicles were ordered in 2016 alone.

Great Western Railway are acquiring 29 brand new bi-mode trains to operate services to the South West of England.

Nationally passengers will see over 5,000 new vehicles delivered to operators between now and the end of 2020.

6th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to accelerate access for train-operating companies delivering services (a) to the South West and (b) nationally to new passenger rolling stock.

Improvements in rolling stock are part of the Government’s investment in the railways that will deliver better journeys for passengers.

In relation to the South West of England specifically, in July 2015 the Department announced that Great Western Railway would be acquiring 29 brand new Hitachi AT300 bi-mode trains for longer distance services between London and the South West of England.

Nationally, new train procurements including Thameslink, Crossrail and the Great Western/East Coast Intercity Express Programme will see over 5000 new carriages delivered to operators between now and the end of 2020.

In 2016 alone we have announced that over 1900 new carriages will be delivered by the franchising programme over the next five years, including over 500 into the Northern and TransPennine franchises, 211 for Great Western, 150 for Great Northern and 1043 for East Anglia.

7th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average time taken was from when a call was received for the coastguard service to when that call was actioned in each of the last five years.

The reported time of an incident to Her Majesty’s Coastguard is the time a 999 call is received. Whilst HM Coastguard specifically records the reported time of an incident it does not specifically record an actioned time when that action does not involve the tasking of a search and rescue resource, such as when Coastguards are gathering information.

Information may be held within the text narrative of an incident record but this would require a check of tens of thousands of records over the last five years at disproportionate cost to the taxpayer.

7th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the reported time of an incident to the coastguard service is the time a 999 call is received or the time that incident is raised on the computer.

The reported time of an incident to Her Majesty’s Coastguard is the time a 999 call is received. Whilst HM Coastguard specifically records the reported time of an incident it does not specifically record an actioned time when that action does not involve the tasking of a search and rescue resource, such as when Coastguards are gathering information.

Information may be held within the text narrative of an incident record but this would require a check of tens of thousands of records over the last five years at disproportionate cost to the taxpayer.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether any requests from Falmouth Coastguard Operations Centre asking for assistance in running an incident have been turned down by (a) the National Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham and (b) any other station in the last two years.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard do not specifically record requests for assistance from the National Maritime Operations Centre or any Coastguard Operations Centre within its Incident Management System. Information may be held in the text narrative of an incident within this system but this would require a check of tens of thousands of records, diverting resources from critical parts of their budget and would be disproportionately costly to collate.

It should be noted that any decision to provide assistance to Coastguard Operations Centre will be on the basis of the professional judgement of a senior operational manager.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many callouts have been recorded for coastguard rescue teams in each of the last five years.

The number of incidents recorded for Coastguard Rescue Teams in each of the last five years is as follows:

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

22,962

21,068

20,123

19,592

17,006

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many coastguard rescue teams have been deployed to inland flooding incidents in the past two years; and how many times those teams were called out to such incidents in the past two years.

The capability to specifically record inland flood/civil contingencies flooding incidents has only been available in Her Majesty’s Coastguards Incident Management System since September 2014 as Coastguard Operations Centres transitioned incrementally into its national network. On the basis of the records available, at least 31 teams on 13 occasions have been deployed to inland flooding incidents in the past two years.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what maximum length of time is considered safe from when an emergency call is received in a coastguard control room to when the coastguard vehicle is ready to leave its station.

Each incident involving a Coastguard Rescue Team is different in its context given geography, terrain, weather conditions, prevailing traffic conditions and the availability of individual volunteer Coastguard Rescue Officers. For this reason the Maritime and Coastguard Agency does not collate or maintain data in the format you have requested either locally or nationally. However, it can provide specific response times for specific incidents.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average length of time is from joining for an employee to qualify as a (a) senior watch manager, (b) watch manager, (c) watch officer and (d) watch assistant.

The length of time taken to train Coastguard Officers is entirely dependent on their level of experience and competence when they join Her Majesty’s Coastguard and the level of experience of competence they gain prior to any internal promotion. Therefore an average for these would be misleading.

On entry to HM Coastguard as a Maritime Operations Officer it will take between six and 12 months to become trained, depending on previous maritime experience and competence.

HM Coastguard do not recruit direct entry Senior Maritime Operations Officers, they are internally recruited from the cadre of fully trained Maritime Operations Officers who will then undertake a further six months of training for this post.

As roles that can be directly recruited from outside HM Coastguard the training for both Maritime Operations Controllers and Maritime Operations Commanders is entirely dependent on their prevailing maritime experience and is in effect bespoke for the individual concerned.

It should be noted that the roles senior watch manager, watch manager, watch officer and watch assistant no longer exist within HM Coastguard.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what change there has been in the number of incidents reported along the south coast from Plymouth to Selsey Bill in the last five years.

The number of incidents reported along the south coast from Plymouth to Selsey Bill over the last five years is as follows:

Year

Total

2011

7,776

2012

7,427

2013

6,470

2014

7,624

2015

3,927

Between September 2014 and December 2015, as part of Her Majesty’s Coastguard’s incremental transition of Maritime Rescue Coordination Centres into to its national network, its Incident Management System (IMS) was upgraded, centralised and improved. These new national network arrangements have removed the potential for incident duplication across the 18 individual IMSs and have led to more consistent classification of incidents.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the coastguard turned down any request from any other service for assistance during inland floods in the last five years.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard does not specifically record occurrences when other Category 1 Responders or any other service requests assistance. Information may be held within the text narrative of an incident record but this would require a check of tens of thousands of records over the last two to five years.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many times the coastguard has turned down requests from other Category 1 Responders for assistance in the last five years; and for each such request (a) what type of request it was, (b) what reason was recorded for it being turned down and (c) which coastguard station turned it down.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard does not specifically record occurrences when other Category 1 Responders or any other service requests assistance. Information may be held within the text narrative of an incident record but this would require a check of tens of thousands of records over the last two to five years.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many vacant posts at each grade there are at the National Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham.

The current vacancies at the National Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham are as follows:

  • Maritime Operations Controller – 1
  • Maritime Operations Specialist – 3
  • Maritime Operations Officer/Senior Maritime Operations Officer – 9.5
5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many times in the last two years the Northern Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham has had staffing levels below what is considered safe.

The operational concepts and procedures that underpin Her Majesty’s Coastguard’s national network mean that the Coastguard Centres within it no longer have fixed geographic boundaries. This enables Coastguards at either the National Maritime Operations Centre (NMOC) or any of the 9 Coastguard Operations Centres (CGOC) to coordinate any incident anywhere around the UK coast irrespective of their location. As a result workload is now managed on a national basis rather than Centre by Centre as was previously the case. National capability and Coastguard staff from any Centre are now available to provide additional support to any individual Centre within the network when it is considered necessary by senior operational managers.

Due to this inherent flexibility Her Majesty’s Coastguard sets ‘Optimum Suggested’ staffing for the network as a whole rather than for each centre. Over the last two years since the national network became operational out of a total of 1,427 watches (both day and night) the network has been staffed below ‘Optimal Suggested’ levels on 137 watches.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many times one person has been left on (a) daytime and (b) night-time watch at Falmouth Coastguard Operations Centre in the last five years.

The operational concepts and procedures that underpin Her Majesty’s Coastguard’s national network mean that the Coastguard Centres within it no longer have fixed geographic boundaries. This enables Coastguards at either the National Maritime Operations Centre (NMOC) or any of the 9 Coastguard Operations Centres (CGOC) to coordinate any incident anywhere around the UK coast irrespective of their location. As a result workload is now managed on a national basis rather than Centre by Centre as was previously the case. National capability and Coastguard staff from any Centre are now available to provide additional support to any individual Centre within the network when it is considered necessary by senior operational managers.

The network enables Coastguards at either the National Maritime Operations Centre or at any of the nine Coastguard Operations Centres to coordinate any incident anywhere around the UK coast. Workload is managed on a national basis enabling national capability and resource to be available to support any Coastguard Centre when it is considered necessary by senior operational managers.

The number of watches when one Coastguard Officer has been on duty at Falmouth in the last five years is as follows:

(a) Daytime – 0

(b) Night Watches – 6.5

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average length of time is from joining for an employee to qualify as a (a) maritime operations commander, (b) maritime operations controller, (c) senior operations officer and (d) maritime operations officer.

The length of time taken to train Coastguard Officers is entirely dependent on their level of experience and competence when they join Her Majesty’s Coastguard and the level of experience of competence they gain prior to any internal promotion. Therefore an average for these would be misleading.

On entry to HM Coastguard as a Maritime Operations Officer it will take between six and 12 months to become trained, depending on previous maritime experience and competence.

HM Coastguard do not recruit direct entry Senior Maritime Operations Officers, they are internally recruited from the cadre of fully trained Maritime Operations Officers who will then undertake a further six months of training for this post.

As roles that can be directly recruited from outside HM Coastguard the training for both Maritime Operations Controllers and Maritime Operations Commanders is entirely dependent on their prevailing maritime experience and is in effect bespoke for the individual concerned.

It should be noted that the roles senior watch manager, watch manager, watch officer and watch assistant no longer exist within HM Coastguard.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many fully-qualified coastguard staff were on (a) daytime and (b) nighttime duty at Falmouth Coastguard operations centre on (a) 2 May and (b) 9 July 2015.

The number of fully qualified Coastguard staff on duty at Falmouth, within Her Majesty’s Coastguard’s national network, was as follows:

(a) 2 May 2015

(a) Day Watch - 4 (Total staffing for the national network – 25)

(b) Night Watch – 2 (Total staffing for the national network – 19)

(b) 9 July 2015

(a) Day Watch – 2 (Total staffing for the national network – 37)

(b) Night Watch – 3 (Total staffing for the national network – 25)

The operational concepts and procedures that underpin HM Coastguard’s national network mean that the Coastguard Centres within it no longer have fixed geographic boundaries. This enables Coastguards at either the National Maritime Operations Centre (NMOC) or any of the 9 Coastguard Operations Centres (CGOC) to coordinate any incident anywhere around the UK coast irrespective of their location. As a result workload is now managed on a national basis rather than Centre by Centre as was previously the case. National capability and Coastguard staff from any Centre are now available to provide additional support to any individual Centre within the network when it is considered necessary by senior operational managers.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many vacant posts at each grade there are at Falmouth Coastguard operations centre.

There are no vacancies at any grade at the Coastguard Operations Centre in Falmouth at present.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many times in the last two years Falmouth Coastguard Operations Centre has had staffing levels below what is considered safe.

The operational concepts and procedures that underpin Her Majesty’s Coastguard’s national network mean that the Coastguard Centres within it no longer have fixed geographic boundaries. This enables Coastguards at either the National Maritime Operations Centre (NMOC) or any of the 9 Coastguard Operations Centres (CGOC) to coordinate any incident anywhere around the UK coast irrespective of their location. As a result workload is now managed on a national basis rather than Centre by Centre as was previously the case. National capability and Coastguard staff from any Centre are now available to provide additional support to any individual Centre within the network when it is considered necessary by senior operational managers.

Due to this inherent flexibility Her Majesty’s Coastguard sets ‘Optimum Suggested’ staffing for the network as a whole rather than for each centre. Over the last two years since the national network became operational out of a total of 1,427 watches (both day and night) the network has been staffed below ‘Optimal Suggested’ levels on 137 watches.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether staff at the National Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham are required to record a reason for not calling on a lifeboat or coastguard team or another resource.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard staff at the National Maritime Operations Centre and Coastguard Operations Centres around the United Kingdom are encouraged to record the rationale for decisions taken for operational reasons during the coordination of maritime search and rescue incidents.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many unanswered telephone calls the National Maritime Operations Centre has each day.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard does not record the number of unanswered routine telephone calls at the National Maritime Operations Centre or at any of the Coastguard Operations Centres within the national network.

It should be noted that there is a robust system, in line with the Public Emergency Call Service (PECS) Code of Practice, to ensure that ‘999’ calls to Centres within the network are answered. This is through a cascade system across the network and if necessary to other emergency services.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many fully-trained coastguard staff working at the National Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham were on the daytime watch covering the south coast from Plymouth to Selsey Bill on (a) 2 May 2015, (b) 9 July 2015, (c) 24 May 2016, (d) 29 May 2016 and (e) 4 June 2016.

The operational concepts and procedures that underpin Her Majesty’s Coastguard’s national network mean that the Coastguard Centres within it no longer have fixed geographic boundaries. This enables Coastguards at either the National Maritime Operations Centre (NMOC) or any of the 9 Coastguard Operations Centres (CGOC) to coordinate any incident anywhere around the UK coast irrespective of their location. As a result workload is now managed on a national basis rather than Centre by Centre as was previously the case. National capability and Coastguard staff from any Centre are now available to provide additional support to any individual Centre within the network when it is considered necessary by senior operational managers.

Therefore the national network had the following fully trained coastguard staff on daytime watch for the following dates:

  • 2 May 2015 - Total network staff 25 (national network in transition: Network Centres – NMOC, Falmouth, Holyhead, Milford Haven, Humber. Centres still to transition - Belfast, Stornoway, Shetland, Aberdeen, London and Dover)

  • 9 July 2015 – Total network staff 37 (national network in transition: Network Centres – NMOC, Falmouth, Holyhead, Milford Haven, Humber. Centres still to transition - Belfast, Stornoway, Shetland, Aberdeen, London and Dover)

  • 24 May 2016 – Total network staff 46 (Full national network)

  • 29 May 2016 – Total network staff 41 (Full national network)

  • 4 June 2016 – Total network staff 45 (Full national network)

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many times the National Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham turned down requests from other Category 1 Responders for assistance in the last two years; and for each such request (a) what type of request it was, (b) what reason was recorded for it being turned down and (c) which coastguard station turned it down.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard does not specifically record occurrences when other Category 1 Responders or any other service requests assistance. Information may be held within the text narrative of an incident record but this would require a check of tens of thousands of records over the last two to five years.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many callouts have been recorded for each coastguard rescue team along the south coast from Plymouth to Selsey Bill in each of the last five years.

The number of incidents recorded for each Coastguard Rescue Team along the south coast from Plymouth to Selsey Bill in each of the last five years is shown below:

Bigbury

Bembridge

Beer

Berry Head

Dartmouth

Exmouth

Hope Cove

Kimmeridge

2011

15

75

37

115

52

105

28

24

2012

25

67

38

95

32

93

36

21

2013

16

60

32

86

38

54

16

7

2014

29

71

31

93

55

63

36

15

2015

20

42

26

86

20

48

78

17

Lymington

Lulworth

Lyme Regis

Newport IOW

Portland Bill

Plymouth

Poole

Prawle

2011

88

40

46

67

73

138

23

2012

69

45

52

53

62

131

15

2013

47

42

33

58

50

95

24

2014

52

26

44

54

48

98

34

2015

48

31

43

22

40

87

71

8

Selsey

Southampton

Swanage

Torbay

Teignmouth

Ventnor

West Bay

Wyke

Yealm

2011

1

123

133

143

89

44

38

192

18

2012

84

145

137

64

26

43

152

14

2013

69

110

124

71

40

34

119

18

2014

121

108

122

74

41

30

83

26

2015

144

81

90

66

37

29

7

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many reports of tombstoning have been received and investigated by a coastguard team from Plymouth to Selsey Bill in each of the last five years.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard has responded to the following number of tombstoning incidents, in the area listed in the question, in each of the last five years:

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

4

4

8

0

1

1

HM Coastguard responsibilities end with its search and rescue response to each incident.

5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many fully-trained staff are based at the National Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard currently have a total of 58 staff who are qualified Coastguards at the National Maritime Operations Centre in Fareham. There are an additional 12 staff who are communication/systems trained, but awaiting to complete their final training and assessments, who are able to undertake watchkeeping tasks commensurate with their training.

26th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to use the (a) £175 million cycling, safety and integration fund and (b) £75 million air quality investment fund referred to in the Government's Road Investment Strategy for the period 2015-16 to 2019-20.

a) £175 million cycling, safety and integration fund

Highways England is developing a programme of initiatives to improve the safety of the network and to also improve facilities for cyclists, pedestrians and equestrians, identifying further opportunities for improved integration with wider transport networks such as Park & Ride.

This fund supports their ambition to reduce the number of casualties on the strategic road network and encourage walking and cycling as an everyday mode of travel, as set out in the DfT Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy.

(b) £75 million air quality investment fund referred to in the Government's Road Investment Strategy for the period 2015-16 to 2019-20.

Highways England’s Delivery Plan commits them to start 10 air quality pilot studies in the first 2 years of this road investment period.

These studies are designed to identify new and innovative solutions that will be funded using the air quality designated fund, to improve air quality alongside the strategic road network and support delivery of the major improvement schemes identified in the Road Investment Strategy.

Highways England’s work in relation to air quality, and the use of the £75million air quality designated fund (2015 – 20), is in support of the Government’s National Air Quality Plan.

9th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make it his policy to include a commitment to constructing safe paths alongside busy roads in rural areas in the forthcoming National Road Safety Strategy to improve cycle safety.

The Conservative Manifesto 2015 had a commitment to reduce the number of cyclists and other road users killed or injured on our roads every year. We have been working closely with road safety groups to consider what more can be done and expect to publish our Road Safety Statement shortly.


The Road Safety Statement will set out the high level plan and overarching approach to road safety that we expect to take over the rest of the Parliament, and will be followed by a series of more detailed proposals and consultations. The Department for Transport will publish a Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy in 2016 which will set out our plans for investment in safer cycling and walking infrastructure.


Busy roads in rural areas will either be the responsibility of Highways England or local authorities.


Highways England have committed to provide a safer, integrated and more accessible strategic road network for cyclists and other vulnerable road users. To support this, the Government has outlined a commitment to invest £100m between 2015/16 and 2020/21 to improve provision for cyclists on the strategic road network.


On a local level, provision of cycling infrastructure is for local traffic authorities. The Department encourages them to ensure cycling is considered as part of the planning process.The Department for Transport’s Cycle Infrastructure Design guidance supports local authorities on providing cycle-safe infrastructure for cyclists.


It is also worth noting that from within the record £6 billion to be allocated to local highways authorities between 2015 and 2021 for road maintenance, from 2018/19 the plan is to change the formula used to allocate local highways maintenance capital funding so that it also takes into account footways and cycleways as well as the roads, bridges and street lighting, which it is currently based on. Once implemented, around 9% of the funding will be based on footway and cycleway lengths.

9th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding his Department plans to allocate to (a) increasing the number of journeys undertaken by bicycle and (b) reducing the number of cyclists killed or seriously injured on roads over the next five years.

The Government remains committed to its manifesto targets to double cycling and make cycling safer.


The Government recently reaffirmed its commitment to cycling and walking, with SR2015 announcing funding support of over £300m. This includes delivering the Cycle City Ambition programme in full, and funding the Bikeability cycle training programme, which increases cycle proficiency amongst school children.


The Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, to be published in summer 2016, will explain the Government’s investment strategy for cycling and walking.

26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of personal independence payment claimants are diagnosed with schizophrenia.

Statistics on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claim outcomes (clearances) at disability level are not readily available and have not previously been published as Official Statistics. We are producing the statistics requested and issuing them in an Official Statistics release on 11th December 2018 in accordance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

Statistics on the number of individuals in receipt of PIP payments broken down by disability are already available on Stat Xplore:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html.

26th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of successful personal independence payment applicants have a diagnosed serious mental health condition.

Statistics on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claim outcomes (clearances) at disability level are not readily available and have not previously been published as Official Statistics. We are producing the statistics requested and issuing them in an Official Statistics release on 11th December 2018 in accordance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

Statistics on the number of individuals in receipt of PIP payments broken down by disability are already available on Stat Xplore:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html.

2nd Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will make one of the qualifying criteria for children under three years of age to access the mobility component of the disability living allowance possession of a blue badge by either of a child's parents.

I refer the honourable lady to the answer provided to her on 2 November (13660).

26th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans he has to provide financial support to help children under the age of three who are eligible for a disabled parking badge but are not eligible for the mobility component of the disability living allowance.

The principle underpinning Disability Living Allowance (DLA) is that payments are made to families who incur extra costs as a result of meeting the additional care and/or mobility needs of a disabled child.


In deciding to set the lower age limit for entitlement to the higher rate mobility component at 3 years of age, the department considered views of medical advisors and independent research that the majority of children could walk at the age of 2½. By the age of 3 it was realistically possible in the majority of cases to make an informed decision as to whether an inability to walk was the result of disability.



We have no plans to make changes to DLA for children under the age of 3.


29th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to support local authorities that do not have a PrEP impact trial prepare for routine commissioning.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many local authorities do not have a PrEP impact trial site.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that sufficient places are available in each clinic for the duration of the PreP trial.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the availability of medicines in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

The Department is doing everything appropriate to prepare for leaving the European Union. We want to reassure patients that our plans should ensure the uninterrupted supply of medicines and medical products once we have left the EU.

The Department, as part of our EU exit preparations, is implementing a multi-layered approach to mitigate potential disruption to supply, which consists of stockpiling where possible, securing freight capacity, changing or clarifying regulatory requirements, procuring additional warehousing, working closely with industry to improve trader readiness and putting in place the National Supply Disruption Response to manage potential shortages. Further details can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/medicines-and-medical-products-supply-government-updates-no-deal-brexit-plans

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the Government's worst case contingency plans related to his remit on the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Operation Yellowhammer is a cross-Government programme of work to ensure that the United Kingdom is prepared to deal with the potential reasonable worst-case scenario impacts of leaving the European Union without a deal.

On 11 September, the Government published planning assumptions for exiting the European Union without a deal at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/government-response-to-humble-address-motion

An updated version will be published in due course.

These include the Department’s planning assumptions relating to the continuity of medicines and medicine supplies, the provision of healthcare to UK nationals within EU Member States, and the provision of adult social care after we have left the EU. The Department maintains robust operational plans to ensure the continuity of services from the National Health Service and wider health and social care system, regardless of circumstances, and will continue to do so.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many bids for capital spending (a) his Department, (b) NHS England and (c) NHS Improvement have (i) accepted and (ii) fully funded in each of the last five years; and what the total value was of those bids in each of those years.

The number of bids received by the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement for capital spending are not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many overheating occurrences triggering a risk assessment were recorded by (a) NHS trusts and( b) foundation trusts in (i) England and (ii) Totnes in each of the last five years.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much capital funding has been (a) allocated to and (b) spent by (i) NHS foundation trusts and (ii) NHS trusts per capita in each of the last five years.

National Health Service capital expenditure by NHS providers is funded in large part through their ability to generate income via trading activity with Commissioners. This internally generated financing is supplemented by Departmental financing in the form of repayable capital loans and Public Dividend Capital (PDC) for specific strategic initiatives, for example sustainability and transformation partnerships funding; for investment to address pressures on urgent and emergency care over the winter period or for investment in strategic technology fields.

Details of these investments can be found in the annual report ‘Financial Assistance under Section 40 of the National Health Service Act 2006’, which is published alongside the Department’s Annual Report. This can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dhsc-annual-report-and-accounts-2018-to-2019

The following table provides detail of the outturn Capital Departmental Expenditure Limit (CDEL) for foundation trusts and NHS trusts over the past five years.

It is not possible to provide this information ‘per capita’ as there is no fixed population or geographical boundary for any given hospital trust.

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

Foundation Trust CDEL Outturn Expenditure (£,000s)

1,925,555

1,795,693

1,815,837

2,061,023

2,380,091

NHS Trust CDEL Outturn Expenditure (£,000s)

1,381,276

1,146,203

1,049,501

1,002,017

1,551,799

Total NHS Provider CDEL Outturn Expenditure (£,000s)

3,306,831

2,941,896

2,865,338

3,063,040

3,931,890

4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) NHS trusts and (b) NHS foundation trusts have implemented an Electronic Patient Record system; and how many patients’ records are recorded on those systems.

NHS Digital has advised that currently there are 71 National Health Service trusts and 108 NHS foundation trusts who have implemented an Electronic Patient Record System. NHS Digital does not routinely collect data on the overall number of patients’ records and therefore the number of patient’s records is not held on the Electronic Patient Record System.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
4th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the July 2017 tobacco control plan for England, when the Government plans to announce a date for achieving its smokefree generation target of smoking prevalence at 5 per cent or below.

The Government’s vision, as set out in the Tobacco Control Plan for England published in 2017, is to create a smokefree generation by reducing adult smoking prevalence to 5% or below. The current smoking rates for England are 14.4%, the lowest on record. The Government has not yet committed to a date by which to achieve a smokefree generation but continues to keep progress on reducing prevalence under close review.

4th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that tobacco companies have no involvement in (a) smoking cessation services and (b) public health campaigns.

The United Kingdom is a signatory to the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). The Government takes very seriously its treaty obligations, including the commitment under Article 5.3 to protect public health policies with respect to tobacco control from commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry. It expects all public bodies to follow comply with the FCTC Secretariat’s guidance on this Article.

To remind the National Health Service of this commitment, NHS England issued a note to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in the CCG bulletin dated 26 July 2018. Public Health England (PHE) has also written to local authorities and Directors of Public Health advising against such partnerships, a message reiterated in the PHE blog. The blog is available to view at the following link:

https://publichealthmatters.blog.gov.uk/2018/01/05/duncan-selbies-friday-message-5-january-2018/

17th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the level of vacancy is in histopathology departments.

NHS Improvement publishes vacancy data for three staff groups; doctors, nurses and ‘other staff’. These vacancy statistics are published for England and at the regional level of North, Midlands and East, London and South.

They do not specifically produce vacancy data for histopathology departments or any vacancy data for each National Health Service hospital or trust.

NHS Digital published the latest NHS Improvement vacancy data which can be found in the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/nhs-vacancies-survey/february-2015---march-2019-provisional-experimental-statistics

17th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients have received whole genome sequencing through the NHS; and how many of those patients had a type of blood cancer.

As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has committed to sequencing 500,000 whole genomes by 2023/24.

During 2019, the NHS will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:

- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;

- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and

- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and Acute Myeloid Leukaemia.

As the price of whole genome sequencing falls and the evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.

17th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients he estimates will benefit from whole genome sequencing in (a) 2019 and (b) each of the next five years.

As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has committed to sequencing 500,000 whole genomes by 2023/24.

During 2019, the NHS will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:

- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;

- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and

- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and Acute Myeloid Leukaemia.

As the price of whole genome sequencing falls and the evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.

17th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the NHS Genomic Medicine Service will begin performing whole genome sequencing.

As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has committed to sequencing 500,000 whole genomes by 2023/24.

During 2019, the NHS will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:

- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;

- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and

- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and Acute Myeloid Leukaemia.

As the price of whole genome sequencing falls and the evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.

21st May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Department's policy is on social prescribing.

‘Prevention is better than cure’, published by the Department in November 2018, highlighted the important role social prescribing can play in reducing people’s isolation and improving levels of activity.

As set out in the NHS Long Term Plan, NHS England has committed to deliver at least £4.5 billion of new investment in primary medical and community health services over the next five years. Part of this investment will support the recruitment of over 1,000 trained social prescribing link workers - in place by the end of 2020/21 rising further by 2023/24, with the aim that over 900,000 people are able to be referred to social prescribing schemes by then.

The Prevention document and the Long Term Plan can be found at the following links:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/prevention-is-better-than-cure-our-vision-to-help-you-live-well-for-longer

www.longtermplan.nhs.uk/publication/nhs-long-term-plan/

29th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Prevention is better than cure vision published by his Department in November 2018, whether the forthcoming prevention Green Paper will include oral health.

We are considering a number of policy options for the prevention green paper and will be mindful of oral health opportunities.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure the sustainability of the supply of new entrants as operating department practitioners.

Reforms to healthcare education funding that started to take effect from 1 August 2017 have unlocked the cap which constrained the number of pre-registration healthcare programmes, including those for Operating Department Practitioners (ODP), allowing students to gain access to degree training courses.

Separately, Health Education England will be supporting the implementation of an apprenticeship route to professional qualification for ODPs offering an ‘earn as you learn’ route in to the profession.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to attract registered staff to work within the perioperative environment.

Recruitment is a matter for National Health Service trusts to manage at the local level.

Health Education England (HEE) leads a Return to Practice (RtP) programme that enables Nurses, Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) (including Operating Department Practitioners) and healthcare scientists that have left their professions to re-enter and gain their Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) registration.

The RtP programme led by HEE is open to and supports:

- All AHPs or healthcare scientists who live and plan to work in England, once returned to the HCPC register;

- AHPs or healthcare scientists who have previously registered with the HCPC or qualified in the United Kingdom, but have not registered in the last five years; and

- Registrants who remained on the HCPC register for more than two years but have not practiced.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to improve recruitment and retention for operating department practitioners.

Recruitment and retention is matter for National Health Service trusts to manage at a local level.

Currently, all trusts across England have access to a series of retention masterclasses provided by NHS Improvement – the first and second series last year were attended by over 400 trust representatives. NHS Improvement has recently announced a third series of masterclasses for the beginning of October 2018.

NHS Improvement also facilitates the sharing of good practice around the country in collaboration with NHS Employers.

24th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the time taken to obtain security clearance for health and social care staff on the delivery of healthcare in prisons.

The Department has not made a formal assessment of the effect of the time taken to obtain security clearance for health and social care staff on the delivery of healthcare in prisons.

All staff and non-directly employed personnel are subject to a series of pre-appointment security checks to determine their suitability to work in a prison. The unique nature of such work means that checks may need to be more comprehensive than other locations and can take time.

NHS England continues to work with Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service and the Ministry of Justice to expedite clearance on a case by case basis where concerns are raised by providers.

The end-to-end recruitment procedure has been reviewed by the Ministry of Justice to identify the points at which delays have or can take place. Action has been taken to address these and the backlog of cases has been reduced significantly from last year. This in turn, should also result in reduced processing times in security vetting for all staff.

16th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government has commissioned a review of research relating to the health implications of shale gas extraction by any organisation since the 2015 general election.

Public Health England continues to review the evidence on the potential public health impacts of emissions associated with shale gas extraction and has not currently identified any significant evidence that would make it change its views stated in its 2014 Review.

17th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 11 May 2018 to Question 141873, what progress has been made on evaluating the potential impact to the sector of sleep-in back-pay liabilities; and which care sector representatives have been consulted with respect to that evaluation.

The Government commissioned market analysis in order to understand the scale of the national minimum wage back-pay liabilities across the social care sector, which was open to all providers across the social care sector. This work is currently subject to further analysis and refinement.

Due to the sensitive nature of this work, no data that could be used to identify providers or local authorities has been shared with any Government department.

Officials meet regularly with various sector representatives including members of Learning Disability Voices, Voluntary Organisations Disability Group, Care England, the Local Government Association, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, and others – to better understand the impact this issue is having on the sector.

17th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 26 March 2018 to Question 133443, on Social Services: Minimum Wage, what timescale he has for discussions with the European Commission.

Officials opened discussions with representatives from the European Commission on 6 December 2017. These discussions are ongoing.

The Government will continue to engage with the European Commission to determine how any support that may be offered would comply with State aid rules.

27th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made on the implementation of his Department's proposals for reform of death certification by April 2019; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is committed to the introduction of medical examiners from April 2019, to provide a system of effective medical scrutiny of all non-coronial deaths. Following a public consultation on associated reforms, the Government plans to publish a response shortly, accompanied by an impact assessment which will set out the costs and benefits of the revised approach.

30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of non-EU GP registrars who are currently on GP training schemes in England who will not be eligible for indefinite leave to remain when they finish their three-year training.

Currently there are 719 non-European Economic Area national general practitioner trainees working under a Tier 2 visa. On the completion of training, these trainees would be eligible to apply for indefinite leave to remain if they meet the requirements as set out by UK Visas and Immigration. Eligibility is based on individual circumstance and will be decided by UK Visas and Immigration.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he plans to take to prevent London medical schools from cross-subsidising the education of international students from their Service Increment for Teaching fund allocated to students from the UK and other EU countries.

The Education and Training tariff guidance document for 2017-18 is clear that funding for placements commissioned by Health Education England (HEE) must not be used to subsidise any element of the cost of placements for non-National Health Service funded students/trainees.

The responsibility for implementing these funding arrangements resides with HEE which commissions the placement activity from the provider.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when allocating the 1000 additional undergraduate medical student places, what steps he plans to take to ensure that medical schools outside London receive a fair allocation of those places.

The Government has announced a historic expansion of medical school places in England, with an increase of 1,500 medical school places in England. The first 500 places have already been allocated and will be available to students in September 2018.

The Government response to the recent consultation was published on 9 August 2017, confirming that 1,000 additional medical school places would be available to medical schools in England via a competitive bidding process to be managed jointly by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and Health Education England (HEE).

It also set out the priority areas bidding criteria would need to focus that include aligning the expansion to local National Health Service workforce need with an emphasis on priority geographical areas, including rural and coastal areas.

HEFCE and HEE are currently finalising the design of the bidding process and will publish details in the autumn.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when he plans to announce the criteria and timetable for allocating additional undergraduate medical student places.

The Government has announced a historic expansion of medical school places in England, with an increase of 1,500 medical school places in England. The first 500 places have already been allocated and will be available to students in September 2018.

The Government response to the recent consultation was published on 9 August 2017, confirming that 1,000 additional medical school places would be available to medical schools in England via a competitive bidding process to be managed jointly by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and Health Education England (HEE).

It also set out the priority areas bidding criteria would need to focus that include aligning the expansion to local National Health Service workforce need with an emphasis on priority geographical areas, including rural and coastal areas.

HEFCE and HEE are currently finalising the design of the bidding process and will publish details in the autumn.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to support the development and growth of smaller and non-London medical schools.

The Government has announced a historic expansion of medical school places in England, with an increase of 1,500 medical school places in England. The first 500 places have already been allocated and will be available to students in September 2018.

The Government response to the recent consultation was published on 9 August 2017, confirming that 1,000 additional medical school places would be available to medical schools in England via a competitive bidding process to be managed jointly by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and Health Education England (HEE).

It also set out the priority areas bidding criteria would need to focus that include aligning the expansion to local National Health Service workforce need with an emphasis on priority geographical areas, including rural and coastal areas.

HEFCE and HEE are currently finalising the design of the bidding process and will publish details in the autumn.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he plans to take to ensure that additional medical student places are fairly allocated to students from (a) the UK and (b) other EU countries.

The Government has announced a historic expansion in domestic supply of the medical workforce by funding an additional 1,500 medical school places in England available to domestic students from 2018-19. In addition, from 2019-20 English universities will not be limited in the number of international students they can recruit on a full fee paying basis.

For medical school intake targets, the only distinction that is made is between home or European Union students and those from outside the EU. As such, the additional 1,500 medical school places the Government is funding will be available to students from across the United Kingdom and all European Economic Area countries subject to the usual residency requirements.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of extra UK medical school places that will be made available to international medical students after the removal of the cap on the number of such places.

The Government has announced a historic expansion in domestic supply of the medical workforce by funding an additional 1,500 medical school places in England available to domestic students from 2018-19. In addition, from 2019-20 English universities will not be limited in the number of international students they can recruit on a full fee paying basis.

For medical school intake targets, the only distinction that is made is between home or European Union students and those from outside the EU. As such, the additional 1,500 medical school places the Government is funding will be available to students from across the United Kingdom and all European Economic Area countries subject to the usual residency requirements.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, for what reasons the Service Increment for Teaching funding allocation process is subject to the market forces factor; and what steps he plans to take to ensure that there is not an excessive regional disparity in allocations of that funding between London and non-London medical schools.

The funding for training placements in secondary care is allocated to placement providers by Health Education England using a tariff payment mechanism. These tariffs are calculated on the basis of average costs and do not take into account some features of cost that are likely to vary across the country. The tariffs are therefore adjusted by the Market Forces Factor in order to compensate for the cost differences of providing training placements in different parts of the country.

28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of the capped expenditure process on patient care.

Providers have managed to reduce the deficit from £2.4 billion (in 2015-16) to £791 million this year.

This success isn’t universal. Some areas consistently exceed budgets, requiring increased savings by others.

14 areas have joined a ‘Capped Expenditure Process’ with commissioners and providers working together to achieve budgets assured by their Boards. Their proposals involve patients and staff; placing patient safety and constitutional rights at the heart of decision making.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on the health service of the reduced capacity of junior doctors to undertake additional shifts or internal locums with their own organisations prior to the implementation of the junior doctors' contract in 2016.

The new Junior Doctor’s contract retains the same maximum requirement for working hours of an average of 48 hours a week or 56 if the doctor chooses to opt out of the working time regulations. The contract also includes a fidelity clause so that trainees wishing to work extra shifts offer them to the National Health Service first.

Further, the General Medical Council has recognised that some trainees that do not work full time may have the capacity to undertake additional shifts and have given their support for those working less than full time to do so. Previous advice was that Less Than Full Time trainees should not undertake additional shifts.

The previous contract allowed patterns of working that junior doctors' representatives told us were unsafe. The new contract is much safer and includes new, stronger limits on working hours and patterns. These include:

- the maximum number of hours worked in a week reduced from 91 to 72;

- the maximum number of consecutive nights reduced from seven to four; and

- the maximum number of consecutive long days reduced from seven to five.

The new contract puts patients first by requiring that these rules apply also to any additional shifts a trainee might choose to work, ensuring junior doctors are not required to work when tired and that their overall working hours, whether they work for their own or another employer remains within safe limits. These are overseen by a Guardian of Safe Working Hours in every trust. Doctors can therefore offer additional hours to the same overall limits as before but must work them within the new safe limits.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish (a) the metrics by which the success of the 2016 junior doctors' contract will be measured in the 2018 review and (b) which stakeholders will be consulted in that review.

The intention of the Government is that the review will be undertaken by NHS Employers with the British Medical Association and that metrics and any wider consultation will be agreed then between the parties.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment was made prior to the implementation of the junior doctors' contract in 2016 of the additional financial and administrative cost associated with (a) pay protection, (b) additional hours payments, (c) guardian fines, (d) guardian of safe working hours role and (e) exception reporting management.

The contract will be recurrently cost-neutral with the exception of additional employer pension contributions arising from the increase in basic pay that was agreed with the British Medical Association as a condition for them entering negotiations in 2013 and was honoured by the Government. This is expected to rise to around £25 million per annum recurrently at the end of transition (circa 0.6% of total contract value).

In addition, there are limited non-recurrent costs of pay protection during transition. Upfront assessments of these costs are uncertain.

Additional hours payments and any fines reflect additional work carried out and are therefore outside the cost neutral funding envelope and will depend on how trusts manage juniors locally. Exception reporting is managed through rota management software. The role of the Guardian of safe working typically takes up a portion of the time of one consultant in each trust. This is seen as an investment in improving safe working for trainees.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment was undertaken before the implementation of the new contract of the work-life balance of junior doctors.

An extensive programme of work is being undertaken, developed with the full involvement of the British Medical Association, to address junior doctors’ non-contractual concerns, particularly through Health Education England’s Working Group on improving junior doctors’ working lives:

- reviewing rotations so that junior doctors do not have to change placements more than is necessary and can establish a relationship with a single organisation;

- ensuring that junior doctors beginning rotations know their schedule a month earlier than at present;

- allowing couples to apply to train in the same area;

- offering training placements close to their home for those with caring responsibilities;

- introducing a new catch up programme for doctors who take maternity leave or take time off for caring responsibilities;

- identifying and removing barriers to flexible (part-time) working; and

- reviewing how to make appraisal for junior doctors simpler and less stressful.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what consultation he has undertaken with organisations operating in the care sector ahead of the publication of the forthcoming Green Paper on adult social care funding.

Following the announcement of the General Election on 8 June, decisions on the future reform and funding of adult social care will be taken by the new Government.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the needs of working-age users of disabled social care ahead of the publication of the forthcoming Green Paper on adult social care funding.

Following the announcement of the General Election on 8 June, decisions on the future reform and funding of adult social care will be taken by the new Government.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether the forthcoming Green Paper on adult social care funding will look at the needs of everyone who receives adult social care.

Following the announcement of the General Election on 8 June, decisions on the future reform and funding of adult social care will be taken by the new Government.

21st Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which sustainability and transformation plans contain no mechanism for engaging schools and colleges as active stakeholders.

This information is not held centrally. Local areas are responsible for engaging with the staff, patients and the public, as well as organisations which may include schools and colleges, to further develop their plans.

15th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many of the groups responsible for each of the 44 sustainability and transformation plans are consulting with schools and colleges in the development of those plans.

Local areas are responsible for engaging with the staff, patients and the public, as well as organisations which may include schools and colleges. This information is not held centrally.

9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will take steps to increase the number of pathologists available to conduct post-mortem examinations for coroners.

Responsibility for staffing levels rests with individual National Health Service trusts and their boards who are best placed to decide how many staff they need to provide a given service, taking into account skill mix and efficiency.

Working with local providers, it is Health Education England’s responsibility to determine the appropriate numbers of students the NHS needs in training on an annual basis. Its latest Workforce Plan for England covering the period 2016/17 is available in this link:

https://www.hee.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/documents/Workforce%20Plan%20for%20England%202016-17.pdf

The most recent NHS workforce statistics from NHS Digital for staff working in trusts and clinical commissioning groups shows that the full time equivalent number of doctors within the pathology specialty group is 4,125 representing an increase of more than 11% increase since May 2010.

9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the number of pathologists.

Responsibility for staffing levels rests with individual National Health Service trusts and their boards who are best placed to decide how many staff they need to provide a given service, taking into account skill mix and efficiency.

Working with local providers, it is Health Education England’s responsibility to determine the appropriate numbers of students the NHS needs in training on an annual basis. Its latest Workforce Plan for England covering the period 2016/17 is available in this link:

https://www.hee.nhs.uk/sites/default/files/documents/Workforce%20Plan%20for%20England%202016-17.pdf

The most recent NHS workforce statistics from NHS Digital for staff working in trusts and clinical commissioning groups shows that the full time equivalent number of doctors within the pathology specialty group is 4,125 representing an increase of more than 11% increase since May 2010.

8th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to increase recruitment of GPs.

The Government is committed to having an extra 5,000 doctors working in general practice by 2020/21. The Department is working with NHS England and Health Education England (HEE) to increase the number of general practitioner (GP) training places. In 2016, HEE recruited the highest ever number of GP trainees (3,019 out of 3,250) – 93% fill rate. In addition to increasing the number of trainees, we are taking forward a range of other measures to increase both recruitment and retention such as encouraging return to general practice, attracting medical students to become GP trainees, as well as a strengthened package of support to help GPs remain in clinical general practice.

8th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the 90 per cent fill rate for GP positions in England in 2016 as set out in Health Education England's General Practice ST1 recruitment figures; and if he will make a statement.

The Government is committed to having an extra 5,000 doctors working in general practice by 2020/21. The Department is working with NHS England and Health Education England (HEE) to increase the number of general practitioner (GP) training places. In 2016, HEE recruited the highest ever number of GP trainees (3,019 out of 3,250) – 93% fill rate. In addition to increasing the number of trainees, we are taking forward a range of other measures to increase both recruitment and retention such as encouraging return to general practice, attracting medical students to become GP trainees, as well as a strengthened package of support to help GPs remain in clinical general practice.

8th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what change there will be in GP education budgets in each Health Education England region between 2016-17 and 2017-18.

The Department is working closely with Health Education England to agree its budget for 2017-18. Beyond the need to reduce running costs and seek greater efficiency from education support costs, no decisions have been taken on the levels of funding that will be available for any given programme.

3rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much the Government plans to spend on health and social care apprenticeships in each of the next five years.

The new Apprenticeship Levy comes into operation in April 2017 and is set at a rate of 0.5% of an employer’s pay bill. Apprenticeship Levy contributions by National Health Service organisations are estimated as £200 million in 2017-18 and will change over the next five years as the NHS pay bill changes. Estimates are not available for social care.

Apprentices are employed and individual employers will decide which apprentices to employ to meet their workforce needs. The Department does not centrally collect the plans of how many apprentices each individual employer intends to recruit by the end of 2020.

The Department is working with a range of partner organisations, including Health Education England, NHS Improvement, Skills for Health and Skills for Care to ensure NHS and social care providers have access to the apprentice standards they need to develop their own workforce and to make full use of the apprentice levy.

3rd Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of the abstinence based approach for the treatment of drug addiction on levels of deaths from drug misuse.

The provision of both harm reduction and abstinence based interventions is essential to any drug treatment system. Each local authority is responsible for ensuring there is a full range of drug treatment services available in their area to meet the needs of their local population.

During the recent Public Health England led inquiry into the rise in drug-related deaths, analysis of the treatment population did not establish a direct relationship between a policy focus on abstinence and drug-related deaths.

6th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, for what reasons the Care Quality Commission closed its fit and proper persons requirement process on Paula Vasco-Knight, then Chief Executive of South Devon NHS Foundation Trust.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has advised that in October 2015 the CQC received information of concern regarding the appointment of Paula Vasco-Knight as Acting Chief Executive at St George’s University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. These concerns related to Paula Vasco-Knight’s conduct whilst she was Chief Executive at South Devon Foundation Trust. The CQC followed this up directly with the trust to review whether they had followed appropriate recruitment processes and carried out robust checks to determine Paula Vasco-Knight’s fitness prior to her employment.

Based on the extensive evidence supplied by the trust and information provided separately from the Nursing and Midwifery Council the CQC concluded that the trust had not breached the fit and proper persons regulation at that time in relation to that appointment. The CQC informed the trust of this decision in February 2016 but reserved the right to reopen the case in light of any further information received. At the time of this decision, neither CQC nor the trust was aware of the fraud charges.

In April 2016 CQC received new information that led it to re-open the case. In early May 2016 both CQC and St George’s became aware for the first time of the criminal investigation and fraud charges being brought against Paula Vasco-Knight. The CQC were subsequently asked by NHS Protect to put the case on hold pending their criminal investigation. St George’s University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust suspended Paula Vasco-Knight at this time. These are matters of public record.

6th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, in how many instances the Care Quality Commission has asked service providers to instigate fit and proper persons requirement (FPPR) investigations for each year since the FPPR came into force; and how many of those FPPR investigations resulted in a director being discharged from duty.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and adult social care in England.

The CQC has provided the following information:

The following actions have been taken in relation to Regulation 5 Fit and Proper Persons Requirement:

- CQC management reviews enable the CQC to reach a decision about the next course of action to take in response to a trigger for review, for example when we identify concerns around non-compliance with the regulations during an inspection, at the point of registration, or when we receive a safeguarding alert or concern. As at 8 February 2017 there have been 38 Adult Social Care (ASC), 14 Hospital, 5 Primary Medical Services and 37 Registration management reviews held regarding regulation 5.

There have been 28 enforcement actions under this regulation:

- 21 have been triggered by an enquiry, 16 of which were during the registration process.

- Seven were triggered by an inspection, four at ASC locations and three at Hospital locations.

- In seven cases registration was refused. In five cases registration was cancelled and in a further eight cases the providers were registered with agreed actions. The remainder included recommended fixed penalty notices, urgent and non-urgent imposition of conditions and warning notices.

6th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, by what metrics the effectiveness of Regulation 5: Fit and proper persons: directors is measured; and if he will make a statement.

Regulation 5 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014, The Fit and Proper Persons Requirement (FPPR) for Directors came into effect for National Health Service bodies on 27 November 2014 and was extended to cover all providers regulated by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) on 1 April 2015.

The regulations include a requirement that they must be reviewed every five years, beginning five years after 1 April 2015. As yet the Department has not undertaken a review of regulation 5. Any such review would be completed with input from the CQC.

The CQC has advised that it is the provider’s responsibility to ensure that all directors appointed are fit and proper for their role. The CQC’s responsibility is to check whether providers have the right systems and processes in place to assure themselves of fitness.

The CQC has not yet conducted a thorough assessment of the regulations’ effectiveness. However, in the first years of implementation, the CQC has received feedback on how the regulation is applied, often driven by an assumption that it is CQC’s role to assess fitness directly rather than to assess providers’ systems and processes.

In response to this feedback, the CQC has considered whether its current approach is in line with what can be reasonably expected of the CQC within the current regulations. The CQC has therefore begun a programme of work to improve its internal systems and processes for handling referrals under FPPR. There are three areas of CQC’s guidance and processes that it is strengthening:

- Passing on all details of FPPR concerns raised with the CQC to providers

Presently the CQC does not pass on all concerns raised with it to providers to ask for an explanation. Instead the CQC assesses whether there are concerns that a reasonable employer should be expected to investigate and if the CQC does not think there is a substantive concern it does not pass the material on. When the CQC does share concerns, it initially summarises the information and will later send on the full material if requested.

CQC’s intention is to change both of these steps so providers are notified of all concerns and receive all of the information immediately. The CQC will set out more clearly the type of investigation it expects providers to undertake, following notification.

- Interpretation of “serious mismanagement”

CQC believes there would be benefit in developing a clearer understanding of what type of behaviour constitutes ‘serious management’. The CQC has prepared some draft guidance that characterises serious mismanagement and will shortly be publishing this for consultation. The CQC will develop the finalised draft into internal and external guidance as to how it interprets and applies this element of the regulation.

- The way CQC manages and records information regarding FPPR

It is recognised internally that CQC needs to improve the data available to itself about CQC’s application of FPPR. The CQC is developing an approach to better enable it to track the volume of FPPR concerns shared with CQC by sector and the actions that result from these.

The CQC aims that, by undertaking the programme of improvements described above, CQC will be better placed to monitor the effectiveness of Regulation 5: Fit and Proper Persons in future.

16th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to the National Audit Office's report, Progress in improving cancer services and outcomes in England, published in January 2015, what the total spend on cancer care in the NHS per newly diagnosed patient was for the most recent period for which figures are available.

The National Audit Office published an estimate of the total amount spent on cancer care in the National Health Service to show the relative scale of the cost of cancer services to the NHS. The NHS does not routinely publish estimates of the total amount spent on cancer patients as the large scale and highly complex range of services that cancer patients interact with makes this very difficult. Many of the services used by people with cancer, in particular diagnostic and rehabilitation services, but also some treatment services, are not specific to cancer patients.

12th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when the consultation on the role of Physician Associates announced in his keynote speech to the NHS Providers conference on 30 November 2016 will be launched.

The Department is currently considering options for a consultation on the regulation of Physician Associates, which will be published in due course.

12th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to his announcement of 4 October 2016, that up to 1,500 extra medical training places will be made available from September 2018, whether those additional students will be supported by the same (a) undergraduate fee and (b) Higher Education Funding Council for England banding payments as existing medical students.

National Health Service providers will receive clinical placement funding for the minimum number of students that Health Education England forecast are required to meet the longer-term workforce needs of the NHS.

In early 2017, the Department plans to run a public consultation on its proposals to expand domestic undergraduate medical training places by up to 1,500 per year, from the academic year 2018-19.

For the 2017-18 academic year, undergraduate medical students undertaking the first four years of their courses will qualify for the same tuition fee loan and living costs support package from the Student Loans Company as other full-time undergraduate students. For years five and six of their courses, these students will continue to qualify for NHS bursaries and an additional reduced rate non-means tested loan for living costs from the Student Loans Company.

Teaching grants for medical students will also continue under the Office for Students (which is expected to assume Higher Education Funding Council for England’s funding responsibility from April 2018) reflecting the high-cost of the subject.

12th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to his announcement of 4 October 2016, that up to 1,500 extra medical training places will be made available from September 2018, what increased Service Increment for Teaching funding will be provided to support the training of those additional medical students.

National Health Service providers will receive clinical placement funding for the minimum number of students that Health Education England forecast are required to meet the longer-term workforce needs of the NHS.

In early 2017, the Department plans to run a public consultation on its proposals to expand domestic undergraduate medical training places by up to 1,500 per year, from the academic year 2018-19.

For the 2017-18 academic year, undergraduate medical students undertaking the first four years of their courses will qualify for the same tuition fee loan and living costs support package from the Student Loans Company as other full-time undergraduate students. For years five and six of their courses, these students will continue to qualify for NHS bursaries and an additional reduced rate non-means tested loan for living costs from the Student Loans Company.

Teaching grants for medical students will also continue under the Office for Students (which is expected to assume Higher Education Funding Council for England’s funding responsibility from April 2018) reflecting the high-cost of the subject.

16th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions his Department has had with National Ambulance Service medical directors on ensuring that the best practice system of flagging people with muscle-wasting conditions to ambulance crews in London, North West and North East Ambulance Services is used across all ambulance services.

The Department has not had any recent discussions with National Ambulance Service Medical Directors on this subject.

NHS England has advised that it is working with all ambulance services in England to ensure the right resource is allocated to the right 999 call at the right time.

Currently the flagging of patients with long term conditions or longer term care needs is not used universally. However the development of technology to allow real-time searching of the National Health Service number as a unique patient identifier will significantly increase the value of placing ‘flags’ on patients with specific clinical needs. This will then reliably allow any attending healthcare professional to access care plans and special patient notes to help inform individual patient management. This is a component of the 2017/19 ambulance service national Commissioning Quality and Innovation framework.

15th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much dental and medical service increment for teaching funding was allocated to each dental school by (a) student and (b) in total for each of the last three years.

The table below shows the total funding allocated by Health Education England (HEE) for dental placements in England in each of the last three years.

Year

Funding Allocated £ million

2014/15

£98.5

2015/16

£97.7

2016/17

£99.7

Source: HEE

Information relating to the funding allocated to individual dental schools is not held centrally.

15th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the income of NHS providers of the proposed withdrawal of the service increment for teaching funding for training international medical students.

In early 2017, the Department plans to run a public consultation on its proposals to expand domestic undergraduate medical training places by 1,500 per year, from the academic year 2018-19.

National Health Service providers will continue to receive placement funding for the minimum number of students that Health Education England forecast are required to meet the longer-term workforce needs of the NHS.

15th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish the rates at which the NHS market forces factor is applied to the dental service increment for teaching.

Payments for dental undergraduate clinical placements (formerly known as dental service increment for teaching) are outside the scope of the medical undergraduate clinical placement tariff and subject to local arrangements between the placement provider and Health Education England.

There is no nationally mandated market forces factor rate applied to these locally agreed payments.

15th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of including the market forces factor as a criterion for allocation of Service Increment for Teaching (SIFT) funding on the amounts allocated for each Local Education and Training Board (LETB) in England; and what estimate he has made of the proportion of SIFT funding spent on salaries in (a) London and (b) each other LETB in England.

The market forces factor (MFF) index used in the allocation of funding for clinical placements (formerly known as service increment for training) is consistent with the approach taken by NHS Improvement in adjusting service tariffs to reflect unavoidable cost differences between health care providers, based on their geographical location. This is considered the most appropriate method to adjust resource allocations in the National Health Service in proportion to these cost differences.

The MFF is applied to all three education and training tariffs, however it is not applied to the contribution to salary for postgraduate doctors in training, which instead are based on national pay scales and amended for inner and outer London weighting.

13th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that students of private medical schools receiving training in NHS settings do not pay less than the cost of providing that training.

The arrangements for students of private medical schools to receive training in National Health Service settings are a matter for agreement between the medical school and the NHS organisation. Funding for placements commissioned by Health Education England and its local offices should not be used to subsidise any element of the cost of placements for non-NHS funded students or trainees.

13th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will publish the funding provided through Health Education England for the training in NHS providers of Physician Associate students for each programme supported per student (a) per year and (b) over the course of the training.

The total funding provided by Health Education England for the training of Physician Associate students for each programme supported is:

- £15,655 per student per year; and

- £31,310 per student over the duration of the two year course.

The cost per student consists of tuition, maintenance and clinical placement funding as outlined in the table below.

Clinical Placement

Tuition

Maintenance

Cost per student

£2,156

£7,310

£6,189

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if the Nursing and Midwifery Council will include mandatory bowel and bladder care training for pre- and post-registration nurses in the new revised curriculum.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is the independent body responsible for the regulation of nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom. It is responsible for the way it discharges its statutory duties including setting standards of education, training, conduct and performance, so that nurses and midwives can deliver high quality healthcare throughout their careers. Accordingly, it is for the NMC to decide what it will include in its standards of proficiency. Its role as a professional regulator does not include developing or revising a curriculum. That is the role of education institutions.

The Code for nurses and midwives requires that they must prioritise people, practise effectively, preserve safety and promote professionalism and trust. This includes practising in line with the best available evidence. The Code also states that nurses and midwives must treat people as individuals and uphold their dignity by delivering the fundamentals of care effectively. The fundamentals of care include nutrition, hydration, bladder and bowel care, physical handling and making sure that those receiving care are kept in clean and hygienic conditions.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which Clinical Commissioning Groups have put into practice the NHS England Excellence in continence care guidelines published in November 2015.

Excellence in Continence Care is best practice guidance and NHS England does not currently hold information on which clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) have put the guidance into practice. However it anticipates auditing CCGs in future in order to capture this information.

NHS England issued a press release and secured significant media coverage to launch the guidance in 2015 and has promoted it to a range of audiences including special interest groups, professional societies and provider organisations.

In addition to media work, NHS England has engaged with key stakeholders who form part of the Excellence in Continence Care Board. The Board membership has evolved over time and has included clinical experts working in National Health Service organisations, patient advocates and representatives. Board members support NHS England to raise awareness of the guidance to special interest groups, patients groups, professionals within their extended networks which recently included the Association of Continence Advisors Conference.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps NHS England has taken to promote the Excellence in continence care guidelines to (a) clinical commissioning groups, (b) patient groups and (c) the general public.

Excellence in Continence Care is best practice guidance and NHS England does not currently hold information on which clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) have put the guidance into practice. However it anticipates auditing CCGs in future in order to capture this information.

NHS England issued a press release and secured significant media coverage to launch the guidance in 2015 and has promoted it to a range of audiences including special interest groups, professional societies and provider organisations.

In addition to media work, NHS England has engaged with key stakeholders who form part of the Excellence in Continence Care Board. The Board membership has evolved over time and has included clinical experts working in National Health Service organisations, patient advocates and representatives. Board members support NHS England to raise awareness of the guidance to special interest groups, patients groups, professionals within their extended networks which recently included the Association of Continence Advisors Conference.

3rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the value was of NHS England payroll expenditure excluding VAT on (a) permanent nursing staff and (b) agency nursing staff in (i) 2014-15 and (ii) 2015-16.

The Department is able to provide payroll expenditure for all Qualified Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Staff on employment contracts with the National Health Service. This information for 2014-15 and 2015-16 is tabled below. VAT costs do not apply to staff on NHS Employment contracts.


The requested information for 2016-17 is not yet available.

Year

Payroll costs for Qualified Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Staff in NHS Hospital and Community Health Services in England. (£)

2014-15

13.3 billion

2015-16

13.5 billion


The Department does not hold national data on agency staff that is broken down by staff group.

3rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of NHS England payroll expenditure excluding VAT on (a) permanent nursing staff and (b) agency nursing staff in 2016-17.

The Department is able to provide payroll expenditure for all Qualified Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Staff on employment contracts with the National Health Service. This information for 2014-15 and 2015-16 is tabled below. VAT costs do not apply to staff on NHS Employment contracts.


The requested information for 2016-17 is not yet available.

Year

Payroll costs for Qualified Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Staff in NHS Hospital and Community Health Services in England. (£)

2014-15

13.3 billion

2015-16

13.5 billion


The Department does not hold national data on agency staff that is broken down by staff group.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will discuss with the General Dental Council steps to address the disparity in acceptable scores on the International English Language Testing System achieved by dentists and dental hygienists and the scores accepted in such tests by the General Medical Council for doctors from outside the UK who are able to practise in the UK.

Both the General Medical Council (GMC) and the General Dental Council (GDC) are able to apply a language test to international applicants wishing to practise in the United Kingdom. Proportionate language controls can also be applied by the GMC and GDC on all applicants from the European Economic Area wishing to practise in the UK to ensure that doctors and dentists have the necessary English language skills to practise safely in the UK.

It is for the GMC and GDC as independent regulatory bodies to decide what constitutes an acceptable knowledge of English to practise safely in the UK including an acceptable score in the International English Language Test.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether his Department plans to respond to the policy briefing from the Royal College of Surgeons on English language testing of EEA healthcare professionals, dated 17 August 2016; and what plans he has to introduce clinical language tests for EEA healthcare professionals working in the UK.

Changes to United Kingdom law introduced in April 2014 and March 2015, allow the General Medical Council (GMC), Nursing Midwifery Council, General Dental Council (GDC), General Pharmaceutical Council and the Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland to carry out language controls for European Economic Area (EEA) doctors, dentists, nurses, midwives, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians in Britain. The regulators are now able to apply proportionate language controls for EEA professionals before registration and admission onto the register ensuring that only those healthcare professionals who have the necessary knowledge of the English language to do their job in a safe and competent manner are able to practise in the UK.

Under the Mutual Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive (MRPQ) regulatory healthcare bodies, including the GMC and GDC, are required to recognise primary and specialist medical qualifications gained in an EEA healthcare professional’s home member state.

The people of the UK have voted to leave the European Union, however until exit negotiations are concluded the UK remains a full member of the EU and all the rights and obligations of EU membership remain in force. This includes implementation of the MRPQ Directive.

A number of concerns have been raised about the constraints that the Directive places on the ability of UK regulators of health professionals to carry out robust checks of both the clinical and language skills of medical professionals from the EEA seeking to practice in the UK. The Government shares these concerns and will review the checks that UK regulators are able to apply in light of the EU exit negotiations.

7th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether legislative changes will be required to remove the NHS bursary for healthcare students by September 2017; and if he will make a statement.

The proposed reforms to healthcare education funding for introduction on 1 August 2017 will not require amendments to the legislation under which the National Health Service bursary is provided.

5th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent discussions his Department has had with NHS ambulance trusts to encourage them to work with Muscular Dystrophy UK to increase health professionals' knowledge of care for people with muscular dystrophy and neuromuscular conditions.

NHS England is responsible for commissioning specialised neurological services, including some services for patients with neuromuscular disorders. NHS England has published a service specification for neurological care that includes an exemplar service specification for neuromuscular conditions that sets out what providers must have in place to offer evidence-based, safe and effective services.

The specification can be found at the following link:

www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/d04-neurosci-spec-neuro.pdf

National Health Service providers, working with local area teams, may establish neuromuscular networks if they consider it would benefit service provision; such decisions are a local matter.

5th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when clinical commissioning groups will be required to update their local transformation plans; and what plans he has for such plans to interact with sustainability and transformation plans.

Health economies have come together to develop Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs) for their footprints until 2020/21. As with the current arrangements for planning and delivery, there are layers of plans which can sit below STPs, with shared links and dependencies. STPs do not replace the existing system architecture. Rather STPs act as an umbrella, holding underneath them a number of different specific plans to address key local issues.

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) have operational plans for 2016/17 in place. Operational plans for 2017/18 will reflect the contribution of the CCG to the overall STP. The timelines for the development of the 2017/18 operational plans are being finalised.

The March guidance stressed the importance of responding to 10 key priority areas which included mental health. Footprints are at different starting points, and so the degree of detail that has been provided in the 30 June STP checkpoint varies. However, final STPs will be expected to set out how Mandate priorities will be delivered, including the oversight of locally led transformation plans for children and young people’s mental health, before being agreed.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether his Department plans to publish and keep updated a public resource for identifying and assisting contact with (a) chairs of clinical commissioning groups, (b) chairs of health and wellbeing boards and (c) sustainability and transformation leads.

There are currently no plans to publish a central resource of contact details. Contact details for each clinical commissioning group are publicly available on their websites. The table below shows where this and other relevant information is publically available:

Chairs of clinical commissioning groups

https://www.england.nhs.uk/ccg-details/

Chairs of health and wellbeing boards

http://www.kingsfund.org.uk/projects/health-and-wellbeing-boards/hwb-map

Sustainability and transformation leads

https://www.england.nhs.uk/2016/03/leaders-confirmed/

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress has been made on the Government's response to the Choice Review; and if he will make a statement.

The Government Response to the Review of Choice in End of Life Care was published on 5 July 2016. The Response sets out a commitment for end of life care to ensure high quality, personalised care for everyone at the end of life and details the actions that the Government and the health and care system will be taking to deliver this.

29th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether NHS England has met the key deliverable in the 2014-15 NHS England business plan to ensure that more than 70 per cent of all scientific and diagnostic services are part of accreditation programmes.

The measurement of scientific and diagnostic services was more complex than originally envisaged which meant that the 70% target for these services to be part of an accreditation programme was difficult to quantify. NHS England continues to lead a programme of work to increase the number of scientific and diagnostic services that are part of accreditation programmes and demonstrate robust quality assurance measures.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many paediatric audiology services have reached the level required, using the Self-Assessment and Improvement Tool, to be eligible to apply for accreditation under the Improving Quality in Physiological Services scheme.

As of July 2016, 74 services are currently registered – covering all stages of gaining and holding Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation.

NHS England does not hold information on the number of services that have been allocated a date and are awaiting an assessment visit by United Kingdom Accreditation Service assessors, or the number of services that failed to gain accreditation after their initial assessment.

NHS England does not hold information on how many paediatric audiology services have reached the level required, using the Self-Assessment and Improvement Tool, to be eligible to apply for Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation.

29th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many paediatric audiology services have (a) been allocated a date and are awaiting an assessment visit by UKAS inspectors under the Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation scheme and (b) failed to gain accreditation after their initial assessment visit, since the accreditation began in 2012.

As of July 2016, 74 services are currently registered – covering all stages of gaining and holding Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation.

NHS England does not hold information on the number of services that have been allocated a date and are awaiting an assessment visit by United Kingdom Accreditation Service assessors, or the number of services that failed to gain accreditation after their initial assessment.

NHS England does not hold information on how many paediatric audiology services have reached the level required, using the Self-Assessment and Improvement Tool, to be eligible to apply for Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation.

29th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many paediatric audiology services have registered for the Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation scheme to date.

As of July 2016, 74 services are currently registered – covering all stages of gaining and holding Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation.

NHS England does not hold information on the number of services that have been allocated a date and are awaiting an assessment visit by United Kingdom Accreditation Service assessors, or the number of services that failed to gain accreditation after their initial assessment.

NHS England does not hold information on how many paediatric audiology services have reached the level required, using the Self-Assessment and Improvement Tool, to be eligible to apply for Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation.

20th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he plans to take to ensure that UK nursing is effectively represented at (a) the World Health Assembly and (b) other EU and international fora.

The World Health Assembly (WHA) is usually attended by the Chief Medical Officer and senior health officials. In the past the Chief Nursing Officer has attended the WHA, though in recent years has not been part of the Department’s delegation. However, the World Health Organization (WHO) is largely focussed on public health and the Chief Nurse at Public Health England works with and contributes to international nursing development with the WHO, including attendance at the WHO Nursing Forum, and also contributes to other global programmes.

There is a European Chief Nursing Officers forum which Government chief nurse advisors attend. It is for the Chief Nursing Officer for England to attend this meeting. In her absence one of the other United Kingdom Chief Nursing Officers should attend.

20th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether (a) staff and (b) external stakeholders were consulted on the proposal to close the Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions policy unit in his Department.

The Department leads the health and care system in England, working closely with a range of organisations on whose expertise it draws, including the nursing and midwifery expertise in NHS England and Public Health England. The Department’s approach to ensuring that nurses are consulted about future policies is to flexibly access professional advice from a wide range of sources, including arms-length bodies, regulators, stakeholders and professional bodies.

The Department’s policy teams will establish new networks and relationships with stakeholders and partners and collaborate with the Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) to ensure systems are in place to secure advice when developing evidence based policy. These changes do not affect the role of the CNO, who as CNO of the Department already advises, and will continue to advise all Ministers and the Department on the range of nursing and midwifery issues.

The Department is changing the way it works to deliver its essential work for the Government while achieving efficiency savings. All of the changes we are making through the resulting DH2020 programme are being done transparently and communicated to staff.


20th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what mechanisms he plans to put in place to ensure ministers receive impartial nursing advice after the proposed closure of the Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions policy unit in his Department.

The Department leads the health and care system in England, working closely with a range of organisations on whose expertise it draws, including the nursing and midwifery expertise in NHS England and Public Health England. The Department’s approach to ensuring that nurses are consulted about future policies is to flexibly access professional advice from a wide range of sources, including arms-length bodies, regulators, stakeholders and professional bodies.

The Department’s policy teams will establish new networks and relationships with stakeholders and partners and collaborate with the Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) to ensure systems are in place to secure advice when developing evidence based policy. These changes do not affect the role of the CNO, who as CNO of the Department already advises, and will continue to advise all Ministers and the Department on the range of nursing and midwifery issues.

The Department is changing the way it works to deliver its essential work for the Government while achieving efficiency savings. All of the changes we are making through the resulting DH2020 programme are being done transparently and communicated to staff.


20th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he plans to take to ensure nurses are consulted on his Department's future policies after the proposed closure of the Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions policy unit in his Department.

The Department leads the health and care system in England, working closely with a range of organisations on whose expertise it draws, including the nursing and midwifery expertise in NHS England and Public Health England. The Department’s approach to ensuring that nurses are consulted about future policies is to flexibly access professional advice from a wide range of sources, including arms-length bodies, regulators, stakeholders and professional bodies.

The Department’s policy teams will establish new networks and relationships with stakeholders and partners and collaborate with the Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) to ensure systems are in place to secure advice when developing evidence based policy. These changes do not affect the role of the CNO, who as CNO of the Department already advises, and will continue to advise all Ministers and the Department on the range of nursing and midwifery issues.

The Department is changing the way it works to deliver its essential work for the Government while achieving efficiency savings. All of the changes we are making through the resulting DH2020 programme are being done transparently and communicated to staff.


15th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to increase cervical screening rates among (a) women with learning disabilities and (b) women in deprived communities.

There is a range of work going on to understand the reasons for the decline in cervical screening uptake amongst women aged 25 to 29 and to try to address them. They include:

a) Data and information – access to data, cleansing, benchmarking for providers, timely and useful information for commissioners;

b) Behavioural insight – communication with commissioners, providers, patients and public;

c) Commissioning levers – commissioning contracts in public health (S7a) and primary care;

d) Partnership work – relationships with commissioners and providers; and

e) Sharing best practice – what works well, evaluation and how to embed quality improvement

Public Health England (PHE) is working with colleagues in NHS England and Health and Social Care Information Centre to implement the Accessible Information Standard which is intended to improve access to services for vulnerable and disadvantaged groups. Through the re-development of cervical Information Technology systems opportunities will arise to review how to help improve uptake.

PHE supports providers to help meet the Accessible Information Standard through the provision of high quality information for people with learning disabilities or sensory loss. A national group of experts and service users has been set up to oversee this work and will be updating the existing easy read leaflets and developing new materials over the next 18 months.

PHE is aware that there are a range of factors which may act as barriers in hindering women from attending cervical screening. It is hoped that through the STRATEGIC (Strategies to Increase Cervical screening uptake at first invitation) interventions will be identified to help minimise barriers and assist women to attend screening whilst increasing uptake across all quintiles. The STRATEGIC trial was completed in 2015 and researchers are expected to publish findings later this year.

15th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent assessment his Department has made of the barriers that prevent women from attending cervical screening.

There is a range of work going on to understand the reasons for the decline in cervical screening uptake amongst women aged 25 to 29 and to try to address them. They include:

a) Data and information – access to data, cleansing, benchmarking for providers, timely and useful information for commissioners;

b) Behavioural insight – communication with commissioners, providers, patients and public;

c) Commissioning levers – commissioning contracts in public health (S7a) and primary care;

d) Partnership work – relationships with commissioners and providers; and

e) Sharing best practice – what works well, evaluation and how to embed quality improvement

Public Health England (PHE) is working with colleagues in NHS England and Health and Social Care Information Centre to implement the Accessible Information Standard which is intended to improve access to services for vulnerable and disadvantaged groups. Through the re-development of cervical Information Technology systems opportunities will arise to review how to help improve uptake.

PHE supports providers to help meet the Accessible Information Standard through the provision of high quality information for people with learning disabilities or sensory loss. A national group of experts and service users has been set up to oversee this work and will be updating the existing easy read leaflets and developing new materials over the next 18 months.

PHE is aware that there are a range of factors which may act as barriers in hindering women from attending cervical screening. It is hoped that through the STRATEGIC (Strategies to Increase Cervical screening uptake at first invitation) interventions will be identified to help minimise barriers and assist women to attend screening whilst increasing uptake across all quintiles. The STRATEGIC trial was completed in 2015 and researchers are expected to publish findings later this year.

15th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to address the decline in cervical screening uptake in the 25 to 29 age group.

There is a range of work going on to understand the reasons for the decline in cervical screening uptake amongst women aged 25 to 29 and to try to address them. They include:

a) Data and information – access to data, cleansing, benchmarking for providers, timely and useful information for commissioners;

b) Behavioural insight – communication with commissioners, providers, patients and public;

c) Commissioning levers – commissioning contracts in public health (S7a) and primary care;

d) Partnership work – relationships with commissioners and providers; and

e) Sharing best practice – what works well, evaluation and how to embed quality improvement

Public Health England (PHE) is working with colleagues in NHS England and Health and Social Care Information Centre to implement the Accessible Information Standard which is intended to improve access to services for vulnerable and disadvantaged groups. Through the re-development of cervical Information Technology systems opportunities will arise to review how to help improve uptake.

PHE supports providers to help meet the Accessible Information Standard through the provision of high quality information for people with learning disabilities or sensory loss. A national group of experts and service users has been set up to oversee this work and will be updating the existing easy read leaflets and developing new materials over the next 18 months.

PHE is aware that there are a range of factors which may act as barriers in hindering women from attending cervical screening. It is hoped that through the STRATEGIC (Strategies to Increase Cervical screening uptake at first invitation) interventions will be identified to help minimise barriers and assist women to attend screening whilst increasing uptake across all quintiles. The STRATEGIC trial was completed in 2015 and researchers are expected to publish findings later this year.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the implications for his policies are of the findings in The Lancet Series on breastfeeding, published in January 2016; and what steps his Department is taking to increase breastfeeding rates.

Following the discontinuation of the Infant Feeding Survey, the Department has been exploring with Public Health England (PHE) and other key stakeholders alternative methods and sources of information to monitor the impact of its policy on infant feeding.

In future, the Maternity and Children’s Dataset will regularly capture data on breastfeeding initiation and prevalence from all women using NHS services rather than using a survey sample. This means that local service providers and commissioners can have up-to-date (e.g. quarterly) information about outcomes for their local populations, enabling service provision to be more agile, responsive and targeted.

The Government is committed to supporting breastfeeding through the Healthy Child Programme. Breastfeeding is also included in the Public Health Outcomes Framework so that the improvements can be tracked, and action taken as needed.

Since 2010, we have recruited more than 2,100 additional midwives who will provide women with the information, advice and support they need with breastfeeding. A further 6,000 midwives are in training. There are also 3,400 more health visitors than in 2010.

The Department is working with PHE, NHS England and UNICEF to try and encourage women to breastfeed for the first six months, although we recognise that not all mothers choose to or are able to breastfeed.

Support and information is currently available to health professionals and parents through NHS Choices, the National Breastfeeding Helpline, UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative, the Start4Life Information Service for Parents and local peer support programmes.

The Department has not retained a record of how many full-time equivalent staff there were with a specific focus on breastfeeding between 2010 and 2016; breastfeeding policy has always formed part of the larger maternity policy for which the Department has the policy lead. Resources to cover this policy area would have fluctuated according the level of work required at any one time.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many full-time equivalent staff in his Department were working on breastfeeding in each year from 2010 to 2016.

Following the discontinuation of the Infant Feeding Survey, the Department has been exploring with Public Health England (PHE) and other key stakeholders alternative methods and sources of information to monitor the impact of its policy on infant feeding.

In future, the Maternity and Children’s Dataset will regularly capture data on breastfeeding initiation and prevalence from all women using NHS services rather than using a survey sample. This means that local service providers and commissioners can have up-to-date (e.g. quarterly) information about outcomes for their local populations, enabling service provision to be more agile, responsive and targeted.

The Government is committed to supporting breastfeeding through the Healthy Child Programme. Breastfeeding is also included in the Public Health Outcomes Framework so that the improvements can be tracked, and action taken as needed.

Since 2010, we have recruited more than 2,100 additional midwives who will provide women with the information, advice and support they need with breastfeeding. A further 6,000 midwives are in training. There are also 3,400 more health visitors than in 2010.

The Department is working with PHE, NHS England and UNICEF to try and encourage women to breastfeed for the first six months, although we recognise that not all mothers choose to or are able to breastfeed.

Support and information is currently available to health professionals and parents through NHS Choices, the National Breastfeeding Helpline, UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative, the Start4Life Information Service for Parents and local peer support programmes.

The Department has not retained a record of how many full-time equivalent staff there were with a specific focus on breastfeeding between 2010 and 2016; breastfeeding policy has always formed part of the larger maternity policy for which the Department has the policy lead. Resources to cover this policy area would have fluctuated according the level of work required at any one time.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to continue monitoring breastfeeding rates following the abolition of the infant feeding survey; and if he will make a statement.

Following the discontinuation of the Infant Feeding Survey, the Department has been exploring with Public Health England (PHE) and other key stakeholders alternative methods and sources of information to monitor the impact of its policy on infant feeding.

In future, the Maternity and Children’s Dataset will regularly capture data on breastfeeding initiation and prevalence from all women using NHS services rather than using a survey sample. This means that local service providers and commissioners can have up-to-date (e.g. quarterly) information about outcomes for their local populations, enabling service provision to be more agile, responsive and targeted.

The Government is committed to supporting breastfeeding through the Healthy Child Programme. Breastfeeding is also included in the Public Health Outcomes Framework so that the improvements can be tracked, and action taken as needed.

Since 2010, we have recruited more than 2,100 additional midwives who will provide women with the information, advice and support they need with breastfeeding. A further 6,000 midwives are in training. There are also 3,400 more health visitors than in 2010.

The Department is working with PHE, NHS England and UNICEF to try and encourage women to breastfeed for the first six months, although we recognise that not all mothers choose to or are able to breastfeed.

Support and information is currently available to health professionals and parents through NHS Choices, the National Breastfeeding Helpline, UNICEF UK Baby Friendly Initiative, the Start4Life Information Service for Parents and local peer support programmes.

The Department has not retained a record of how many full-time equivalent staff there were with a specific focus on breastfeeding between 2010 and 2016; breastfeeding policy has always formed part of the larger maternity policy for which the Department has the policy lead. Resources to cover this policy area would have fluctuated according the level of work required at any one time.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will ensure that the benefits of breastfeeding will be included in the upcoming obesity strategy.

Our Childhood Obesity Strategy, which will be launched in the summer, will look at everything that contributes to a child becoming overweight and obese.

26th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to collect data on (a) the number of patients who are required to return to hospital for a review or follow-up out-patient appointment or procedure and (b) the length of time between such patients' initial appointment and that review or follow-up appointment.

Such data are already collected in Hospital Episode Statistics, a data warehouse managed by the Health and Social Care Information Centre that includes details of all admissions and outpatient appointments at National Health Service and independent sector hospitals in England. A summary report of the data published for 2014-15 is at:

http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB19608/hosp-outp-acti-2014-15-summ-repo-rep.pdf

Information on length of time between first and follow-up appointments has not been published because there are no national standards for the appropriate intervals, which will vary between different services or specialties, and between individual patients, depending on the severity of the condition and clinical decision making.

21st Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what safeguards are in place to ensure that patients who require review hospital appointments are seen within a clinically recommended or safe time.

The appropriate interval for follow up appointments will vary between different services or specialties, and between individual patients, depending on the severity of their condition. All follow up appointments (also known as planned, surveillance or recall appointments) should take place when clinically appropriate.

NHS England’s guidance, “Recording and reporting referral to treatment (RTT) waiting times for consultant-led elective care” is clear that when patients on planned lists are clinically ready for their care to commence and reach the date for their planned appointment, they should either receive that appointment or be transferred to an active waiting list, meaning a waiting time clock will be started and their wait reported in the relevant statistical return.

Furthermore, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) also assesses providers against the new fundamental standards of safety and quality below which care should never fail. One of the fundamental standards requires that care and treatment must be appropriate and reflect service users’ needs and preferences. Another standard requires that care and treatment must be provided in a safe way. The CQC will require a provider to improve where it is not meeting these standards.

12th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether he expects to be consulted in cases where a Bulk Personal Dataset is required from his Department by an Agency under the provisions of Part 7 of the Investigatory Powers Bill.

The Investigatory Powers Bill does not include any powers to require the provision of a bulk personal dataset (BPD) to a security and intelligence agency. It does require that there should be robust and transparent safeguards relating to such an agency’s use of BPDs. This includes a new requirement for warrants to authorise the retention and examination of BPDs.

The Bill provides for both class BPD warrants, covering datasets of a particular class, and specific BPD warrants, covering an individual dataset. The draft statutory Code of Practice provides further guidance on the factors that the security and intelligence agencies should consider in determining which type of warrant to apply for. These include whether the nature or provenance of the dataset raises particularly novel or contentious issues; whether it contains a significant component of intrusive data; and whether it contains a significant component of confidential information relating to members of sensitive professions. All warrants will be subject to the ‘double-lock’ safeguard meaning that they will be subject to approval by both a Secretary of State and a Judicial Commissioner.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will ask the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation to conduct an equality impact assessment as part of its decision-making process on the vaccination of adolescent boys.

I refer the hon. Member to the Written Answer I gave the hon. Member for Basildon and Billericay (Mr John Baron) on 20 July 2015 to Question 7298.

4th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of how many men who have sex with men (MSM) are expected to receive the HPV vaccine each year as a result of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation's recommendation that it be offered at sexual health clinics; and what proportion of the MSM population aged up to 45 his Department estimates will have been vaccinated within (a) one year, (b) five years and (c) 10 years of that vaccine first being so offered.

In November 2015, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), the expert body that advises the Government on all immunisation matters, advised that a targeted human papillomavirus vaccination programme should be undertaken for men who have sex with men (MSM) up to 45 years of age who attend genitourinary medicine and HIV clinics. They noted that this should be subject to procurement of the vaccine and delivery of the programme at a cost-effective price. JCVI acknowledged that finding a way to implement its advice would be challenging and made clear that work was needed by the Department and others to consider commissioning and delivery routes for this programme. This work is already underway and we will announce our plans as soon as we can.

The Department is not yet in a position to suggest estimates of the numbers or proportion of MSM who might be vaccinated from this potential vaccination programme.

2nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether he has received requests to expedite the timetable of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation for a decision on HPV vaccination for boys; and whether he plans to review that timetable.

The Department and Public Health England (PHE) have received correspondence from hon. members, organisations and members of the public asking for the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation’s (JCVI’s) advice to be expedited.

The JCVI has requested modelling work to help inform whether a human papillomavirus vaccination programme for boys would be cost-effective. It is anticipated that PHE will submit this to JCVI by early 2017. This is not an issue of resources, as the process of model development and checking the validity of the results is complex and requires close working between the modelling team and the scientific and clinical experts. We need to follow due process and ensure that decisions are based upon robust and rigorous cost-effectiveness analysis.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many children and young people in need of specialist mental health support as a result of (a) experiences of sexual abuse, (b) non-sexual physical abuse or neglect, (c) emotional abuse or neglect, (d) bereavement or (e) other trauma have been (i) granted and (ii) not granted access to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services.

The information needed to link individuals who have experienced various forms of trauma with those who have experienced mental health problems is not collected centrally.

We are committed to improving child and adolescent mental health services, which is why we are investing an additional £1.4 billion in services for children and young people with mental health problems over the course of this Parliament. The guidance issued by NHS England in August last year on Local Transformation Plans for children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing specified that the plans should address the full spectrum of need including those with particular vulnerability to mental health problems such as those who have been sexually abused or exploited. The bespoke assurance process that was undertaken by NHS England will therefore have addressed the extent to which this has been addressed in local plans.


NHS England has commissioned a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the Local Transformation Plans, in order to support policy makers, local commissioners and services to understand and use the data that is contained within the plans to drive further improvements. Local Transformation Plans will be reviewed from a narrative, analytical and financial perspective, with thematic reviews carried out in key focus areas that align with Future in Mind principles.

Sensitive and routine enquiry will be introduced in targeted health services, such as sexual health clinics and mental health services, to help identify those children who have been subjected to abuse and other traumatic experiences.

NHS England also published a Commissioning Framework for Adult and Paediatric Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC) Services in August 2015 which outlines the core services in SARCs and referral pathways to other services. These are now being rolled out throughout England and should lead to improved services for those who have experienced sexual assault, including children and young people.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department has taken to improve access to mental health services for children who have (a) been the victims of abuse and (b) experienced other trauma.

The information needed to link individuals who have experienced various forms of trauma with those who have experienced mental health problems is not collected centrally.

We are committed to improving child and adolescent mental health services, which is why we are investing an additional £1.4 billion in services for children and young people with mental health problems over the course of this Parliament. The guidance issued by NHS England in August last year on Local Transformation Plans for children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing specified that the plans should address the full spectrum of need including those with particular vulnerability to mental health problems such as those who have been sexually abused or exploited. The bespoke assurance process that was undertaken by NHS England will therefore have addressed the extent to which this has been addressed in local plans.


NHS England has commissioned a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the Local Transformation Plans, in order to support policy makers, local commissioners and services to understand and use the data that is contained within the plans to drive further improvements. Local Transformation Plans will be reviewed from a narrative, analytical and financial perspective, with thematic reviews carried out in key focus areas that align with Future in Mind principles.

Sensitive and routine enquiry will be introduced in targeted health services, such as sexual health clinics and mental health services, to help identify those children who have been subjected to abuse and other traumatic experiences.

NHS England also published a Commissioning Framework for Adult and Paediatric Sexual Assault Referral Centre (SARC) Services in August 2015 which outlines the core services in SARCs and referral pathways to other services. These are now being rolled out throughout England and should lead to improved services for those who have experienced sexual assault, including children and young people.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether, as part of the NHS Five Year Forward View, local sustainability and transformation plans should include measures to improve children and young people's mental health; and on what outcomes they will be assessed.

Local health economies are developing a five year Sustainability and Transformation Plan which will set out how they will implement the Five Year Forward View in their area. They will identify and collectively agree the priorities to address over the next five years. We expect the improvement of children and young people’s mental health to be a key priority for many local health economies and NHS England will support these areas to develop transformative plans for these services. Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) will be assessed through a new CCG assessment framework and their progress with transformation will be included.

17th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Education on the Chief Medical Officer's recommendations that PSHE education be made a routine part of children's education.

The Chief Medical Officer’s Annual Report for 2012, Our Children Deserve Better (published October 2013) included a recommendation that: ‘Public Health England, the PSHE Association and other leading organisations in the field should review the evidence linking health and wellbeing with educational attainment, and from that promote models of good practice for educational establishments to use.


There was no recommendation as such that Personal, Social and Health Education be made routine or mandatory in schools; however the Department for Education is working with a group of head teachers and experts to improve the quality of PSHE.


The Department of Health’s Framework for Sexual Health Improvement in England (2013) sets out our objectives and ambitions to improve the sexual health of all people, including young people. For young people the Framework highlights the importance of: building knowledge and resilience through good-quality sex and relationship education; access to confidential advice and support about wellbeing, relationships and sexual health; understanding consent (including sexual consent and abusive relationships), and understanding the benefits of delaying sex.


14th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to ensure that mental health services receive parity of esteem with physical health services in terms of funding.

NHS England required clinical commissioning groups in the annual planning guidance for 2015/16, to increase their spending on mental health in line with the increase in their overall funding allocation.

10th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to ensure that funding is sufficient to meet patient demand in (a) community mental healthcare and (b) inpatient mental healthcare; and if he will make a statement.

NHS England’s Planning Guidance for 2015/16, Forward View into action: planning for 2015-16, sets out the expectation that clinical commissioning groups’ (CCGs) spending on mental health services in 2015/16 should increase in real terms, and grow by at least as much as each CCG’s allocation increase to support the ambition of parity between mental and physical health. Compliance with the Planning Guidance is being assured at national and Area Team level.

7th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on patient outcomes of the planned transfer of obesity surgery commissioning responsibilities to clinical commissioning groups from April 2016.

We do not expect obesity outcomes to be affected, as the change will primarily be in regard to commissioning responsibilities. However, we believe the transfer should support better integration between Tier 3 and Tier 4 services (which include obesity services) which in turn should improve patient pathways.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when NHS England's Clinical Reference Group for Severe and Complex Obesity will publish its proposed template for clinical commissioning groups on access to obesity surgery pathways and follow-up treatment.

The template is in development and the draft will be shared in January 2016.


George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what account will be taken of NICE's clinical guidelines on levels of patient access in setting the budgets devolved by NHS England to clinical commissioning groups for obesity surgery from April 2016.

NHS England would expect commissioners to take account of this guidance when commissioning services.


Any transfer of budget from NHS England to devolved areas will be on the basis of existing contractual activity.


Before the transfer of services, NHS England will complete a data capture exercise, working with providers through the specialised commissioning hubs, to collect the current activity level. This will provide the basis for the transfer of the budget. Governance sign off will then be agreed at NHS England Board level.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how he plans for the Public Health Outcomes Framework to continue to give a comprehensive picture of children's school readiness, when the Early Years Foundation Stage Profile becomes non-compulsory in September 2016; and if he will make a statement.

The consultation on updating the Public Health Outcomes Framework was published on 3 September and closed on 2 October. We are considering the responses and intend to publish our proposals early next year.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether the General Medical Council (a) has undertaken and (b) plans to undertake any reviews of online prescribing of oral antibiotics.

The General Medical Council (GMC) is an independent body and responsible for matters concerning the discharge of its statutory duties.

The GMC has advised that on 31 January 2013, it published Good practice in prescribing and managing medicines and devices, which came into effect on 25 February 2013. In relation to online prescribing, this guidance is clear on the need for an adequate assessment of the patient’s health, meaningful dialogue and consent, and for the doctor to be satisfied the medicines are appropriate for the patient’s needs. The GMC has a duty to look into concerns raised about individual doctors who are not following this guidance.

The GMC has confirmed that it does not currently have plans to further review its guidance on prescribing and managing medicines and devices.

12th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of clinical consultations conducted by online pharmacies.

The General Medical Council (GMC) guidance on remote prescribing makes absolutely clear that doctors must feel satisfied that they can make an adequate assessment, establish a dialogue and obtain the patient’s consent. The GMC expect all doctors to take account of GMC guidance and relevant clinical and other guidelines regardless of how they are prescribing.

12th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment Public Health England has made of the effect of remote prescribing of oral antibiotics through online pharmacies on resistance to antibiotics.

National Health Service community prescriptions, delivered online and in person, are collated by NHS Business Services Authority and shared with the Health and Social Care Information Centre and Public Health England (PHE), through an open government license. PHE, through the English Surveillance Programme on Antimicrobial Utilisation and Resistance, released the first national report collating antibiotic use and resistance across the healthcare economy in 2014. The report is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/english-surveillance-programme-antimicrobial-utilisation-and-resistance-espaur-report

12th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to ensure that online pharmacies adhere to national best practice guidelines.

The General Medical Council (GMC) guidance on remote prescribing makes absolutely clear that doctors must feel satisfied that they can make an adequate assessment, establish a dialogue and obtain the patient’s consent. The GMC expect all doctors to take account of GMC guidance and relevant clinical and other guidelines regardless of how they are prescribing.

12th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what regulatory powers the General Medical Council has to review online prescribing where there is evidence that patients may be being prescribed suboptimal treatment.

The General Medical Council (GMC) guidance on remote prescribing makes absolutely clear that doctors must feel satisfied that they can make an adequate assessment, establish a dialogue and obtain the patient’s consent. The GMC expect all doctors to take account of GMC guidance and relevant clinical and other guidelines regardless of how they are prescribing.

9th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what analysis his Department has made of the adequacy of the provision of workforce training within service specifications for sexual health services.

The content and standards of professional healthcare training is the responsibility of the professional regulators, which have the general function of promoting high standards of education to ensure that healthcare professionals are equipped with the knowledge, skills and attitudes essential for professional practice. The Department published a model service specification for integrated sexual health services in May 2013:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/210726/Service_Specification_with_covering_note.pdf

Provision of workforce training and education features prominently in this document.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the number of carers over the age of 50 who have obtained full-time work within a period of (a) three and (b) six months following the death of the person they were caring for since 2010.

The Government recognises the valuable contribution made by carers, many of whom spend a significant proportion of their life providing support to family members or friends.

We know that former carers need to adjust to life after caring, so it is important that they receive support to cope and are signposted to relevant advice and support, including return to work programmes.

We have also legislated to give all carers new rights under the Care Act, which includes a principle to promote individual well-being. We have ensured that the definition of well-being in the Act includes participation in work, education and training. Local authorities must therefore consider these as relevant considerations when they are conducting an assessment or working on a support plan with a carer.

Any change of circumstances should trigger a review of circumstances. Support and planning should include planning for the end of a caring role, where relevant.

In 2002, the Government established a Task and Finish Group jointly with Employers for Carers in 2012 which looked into the factors affecting carers, including former carers wishing to return to work. We are taking forward its recommendations and have recently launched nine local authority pilots that are exploring ways in which people can be supported to combine work and care.

The Department for Work and Pensions continues to invest in supporting carers to return to work. If someone who was previously a carer and is fit for and looking for work, they would make a claim for Job Seekers Allowance and if eligible, will have access to the full Job Centre Plus offer, a core regime that provides:

- Mandatory interventions and additional flexible interventions. The interventions provide the contact with claimants so that a work coach can offer them help and support to return to work or move closer to the labour market; and

- The model has three elements: a core regime of regular face-to-face meetings, flexible work coach support and access to a menu of support options including work experience, skills provision and job search help, including provision funded through the Flexible Support Fund.

Former carers can continue to get Carer’s Allowance for up to eight weeks after the death of the person they were caring for.

Carers already have a legal right to request flexible working arrangements after 26 weeks of continuous employment. Through the Children and Families Act 2014, this right was extended to all employees from 30 June 2014, helping to normalise flexible working practices within the workplace.

As with other employees or potential employees, the Equality Act 2010 protects former carers from direct and indirect discrimination in employment on grounds such as age and sex. Given the current protection from discrimination for former carers (along with other people seeking work or already employed), such as on grounds of age, sex or disability, we do not believe that additional measures are needed at the present time.

We do not hold records of former carers over the age of 50 who were unemployed or returned to work after the death of the person they were caring for. However, data from the 2011 Census which encompasses the provision of unpaid care in England and Wales showed that 8.9% of men and 11.1% of women who are caring, were unemployed.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many carers over the age of 50 have become unemployed after the death of the person they were caring for since 2010.

The Government recognises the valuable contribution made by carers, many of whom spend a significant proportion of their life providing support to family members or friends.

We know that former carers need to adjust to life after caring, so it is important that they receive support to cope and are signposted to relevant advice and support, including return to work programmes.

We have also legislated to give all carers new rights under the Care Act, which includes a principle to promote individual well-being. We have ensured that the definition of well-being in the Act includes participation in work, education and training. Local authorities must therefore consider these as relevant considerations when they are conducting an assessment or working on a support plan with a carer.

Any change of circumstances should trigger a review of circumstances. Support and planning should include planning for the end of a caring role, where relevant.

In 2002, the Government established a Task and Finish Group jointly with Employers for Carers in 2012 which looked into the factors affecting carers, including former carers wishing to return to work. We are taking forward its recommendations and have recently launched nine local authority pilots that are exploring ways in which people can be supported to combine work and care.

The Department for Work and Pensions continues to invest in supporting carers to return to work. If someone who was previously a carer and is fit for and looking for work, they would make a claim for Job Seekers Allowance and if eligible, will have access to the full Job Centre Plus offer, a core regime that provides:

- Mandatory interventions and additional flexible interventions. The interventions provide the contact with claimants so that a work coach can offer them help and support to return to work or move closer to the labour market; and

- The model has three elements: a core regime of regular face-to-face meetings, flexible work coach support and access to a menu of support options including work experience, skills provision and job search help, including provision funded through the Flexible Support Fund.

Former carers can continue to get Carer’s Allowance for up to eight weeks after the death of the person they were caring for.

Carers already have a legal right to request flexible working arrangements after 26 weeks of continuous employment. Through the Children and Families Act 2014, this right was extended to all employees from 30 June 2014, helping to normalise flexible working practices within the workplace.

As with other employees or potential employees, the Equality Act 2010 protects former carers from direct and indirect discrimination in employment on grounds such as age and sex. Given the current protection from discrimination for former carers (along with other people seeking work or already employed), such as on grounds of age, sex or disability, we do not believe that additional measures are needed at the present time.

We do not hold records of former carers over the age of 50 who were unemployed or returned to work after the death of the person they were caring for. However, data from the 2011 Census which encompasses the provision of unpaid care in England and Wales showed that 8.9% of men and 11.1% of women who are caring, were unemployed.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the socio-economic background of carers over the age of 50 who have become unemployed after the death of the person they were caring for since 2010.

The Government recognises the valuable contribution made by carers, many of whom spend a significant proportion of their life providing support to family members or friends.

We know that former carers need to adjust to life after caring, so it is important that they receive support to cope and are signposted to relevant advice and support, including return to work programmes.

We have also legislated to give all carers new rights under the Care Act, which includes a principle to promote individual well-being. We have ensured that the definition of well-being in the Act includes participation in work, education and training. Local authorities must therefore consider these as relevant considerations when they are conducting an assessment or working on a support plan with a carer.

Any change of circumstances should trigger a review of circumstances. Support and planning should include planning for the end of a caring role, where relevant.

In 2002, the Government established a Task and Finish Group jointly with Employers for Carers in 2012 which looked into the factors affecting carers, including former carers wishing to return to work. We are taking forward its recommendations and have recently launched nine local authority pilots that are exploring ways in which people can be supported to combine work and care.

The Department for Work and Pensions continues to invest in supporting carers to return to work. If someone who was previously a carer and is fit for and looking for work, they would make a claim for Job Seekers Allowance and if eligible, will have access to the full Job Centre Plus offer, a core regime that provides:

- Mandatory interventions and additional flexible interventions. The interventions provide the contact with claimants so that a work coach can offer them help and support to return to work or move closer to the labour market; and

- The model has three elements: a core regime of regular face-to-face meetings, flexible work coach support and access to a menu of support options including work experience, skills provision and job search help, including provision funded through the Flexible Support Fund.

Former carers can continue to get Carer’s Allowance for up to eight weeks after the death of the person they were caring for.

Carers already have a legal right to request flexible working arrangements after 26 weeks of continuous employment. Through the Children and Families Act 2014, this right was extended to all employees from 30 June 2014, helping to normalise flexible working practices within the workplace.

As with other employees or potential employees, the Equality Act 2010 protects former carers from direct and indirect discrimination in employment on grounds such as age and sex. Given the current protection from discrimination for former carers (along with other people seeking work or already employed), such as on grounds of age, sex or disability, we do not believe that additional measures are needed at the present time.

We do not hold records of former carers over the age of 50 who were unemployed or returned to work after the death of the person they were caring for. However, data from the 2011 Census which encompasses the provision of unpaid care in England and Wales showed that 8.9% of men and 11.1% of women who are caring, were unemployed.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if the Government will bring forward legislative proposals to protect former carers from discrimination.

The Government recognises the valuable contribution made by carers, many of whom spend a significant proportion of their life providing support to family members or friends.

We know that former carers need to adjust to life after caring, so it is important that they receive support to cope and are signposted to relevant advice and support, including return to work programmes.

We have also legislated to give all carers new rights under the Care Act, which includes a principle to promote individual well-being. We have ensured that the definition of well-being in the Act includes participation in work, education and training. Local authorities must therefore consider these as relevant considerations when they are conducting an assessment or working on a support plan with a carer.

Any change of circumstances should trigger a review of circumstances. Support and planning should include planning for the end of a caring role, where relevant.

In 2002, the Government established a Task and Finish Group jointly with Employers for Carers in 2012 which looked into the factors affecting carers, including former carers wishing to return to work. We are taking forward its recommendations and have recently launched nine local authority pilots that are exploring ways in which people can be supported to combine work and care.

The Department for Work and Pensions continues to invest in supporting carers to return to work. If someone who was previously a carer and is fit for and looking for work, they would make a claim for Job Seekers Allowance and if eligible, will have access to the full Job Centre Plus offer, a core regime that provides:

- Mandatory interventions and additional flexible interventions. The interventions provide the contact with claimants so that a work coach can offer them help and support to return to work or move closer to the labour market; and

- The model has three elements: a core regime of regular face-to-face meetings, flexible work coach support and access to a menu of support options including work experience, skills provision and job search help, including provision funded through the Flexible Support Fund.

Former carers can continue to get Carer’s Allowance for up to eight weeks after the death of the person they were caring for.

Carers already have a legal right to request flexible working arrangements after 26 weeks of continuous employment. Through the Children and Families Act 2014, this right was extended to all employees from 30 June 2014, helping to normalise flexible working practices within the workplace.

As with other employees or potential employees, the Equality Act 2010 protects former carers from direct and indirect discrimination in employment on grounds such as age and sex. Given the current protection from discrimination for former carers (along with other people seeking work or already employed), such as on grounds of age, sex or disability, we do not believe that additional measures are needed at the present time.

We do not hold records of former carers over the age of 50 who were unemployed or returned to work after the death of the person they were caring for. However, data from the 2011 Census which encompasses the provision of unpaid care in England and Wales showed that 8.9% of men and 11.1% of women who are caring, were unemployed.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of carers over the age of 50 who have not obtained full-time work within a period of (a) three and (b) six months following the death of the person they were caring for since 2010.

The Government recognises the valuable contribution made by carers, many of whom spend a significant proportion of their life providing support to family members or friends.

We know that former carers need to adjust to life after caring, so it is important that they receive support to cope and are signposted to relevant advice and support, including return to work programmes.

We have also legislated to give all carers new rights under the Care Act, which includes a principle to promote individual well-being. We have ensured that the definition of well-being in the Act includes participation in work, education and training. Local authorities must therefore consider these as relevant considerations when they are conducting an assessment or working on a support plan with a carer.

Any change of circumstances should trigger a review of circumstances. Support and planning should include planning for the end of a caring role, where relevant.

In 2002, the Government established a Task and Finish Group jointly with Employers for Carers in 2012 which looked into the factors affecting carers, including former carers wishing to return to work. We are taking forward its recommendations and have recently launched nine local authority pilots that are exploring ways in which people can be supported to combine work and care.

The Department for Work and Pensions continues to invest in supporting carers to return to work. If someone who was previously a carer and is fit for and looking for work, they would make a claim for Job Seekers Allowance and if eligible, will have access to the full Job Centre Plus offer, a core regime that provides:

- Mandatory interventions and additional flexible interventions. The interventions provide the contact with claimants so that a work coach can offer them help and support to return to work or move closer to the labour market; and

- The model has three elements: a core regime of regular face-to-face meetings, flexible work coach support and access to a menu of support options including work experience, skills provision and job search help, including provision funded through the Flexible Support Fund.

Former carers can continue to get Carer’s Allowance for up to eight weeks after the death of the person they were caring for.

Carers already have a legal right to request flexible working arrangements after 26 weeks of continuous employment. Through the Children and Families Act 2014, this right was extended to all employees from 30 June 2014, helping to normalise flexible working practices within the workplace.

As with other employees or potential employees, the Equality Act 2010 protects former carers from direct and indirect discrimination in employment on grounds such as age and sex. Given the current protection from discrimination for former carers (along with other people seeking work or already employed), such as on grounds of age, sex or disability, we do not believe that additional measures are needed at the present time.

We do not hold records of former carers over the age of 50 who were unemployed or returned to work after the death of the person they were caring for. However, data from the 2011 Census which encompasses the provision of unpaid care in England and Wales showed that 8.9% of men and 11.1% of women who are caring, were unemployed.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what support the Government provides to former carers entering employment or training following the death of the person they are caring for.

The Government recognises the valuable contribution made by carers, many of whom spend a significant proportion of their life providing support to family members or friends.

We know that former carers need to adjust to life after caring, so it is important that they receive support to cope and are signposted to relevant advice and support, including return to work programmes.

We have also legislated to give all carers new rights under the Care Act, which includes a principle to promote individual well-being. We have ensured that the definition of well-being in the Act includes participation in work, education and training. Local authorities must therefore consider these as relevant considerations when they are conducting an assessment or working on a support plan with a carer.

Any change of circumstances should trigger a review of circumstances. Support and planning should include planning for the end of a caring role, where relevant.

In 2002, the Government established a Task and Finish Group jointly with Employers for Carers in 2012 which looked into the factors affecting carers, including former carers wishing to return to work. We are taking forward its recommendations and have recently launched nine local authority pilots that are exploring ways in which people can be supported to combine work and care.

The Department for Work and Pensions continues to invest in supporting carers to return to work. If someone who was previously a carer and is fit for and looking for work, they would make a claim for Job Seekers Allowance and if eligible, will have access to the full Job Centre Plus offer, a core regime that provides:

- Mandatory interventions and additional flexible interventions. The interventions provide the contact with claimants so that a work coach can offer them help and support to return to work or move closer to the labour market; and

- The model has three elements: a core regime of regular face-to-face meetings, flexible work coach support and access to a menu of support options including work experience, skills provision and job search help, including provision funded through the Flexible Support Fund.

Former carers can continue to get Carer’s Allowance for up to eight weeks after the death of the person they were caring for.

Carers already have a legal right to request flexible working arrangements after 26 weeks of continuous employment. Through the Children and Families Act 2014, this right was extended to all employees from 30 June 2014, helping to normalise flexible working practices within the workplace.

As with other employees or potential employees, the Equality Act 2010 protects former carers from direct and indirect discrimination in employment on grounds such as age and sex. Given the current protection from discrimination for former carers (along with other people seeking work or already employed), such as on grounds of age, sex or disability, we do not believe that additional measures are needed at the present time.

We do not hold records of former carers over the age of 50 who were unemployed or returned to work after the death of the person they were caring for. However, data from the 2011 Census which encompasses the provision of unpaid care in England and Wales showed that 8.9% of men and 11.1% of women who are caring, were unemployed.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps the Government is taking to prevent discrimination against former carers.

The Government recognises the valuable contribution made by carers, many of whom spend a significant proportion of their life providing support to family members or friends.

We know that former carers need to adjust to life after caring, so it is important that they receive support to cope and are signposted to relevant advice and support, including return to work programmes.

We have also legislated to give all carers new rights under the Care Act, which includes a principle to promote individual well-being. We have ensured that the definition of well-being in the Act includes participation in work, education and training. Local authorities must therefore consider these as relevant considerations when they are conducting an assessment or working on a support plan with a carer.

Any change of circumstances should trigger a review of circumstances. Support and planning should include planning for the end of a caring role, where relevant.

In 2002, the Government established a Task and Finish Group jointly with Employers for Carers in 2012 which looked into the factors affecting carers, including former carers wishing to return to work. We are taking forward its recommendations and have recently launched nine local authority pilots that are exploring ways in which people can be supported to combine work and care.

The Department for Work and Pensions continues to invest in supporting carers to return to work. If someone who was previously a carer and is fit for and looking for work, they would make a claim for Job Seekers Allowance and if eligible, will have access to the full Job Centre Plus offer, a core regime that provides:

- Mandatory interventions and additional flexible interventions. The interventions provide the contact with claimants so that a work coach can offer them help and support to return to work or move closer to the labour market; and

- The model has three elements: a core regime of regular face-to-face meetings, flexible work coach support and access to a menu of support options including work experience, skills provision and job search help, including provision funded through the Flexible Support Fund.

Former carers can continue to get Carer’s Allowance for up to eight weeks after the death of the person they were caring for.

Carers already have a legal right to request flexible working arrangements after 26 weeks of continuous employment. Through the Children and Families Act 2014, this right was extended to all employees from 30 June 2014, helping to normalise flexible working practices within the workplace.

As with other employees or potential employees, the Equality Act 2010 protects former carers from direct and indirect discrimination in employment on grounds such as age and sex. Given the current protection from discrimination for former carers (along with other people seeking work or already employed), such as on grounds of age, sex or disability, we do not believe that additional measures are needed at the present time.

We do not hold records of former carers over the age of 50 who were unemployed or returned to work after the death of the person they were caring for. However, data from the 2011 Census which encompasses the provision of unpaid care in England and Wales showed that 8.9% of men and 11.1% of women who are caring, were unemployed.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of implementation rates of domiciliary sight tests for (a) children and (b) adults with disabilities.

Free National Health Service sight tests are available to people aged 60 and over, children under 16, those aged 16-18 in full-time education, people on low incomes and defined categories of people at particular risk of developing eye disease. NHS sight tests can also be provided as mobile services (domiciliary) to those eligible for an NHS sight test who are unable to leave home unaccompanied because of physical, mental illness or disability.

During a sight test, a doctor or optometrist is legally required to perform such examinations as are necessary to detect signs of injury, disease or abnormality and to refer the patient for further investigation if necessary. They will also carry out tests to determine if the patient requires an optical appliance to correct a defect in sight. These requirements apply regardless of where the sight test occurs and therefore no specific assessment has been made as to the effectiveness of domiciliary sight tests compared to non-domiciliary provision.

In 2013/14, domiciliary sight tests made up 3.3% of total NHS sight tests. At 428,109, this was 5% more than in 2012/13 (406,995). It is not possible to identify how many of these were provided to children or those eligible adults with disabilities.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of domiciliary sight tests for the diagnosis of (a) visual impairment and (b) eye health conditions in (i) children and (ii) adults with disabilities.

Free National Health Service sight tests are available to people aged 60 and over, children under 16, those aged 16-18 in full-time education, people on low incomes and defined categories of people at particular risk of developing eye disease. NHS sight tests can also be provided as mobile services (domiciliary) to those eligible for an NHS sight test who are unable to leave home unaccompanied because of physical, mental illness or disability.

During a sight test, a doctor or optometrist is legally required to perform such examinations as are necessary to detect signs of injury, disease or abnormality and to refer the patient for further investigation if necessary. They will also carry out tests to determine if the patient requires an optical appliance to correct a defect in sight. These requirements apply regardless of where the sight test occurs and therefore no specific assessment has been made as to the effectiveness of domiciliary sight tests compared to non-domiciliary provision.

In 2013/14, domiciliary sight tests made up 3.3% of total NHS sight tests. At 428,109, this was 5% more than in 2012/13 (406,995). It is not possible to identify how many of these were provided to children or those eligible adults with disabilities.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many children with a learning disability took a sight test in 2013-14.

Children aged under 16 and between 16-18 in full-time education are eligible for free National Health Service funded sight tests.

In 2013/14, 3.1 million NHS sight tests were provided to children aged up to 18 years, an increase of 6.2% on the previous year. We do not have figures for how many of these children had a disability in general, or a learning disability in particular.

The Department works with NHS Choices to raise the profile of visual health and promote the importance of regular sight tests.

26th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if his Department will take steps to improve the uptake of sight tests by children with disabilities.

Children aged under 16 and between 16-18 in full-time education are eligible for free National Health Service funded sight tests.

In 2013/14, 3.1 million NHS sight tests were provided to children aged up to 18 years, an increase of 6.2% on the previous year. We do not have figures for how many of these children had a disability in general, or a learning disability in particular.

The Department works with NHS Choices to raise the profile of visual health and promote the importance of regular sight tests.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when his Department plans to publish the review of the first year's operation of the framework for sexual health improvement in England.

The Framework for Sexual Health Improvement in England Progress Report will be published shortly.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when vaccinations for human papillomavirus for men who have sex with men will be implemented.

The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), the independent expert body that advises the Government on all immunisation matters agreed at its October meeting that further consultation was needed with stakeholders before finalising its advice to ministers on the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of men who have sex with men (MSM). It held a stakeholder consultation between 12 November and 7 January and we understand that the JCVI considered the outcome of the consultation at its meeting on 4 February 2015, as it reviewed its provisional advice on MSM.

Any implementation of an HPV MSM vaccination programme will be dependent on the JCVI’s final advice. We look forward to receiving the JCVI’s final advice in due course.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans are in place for an audit of the commissioning process for sexual health services.

Since March 2013, the Department, Public Health England (PHE) and other partners have produced a range of policy documents and guidance for local authorities, clinical commissioning groups, providers and others to support the provision of joined up, high quality sexual health services. This guidance includes:

A Framework for Sexual Health Improvement in England –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/a-framework-for-sexual-health-improvement-in-england

Making it work –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/commissioning-sexual-health-reproductive-health-and-hiv-services

HIV, sexual and reproductive health current issues bulletin Issue 1: Payments for patients living outside your local authority -

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hiv-sexual-and-reproductive-health-current-issues-bulletin-issue-1-november-2013

HIV, sexual and reproduction health current issues bulletin Issue 2: Commissioning Sexual Health Services from Primary Care –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hiv-sexual-and-reproductive-health-current-issues-bulletin-issue-2-december-2013

HIV, sexual and reproduction health current issues bulletin Issue 3: Commissioning HIV Services –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hiv-sexual-and-reproductive-health-current-issues-bulletin-issue-3-february-2014

HIV, sexual and reproduction health current issues bulletin Issue 4: Tendering Sexual Health Services –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hiv-sexual-and-reproductive-health-current-issues-bulletin-issue-4-may-2014

Sexual Health Clinical Governance: Key principles to assist service commissioners and providers to operate clinical governance systems in sexual health services –

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/252975/Sexual_Health_Clinical_Governance_final.pdf

Commissioning Sexual Health Services and Interventions: Best Practice Guidance for Local Authorities –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/commissioning-sexual-health-services-and-interventions-best-practice-guidance-for-local-authorities

Sexual Health: Key Principals for Cross Charging –

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/226325/Sexual_Health_Key_Principles_for_cross_charging.pdf

Integrated Sexual Health Services: National Service Specification –

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/210726/Service_Specification_with_covering_note.pdf

PHE is planning a joint review with the Association of Directors of Public Health and other partners of the current commissioning arrangements for Sexual Health, Reproductive Health and HIV services. The review is intended to look at current commissioning arrangements and identify any issues arising from the changes to the commissioning of services, together with examples of good practice. It will be based on a structured questionnaire which will enable comparable information to be collected through interview with key partners. A summary of the findings will be published in the summer of 2015.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to ensure that standards of patient access, service quality and patient safety are maintained by local authorities in the commissioning of clinical sexual health services.

Since March 2013, the Department, Public Health England (PHE) and other partners have produced a range of policy documents and guidance for local authorities, clinical commissioning groups, providers and others to support the provision of joined up, high quality sexual health services. This guidance includes:

A Framework for Sexual Health Improvement in England –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/a-framework-for-sexual-health-improvement-in-england

Making it work –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/commissioning-sexual-health-reproductive-health-and-hiv-services

HIV, sexual and reproductive health current issues bulletin Issue 1: Payments for patients living outside your local authority -

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hiv-sexual-and-reproductive-health-current-issues-bulletin-issue-1-november-2013

HIV, sexual and reproduction health current issues bulletin Issue 2: Commissioning Sexual Health Services from Primary Care –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hiv-sexual-and-reproductive-health-current-issues-bulletin-issue-2-december-2013

HIV, sexual and reproduction health current issues bulletin Issue 3: Commissioning HIV Services –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hiv-sexual-and-reproductive-health-current-issues-bulletin-issue-3-february-2014

HIV, sexual and reproduction health current issues bulletin Issue 4: Tendering Sexual Health Services –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hiv-sexual-and-reproductive-health-current-issues-bulletin-issue-4-may-2014

Sexual Health Clinical Governance: Key principles to assist service commissioners and providers to operate clinical governance systems in sexual health services –

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/252975/Sexual_Health_Clinical_Governance_final.pdf

Commissioning Sexual Health Services and Interventions: Best Practice Guidance for Local Authorities –

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/commissioning-sexual-health-services-and-interventions-best-practice-guidance-for-local-authorities

Sexual Health: Key Principals for Cross Charging –

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/226325/Sexual_Health_Key_Principles_for_cross_charging.pdf

Integrated Sexual Health Services: National Service Specification –

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/210726/Service_Specification_with_covering_note.pdf

PHE is planning a joint review with the Association of Directors of Public Health and other partners of the current commissioning arrangements for Sexual Health, Reproductive Health and HIV services. The review is intended to look at current commissioning arrangements and identify any issues arising from the changes to the commissioning of services, together with examples of good practice. It will be based on a structured questionnaire which will enable comparable information to be collected through interview with key partners. A summary of the findings will be published in the summer of 2015.

13th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many antibiotics were prescribed by out-of-hours dentists in each quarter of the last three years.

The exact information requested is not available. Dental prescribing data is published annually at national level and antibiotic prescribing by dentists can be found in table 4.2 on page 20 in the report “Prescribing by Dentists, England 2013” which is available at the link below. This information is not collected in a form that separates in and out of hours prescribing, nor is there quarterly data.

http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB14016/pres-dent-eng-2013-rpt.pdf

2nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether funding will be made available to ensure that the Prevalence Study on Mental Health of Children and Young People in Great Britain covers the same data sets to enable it to be comparable to the 2004 survey.

The Department is in the process of commissioning a new prevalence survey of children and young people’s mental health that is comparable to the 2004 survey.

Ministers are currently considering options for the new survey informed by advice from a range of academics and researchers, health and care professionals and their representative bodies, commissioners and survey suppliers. The Department hopes to announce the procurement phase of the survey in the near future.

Final decisions on the scope, sample size, methodology and questionnaire have not yet been made and it is not possible to pre-empt them at this stage or to say exactly what the new survey will cover, although it is likely to provide some data on characteristics such as ethnicity.

2nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what provisions are in place within the Prevalence Study on Mental Health of Children and Young People in Great Britian to sub-sample the population by ethnicity.

The Department is in the process of commissioning a new prevalence survey of children and young people’s mental health that is comparable to the 2004 survey.

Ministers are currently considering options for the new survey informed by advice from a range of academics and researchers, health and care professionals and their representative bodies, commissioners and survey suppliers. The Department hopes to announce the procurement phase of the survey in the near future.

Final decisions on the scope, sample size, methodology and questionnaire have not yet been made and it is not possible to pre-empt them at this stage or to say exactly what the new survey will cover, although it is likely to provide some data on characteristics such as ethnicity.

2nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether the Prevalence Study on Mental Health of Children and Young People in Great Britian contains data on (a) children under five, (b) young poeple over 15, (c) BME populations, (d) LGBT young people, (e) migrant children, (f) asylum seekers and (g) children in detention centres.

The Department is in the process of commissioning a new prevalence survey of children and young people’s mental health that is comparable to the 2004 survey.

Ministers are currently considering options for the new survey informed by advice from a range of academics and researchers, health and care professionals and their representative bodies, commissioners and survey suppliers. The Department hopes to announce the procurement phase of the survey in the near future.

Final decisions on the scope, sample size, methodology and questionnaire have not yet been made and it is not possible to pre-empt them at this stage or to say exactly what the new survey will cover, although it is likely to provide some data on characteristics such as ethnicity.

19th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when he plans to lay before Parliament regulations on the standardised packaging of cigarettes and tobacco products.

The Government has not yet made a final decision on whether to introduce standardised packaging of tobacco products. The Government continues to consider carefully all issues relevant to the introduction of standardised packaging of tobacco products. Any decision about the appropriate Parliamentary timetable for the proposed regulations will be made if required, when the Government has made its final decision.

The draft regulations were notified to the European Commission under the Technical Standards Directive on 29 August. This started an initial three month “standstill” period. We have received a detailed opinion from a Member State which extends the “standstill” period to six months.

19th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when he plans to make a final decision on whether to proceed with the introduction of the standardised packaging of cigarettes and tobacco products; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has not yet made a final decision on whether to introduce standardised packaging of tobacco products. The Government continues to consider carefully all issues relevant to the introduction of standardised packaging of tobacco products. Any decision about the appropriate Parliamentary timetable for the proposed regulations will be made if required, when the Government has made its final decision.

The draft regulations were notified to the European Commission under the Technical Standards Directive on 29 August. This started an initial three month “standstill” period. We have received a detailed opinion from a Member State which extends the “standstill” period to six months.

2nd Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will adopt the latest Inflammatory Bowel Disease Standards Group standards for the care of patients with the condition.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) provides the National Health Service and social care providers with advice on delivering effective healthcare. NICE has published guidelines on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), set out in, Crohn’s disease: Management in adults, children and young people, published in October 2012 and, Ulcerative colitis: Management in adults, children and young people, published in June 2013. NHS England expects local commissioners and providers to consider the latest evidence and guidance when planning services for patients with all conditions, including IBD.

NICE is currently developing a Quality Standard for IBD, covering both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, and invited submissions to its development group from key stakeholders as part of this process. Quality Standards are important in setting out to patients, the public, commissioners and providers the key elements of a high quality service in a particular area of care. The IBD Standards Group made a submission to the development group which drew on its new standards of care, published in October 2013. The Quality Standard is due to be published later this month.

2nd Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will fund the provision of a minimum of 1.5 specialist irritable bowel syndrome nurses per 250,000 people.

The Government has no plans to fund the provision of specialist nurses for irritable bowel syndrome. Through the Mandate, we have asked NHS England to deliver continued improvements in relation to the experience of care, including long term conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome. Local healthcare organisations, with their knowledge of the people they serve, are best placed to plan and employ a workforce based on clinical need and sound evidence.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is currently developing a quality standard for irritable bowel syndrome. This is due to be published in September 2014. NHS England expects clinical commissioning groups to take into account the needs of their population and for service providers to be fully aware of the new guidance and to examine the performance of their organisation and assess improvement in standards of care they provide for people with irritable bowel syndrome.

4th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will review the adequacy of the sentences available under the Cancer Act 1939 for people convicted of fraudulently advertising offers to treat cancer.

The Department last consulted on changes to the Cancer Act 1939 in 2006, and subsequently to this a Legislative Reform Order came into force in October 2008.

We do not currently have any plans to review the adequacy of the sentences available under the Act for people convicted of fraudulently advertising offers to treat cancer.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent assessment he has made of the data collected by the Palliative Care Funding Review Pilot sites; and whether enough data has been collected to allow a decision to be made before the end of this Parliament on implementing free social care at the end of life.

NHS England is due to receive the health and social care data from the Palliative Care Funding Review Pilots by the end of May. Once these data have been analysed, this will form the evidence base for a decision on free social care at the end of life, along with wider policy and financial considerations.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the time taken to obtain security clearance for health and social care staff on the delivery of healthcare in prisons.

The Department has not made a formal assessment of the effect of the time taken to obtain security clearance for health and social care staff on the delivery of healthcare in prisons.

All staff and non-directly employed personnel are subject to a series of pre-appointment security checks to determine their suitability to work in a prison. The unique nature of such work means that checks may need to be more comprehensive than other locations and can take time.

NHS England continues to work with Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service and the Ministry of Justice to expedite clearance on a case by case basis where concerns are raised by providers.

The end-to-end recruitment procedure has been reviewed by the Ministry of Justice to identify the points at which delays have or can take place. Action has been taken to address these and the backlog of cases has been reduced significantly from last year. This in turn, should also result in reduced processing times in security vetting for all staff.

16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to the Israeli Government on conducting a criminal investigation into the alleged shooting by the Israeli Defence Force of a 9 year old Palestinian boy, Abd a-Rahman a-Shteiwi on 12 July 2019.

I refer the hon. Member to my answer of 2 October (PQ 291575). Our Embassy in Tel Aviv has raised the death of Abd a-Rahman with the Israeli authorities, stressing the importance of protecting civilians, especially children. The British Government is very concerned at the high numbers of Palestinian children killed and injured by Israel Defense Forces in the West Bank and Gaza. We have raised the issue of excessive use of force, including use of live ammunition with both the Office of the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories and the Israeli Ministry of Defense. We will continue to encourage the Israeli authorities to carry out transparent investigations on the use of live fire.

27th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to the Israeli Government on the alleged shooting by the Israeli Defence Force of a 9 year old Palestinian boy, Abd a-Rahman a-Shteiwi on 12 July 2019; and if he will make a statement.

​Our Embassy in Tel Aviv has raised the death of Abd a-Rahman with the Israeli authorities, stressing the importance of protecting civilians, especially children. The Government is very concerned at the high numbers of Palestinian children killed and injured by Israel Defense Forces in the West Bank and Gaza. We have raised the issue of excessive use of force, including use of live ammunition with both the Office of the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories and the Israeli Ministry of Defense.

5th Jul 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to increase support for parents who care for disabled children at home.

Child Disability Living Allowance (DLA) is a benefit for children under the age of 16 who, due to a disability or health condition, have mobility issues and/or require substantially more care, attention and supervision than children their age normally would. If a parent or carer is claiming Child Tax Credits (CTC) and their child is in receipt of DLA, they are also eligible for additional premiums on their award and for childcare support. Parents of disabled children may be also able to claim Carer’s Allowance.

Universal Credit is designed to ensure that work pays and the most vulnerable in society are protected, making the system fair for claimants and those who are able to support themselves solely through work. The increased work allowance in Universal Credit from April 2019 is assisting 2.4 million working families, with children or with a disability, to become better off by £635 per year.

The government is committed to protecting and supporting the most vulnerable in society. It is for that reason the government has continued to uprate disability and carer benefits by inflation, including the disability elements of tax credits.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
4th Jul 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what programmes will be funded through the £10 million allocated for fisheries innovation South West announced in Budget 2018.

At Budget 2018, the government announced that £10 million from UK Research and Innovation will be invested into the fisheries and seafood industries to help ensure the UK is a world leader in safe, sustainable and productive fishing.

Defra and Cefas will deliver this funding. I understand they expect to launch the fund shortly.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
16th Mar 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of using money raised from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy to support (a) nursery schools and (b) private nurseries in accessing the Children's Food Trust accreditation scheme; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has already confirmed that, in England, we will invest the £1 billion revenue we originally forecast from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy during this parliament in giving school-aged children a better and healthier future, including through doubling the primary school PE and sport premium and expanding school breakfast clubs. The Secretary of State for Education recently set out further details on this, including £415m for a new healthy pupils capital programme. The Department for Education will set out more detail in due course.

16th Mar 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has assessed the potential merits of using money raised through the Soft Drinks Industry Levy to extend the free school meals scheme to (a) nursery schools and (b) private nurseries; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has already confirmed that, in England, we will invest the £1 billion revenue we originally forecast from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy during this parliament in giving school-aged children a better and healthier future, including through doubling the primary school PE and sport premium and expanding school breakfast clubs. The Secretary of State for Education recently set out further details on this, including £415m for a new healthy pupils capital programme. The Department for Education will set out more detail in due course.

20th Jul 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the Government's plans are for the implementation of the soft drinks industry levy; and if he will publish a timetable for the implementation of that levy.

The Soft Drinks Industry Levy consultation was launched on 18th August 2016. At the Budget in March, the Government announced that it would consult on the Levy during the summer and legislate in Finance Bill 2017, for implementation from April 2018. This timetable remains in place.

28th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support is available for EU citizens with (a) dementia and (b) other similar health conditions when applying for settled status given the possibility that they may have lost the necessary paperwork.

The EU Settlement Scheme is designed to make it simple and straightforward for EU citizens and their family members to apply to stay in the UK after we leave the EU. We are looking for reasons to grant status, not reasons to refuse, and the scheme is performing well.

The Home Office has put in place a comprehensive vulnerability strategy to ensure that the EU Settlement Scheme is accessible for all, including those requiring someone to make an application on their behalf. We are also engaging with relevant stakeholders, such as the Department for Health and Social Care, the Local Government Association, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services and the Devolved Administrations, to assess the needs of vulnerable groups and ensure they are met.

The Home Office has introduced a range of support for applicants, including assisted digital support at around 300 locations across the UK and the EU Settlement Scheme Resolution Centre, open seven days a week, to provide help and information by telephone and e-mail. We have also provided up to £9 million of grant funding to 57 voluntary and community organisations across the UK to enable them to mobilise services targeted at vulnerable EU citizens.

Regarding specific support for (a) those with dementia and (b) other similar health conditions, such as those without mental capacity, the Home Office has designed a scheme that allows applicants to consent to an appropriate third party to apply on their behalf. This means that care givers, family members and friends can provide the necessary assistance to those who need it.

The Home Office is aware that a range of vulnerable applicants may face challenges in securing evidence to support their application. For this reason, we will in such circumstances accept a range of evidence of identity and residence on behalf of an applicant, working with the person making the application to establish the applicant’s eligibility based on all the evidence available. Caseworkers are trained to exercise discretion in the applicant’s favour where appropriate.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
21st Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether procedures have changed as a result of recent successful prosecutions for unlawful immigration detention.

The cross-system Detention Gatekeeper has now been introduced to scrutinise all proposed detentions independently of an arresting team. Individuals can now only enter immigration detention with the authority of the Detention Gatekeeper, who will ensure that there is no evidence of vulnerability which would be exacerbated by detention, that return will occur within a reasonable timeframe and check that any proposed detention is lawful.

Separately, Case Progression Panels have been introduced to review all cases within immigration detention by a peer-led panel. These panels focus on ensuring that there is progression toward return for all individuals detained, and that detention remains lawful.

20th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department has paid in compensation for unlawful immigration detention since figures on such compensation payments were published in 2014-15.

I refer the honourable member to my response to PQ 47658, submitted to Parliament on 19 October 2016.

20th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans for the Immigration Enforcement Business Plan for 2016-17 to be published.

The Department’s plans for immigration enforcement will be communicated in due course.

18th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when the Government's new Drug Strategy will be published.

We are currently developing the new Drug Strategy, working across government and with key partners. The new strategy will be published in due course.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to accelerate the process of family reunification for unaccompanied refugee children in Europe.

The Government began work to implement the ‘Dubs amendment’ immediately after the Immigration Bill gained Royal Assent. Over 30 children who meet the criteria in the Immigration Act have been accepted for transfer since it received Royal Assent in May, the majority of these have already arrived in the UK.

We continue to work with the French, Greek and Italian authorities and others to speed up existing family reunification processes or implement new processes where necessary for unaccompanied children. We have seconded a UK official to Greece, we have a long-standing secondee working in Italy and will shortly be seconding another official to the French Interior Ministry to support these efforts.

We have established a dedicated team in the Home Office Dublin Unit to lead on family reunion cases for unaccompanied children. Transfer requests under the Dublin Regulation are now generally processed within 10 days and children transferred within weeks. Over 120 children have been accepted for transfer this year from Europe.

We also continue to consult local authorities about the transfer unaccompanied refugee children from Europe to the UK, where it is in their best interests.

23rd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether, when considering whether to acquire a bulk personal dataset from another government department under the Investigatory Powers Bill, she plans to consult the Secretary of State for that department.

The Investigatory Powers Bill provides for robust and transparent safeguards relating to the security and intelligence agencies’ use of bulk personal datasets (BPDs). This includes a new requirement for warrants to authorise the retention and examination of BPDs. The Bill provides for both class BPD warrants, covering datasets of a particular class, and specific BPD warrants, covering an individual dataset. The draft statutory Code of Practice provides further guidance on the factors that the security and intelligence agencies should consider in determining which type of warrant to apply for. These include whether the nature or the provenance of the dataset raises particularly novel or contentious issues; whether it contains a significant component of intrusive data; and whether it contains a significant component of confidential information relating to members of sensitive professions. All warrants will be subject to the ‘double-lock’ safeguard meaning that they will be subject to approval by both a Secretary of State and a Judicial Commissioner.

6th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for how long people under the age of 18 who were transferred to a place of safety under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 were detained on average in (a) a police cell and (b) a police vehicle in England and Wales in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

However, the use of police cells as a place of safety for all persons detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983 has more than halved since 2011/12 (when figures were first collated) as shown in the following table. A joint inspection by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC); Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP); the Care Quality Commission (CQC); and Healthcare Inspectorate Wales (HIW) (published in 2013) found that the average time that each such person spent in police custody was 10 hours 32 minutes.

The Government intends to make provision in the Policing and Crime Bill, to be introduced in Parliament soon, to prohibit the use of police cells as places of safety for people under the age of 18, and to further limit their use in the case of adults. The maximum period for which a person may be detained pending a mental health assessment will also be reduced.


Table 1: number of times a police station was used as a place of safety for people detained under Section 136 Mental Health Act 1983 (England only)


Year

Section 136 detentions in police stations

Percentage reduction year on year (to nearest whole number)

2011-12

8,667

N/A[1]

2012-13

7,881

-9%

2013-14

6,028

-24%

2014-15

3,996

-34%


Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre


[1] No data on use of police stations is available for 2010-11.



8th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it her policy to commission an independent review of support rates paid to asylum applicants under section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 before making changes to that level of support.

Asylum seekers who are destitute are provided with accommodation and a cash allowance to cover their essential living needs. The level of the allowance is kept under regular review. If they are recognised as refugees they are able to claim mainstream benefits in the normal way.

The Government currently has no plans to establish an independent review of these arrangements.

8th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to ratify the Istanbul Convention.

The Coalition Government signed the Istanbul Convention on 8 June 2012 signalling its strong commitment on tackling violence against women and girls. The UK already has some of the most robust protections in the world against violence towards women and we already comply with the majority of the articles to the Convention.

One of the key components was the criminalisation of forced marriage which has now come into force following Royal Assent of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014. However Government Departments and the Devolved Administrations continue to rigorously examine whether we are doing everything necessary to be able to ratify the Convention. In particular, this includes considering the extent to which we first need to take extra-territorial jurisdiction in respect of offences established in accordance with the Convention.

21st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the Red Arrows will go on tour to foreign countries in the next three years; and what recent assessment he has made of the effect on UK based air shows of future Red Arrows international tours.

The Red Arrows have a long history of overseas tours showcasing Britain at its best and will continue to undertake them. However, at this stage future overseas tours have not been confirmed.

The RAF fully considers the overall benefits of Red Arrows tours around the UK and weighs this against the benefits of displaying overseas.

Whilst overseas tours may limit the number of displays the Red Arrows can give in the UK during the summer display season, considerable effort is made to maximise the Red Arrows appearances in the UK. The RAF's other display assets including Typhoon, the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight and the Falcons Parachute Team will continue to be available for airshows.

21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when (a) HMS Medway and (b) HMS Trent will be completed for deployment.

As announced by the Secretary of State for Defence onboard HMS TYNE on 22 November 2018, the Royal Navy is expected to have all the Batch 2 Offshore Patrol Vessels, which includes HMS MEDWAY and HMS TRENT, by the end of 2020.

Stuart Andrew
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to ensure the continued effective patrolling of the (a) North Sea, (b) English Channel, (c) Western Approaches, (d) Bristol Channel and (e) Irish Sea; and what plans he has to increase the number of vessels based at the South Atlantic station.

The Royal Navy has a range of vessels that contribute to patrolling the waters of the UK. Those vessels are tasked to reflect the day to day operational demand, including supporting and working with Other Government Departments.

Force levels in the South Atlantic are regularly kept under review, and will be adjusted to meet the operational demand.

21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps he is taking to ensure the continued effective operation of the Fisheries Protection patrol in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

Ministry of Defence (MOD) officials are working closely with colleagues from across Government to manage the consequences of exiting the EU under a 'no deal' scenario. We firmly believe it is in the interests of both the EU and the UK to strike a deal.

That remains the goal on both sides and we are confident that this will be achieved. But it is the job of a responsible Government to prepare for all scenarios, so we have already carried out significant 'no deal' preparations for the unlikely event that we reach March 2019 without agreeing a deal.

As part of the Department's 2018-19 EU exit allocation from Her Majesty's Treasury, funding was provided to sustain an enhanced number of Offshore Patrol Vessels to ensure that the MOD has the ability to meet the anticipated additional Fisheries Protection requests from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs following the UK departure from the EU.

3rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans he has to place new orders for Hawk Trainers for the Royal Air Force.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 23 October 2017 to Question 107787 to the hon. Member for Kingston Upon Hull North (Diana Johnson).

29th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the Government plans to bring forward legislative proposals to make it easier for tenants in rented accommodated to have pets.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Dissolution.

16th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment the Government has made of the effect on pet owners of the implementation of the Tenant Fees Act 2019.

The government has not made a specific assessment of the effect on pet owners of the implementation of the Tenant Fees Act 2019.

26th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effect of disregarding restrictive covenants or planning conditions intended to prevent a domestic residence from operating a business from that premises when taking a decision to transfer a domestic dwelling from council tax to Uniform Business Rate.

The Valuation Office Agency decides whether a property should be subject to council tax or non-domestic rates. The Agency is an executive agency of HMRC and operates independently of Ministers. In reaching a view on the most appropriate listing, the Agency has regard to the relevant provisions of the Local Government Finance Act 1988. I understand that the Agency would not normally take account of whether the use is consistent with planning or other restrictions, rather it would be guided by the facts pertaining to the occupation of the property.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
26th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what guidance his Department has provided to the Valuation Office Agency on dealing with restrictive covenants or planning conditions which apply to domestic dwellings and are intended to prevent any business from operating from such a domestic dwelling when making decisions regarding the transfer of a domestic dwelling from council tax to Uniform Business Rate lists.

The Valuation Office Agency decides whether a property should be subject to council tax or non-domestic rates. The Agency is an executive agency of HMRC and operates independently of Ministers. In reaching a view on the most appropriate listing, the Agency has regard to the relevant provisions of the Local Government Finance Act 1988. I understand that the Agency would not normally take account of whether the use is consistent with planning or other restrictions, rather it would be guided by the facts pertaining to the occupation of the property.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
14th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing (a) proactive and (b) regular inspections to increase standards in the social housing sector.

Nothing is more important than ensuring people are safe in their homes. Residents’ voices need to be heard to ensure proper standards are maintained and that where things are going wrong they are picked up and addressed. We want to ensure that there is a coherent and consistent approach to regulation to deliver these objectives, and achieve the best deal for tenants and landlords. Our review of social housing regulation is exploring the most appropriate way of doing so, and we will publish the results of that review in due course.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of recommendations for a new Social Housing regulator in the report entitled A Vision for Social Housing published by Shelter.

Nothing is more important than ensuring people are safe in their homes. Residents’ voices need to be heard to ensure proper standards are maintained and that where things are going wrong they are picked up and addressed. We want to ensure that there is a coherent and consistent approach to regulation to deliver these objectives, and achieve the best deal for tenants and landlords. Our review of social housing regulation is exploring the most appropriate way of doing so, and we will publish the results of that review in due course.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of the recommendation in the Shelter report entitle of, A vision for social housing, to establish a consumer protection regulator for social renters alongside an economic regulator of social housing.

Nothing is more important than ensuring people are safe in their homes. Residents’ voices need to be heard to ensure proper standards are maintained and that where things are going wrong they are picked up and addressed. We want to ensure that there is a coherent and consistent approach to regulation to deliver these objectives, and achieve the best deal for tenants and landlords. Our review of social housing regulation is exploring the most appropriate way of doing so, and we will publish the results of that review in due course.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what proportion of housing estate developments built in the last five years have outdoor children's play areas.

The Department does not hold the information requested.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether the Community Housing Fund will continue to be distributed through local authorities from 2017-18.

The first year of the Community Housing Fund was distributed through local authorities and used to build capacity within local groups. Funding for 2017/18 will be used to deliver housing on the ground for local people.

21st Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 6.6 of the Autumn Statement 2015, when his Department plans to make available the proposed extra funding for communities affected by high levels of second home ownership.

The Department for Communities and Local Government remains committed to providing the funding indicated at Budget 2016 to support community led housing in areas affected by high levels of second home ownership. We will announce the allocation process for this funding shortly.

21st Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 6.6 of the Autumn Statement 2015, if he will publish the application process for applying for extra funding for local authorities in areas affected by high levels of second home ownership.

The Department for Communities and Local Government remains committed to providing the funding indicated at Budget 2016 to support community led housing in areas affected by high levels of second home ownership. We will announce the allocation process for this funding shortly.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether regulations are in place to ensure that (a) town councils, (b) parish councils and (c) local communities can exercise a community right to bid for independent qualified contractors to deliver highways infrastructure works that are funded by Section 106 contributions from developments within their parish as part of any competitive bidding process carried out by the local highways authority.

Provisions are in place under the Community Right to Challenge to enable town and parish councils and voluntary and community organisations to challenge how council services are delivered by submitting a bid (Expression of Interest) to the relevant council.

Expressions of Interest need to be made in respect of an existing service and one that the local authority has responsibility for providing, which councils must consider and can only reject if specific circumstances set out in legislation apply. If a developer is undertaking work as part of an agreement under Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, then this would not fall under the scope of the Right to Challenge as it would not be a local authority service.

However, if a highways service was to be delivered by a local authority as a result of a Section 106 contribution then this would be within the scope of the Right, although it is important to note that local authorities are able to reject an Expression of Interest if a service is already the subject of a procurement process or pre-procurement negotiations. If this is the case, the town or parish council or community group would be able to participate in the procurement process.

The Community Right to Bid provides local people and parish councils with the opportunity to nominate a building or land for listing by a local council as an Asset of Community Value (ACV), which, if the owner decides to sell, a moratorium of up to six months is triggered. During the moratorium period, the asset cannot be sold except to a community bidder.

If a highways service was to be delivered by a local authority as a result of a Section 106 contribution then this should be within the scope of the Community Right to Challenge. It is important to note though that local authorities are able to reject an expression of interest if a service is already the subject of a procurement process or if the authority has entered into negotiations with a third party to deliver the service and these are at least in part conducted in writing. Where the services are currently being procured, the organisation in question would be able to participate in the procurement exercise.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
11th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether regulations are in place to ensure that (a) town councils, (b) parish councils and (c) local communities receive regular updates from highways authorities about (i) the sum total for Section 106 contributions for highways infrastructure works promised and delivered within their areas each year and (ii) a breakdown of expenditure on individual works within their areas.

Section 106 agreements are negotiated and agreed between a local planning authority and a developer and/or landowner along with other interested parties in the land, such as mortgage providers. National planning policy makes clear that Section 106 requirements, modifications and discharges should be transparent and available for inspection.

Local planning authorities are expected to use all of the funding they receive through planning obligations in accordance with the terms of the individual planning obligation agreement. This is to ensure that new developments are acceptable in planning terms; benefit local communities and support the provision of local infrastructure.

Planning decisions should be based on Local Plan policy unless material considerations indicate otherwise. Representations from interested third parties may constitute material considerations. Town councils, parish councils and local communities can influence infrastructure and other considerations in Local Plans through the consultation process.

The Community Infrastructure Levy was introduced to provide a faster, fairer and more transparent approach to collecting developer contributions toward infrastructure. The Government launched a review of the Levy in 2015. This review will consider a range of issues, including the relationship between the Levy and Section 106 planning obligations.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
11th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether regulations are in place to ensure that (a) town councils, (b) parish councils and (c) local communities have access to itemised expenditure on any associated administrative, legal, design, preparatory or maintenance works associated with individual highways infrastructure works within their areas on which Section 106 contributions have been spent.

Section 106 agreements are negotiated and agreed between a local planning authority and a developer and/or landowner along with other interested parties in the land, such as mortgage providers. National planning policy makes clear that Section 106 requirements, modifications and discharges should be transparent and available for inspection.

Local planning authorities are expected to use all of the funding they receive through planning obligations in accordance with the terms of the individual planning obligation agreement. This is to ensure that new developments are acceptable in planning terms; benefit local communities and support the provision of local infrastructure.

Planning decisions should be based on Local Plan policy unless material considerations indicate otherwise. Representations from interested third parties may constitute material considerations. Town councils, parish councils and local communities can influence infrastructure and other considerations in Local Plans through the consultation process.

The Community Infrastructure Levy was introduced to provide a faster, fairer and more transparent approach to collecting developer contributions toward infrastructure. The Government launched a review of the Levy in 2015. This review will consider a range of issues, including the relationship between the Levy and Section 106 planning obligations.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
11th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what procedures are in place to ensure that (a) town councils, (b) parish councils and (c) local communities have the opportunity to influence how Section 106 contributions for highways infrastructure works are spent within their areas.

Section 106 agreements are negotiated and agreed between a local planning authority and a developer and/or landowner along with other interested parties in the land, such as mortgage providers. National planning policy makes clear that Section 106 requirements, modifications and discharges should be transparent and available for inspection.

Local planning authorities are expected to use all of the funding they receive through planning obligations in accordance with the terms of the individual planning obligation agreement. This is to ensure that new developments are acceptable in planning terms; benefit local communities and support the provision of local infrastructure.

Planning decisions should be based on Local Plan policy unless material considerations indicate otherwise. Representations from interested third parties may constitute material considerations. Town councils, parish councils and local communities can influence infrastructure and other considerations in Local Plans through the consultation process.

The Community Infrastructure Levy was introduced to provide a faster, fairer and more transparent approach to collecting developer contributions toward infrastructure. The Government launched a review of the Levy in 2015. This review will consider a range of issues, including the relationship between the Levy and Section 106 planning obligations.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
11th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, in the event that the actual cost of a Section 106 highway infrastructure scheme exceeds the previously estimated and agreed contribution, (a) what options exist for making good that shortfall, (b) whether the local authority or the developer is liable for any additional costs and (c) whether Section 106 contributions originally allocated for other schemes may be reallocated to cover such costs.

It is for the local planning authority to determine what is required and seek planning obligations through a Section 106 agreement in order to make a development acceptable in planning terms. There are three statutory tests that need to be applied when considering a planning obligation, that it is: necessary to make the development acceptable in planning terms; directly related to the development; and fairly and reasonably related in scale and kind to the development.

Developers may be asked to provide contributions for infrastructure in several ways. This may be by way of planning obligations in the form of Section 106 agreements but can also include contributions through payment of the Community Infrastructure Levy and Section 278 highway agreements.

It is for local planning authorities to decide what provisions they make in Section 106 agreements, and agree these with the interested parties, and therefore any liabilities would depend on the individual agreement. Local authorities and developers can renegotiate planning obligations by mutual agreement at any time or under Section 106A of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990. However, Local planning authorities are expected to use all of the funding they receive through planning obligations in accordance with the terms of the individual planning obligation agreement. This is to ensure that new developments are acceptable in planning terms; benefit local communities and support the provision of local infrastructure.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
11th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether Section 106 contributions for highways infrastructure works can be used to pay for (a) the costs of administrative, legal or design work or general highways maintenance works required prior to the installation of highways infrastructure works and (b) other associated overhead costs incurred by the local highways authority or its contractors.

It is for the local planning authority to determine what is required and seek planning obligations through a Section 106 agreement in order to make a development acceptable in planning terms. There are three statutory tests that need to be applied when considering a planning obligation, that it is: necessary to make the development acceptable in planning terms; directly related to the development; and fairly and reasonably related in scale and kind to the development.

Developers may be asked to provide contributions for infrastructure in several ways. This may be by way of planning obligations in the form of Section 106 agreements but can also include contributions through payment of the Community Infrastructure Levy and Section 278 highway agreements.

It is for local planning authorities to decide what provisions they make in Section 106 agreements, and agree these with the interested parties, and therefore any liabilities would depend on the individual agreement. Local authorities and developers can renegotiate planning obligations by mutual agreement at any time or under Section 106A of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990. However, Local planning authorities are expected to use all of the funding they receive through planning obligations in accordance with the terms of the individual planning obligation agreement. This is to ensure that new developments are acceptable in planning terms; benefit local communities and support the provision of local infrastructure.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
1st Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the planning protection for Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty; and if he will make a statement.

The National Planning Policy Framework provides strong protection for Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is for decision makers to apply that policy and related legislation. The local planning authorities have responsibility for determining planning applications and developing local plan policies in the first instance.

The strong protection for these valued areas is supported by planning guidance. We keep this guidance under review to ensure it reflects up-to-date planning policy.


1st Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what plans he has to provide additional practice guidance on applying planning policy and legislation in Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The National Planning Policy Framework provides strong protection for Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is for decision makers to apply that policy and related legislation. The local planning authorities have responsibility for determining planning applications and developing local plan policies in the first instance.

The strong protection for these valued areas is supported by planning guidance. We keep this guidance under review to ensure it reflects up-to-date planning policy.


4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the planning system in the delivery of mobile telecommunications infrastructure in National Parks; and how he reached that assessment.

On 10 July, the Government’s Productivity Plan set out its ambitions for mobile connectivity in England and launched the Call for Evidence. We sought views from communities, mobile network operators, local authorities and others on the ability of the planning system to deliver and support mobile connectivity in all areas of England, including technical and operational factors, which may be limiting deployment.

We are considering the evidence submitted and will announce the outcome of the planning review in due course.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of (a) the planning system, (b) technical factors and (c) operational factors on delays to the expansion of mobile telecommunications coverage in National Parks; and how he reached that assessment.

On 10 July, the Government’s Productivity Plan set out its ambitions for mobile connectivity in England and launched the Call for Evidence. We sought views from communities, mobile network operators, local authorities and others on the ability of the planning system to deliver and support mobile connectivity in all areas of England, including technical and operational factors, which may be limiting deployment.

We are considering the evidence submitted and will announce the outcome of the planning review in due course.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what measures his Department will take to protect National Park landscapes where permitted development rights for mobile telecommunications masts are granted.

On 10 July, the Government’s Productivity Plan set out its ambitions for mobile connectivity in England and launched the Call for Evidence. We sought views from communities, mobile network operators, local authorities and others on the ability of the planning system to deliver and support mobile connectivity in all areas of England, including technical and operational factors, which may be limiting deployment.

We are considering the evidence submitted and will announce the outcome of the planning review in due course.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
8th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to publish the revised commutation factors for the firefighters pension scheme.

The Government accepts in full the Pension Ombudsman’s recent determination regarding commutation factors used to calculate lump sum payments for certain firefighters and police officers. It also recognises that there are other individuals who are affected by the principles set out in this determination, and is working with pension administrators to identify these and ensure that appropriate payments are made as quickly as possible. The Government Actuary’s Department is preparing detailed guidance for administrators to aid them in calculating the amounts owed. They intend to issue this guidance, as well as tables of revised commutation factors, to administrators in the near future. At this point, they will also be made available online.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, in how many local authority areas park home site owners have breached their site licences more than three times in the last two years.

The Department for Communities and Local Government does not hold details of the number of local authority areas where site owners have breached their site licences, or details of the number of local authorities taking proceedings against site owners, or the number of local authorities who have revoked the licences of park home site owners who have breached their site licences.

This Government is determined to improve life for park home residents and we have already given residents important new rights to improve their lives and protect them from rogue site owners.


We know that a source of real anxiety for residents is the poor state of some sites and the lack of routine maintenance and repairs. That is why this Government has given local authorities, for the first time, powers to issue compliance notices requiring a site owner to carry out any necessary work to the site to comply with their licence obligations. If the site owner fails to comply, the local authority will be able to prosecute them and if convicted they will face an unlimited fine. The local authority may then enter the site and do the necessary works. In an emergency, a local authority may also enter a site and do the works if it considers there is an imminent risk to the health and safety of residents. The authority will in any of these cases be able to recover all its enforcement costs directly from the site owner. We have published guidance for local authorities on how to use their new powers to best effect.

We have also given local authorities powers to refuse to grant a new application or transfer of a site licence. We have issued guidance which sets out the matters an authority can take into account when considering an application including the funding and management arrangements in place for managing the site and complying with the licence.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many local authorities are taking proceedings against park home site owners who have breached their site licences more than three times in the last two years.

The Department for Communities and Local Government does not hold details of the number of local authority areas where site owners have breached their site licences, or details of the number of local authorities taking proceedings against site owners, or the number of local authorities who have revoked the licences of park home site owners who have breached their site licences.

This Government is determined to improve life for park home residents and we have already given residents important new rights to improve their lives and protect them from rogue site owners.


We know that a source of real anxiety for residents is the poor state of some sites and the lack of routine maintenance and repairs. That is why this Government has given local authorities, for the first time, powers to issue compliance notices requiring a site owner to carry out any necessary work to the site to comply with their licence obligations. If the site owner fails to comply, the local authority will be able to prosecute them and if convicted they will face an unlimited fine. The local authority may then enter the site and do the necessary works. In an emergency, a local authority may also enter a site and do the works if it considers there is an imminent risk to the health and safety of residents. The authority will in any of these cases be able to recover all its enforcement costs directly from the site owner. We have published guidance for local authorities on how to use their new powers to best effect.

We have also given local authorities powers to refuse to grant a new application or transfer of a site licence. We have issued guidance which sets out the matters an authority can take into account when considering an application including the funding and management arrangements in place for managing the site and complying with the licence.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many local authorities have revoked the licences of park home site owners who have breached their site licences more than three times in the last two years.

The Department for Communities and Local Government does not hold details of the number of local authority areas where site owners have breached their site licences, or details of the number of local authorities taking proceedings against site owners, or the number of local authorities who have revoked the licences of park home site owners who have breached their site licences.

This Government is determined to improve life for park home residents and we have already given residents important new rights to improve their lives and protect them from rogue site owners.


We know that a source of real anxiety for residents is the poor state of some sites and the lack of routine maintenance and repairs. That is why this Government has given local authorities, for the first time, powers to issue compliance notices requiring a site owner to carry out any necessary work to the site to comply with their licence obligations. If the site owner fails to comply, the local authority will be able to prosecute them and if convicted they will face an unlimited fine. The local authority may then enter the site and do the necessary works. In an emergency, a local authority may also enter a site and do the works if it considers there is an imminent risk to the health and safety of residents. The authority will in any of these cases be able to recover all its enforcement costs directly from the site owner. We have published guidance for local authorities on how to use their new powers to best effect.

We have also given local authorities powers to refuse to grant a new application or transfer of a site licence. We have issued guidance which sets out the matters an authority can take into account when considering an application including the funding and management arrangements in place for managing the site and complying with the licence.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the average cost to the public purse of a request for him to call in a planning application in each of the last five years.

Very few planning applications are called in each year - an average of only 8 cases in each of the last five years. In all these cases the parties who take part in the planning inquiry are expected to meet their own costs in preparing and presenting evidence. The cost to the public purse is therefore limited. It varies considerably between cases, depending on factors including the complexity of each project and the length of the planning inquiry, and whether there is any litigation following the issue of a decision.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
30th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what the definition his Department uses for 'place of worship' is for the purpose of exemption from Energy Performance Certificates.

DCLG does not define the term, "buildings used as places of worship" but allows it to take its common sense meaning.

However, those responsible for such buildings may wish to seek advice from their local weights and measures authority to ensure that they, as the relevant enforcement body, share the view that the building in question is exempt from the requirement to have an Energy Performance Certificate on sale or rent.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what measures his Department will take to protect National Park landscapes where permitted development rights for mobile telecommunications masts are granted.

On 10 July, the Government’s Productivity Plan set out its ambitions for mobile connectivity in England and launched the Call for Evidence. We sought views from communities, mobile network operators, local authorities and others on the ability of the planning system to deliver and support mobile connectivity in all areas of England, including technical and operational factors, which may be limiting deployment.

We are considering the evidence submitted and will announce the outcome of the planning review in due course.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
6th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to amend section 14 of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013 to give legal recognition to humanist marriages before waiting for the outcome of the Law Commission’s review.

The Law Commission review that the Government announced this June is a fundamental review of the law on how and where people can legally marry in England and Wales. As part of that review, the Government invited the Law Commission to make recommendations about how marriage by humanist and other non-religious belief organisations could be incorporated into a revised or new scheme for all marriages that is simple, fair and consistent.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reasons the Law Commission is undertaking a review into humanist marriages.

The Law Commission review that the Government announced this June is a fundamental review of the law on how and where people can legally marry in England and Wales. The law has been added to over several centuries without any systematic reform.

As part of that review, the Government invited the Law Commission to make recommendations about how marriage by humanist and other non-religious belief organisations could be incorporated into a revised or new scheme for all marriages that is simple, fair and consistent.

The Law Commission has published the terms of reference for the review at https://www.lawcom.gov.uk/project/weddings/.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what funding has been allocated to the Law Commission review of the law on marriage.

The Law Commission will review the law on how and where people can marry in England and Wales, and will provide recommendations for a simple, fair and consistent system which gives couples choice in to marry in a way that is meaningful to them. The cost of this project will be approximately £400,000.

This cost is for the resource for two years of a project team made up of one full-time lawyer, one full-time research assistant, a proportion of the time of a team manager and some travel, publication and translation costs (totalling approximately £150,000 per year) plus the cost of engaging a specialist academic (£50,000 per year).

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Jul 2019
What recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the probate system.

Waiting times in the probate service have recently increased. However, following urgent action by the courts service, they are now starting to improve.

The temporary delays were the result of more work coming into the system and the impact of the initial move to a new IT system for managing probate work.

Now that move is complete, and the unusually high workload has been dealt with, we expect waiting times to continue to improve – and be back to normal levels in the coming weeks.

24th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department and HM Prison and Probation Service are taking to speed up security clearance for health and social care staff commencing employment in prisons.

The last year has seen a significant increase in the level of recruitment with a target of deploying an additional 2,500 prison officers in post by the end of 2018. This has impacted the overall volume of cases handled by our shared services provider, due to significant increases in the number of applications handled. This has resulted in backlogs in processing across all of the business.

The right balance needs to be struck between having staff appropriately security cleared and the speed at which they can begin employment with HMPPS. Steps have been taken to review the whole recruitment end-to-end procedure to look at the points in which delays have or can take place. Action has been taken to address these and the backlog of cases has been reduced significantly from last year. This in turn, has also resulted in speedier processing times in security vetting for all staff.

31st Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many applications were made under S41 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999 for (a) sexual assault and (b) rape in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not held centrally.

We asked the CPS to analyse a sample of rape cases finalised in 2016 to assess the frequency and outcome of applications to introduce evidence of a complainant’s sexual history under s 41 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999.

A section 41 application was made by the defence in 13% of the 309 sample cases looked at. In 8% of the 309 sample cases, an application to permit such evidence was granted by the court.

These are not official published statistics. For further details of this study, see our report published in December: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/limiting-the-use-of-complainants-sexual-history-in-sexual-offence-cases

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
31st Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the criteria are for applications under S41 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999, in cases of rape.

The same criteria apply to proceedings in relation to all sexual offences. See page 5 of the report ‘Limiting the use of complainants’ sexual history in sexual offences cases’ available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/limiting-the-use-of-complainants-sexual-history-in-sexual-offence-cases

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
31st Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the criteria are for applications under S41 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999, in cases of sexual assault.

The same criteria apply to proceedings in relation to all sexual offences. See page 5 of the report ‘Limiting the use of complainants’ sexual history in sexual offences cases’ available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/limiting-the-use-of-complainants-sexual-history-in-sexual-offence-cases

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to collect centrally data on waiting times for coronial post mortems for (a) adults, (b) children and (c) neonatal deaths.

The Ministry of Justice collects data on the number of post mortem examinations commissioned by coroners and this is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/coroners-statistics-2016

We have no plans to collect data on waiting times for coroner post mortems.

9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of bodies were released by coroners within the Chief Coroner's target of three days in the most recent period for which figures are available.

The information requested is not held centrally.

9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average waiting time for carrying out post-mortems for (a) children and (b) adults was in the most recent period for which figures are available.

The information requested is not held centrally.

9th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if she will increase the fee paid to pathologists who conduct post-mortem examinations for coroners.

The Government keeps statutory fees under review but has no plans at the present time to amend the fees paid for coronial post-mortem examinations.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what provisions are in place to support the non-abusing parent of a child who has a parent convicted of child sexual abuse; and what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of those provisions.

The Government takes very seriously the need to protect children at risk of harm from their parents. The Government is also aware of the concerns regarding the exercise of parental responsibility by a parent who has been convicted of sexual abuse of a child.

Under the Children Act 1989, parents and guardians, as well as others who are entitled, can apply to a family court for a section 8 order in cases where a question arises in relation to the welfare of a child. These orders include prohibited steps orders and specific issue orders to restrict the exercise of parental responsibility. The court can also make child arrangements orders with provisions to protect a child, perhaps by providing for ‘no contact’ with a parent where this is considered to be in the best interests of the child.

The Government believes that these provisions provide good protection for children where a parent has been convicted of child abuse, including abuse of the child concerned, but we always keep the law and the practice in this area under review and are very conscious of the need to have the maximum possible protection of children and young people at all times.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government has taken to protect children from a parent who has been convicted of child sexual abuse.

The Government takes very seriously the need to protect children at risk of harm from their parents. The Government is also aware of the concerns regarding the exercise of parental responsibility by a parent who has been convicted of sexual abuse of a child.

Under the Children Act 1989, parents and guardians, as well as others who are entitled, can apply to a family court for a section 8 order in cases where a question arises in relation to the welfare of a child. These orders include prohibited steps orders and specific issue orders to restrict the exercise of parental responsibility. The court can also make child arrangements orders with provisions to protect a child, perhaps by providing for ‘no contact’ with a parent where this is considered to be in the best interests of the child.

The Government believes that these provisions provide good protection for children where a parent has been convicted of child abuse, including abuse of the child concerned, but we always keep the law and the practice in this area under review and are very conscious of the need to have the maximum possible protection of children and young people at all times.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the merits of restricting the access of parents who have been convicted of sexually abusing a child to their own children.

The Government takes very seriously the need to protect children at risk of harm from their parents. The Government is also aware of the concerns regarding the exercise of parental responsibility by a parent who has been convicted of sexual abuse of a child.

Under the Children Act 1989, parents and guardians, as well as others who are entitled, can apply to a family court for a section 8 order in cases where a question arises in relation to the welfare of a child. These orders include prohibited steps orders and specific issue orders to restrict the exercise of parental responsibility. The court can also make child arrangements orders with provisions to protect a child, perhaps by providing for ‘no contact’ with a parent where this is considered to be in the best interests of the child.

The Government believes that these provisions provide good protection for children where a parent has been convicted of child abuse, including abuse of the child concerned, but we always keep the law and the practice in this area under review and are very conscious of the need to have the maximum possible protection of children and young people at all times.

16th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of measures to protect children from a parent who has been convicted of child sexual abuse.

The Government takes very seriously the need to protect children at risk of harm from their parents. The Government is also aware of the concerns regarding the exercise of parental responsibility by a parent who has been convicted of sexual abuse of a child.

Under the Children Act 1989, parents and guardians, as well as others who are entitled, can apply to a family court for a section 8 order in cases where a question arises in relation to the welfare of a child. These orders include prohibited steps orders and specific issue orders to restrict the exercise of parental responsibility. The court can also make child arrangements orders with provisions to protect a child, perhaps by providing for ‘no contact’ with a parent where this is considered to be in the best interests of the child.

The Government believes that these provisions provide good protection for children where a parent has been convicted of child abuse, including abuse of the child concerned, but we always keep the law and the practice in this area under review and are very conscious of the need to have the maximum possible protection of children and young people at all times.

4th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions have taken place under the Cancer Act 1939 in each of the last 30 years.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates' courts for offences under the Cancer Act 1939, in England and Wales, from 1984 to 2013, can be viewed in the table attached.