Chris Law Portrait

Chris Law

Scottish National Party - Dundee West

First elected: 7th May 2015


Committees on Arms Export Controls
6th Jul 2020 - 16th Jan 2024
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (International Development)
20th Jun 2017 - 12th Dec 2022
Committees on Arms Export Controls (formerly Quadripartite Committee)
10th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
International Development Sub-Committee on the Work of the Independent Commission for Aid Impact
13th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
International Development Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committees on Arms Export Controls
10th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Climate Justice)
20th Jun 2017 - 1st Jul 2018
Scottish Affairs Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 12th March 2024
14:00
International Development Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The UK Government’s work on achieving SDG2: Zero Hunger
12 Mar 2024, 2 p.m.
At 2:30pm: Oral evidence
Rt Hon Rory Stewart - President at Give Directly
Donal Brown - Associate Vice-President, Programme Management at International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)
At 3:15pm: Oral evidence
Ruchi Tripathi - Global Lead on Livelihoods and Resilience at VSO
Dr Diana Onyango - Head of Technical Team at Farm Africa
View calendar
Division Votes
Wednesday 31st January 2024
Political Parties, Elections and Referendums
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 34 Scottish National Party No votes vs 0 Scottish National Party Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 273 Noes - 190
Speeches
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Oral Answers to Questions
23. What recent assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of introducing a social energy tariff.
Written Answers
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Arms Trade: Israel
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has sought legal advice on the implications for …
Early Day Motions
Monday 4th March 2024
Dundee Fairtrade City 20th anniversary
That this House celebrates the 20th anniversary of Dundee becoming a Fairtrade City; recognises that Dundee and Aberdeen were declared …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th October 2023
8. Miscellaneous
From 4 March 2020, a Member of the Executive Committee of the British Group of the Inter-Parliamentary Union. This is …
EDM signed
Monday 4th March 2024
Craig Bainbridge, Volunteer of the Year
That this House congratulates Mr Craig Bainbridge on winning the accolade, Volunteer of the Year by the Scottish Centre for …
Supported Legislation
Tuesday 9th November 2021
Recognition of Armenian Genocide Bill 2021-22
A Bill to require Her Majesty's Government formally to recognise the Armenian genocide of 1915–23; and for connected purposes.

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Chris Law has voted in 524 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Chris Law Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(15 debate interactions)
James Cleverly (Conservative)
Home Secretary
(13 debate interactions)
Alister Jack (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Scotland
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(30 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(13 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(7 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Chris Law has not made any spoken contributions to legislative debate
View all Chris Law's debates

Dundee West Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Chris Law has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Chris Law

1st March 2024
Chris Law signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 4th March 2024

Craig Bainbridge, Volunteer of the Year

Tabled by: Patricia Gibson (Scottish National Party - North Ayrshire and Arran)
That this House congratulates Mr Craig Bainbridge on winning the accolade, Volunteer of the Year by the Scottish Centre for Personal Safety; notes that this volunteer-run, Ardrossan based charity provides personal safety training to vulnerable individuals, organisations and businesses across Scotland; recognises that its empowerment-focussed and trauma-informed approach has helped …
4 signatures
(Most recent: 4 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
28th February 2024
Chris Law signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 4th March 2024

Coatbridge volunteers and the Sovereign Military Order of Malta

Tabled by: Steven Bonnar (Scottish National Party - Coatbridge, Chryston and Bellshill)
That this House commends five volunteers of the Friends Together Club of St Patrick's RC Church in Coatbridge, who were recognised for their charity work by the Sovereign Military Order of Malta on 5 February 2024 at their headquarters in Rome; congratulates Ena Marie Hamill on receiving a Silver Medal …
5 signatures
(Most recent: 4 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Chris Law's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Chris Law, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Chris Law has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Chris Law has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Chris Law has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


339 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
6 Other Department Questions
1st Feb 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether the Government has received legal advice on amending the Equality Act 2010 to include care experience as a protected characteristic.

The Government does not believe that the creation of new protected characteristics is often the most effective means of achieving positive change and fairer treatment. We will however continue to keep the Equality Act 2010 under review and if there were ever to be a formal review of the legislation, this recommendation could be revisited as part of that.

In this context, we are unable to comment on whether or not legal advice has been received on the specific question of care experience.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the President of COP26, if he will make it his policy to support loss and damage finance at COP27, in the context of the damage caused by recent flooding in Pakistan.

At COP26, Parties recognised loss and damage is already impacting lives and livelihoods and agreed to scale-up support. The Glasgow Dialogue was established to discuss the arrangements for the funding of activities to avert, minimise and address loss and damage.

In June 2022, at the Bonn Intersessional meeting, the Glasgow Dialogue on loss and damage was launched to discuss the funding arrangements for addressing loss and damage. There will be further dialogues taking place every year to 2024, though these are not formal negotiations.This will continue to be a critical forum to discuss practical ways finance can be scaled up and effectively delivered. I regularly discuss Loss and Damage with international counterparts, including non-governmental organisations and the private sector.

The UK is committed to deliver on the Glasgow Climate Pact working with Parties and Civil Society organisations to advance progress through the Glasgow Dialogue and operationalising the Santiago Network.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the President of COP26, what discussions he has had with (a) Cabinet colleagues and (b) international counterparts on the development of a loss and damage fund.

As the Hon. Gentleman is aware, COP26 was the first COP where a section of the “Cover Decisions” were devoted to Loss and Damage. We agreed a new “Glasgow Dialogue on Loss and Damage”. This Dialogue was formally launched in Bonn last week.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
26th Apr 2022
To ask the President of COP26, with reference to the Statistics on International Development: Provisional UK Aid Spend 2021, if he will provide a breakdown of Official Development Assistance spending on COP26 in 2021.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
22nd Sep 2021
To ask the President of COP26, if he will make it Government policy to commit to specific targets for climate finance that (a) supports gender equality and (b) reaches women and their organisations most affected by the climate crisis.

The UK Presidency recognises the disproportionate impact climate change has on women and girls. To achieve our long term climate goals, climate finance must deliver on gender equality, but there is work to be done. As highlighted in our priorities for public finance for COP26, published earlier this year, we are committed to improving the gender-responsiveness of climate finance and ensuring that women have full and meaningful participation in climate policy and action.

The UK has signed up to a range of initiatives to help to encourage gender equality, including to help women have better access to finance and enable them to participate in the transition to a green economy. For instance, our Partnership for Forests (P4F) programme has enabled greater female participation in designing payment-for-ecosystem-services systems in the Amazon that benefited the whole community, giving more involvement in the decision-making and leading to sustainable economic growth. As COP26 Presidency, we are calling on others to take similar steps.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment the Government has made of the security of civil servants' pensions data following the cyber attack against Capita in March 2023.

The Civil Service Pension Scheme (CSPS) contract has been structured to ensure that robust Information Security including Cyber Security controls are in place. This has been a fundamental principle from the inception of the procurement. As such the procurement has built measures into the CSPS contract and supporting requirements to ensure that Information Security including Cyber Security is of paramount importance throughout all stages of transition and the contract term. This includes:

  • CSPS requirements including a robust set of security principles that are up to date with the latest His Majesty's Government (HMG) requirements, specifically no off-shoring of CSPS data, annual IT health checks, a monthly Security Working Group to review and investigate any issues relating to security and ongoing requirement to provide Cabinet Office Digital team, assurance against the Cyber Assessment Framework (GovAssure) standard.

  • Embedding within the CSPS contract is the requirement to ensure that Capita, and the administration solution, will be subject to a rigorous accreditation process prior to any CSPS data being migrated to their infrastructure.

  • Enhancements being made to the standard Model Service Contract Security Schedule (2.4) to ensure that the Cabinet Office has the contractual leverage to enforce proactive and reactive controls for cyber and data security.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what criteria were used to assess the suitability of Capita to administer the Civil Service Pension Scheme for his Department.

The Civil Service Pension Scheme (CSPS) procurement was run in accordance with the Public Contracts Regulations 2015. In accordance with this, strict criteria were applied to the evaluation of all bids submitted. In summary:

  • All final tender bids submitted were assessed against three criteria, each with an allocated weighting. These areas were Quality (65%), Price (25%) and Social Value (10%).

  • The Quality aspects of the bid evaluated included: Security, Business Systems, Core Administration, Member & Employer Engagement, Data, Fraud & Finance, Risk & Governance and Transition.

  • The Social Value aspects of the bid evaluated included: Tackling Economic Inequality, Fighting Climate Change, Equal Opportunity and Wellbeing.

  • To ensure that the evaluation of all bids was fair, proportionate and met the criteria for best value for money, strict moderation protocols were implemented to ensure that consensus was agreed on the outcomes.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Open Government Partnership National Action Plan 2021-23 commitment to explore in greater detail developing a commitment to Aid Transparency, what plans the Government has to publish a timeline for that process.

As a part of UK membership to the Open Government Partnership, government and civil society work together to develop a National Action Plan every two years. Due to COVID-19 related resource constraints, not all commitment areas identified through the co-creation process could be developed in full, including Aid Transparency. However, as set out in the plan, we will look to explore this theme further as engagement continues into 2022.

If all parties agree to explore this topic following discussion at an upcoming multi-stakeholder forum, a discrete working group will be convened to develop a commitment. A timeline will then be published.

23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Open Government Partnership National Action Plan 2021-23 commitment to explore in greater detail developing a commitment to Aid Transparency, what steps the Government is taking to consult with stakeholders during that process.

As a part of UK membership to the Open Government Partnership, government and civil society work together to develop a National Action Plan every two years. Due to COVID-19 related resource constraints, not all commitment areas identified through the co-creation process could be developed in full, including Aid Transparency. However, as set out in the plan, we will look to explore this theme further as engagement continues into 2022.

If all parties agree to explore this topic following discussion at an upcoming multi-stakeholder forum, a discrete working group will be convened to develop a commitment. A timeline will then be published.

29th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to monitor cross-government progress to the delivery of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) as outlined in the 2021 Outcome Delivery Plans.

The Cabinet Office supports the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, which has overall policy oversight for the Sustainable Development Goals, on domestic coordination and implementation by embedding Sustainable Development Goals into the Planning and Performance Framework. Outcome Delivery Plans were published for all government departments on 15 July 2021. These plans highlight how each department will support the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals for the financial year 21-22. Departments continue to report on performance against these plans as part of the financial year 21-22 Annual Reports and Accounts process.

16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she has sought legal advice on the implications for her policies on arms export licences to Israel of the International Court of Justice’s decision on the request for provisional measures in the case concerning Application of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide in the Gaza Strip (South Africa v. Israel).

All export licence applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis against the UK’s Strategic Export Licensing Criteria, including with regard to international humanitarian law.

All licences are kept under careful and continual review and the Government is able to amend, suspend, refuse or revoke licences as circumstances require.

The Secretary of State for Business and Trade receives legal advice as appropriate, on all matters related to import and export licensing, as part of advice from officials.

Any legal advice received is subject to legal professional privilege and as such we do not comment on legal advice that may or may not have been sought or received.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment her Department has made of the potential impact of AI on democracy.

The Government takes threats posed by digitally manipulated content extremely seriously.

The Defending Democracy Taskforce is leading the Government's response, working with DSIT and others to protect the integrity of our democratic processes.

We are working with international partners to tackle this shared challenge and to ensure that social media platforms have the right processes in place to respond. The Online Safety Act puts requirements on platforms to remove illegal mis/dis information - including where it is AI generated.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if the Government will make it his policy to bring forward legislative proposals on requiring UK companies to prevent abuse and environmental destruction in their overseas supply chains and operations.

The Government expects all businesses in the UK to respect human rights and the environment throughout their operations, in line with the UN Guiding Principles and the OECD Guidelines on Multinational Enterprises. The Modern Slavery Act requires businesses with a turnover of £36 million or more, to set out the steps they have taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains. Financial penalties will be introduced through primary legislation, when parliamentary time allows, to increase compliance.

We have also introduced world-leading due diligence legislation through the Environment Act to tackle illegal deforestation in UK supply chains.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government will take to hold to account companies that fail to prevent human rights and environmental abuse in their supply chains.

The Government expects all businesses in the UK to respect human rights and the environment throughout their operations, in line with the UN Guiding Principles and the OECD Guidelines on Multinational Enterprises. The Modern Slavery Act requires businesses with a turnover of £36 million or more, to set out the steps they have taken to prevent modern slavery in their operations and supply chains. Financial penalties will be introduced through primary legislation, when parliamentary time allows, to increase compliance.

We have also introduced world-leading due diligence legislation through the Environment Act to tackle illegal deforestation in UK supply chains.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to provide the Energy Bill Support Scheme discount to heat network customers in domestic households who use the same billing agent for both heat and electricity.

If a heat network customer has a domestic electricity meter, they should already be in receipt of the Energy Bills Support Scheme.

If a customer does not have a domestic electricity meter or a direct relationship with an electricity supplier, the Energy Bill Support Scheme Alternative Funding will provide a £400 support for energy bills. Eligibility, timescales and method of delivery will be announced shortly.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when heat network customers in domestic households will begin to receive the £400 Energy Bills Support Scheme discount.

If a heat network customer has a domestic electricity meter, they should already be in receipt of the Energy Bills Support Scheme.

If a customer does not have a domestic electricity meter or a direct relationship with an electricity supplier, the Energy Bill Support Scheme Alternative Funding will provide a £400 support for energy bills. Eligibility and timescales will be announced shortly.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what methods his Department has assessed for the delivery of the Energy Bills Support Scheme to domestic households on communal heating systems.

If a household on a communal heating system has a domestic electricity meter, they should already be in receipt of the Energy Bills Support Scheme.

If a customer does not have a domestic electricity meter or a direct relationship with an electricity supplier, they may be eligible for the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding. Further details have been recently announced on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/vital-help-with-energy-bills-on-the-way-for-millions-more-homes-across-great-britain-and-northern-ireland.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of whether all UK Official Development Assistance (ODA) programmes run by his Department fulfil the primary requirement that ODA supports the economic development and welfare of developing countries as its main objective.

BEIS ODA Funds must act in compliance with the International Development Act (IDA) 2002. The primary purpose of the IDA requires that spend will help reduce poverty overseas. In parallel to ensuring my Department’s ODA spend is compatible with the IDA, the spend must be in line with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Development Assistance Committee (DAC) rules on ODA. BEIS officials work in close contact with counterparts in the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) to ensure that all of our ODA spending meets this primary purpose requirement, and is accurately accounted for through the annual Statistics on International Development (SID) reporting process (published every April on gov.uk). All programmes employ relevant and robust mechanisms through programme design and implementation to ensure their primary development purpose is met.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what criteria his Department is using to make decisions on UK Official Development Assistance funded programmes for 2021.

All Government Departments with responsibility for spending Official Development Assistance took part in a cross-government process, led by my Rt. Hon. Friend the First Secretary of State, to review in detail how ODA is allocated between key priorities - recognising the difficult economic circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic.

On 2nd December last year, my Rt. Hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary wrote to the Chair of the International Development Committee setting out the Strategic Framework for UK ODA, which details the UK’s foreign aid spending priorities. In line with these priorities, he confirmed each Department’s total ODA settlement on 26th January.

We are currently working with UKRI, and all our Global Challenges Research Fund and Newton Fund Delivery Partners to manage the Financial Year 2021/22 ODA allocations. UKRI have written to their award holders to set out the process for reviewing ODA funding next year, and to explore options for individual programmes. (Full details have been published on the UKRI website). Ongoing GCRF and Newton Fund programme activity will be prioritised according to the Strategic Framework for UK ODA priorities.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that people most adversely affected by the covid-19 pandemic receive the warm home discount to which they are entitled.

This winter (2020/21), around 1 million Pension Credit Guarantee Credit recipients will receive the rebate automatically on their energy bills, as a result of data matching between the Department for Work and Pensions and participating energy suppliers. A further 200,000 low income pensioners, who meet some of the eligibility criteria, will receive a letter from Government encouraging them to claim via a dedicated helpline if they meet the remaining criteria. Of these, over 45,000 have claimed a rebate through calling the helpline so far.

To make sure that all eligible pensioners claim the support to which they are rightly entitled, in 2020 Government ran a nationwide 12-week campaign to raise awareness of Pension Credit, and launched a new online claim service, which improves access.

In addition to the Core Group, over 1.1 million vulnerable and low income households will also receive a Warm Home Discount rebate through the Broader Group, which is administered by energy suppliers.

To help vulnerable energy customers during the pandemic, Government negotiated a Voluntary Agreement with energy suppliers, to support customers impacted by COVID-19 who may be struggling with their energy bills and help to keep them on supply. Additionally, the Energy Price Cap has continued to protect around 15 million households on default and prepayment meter tariffs. Government also operates other schemes, such as the Cold Weather Payments and Winter Fuel Payment, which help vulnerable households with their winter energy costs.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Law Commission and the Scottish Law Commission's 2015 Joint Consultation Paper, Unfair Terms in Contracts?, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the recommendations made in that Paper on protecting small businesses from unfair contract clauses.

Following the joint consultation paper, the Department held two calls for evidence relating to the protection of small business when buying goods and services. As a result, it has decided not to intervene in the contractual relations agreed between businesses outside of certain sectors such as groceries and pubs. The second call for evidence led to the establishment of the Small Business Commissioner by the Department.

19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how the Government is supporting the implementation of the UNFCCC Gender Action Plan which calls for women’s equal participation in climate change negotiations through its Presidency of COP26.

The UK is fully committed to implementing and facilitating the implementation of the enhanced UNFCCC Gender Action Plan agreed at COP25, both domestically and internationally. We welcome the steps taken so far by Parties, non-Party stakeholders and the UNFCCC Secretariat to centre gender equality in climate action. We continue to call on all countries to implement the Gender Action Plan and to develop gender-responsive climate policies, plans, strategies and actions.

We recognise the impact of climate change on women and girls, in particular those from the global south or indigenous communities. The UK is committed to providing sufficient space for key constituencies, including women and girls from these communities, to participate and express their views. For example, through the UK-funded Climate Ambition Support Alliance, we are supporting the ECBI (European Capacity Building Initiative) ‘Women Negotiator Mentoring Initiative.’ This initiative will help to level the playing field in international climate negotiations, not only in terms of developed and developing countries, but also between men and women.

More broadly, the UK is committed to championing diversity and inclusivity throughout our COP26 Presidency. Our network of leaders, diplomatic representatives and expert voices reflect this in all of their work. We are also working with a diverse group of "Friends of COP" - leading world figures who are sharing their expertise for a successful summit.

19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that the effect of climate change on gender equality and women and girls in the global south is being tackled through its presidency of COP26.

Through our Presidency of COP26, we will support all to be active agents of change in addressing climate and environment issues. We will champion women, indigenous people and other key groups roles as decision-makers, educators and climate leaders in order to deliver effective, long-term solutions to climate change. For example, through the UK-funded Climate Ambition Support Alliance, we are supporting the ECBI (European Capacity Building Initiative) ‘Women Negotiator Mentoring Initiative.’ This initiative will help to level the playing field in international climate negotiations, not only in terms of developed and developing countries, but also between men and women.

The UK is also fully committed to implementing and facilitating the implementation of the Gender Action Plan agreed at COP25, both domestically and internationally. We recognise that the Gender Action Plan is a valuable tool in addressing the differentiated impacts of climate change and continue to call on all countries to develop gender-responsive climate policies, plans, strategies and actions.

19th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to improve (a) recruitment and (b) retention of key workers during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government defines key workers as those whose work are critical to the Coronavirus response. This includes those who work in the health and social care sectors, as well as in education and childcare, transport, food and delivery, utilities, communications, public safety, and the Government.

To assist retention, schools will provide essential support to the most vulnerable children and the children of those identified as key workers.

In addition, the Department of Health and Social Care is enhancing the capacity and flexible deployment of staff across essential services, for example:

  • By allowing the temporary registration of recently retired NHS staff and social workers.
  • By allowing retired staff to return to the NHS without a negative impact on their pension.
  • By providing additional indemnity cover to key workers.

By protecting the employment rights of NHS volunteers.

1st Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of the proposal by The Independent Game Developers’ Association to introduce a video games investment fund.

The Government is committed to supporting the growth of the UK’s games sector. As part of a wider package to support the growth of the creative industries, the government has committed to an £8 million expansion of the UK Games Fund. The UK Games Fund will continue to provide valuable support to early-stage games development and talented graduates throughout the UK. In addition, the Video Games Tax Relief continues to make the UK one of the leading destinations in the world for making video games.

We are not seeking to take forward a proposal for a new Video Games Investment Fund. We welcome continued discussions with the games industry on how best to support a thriving UK games sector.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
2nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 February 2023 to Question 148681 on Children in Care: Equality, how many organisations supported the independent review of children's care's recommendation that care experience should be a protected characteristic during her Department's two roundtable discussions with the care sector.

Education is a devolved matter, and the response outlines the information for England only.

In developing the Care Experience chapter of Stable Homes: Built on Love, the department held two roundtable discussions with organisations representing the care sector. The organisations were:

  • Action for Children
  • Association of Directors of Children’s Services
  • Barnardo’s
  • Become
  • Care Leavers Association
  • Career Matters
  • Catch 22
  • Coram Voice
  • Drive Forward
  • House Project
  • Just 4 Kids Law
  • National Association of Virtual School Heads
  • National Children’s Bureau
  • National Youth Advocacy Service
  • Office of the Children’s Commissioner
  • Ofsted
  • Rees Foundation
  • Spectra.

To enable the most robust and constructive exchange of views possible, these conversations were held in confidence.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
2nd Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 28 February 2023 to Question 148681 on Children in Care: Equality, which organisations attended the roundtable discussions held by her Department.

Education is a devolved matter, and the response outlines the information for England only.

In developing the Care Experience chapter of Stable Homes: Built on Love, the department held two roundtable discussions with organisations representing the care sector. The organisations were:

  • Action for Children
  • Association of Directors of Children’s Services
  • Barnardo’s
  • Become
  • Care Leavers Association
  • Career Matters
  • Catch 22
  • Coram Voice
  • Drive Forward
  • House Project
  • Just 4 Kids Law
  • National Association of Virtual School Heads
  • National Children’s Bureau
  • National Youth Advocacy Service
  • Office of the Children’s Commissioner
  • Ofsted
  • Rees Foundation
  • Spectra.

To enable the most robust and constructive exchange of views possible, these conversations were held in confidence.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to page 196 of her Department’s consultation entitled Stable Homes, Built on Love: Implementation Strategy and Consultation published in February 2023, what recent discussions she has had with representatives from the care sector on the potential merits of listing care experience as a protected characteristic.

The department has sought the views and advice from a range of stakeholders, including the National Implementation Board, local authorities, sector organisations and sector charities in developingStable Homes: Built on Love’, the government’s implementation strategy and consultation for reforming children’s social care. The department has also sought the views of care-experienced young people in developing our response. We will continue to engage during and after the consultation.

On the Care Experience chapter, as well as regular informal engagement with key stakeholders, the department held two roundtable discussions with around 20 organisations representing the care sector. The department participated in over 10 discussion sessions facilitated by charities with care-experienced children and young people. Some of these conversations included discussion of the review’s recommendation to make care experience a protected characteristic. The department’s engagement has not shown a consensus for making care experience a protected characteristic, as some fear it would add to the stigma and discrimination faced by care-experienced people.

To tackle stigma and discrimination, the department is prioritising extending strengthened corporate parenting responsibilities to all government departments and relevant public bodies. By amending the corporate parenting principles, we will ensure that policies and services that affect care-experienced young people take account of the challenges they face, remove barriers, and provide opportunities for them to thrive.

The department will hold a public consultation on the detail of these proposals in late 2023.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of care sector representatives with which her Department consulted before publishing the response to the independent review of children's social care said that care experience should become a protected characteristic.

The department has sought the views and advice from a range of stakeholders, including the National Implementation Board, local authorities, sector organisations and sector charities in developingStable Homes: Built on Love’, the government’s implementation strategy and consultation for reforming children’s social care. The department has also sought the views of care-experienced young people in developing our response. We will continue to engage during and after the consultation.

On the Care Experience chapter, as well as regular informal engagement with key stakeholders, the department held two roundtable discussions with around 20 organisations representing the care sector. The department participated in over 10 discussion sessions facilitated by charities with care-experienced children and young people. Some of these conversations included discussion of the review’s recommendation to make care experience a protected characteristic. The department’s engagement has not shown a consensus for making care experience a protected characteristic, as some fear it would add to the stigma and discrimination faced by care-experienced people.

To tackle stigma and discrimination, the department is prioritising extending strengthened corporate parenting responsibilities to all government departments and relevant public bodies. By amending the corporate parenting principles, we will ensure that policies and services that affect care-experienced young people take account of the challenges they face, remove barriers, and provide opportunities for them to thrive.

The department will hold a public consultation on the detail of these proposals in late 2023.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many representatives from the care sector her Department engaged with ahead of the publication of the UK Government's response to the independent review of children's care.

The department has sought the views and advice from a range of stakeholders, including the National Implementation Board, local authorities, sector organisations and sector charities in developingStable Homes: Built on Love’, the government’s implementation strategy and consultation for reforming children’s social care. The department has also sought the views of care-experienced young people in developing our response. We will continue to engage during and after the consultation.

On the Care Experience chapter, as well as regular informal engagement with key stakeholders, the department held two roundtable discussions with around 20 organisations representing the care sector. The department participated in over 10 discussion sessions facilitated by charities with care-experienced children and young people. Some of these conversations included discussion of the review’s recommendation to make care experience a protected characteristic. The department’s engagement has not shown a consensus for making care experience a protected characteristic, as some fear it would add to the stigma and discrimination faced by care-experienced people.

To tackle stigma and discrimination, the department is prioritising extending strengthened corporate parenting responsibilities to all government departments and relevant public bodies. By amending the corporate parenting principles, we will ensure that policies and services that affect care-experienced young people take account of the challenges they face, remove barriers, and provide opportunities for them to thrive.

The department will hold a public consultation on the detail of these proposals in late 2023.

Claire Coutinho
Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made on the effect of the proposed reductions in Official Development Assistance on the UK’s contribution to multilateral agencies operating in Yemen, including the (a) UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, (b) UN International Children’s Fund and (c) World Food Programme.

Yemen remains a key priority for the UK Government. The UK’s £160 million pledge made at the 2020 Yemen Humanitarian Pledging Conference on June 2nd was the third largest by any country and brings our total commitment to Yemen to nearly £1 billion since the conflict started in 2015. The UK remains committed to honouring this pledge and supporting various multilateral agencies operating in Yemen.

Our funding will help UN agencies provide support to at least 300,000 vulnerable people each month to help them buy food and household essentials, treat 40,000 children for malnutrition and provide 1 million people with improved water supply and basic sanitation.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made on the effect of the proposed reductions in Official Development Assistance on the UK’S contribution to multilateral funding bodies in (a) Syria and (b) the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The UK is committed to spending 0.7% of Gross National Income (GNI) on Official Development Assistance, which is enshrined in law. This means the aid budget increases when the UK economy grows and decreases if the economy shrinks.

Given the expected fall in GNI this year, aid spending is under review across all departments. No decision has been taken and we are considering the full range of our work.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the implications for the merger of her Department with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of the Aid Transparency Index rating the transparency of aid spending by her Department as very good and by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office as fair.

The 2020 Aid Transparency Index was launched on 24 June and DFID remains ‘very good’ and the 2nd best bilateral donor, and the FCO has improved performance, moving into the ‘fair’ category for the first time and scoring above average for the non-specialised ministries (foreign/defence/trade) assessed. DFID and FCO both lost points because they were unable to provide sufficiently forward-looking budget forecasts due to the limitations of the current Spending Review settlement, which will be addressed in future assessments.

The UK is globally recognised for its expertise and transparency in aid spending. The new Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office will continue to benefit from that expert knowledge as it delivers aid programmes to some of the world’s poorest people.

We are committed to improving transparency of aid globally and maintaining our high standards for overseas spending.?We will continue to be accountable to parliament and to taxpayers for how we spend UK aid, and to mandate our partners to be transparent.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if she will take steps to protect funding for (a) health and (b) education in the event that reductions in the aid budget are required as a result of a reduction in Gross National Income.

All government departments are working through how their plans need to change in light of the risk of a recession this year. No decision has been taken, but we are considering the full range of our work. It is absolutely in Britain’s interest to use ODA to make the world a healthier, safer and more prosperous place, either through tackling coronavirus, providing humanitarian aid in crises or helping girls get a quality education.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what plans her Department has to help ensure that girls are not prevented from returning to education as schools reopen following the covid-19 pandemic.

Ensuring 12 years of quality education for all girls remains a UK priority. As the effects of the COVID-19 crisis play out, the impact on girls’ education is becoming increasingly clear. The UK’s response to the pandemic aims to tackle the preventative measures to girls returning to education by mitigating short term risks by focussing on safety, nutrition, wellbeing and learning whilst schools are closed; and supporting countries to protect and maintain education budgets in the longer term.

DFID is adapting its bilateral education programmes in 18 countries. The Global Partnership for Education, to which the UK is the largest donor, is flexing over £200 million to support education sector stability in response to the pandemic. The UK has also announced £20 million for UNICEF’s crisis appeal, which includes education, and a further £5 million to the Education Cannot Wait fund to support emergency education in fragile contexts.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions she is having with UN agencies to ensure that funding for the covid-19 response is allocated urgently to organisations operating at community level.

My officials continue to liaise with UN partners on all aspects of its COVID-19 response, including their work with NGOs and civil society organisations.

DFID welcomes the vital role that NGOs and civil society organisations will continue to play in service delivery through multilaterals. UN agencies have undertaken a review of their existing procedures related to partnership management and issued additional internal guidance to simplify and expedite collaboration where appropriate. We will be working with the UN and DFID’s country offices.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps she is taking to ensure that programmes funded by her Department can be adapted to respond to the covid-19 pandemic and progress on development does not stop as a result of it.

We are maximising the UK’s efforts to tackle COVID-19 by adapting and scaling up existing programmes where they can respond to the crisis. In country, we are working quickly to pivot our programming to support the COVID-19 response, reinforcing health, humanitarian, social protection or economic support programmes.

16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that aid to Yemen is received by people who need it most.

The UK Government has a zero-tolerance policy to the diversion of UK aid funds and seeks to minimise the risks, to ensure our life-saving assistance (such as food, clean water and medical support) reaches those vulnerable Yemenis who need it most.

We do this by only channelling our support through organisations with a strong record of delivering and monitoring assistance, such as UN agencies and international NGOs. We also subject our partners to rigorous due diligence processes and regular reviews (including independent third-party verification of delivery).

We also continue to actively call on the Houthis and all parties to the conflict to immediately end all restrictions on aid agencies and comply with UN Security Council Resolution 2451 by allowing safe, rapid, and unhindered access for the humanitarian response and commercial supplies.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to help ensure that humanitarian (a) access and (b) principles are protected in the global covid-19 response.

To date, the UK has committed £744 million of UK Aid to support global efforts to combat COVID-19. We are working with all our international partners to ensure aid is effectively distributed to vulnerable countries.

The UK is a key contributor to the UN’s Global Humanitarian Response Plan (GHRP), which focuses on humanitarian access, through securing the continuity of the supply chains for essential commodities and services, and supporting the most vulnerable, including protecting and assisting refugees, Internally Displaced Peoples, migrants and host communities.

We are co-leading work with Italy through the G7 to strengthen the resilience of vulnerable countries. A large part of this work is to ensure unhindered humanitarian access for vulnerable populations, and to make sure the global response is prioritising the most in need.

We are also using diplomatic channels to ensure that international humanitarian law and global commitments regarding the rights and protection of refugees and access to asylum are upheld in this crisis.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to (a) enhance and (b) maintain humanitarian access in Yemen.

The UK is extremely concerned that Houthi restrictions and interference in the delivery of humanitarian assistance is now forcing humanitarian agencies, such as the World Food Programme, to scale back their assistance in northern Yemen. In line with United Nations Security Council Resolution 2451, we are calling on all parties to facilitate unhindered access for humanitarian actors and agencies and ensure that humanitarian workers are able to conduct their work safely and without harm.

Ministers and officials continue to engage closely with other donors and humanitarian agencies to ensure a coordinated international approach on how we adjust the way we all give aid, to ensure it gets to those in need.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions she has had with her international counterparts on planned funding levels for a humanitarian response in Yemen.

As reported by the United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, Mark Lowcock, in his UN Security Council briefing of Monday 16 April, UN agencies estimate that they need more than $900 million to enable them to continue their operations in Yemen until July.

On Thursday 23 April, DFID’s acting Permanent Secretary discussed ways of improving humanitarian funding levels in Yemen with Mark Lowcock.

The Secretary of State also discussed Yemen funding with the Executive Director of the World Food Programme on Friday 17 April and UK officials remain in close contact with other major donors such as Saudi Arabia, the US and Germany.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to support countries with weak health systems to ensure they have the resilience to respond to the covid-19 pandemic and maintain pre-existing health priorities.

The UK has, so far, pledged £744 million of UK aid to help end the COVID-19 pandemic as quickly as possible. This includes a package of £200 million to support UK charities and international organisations to help prevent infections and mitigate the impact of COVID-19 in developing countries, including maintaining essential health services.

DFID recognises strong and resilient health systems are vital to national and global health security and helping to protect the world from health threats, including COVID-19, and to maintaining the delivery of essential health services.

Through our multilateral partnerships, and our regional and national programmes, we support developing countries to make their health systems stronger and more resilient, and prepared to detect, prevent and respond to health threats, such as COVID-19.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to support women and girls as part of its response to covid-19.

There must be an explicit and visible consideration of, and support to, women and girls across DFID’s response to COVID-19. DFID has committed an additional £10 million to the United Nation’s Population Fund COVID-19 response to strengthen health systems to deliver sexual and reproductive health and gender-based violence services, support supply chains for lifesaving commodities and deliver community engagement activities. We also recently committed £20 million to the UN Children’s Fund to help keep children in developing countries safe and learning throughout the crisis. DFID has also launched a call for proposals under our Rapid Response Facility, which required all projects to mainstream gender, protection and safeguarding.

DFID is flexing existing programmes to ensure we can better respond to the specific impacts women and girls are facing as a result of COVID-19. For example, the Women's Integrated Sexual Health (WISH) programme is our flagship women’s sexual and reproductive health programme and provides lifesaving services to women in 27 countries around the world. WISH is finding innovative ways to keep delivering desperately-needed services and supplies during this pandemic, while also supporting efforts to stop the spread of the disease.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what her Department’s policy is on the Gavi replenishment period and strategy review.

As Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance’s largest donor, the UK fully supports the Gavi 5.0 strategy for 2021-2015 to ‘leave no one behind with immunisation’. The UK has committed £1.65 billion, the equivalent of £330 million per year, to support Gavi’s goal to immunise a further 300 million children and save up to 8 million lives.

The UK is hosting the Global Vaccine Summit on 4 June, which will bring countries together to raise the funds required to save millions of lives. The Gavi replenishment period is vital to raise at least $7.4 billion to fund Gavi’s investment case for its next five years of work (2021-2025).

Gavi’s strategy for the next five years was approved by the Gavi Board in June 2019, with a focus on equity and increasing vaccination coverage to unreached and under-immunised children. Gavi is adapting its strategy to support countries’ responses to the impacts of COVID-19 on routine immunisation.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what level of funding she plans to allocate to the replenishment of Gavi, the Vaccines Alliance.

The Secretary of State announced the UK’s support to Gavi in Parliament on Wednesday 29 April. Our pledge of £1.65 billion to Gavi over the next five years. will immunise up to 75 million children against vaccine preventable diseases, strengthen health systems, build resilience against coronavirus and other diseases and support global access to any future coronavirus vaccine.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that user fees are not a barrier to the treatment of covid-19 in developing countries.

I refer my honourable friend to the answer to question 39671, on 1 May.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that services to help prevent maternal, new-born and child deaths that may be under pressure as a result of covid-19 are protected.

The UK government’s commitment to end the preventable deaths of mothers, new-born babies and children by 2030 is more essential now than ever given the COVID-19 outbreak. DFID is stepping up efforts to ensure sexual, reproductive, maternal and new-born health services continue to be prioritised in our response to the pandemic, to stop mothers and babies dying unnecessarily.

Globally we are working with agencies such as the World Health Organisation, UNFPA, the Partnership for Maternal New-born and Child Health and the Global Financing Facility (GFF) to support governments to maintain health systems in affected countries, provide technical guidance and advocate for sustained reproductive, maternal, new-born and child health services. This may include filling essential supply chain gaps and supporting frontline health workers. The UK supported the GFF Investors Group press release last week that called for strong, collective action to avoid a potential secondary health crisis from disruptions in health services from COVID-19.

The UK has committed £1.65 billion, the equivalent of £330 million per year, to support Gavi’s goal to immunise a further 300 million children and save up to 8 million lives. The UK is hosting the Global Vaccine Summit on 4 June, which will bring countries together to raise the funds required to save millions. The Gavi replenishment period is vital to raise at least $7.4 billion to fund Gavi’s investment case for its next five years of work (2021-2025).

19th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how many projects and at what cost to the public purse have been assessed by (a) her and (b) her Chief Statistician as not meeting the definition of Official Development Assistance in each of the last five years.

Spend reported as Official Development Assistance (ODA) must meet the criteria set by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC). DFID receives a small non-ODA allocation from HMT for the known areas of spend we have that fall outside of the scope of ODA.

DFID collates and checks UK ODA spend data in reporting to the OECD DAC and in our National Statistics publication ‘Statistics on International Development’. The DAC Secretariat quality assures donors’ ODA spend to ensure that it is reported correctly and qualifies under the ODA rules.

21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much funding his Department has allocated to the UK-Africa Investment Summit; and whether that funding was classified as Overseas Development Assistance.

As with all such Government events, the full costing will be available in due course. 2020 UK ODA spend, including for this Summit, will be reported in Statistics on International Development, published by DFID in Autumn 2021.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps he has taken to ensure that his Department's funding for Sittwe General Hospital, Rakhine State, Burma, is not being used to discriminate against Rohingya people.

The UK supports improved health care for all communities in Rakhine through the multi-donor Access to Health Fund. We are clear that funding for Sittwe Hospital, provided as one part of this programme, must deliver improved access to healthcare for Rohingya people. We will not fund activities that further disadvantage this group.

Baroness Sugg raised the need for equal access to health treatment for all, when she met with the Rakhine State Health Director and the Union Minister of Health and Sport during her visit to Myanmar last autumn. This is in accordance with the Rakhine Advisory Commission recommendations. The UK will continue to raise this issue in discussions.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent steps her Department has taken to help ensure that legal protection for intellectual property and patents does not determine the ability of people around the world to gain urgent access to a safe, timely and effective covid-19 vaccine.

Whilst the UK has not seen evidence that Intellectual Property is a barrier to the production or supply of COVID-19 goods, including vaccines, the Government will continue to engage constructively in debates at the World Trade Organisation Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Council and other international institutions to promote affordable and equitable global access to COVID-19 vaccines for all.

The UK will continue to push ahead with pragmatic action, including voluntary licensing and technology transfer agreements for vaccines, support for COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access, and solutions for production bottlenecks and supply chain issues.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 27 October 2020 to 106364, how many projects were applied for by the Department of International Trade under the Integrated Activity Fund in the (a) 2016-17, (b) 2017-18, (c) 2018-19 and (d) 2019-20 financial years; and what the (a) allocated budget and (b) actual spending was for each project.

The Integrated Activity Fund (IAF) provides funding in support of a range of programmes across the Gulf Region. The Department for International Trade has led or been involved in programmes that include, but are not limited to, activities focusing on education; sport and culture; and healthcare. All of our work is in line with international standards and aims to share the United Kingdom's expertise and experience.

It is government policy to not disclose specific information related to individual IAF projects to maintain the confidence and confidentiality of commercial interests and our Gulf partners.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the total value was of arms exports from the UK to Saudi Arabia in 2019.

Defence and security export statistics by region – rather than individual countries – are published on GOV.UK annually

However, HM Government publishes Official Statistics about export licences granted and refused each quarter. The publicly available data on GOV.UK currently includes details of licences up to 31st March 2020; data for the period 1st April 2020 to 30th June 2020 will be published on 13th October 2020.

Licensing data does not provide an accurate export value as value needs only to be declared for Standard Individual Export Licences (SIELs). Nonetheless, export values declared in SIELs for military exports granted to Saudi Arabia in 2019 were £638,236,675; and in the last 10 years were £9,262,769,732. Licences granted are not necessarily a measure of exports shipped in a given period though – as they are valid for between two and five years – and some such licences expire before they are used so, in these circumstances, exporters must submit a further application, which can result in double counting.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the total value of arms exports from the UK to Saudi Arabia was in the last ten years.

Defence and security export statistics by region – rather than individual countries – are published on GOV.UK annually

However, HM Government publishes Official Statistics about export licences granted and refused each quarter. The publicly available data on GOV.UK currently includes details of licences up to 31st March 2020; data for the period 1st April 2020 to 30th June 2020 will be published on 13th October 2020.

Licensing data does not provide an accurate export value as value needs only to be declared for Standard Individual Export Licences (SIELs). Nonetheless, export values declared in SIELs for military exports granted to Saudi Arabia in 2019 were £638,236,675; and in the last 10 years were £9,262,769,732. Licences granted are not necessarily a measure of exports shipped in a given period though – as they are valid for between two and five years – and some such licences expire before they are used so, in these circumstances, exporters must submit a further application, which can result in double counting.

20th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department is planning to produce a hydrogen transport strategy.

The British Energy Security Strategy, UK Hydrogen Strategy and Transport Decarbonisation Plan set out hydrogen’s role in the UK’s transition to a net zero economy. In transport, hydrogen has an important potential role to play in decarbonising heavier applications such as aviation, shipping,some buses and HGVs.

24th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant on the Answer of 24 January 2023 to Question 126690 on Railways: Concessions, what consultation (a) his Department, (b) the Rail Delivery Group and (c) the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee has had with (i) disabled people and (ii) disabled persons organisations as part of its eligibility criteria review for the Disabled Persons Railcard.

The Department’s statutory advisor, the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee (DPTAC), has provided expert advice as part of the review. DPTAC takes account of the broad views and experiences of all disabled people when engaging on policy and develops its advice through engagement with organisations representing disabled people. In addition, the Rail Delivery Group has undertaken targeted research with disabled people to inform the review.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people applied for a Disabled Person’s Railcard in each year since 2018.

Railcards are administered by the Rail Delivery Group. Details of an individual's qualifying disability or progressive medical condition are not recorded centrally for Disabled Persons Railcard holders or applicants. Therefore, information on how many people with Multiple Sclerosis applied for, or obtained, a Disabled Person’s Railcard, or any information as to the proportion of applicants who have Multiple Sclerosis, is not available.

With regards to promoting the availability of the Disabled Persons Railcard, as per our Inclusive transport strategy commitment, the Department alongside the Rail Delivery Group and the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee is currently undertaking a review of the Disabled Persons Railcard. The review is considering the eligibility criteria and also the options to verify entitlement. We expect to complete this review in the first part of 2023.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of applicants for a Disabled Person’s Railcard had Multiple Sclerosis in each year since 2018.

Railcards are administered by the Rail Delivery Group. Details of an individual's qualifying disability or progressive medical condition are not recorded centrally for Disabled Persons Railcard holders or applicants. Therefore, information on how many people with Multiple Sclerosis applied for, or obtained, a Disabled Person’s Railcard, or any information as to the proportion of applicants who have Multiple Sclerosis, is not available.

With regards to promoting the availability of the Disabled Persons Railcard, as per our Inclusive transport strategy commitment, the Department alongside the Rail Delivery Group and the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee is currently undertaking a review of the Disabled Persons Railcard. The review is considering the eligibility criteria and also the options to verify entitlement. We expect to complete this review in the first part of 2023.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people living with Multiple Sclerosis have obtained a Disabled Person’s Railcard in (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland.

Railcards are administered by the Rail Delivery Group. Details of an individual's qualifying disability or progressive medical condition are not recorded centrally for Disabled Persons Railcard holders or applicants. Therefore, information on how many people with Multiple Sclerosis applied for, or obtained, a Disabled Person’s Railcard, or any information as to the proportion of applicants who have Multiple Sclerosis, is not available.

With regards to promoting the availability of the Disabled Persons Railcard, as per our Inclusive transport strategy commitment, the Department alongside the Rail Delivery Group and the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee is currently undertaking a review of the Disabled Persons Railcard. The review is considering the eligibility criteria and also the options to verify entitlement. We expect to complete this review in the first part of 2023.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people with Multiple Sclerosis have obtained a Disabled Person’s Railcard.

Railcards are administered by the Rail Delivery Group. Details of an individual's qualifying disability or progressive medical condition are not recorded centrally for Disabled Persons Railcard holders or applicants. Therefore, information on how many people with Multiple Sclerosis applied for, or obtained, a Disabled Person’s Railcard, or any information as to the proportion of applicants who have Multiple Sclerosis, is not available.

With regards to promoting the availability of the Disabled Persons Railcard, as per our Inclusive transport strategy commitment, the Department alongside the Rail Delivery Group and the Disabled Persons Transport Advisory Committee is currently undertaking a review of the Disabled Persons Railcard. The review is considering the eligibility criteria and also the options to verify entitlement. We expect to complete this review in the first part of 2023.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people have obtained a Disabled Person’s Railcard in each of the last five years.

The table below presents the number of one and three year disabled persons railcards issued annually from April 2017 to March 2022. Periodic data is also available from the Office of Rail and Road’s website which is available here:

https://dataportal.orr.gov.uk/statistics/passenger-experience/disabled-persons-railcards/

Table: Number of existing and newly issued, and one year and three year Disabled Persons Railcards (DPRC) issued, Great Britain

Financial Year

Number of existing and newly issued DPRC in circulation as at 31 March

Number of one year DPRC issued

Number of three year DPRC issued

April 2017 to March 2018

222,616

108,402

39,656

April 2018 to March 2019

239,037

115,494

44,697

April 2019 to March 2020

246,336

115,518

46,465

April 2020 to March 2021

148,608

39,462

17,984

April 2021 to March 2022

218,448

106,219

47,780

Source: Office of Rail and Road, Disabled Persons Railcards (DPRC) in circulation and issued, (Table 4310) Notes: The number of issued DPRCs was severely impacted in the year April 2020 to March 2021 due to the COVID19 pandemic.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish data on the use of motorcycles during the covid-19 outbreak in line with the data published by his Department entitled Transport use by mode: Great Britain, since 1 March 2020.

Road traffic data on the use of motorcycles during the COVID-19 pandemic is not available.

Road traffic data published as part of ‘Transport use by mode: Great Britain, since 1 March 2020’ is based on approximately 275 automatic traffic counter sites, as used for the Quarterly Road Traffic National Statistics publication series.

As with the Quarterly series (where motorcycle traffic estimates are not published), the pattern and relative infrequency of motorcycle travel means that robust estimates of change in use of this mode during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic are unavailable.

12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will include commuter motorcycling within his transport policy response to covid-19 announced on 9 May 2020; and if he will make a statement.

We recognise the social distancing benefits of using motorcycles at this time. However, the Department is keen to encourage cycling and walking as healthy and environmentally friendly forms of travel that support social distancing as well. More people have been cycling and walking during lockdown and it is the right time to encourage people to continue with this travel behaviour.

12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he plans to take to support the (a) increased, (b) easier and (c) safe use of (i) motorcycles, (ii) e-scooters and (iii) other two-wheeled commuter transport as the covid-19 lockdown is eased.

The recent update of the Department’s Road Safety Statement, which was published on 19 July 2019, provides steps to improve motorcycle safety.

In response to COVID-19, the Department is accelerating and expanding planned trials of rental e-scooters, allowing all areas that want to host trials to do so. We will introduce legislation in June to allow trials to begin.

27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what fiscal steps he is taking to (a) tackle the impact of the benefit cap on low-income families and (b) help prevent increases in child poverty.

The Government is committed to reducing child poverty and supporting low-income families. We will spend around £276bn through the welfare system in Great Britain in 2023/24 including around £124bn on people of working age and their children.

The Secretary of State reviewed the benefit cap levels in November 2022 and decided they should be increased from April 2023. The Secretary of State has a statutory obligation to review the benefit cap levels at least once every five years.

With 1.05 million job vacancies across the UK, our focus remains firmly on supporting individuals, including parents, to move into, and progress in work, an approach which is based on clear evidence about the importance of employment - particularly where it is full-time - in substantially reducing the risks of child poverty and in improving long-term outcomes for families and children. The latest statistics show that in 2021/22 children living in workless households were around 5 times more likely to be in absolute poverty after housing costs than those where all adults work.

To support those who are in work, from 1 April 2023, the National Living Wage (NLW) increased by 9.7% to £10.42 an hour for workers aged 23 and over - the largest ever cash increase for the NLW.

At the Spring Budget, the Chancellor announced an ambitious package of measures designed to support people wherever they live in the UK to enter work, increase their working hours and extend their working lives.

The Government recognises that high childcare costs can affect parents’ decisions to take up paid work or increase their working hours which is why, from 28 June, the changes to the Universal Credit (UC) childcare element announced in Spring Budget 2023 will provide generous additional financial support to parents moving into paid work and/or increasing their working hours.

This government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living which is why we are providing total support of over £94bn over 2022-23 and 2023-24 to help households and individuals with the rising bills.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will increase Local Housing Allowance to reflect the housing market.

The Local Housing Allowance (LHA) determines the maximum housing support for tenants in the private rented sector.

In 2020 we spent almost £1 billion increasing LHA rates to the 30th percentile of market rents. This significant investment has been maintained ensuring that everyone who benefited continues to do so. The level of LHA rates is reviewed annually by the Secretary of State usually in the Autumn.

For those who require additional support with housing costs, Discretionary Housing Payments (DHPs) may be available. Since April 2017, DHPs have been fully devolved to Scotland who are responsible for the allocation and payment to Scottish local authorities.

We recognise that rents are increasing. However, the challenging fiscal environment means that difficult decisions have been necessary to ensure support is targeted effectively.

Over 2022-23 and 2023- 24 the Government is providing support in excess of £94 billion to help households and individuals with the rising cost of living.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to (a) ensure regular and adequate uprating of benefits and (b) mitigate the risk of families falling into poverty.

The Government is committed to reducing poverty and supporting low-income families. We will spend around £276bn through the welfare system in Great Britain in 2023/24 including around £124bn on people of working age and children, and around £152 billion on pensioners. Of this, around £79 billion will be spent on benefits to support disabled people and people with health conditions.

With respect to up-rating, the Social Security Administration Act 1992 places an obligation on the Secretary of State to review increases in prices and earnings each tax year, and to increase certain State pensions, additional-needs disability benefits and carers benefits at least in line with the relevant index. In the case of the new and basic State Pensions, the Government is committed to increasing these in line with the triple lock for the remainder of this Parliament. This is the highest of the increase in prices, the increase in earnings, or 2.5%.

Once he has completed his review of the increase in prices, he must also decide whether to up-rate other benefit rates, and if so by how much. In the up-rating for the tax year 2023/24, all relevant State pension and benefit rates were increased by 10.1%, in line with the increase in the Consumer Prices Index in the year to September 2022.

With 1.05 million job vacancies across the UK, our focus remains firmly on supporting individuals, including parents, to move into, and progress in work, an approach which is based on clear evidence about the importance of employment - particularly where it is full-time - in substantially reducing the risks of poverty. The latest statistics show that in 2021/22 working age adults living in workless families were 7 times more likely to be in absolute poverty after housing costs than working age adults in families where all adults work.

To support those who are in work, from 1 April 2023, the National Living Wage (NLW) increased by 9.7% to £10.42 an hour for workers aged 23 and over - the largest ever cash increase for the NLW.

At the Spring Budget, the Chancellor announced an ambitious package of measures designed to support people wherever they live in the UK to enter work, increase their working hours and extend their working lives.

The Government recognises that high childcare costs can affect parents’ decisions to take up paid work or increase their working hours which is why, from 28 June, the changes to the Universal Credit (UC) childcare element announced in Spring Budget 2023 will provide generous additional financial support to parents moving into paid work and/or increasing their working hours.

This government understands the pressures people are facing with the cost of living which is why we are providing total support of over £94bn over 2022-23 and 2023-24 to help households and individuals with the rising bills.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what proportion of people aged 18 to 25 claim Universal Credit.

Statistics on the number of people in receipt of Universal Credit are published every month. The latest statistics are available by age, to December 2022, on Stat-Xplore.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of care-experienced people aged 18 to 25 claim Universal Credit.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Scottish Social Security Committee's report on Benefit take-up, published 11 March 2020, whether her Department plans to respond to the (a) recommendation that the Government develops a written strategy that aims to?maximise?take-up of reserved benefits across the UK and (b) other recommendations made in that report.

DWP officials appeared at the inquiry to provide information on reserved benefits, and they will provide further information to the Committee should it be required.

16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what plans she has to allow universal credit advance payments to be made as soon as possible without work coach meetings.

Face-to-face checks for Universal Credit advances have been removed for people self-isolating due to coronavirus so they can get the support they need quickly. Advances are available online or via the phone.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Feb 2021
What recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of his Department’s response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has assessed and managed the impact of COVID-19, taking the necessary action to suppress the virus, prevent the National Health Service from becoming overwhelmed and save lives. Levels of infection are showing clear signs of coming down and over 17 million people – one in three – have received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to extend the professional registration of health care staff on the Health and Care Professions Council register beyond the groups currently listed.

The Government does not have any plans to extend the list of professions that are regulated by the Health and Care Professions Council at this time.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will ask the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to review the evidence behind its initial decision to reject siponimod for routine use to treat active secondary multiple sclerosis.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) follows established methods and processes when developing its technology appraisals guidance and only publishes final guidance on the use of a drug after careful consideration of the evidence and consultation with stakeholders.

The appraisal consultation document (ACD) on siponimod for treating secondary progressive multiple sclerosis is draft guidance and is currently subject to public consultation, allowing stakeholders and individuals to comment on the draft guidance so that their views can be taken into account. The ACD is not NICE's final guidance on a technology and the recommendations may change after consultation.

The consultation has been running from 25 June to 5pm on 23 July 2020. The consultation can be found at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/indevelopment/gid-ta10436/consultation/html-content-2

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, whether representations were made to the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs on the UK's funding of UNRWA in meetings with Israeli government officials during his most recent visit to that country.

The UK is appalled by allegations that the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) staff were involved in the 7 October attack against Israel, a heinous act of terrorism that the UK Government has repeatedly condemned. The UK is temporarily pausing any future funding of UNRWA whilst we review these concerning allegations. We remain committed to getting humanitarian aid to the people in Gaza who desperately need it.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, if he will publish details of the discussions between the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs and his Israeli counterpart during his most recent visit to that country.

The Foreign Secretary spoke with Prime Minister Netanyahu and Foreign Minister Katz in Jerusalem, during his most recent visit to Israel.

The Foreign Secretary discussed the urgency of getting significantly more aid into Gaza to alleviate the desperate situation there with Prime Minister Netanyahu. He reiterated the need for Israel to open more crossing points into Gaza, for Nitzana and Kerom Shalom to be open for longer, and for Israel to support the UN to deliver aid effectively across the whole of Gaza.

We also want to see Israel take greater care to limit its operations to military targets and avoid harming civilians and destroying home.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
19th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Israeli counterpart on the humanitarian situation in Gaza.

The UK is calling for immediate unimpeded humanitarian access to Gaza so that essential aid can reach civilian populations, including food, water, fuel and medical supplies. The UK is also calling on all parties to protect border crossings to support safe humanitarian access and mitigate harm to civilians. The Foreign Secretary continues to engage regularly and closely with his Israeli counterparts, including in relation to ensuring the delivery of humanitarian aid to people in Gaza. He most recently spoke to the Israeli Foreign Minister, Eli Cohen, on 23 October. The UK will remain committed to mitigating the deteriorating humanitarian situation in Gaza and calling for international humanitarian law to be respected, while standing alongside the people of Israel against the terrorist group Hamas.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what information his Department holds on the level of damage that has been caused to (a) civilian infrastructure and (b) homes in Gaza since 7 October 2023.

The UK Government is clear that civilian infrastructure like schools, hospitals and shelters must be protected in conflict. The UK is calling for unimpeded humanitarian access so that essential aid can reach civilian populations in Gaza including food, water, fuel and medical supplies. The UK is steadfast in its position that all states should uphold International Humanitarian Law and we call on our friends and partners to do so. Israel has the right to defend itself proportionately and its military operations must be conducted in accordance with International Humanitarian Law. Civilian infrastructure must be respected and protected. The Prime Minister, along with the Foreign Secretary, continues to engage regularly and closely with their Israeli counterparts, including in relation to ensuring the protection of civilian infrastructure in Gaza.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he plans to have discussions on Saudi Arabia's human rights (a) record and (b) ongoing situation with the Crown Prince during his planned visit to the UK.

Saudi Arabia remains an FCDO Human Rights Priority Country. Our latest published assessment of human rights in Saudi Arabia can be found in the 2022 FCDO Human Rights and Democracy Report. Our relationship with Saudi Arabia enables us to engage candidly on human rights. The Minister for the Middle East, Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, regularly discusses human rights with the Saudi authorities, including the Saudi Vice Foreign Minister and Saudi Ambassador in London. Lord Ahmad, senior HMG officials, and non-governmental figures and organisations engaged in constructive dialogue with the Saudi Human Rights Commission during their first official visit to the UK on 26-29 September. We will continue to discuss human rights with the Saudi authorities through a range of Ministerial and official channels.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the human rights situation in Saudi Arabia; and whether he has raised that matter with his Saudi Arabian counterpart.

It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly. Saudi Arabia remains an FCDO Human Rights Priority Country. We will continue to discuss human rights with the Saudi authorities through a range of Ministerial and official channels.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the UK supports a UN fact-finding mission in Nagorno-Karabakh.

It is vital that international humanitarian organisations have independent access into Nagorno-Karabakh, so they can assess humanitarian need and respond appropriately. We therefore welcome Azerbaijan's decision on 1 October to allow UN agencies into Nagorno-Karabakh, to complement ongoing efforts by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of recent clashes between Azerbaijan and Armenia.

The UK continues to monitor the humanitarian situation in Nagorno-Karabakh and the significant refugee flows from Nagorno-Karabakh into Armenia. On 29 September, the UK Government announced that it is giving £1 million to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Alongside contributions from others, this will help fund life-saving medication, healthcare, and other essential support to those affected by the recent conflict. We continue to urge both Armenia and Azerbaijan to do all they can to reduce tensions and avoid further escalation, and to return to substantive peace negotiations. We will continue to monitor the situation, in close cooperation with our international partners.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that investments made by British Investment International are supporting public health infrastructure in (a) India and (b) Kenya.

Since 2017, British International Investment's (BII) healthcare investments have been guided by a health impact framework [https://www.bii.co.uk/en/emerging-markets-investment/evaluating-the-impact-of-private-providers-on-health-and-health-systems/] which focuses on investing in private-healthcare providers that have a positive impact on the overall healthcare system. BII's investments are subject to its Policy of Responsible Investing.

In India, BII investment has supported the delivery of quality care to more than 2 million low-income patients including in underserved parts of central and eastern India. In Kenya, BII investment supports healthcare clinics and pharmacies that provide for more than 430,000 patient visits per month with over half of patients coming from low to very low-income groups. BII investments also provide access to a medical consultation with a nurse for KES 300-600 ($2-$4).

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much and what percentage of Official Development Assistance is spent on programmes with a (a) significant focus on gender equality measured as Gender Equality Marker 1 and (b) principal focus on gender equality measured as Gender Equality Marker 2 in financial year 2022-23.

We do not have this official data for financial year 2022-23, due to the reporting times on Official Development Assistance statistics to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's (OECD) Development Assistance Committee (DAC). The latest data, for 2021, sourced from the Statistics for International Development and OECD DAC Creditor Reporting System, indicates that 49 percent of FCDO bilateral programmes were marked with the Significant (1) OECD DAC Gender Policy Marker, and 10 percent were marked as Principal (2).

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether it his Department's policy that 80 per cent of Official Development Assistance expenditure will include gender equality as a (a) significant focus measured as Gender Equality Marker 1 or (b) principal focus measured as Gender Equality Marker 2.

The FCDO's new International Women and Girls Strategy commits to at least 80 percent of FCDO's bilateral aid programmes having a focus on gender equality by 2030, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Development Assistance Committee (DAC) gender equality markers, marked as significant (1) or principal (2).

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department is taking steps to help improve the (a) transparency and (b) reporting of international climate finance.

Details of all programmes funded through UK International Climate Finance (ICF) are published on the development tracker website (Development Tracker (fcdo.gov.uk)), an ICF filter has been made available in order to support greater transparency. In addition, we publish an annual report setting out the results that we have achieved through our ICF (UK Climate Finance results 2022 - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)). We continue to work with the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development and other partners to improve the consistency and quality of global ICF reporting.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much and what proportion of the £11.6 billion International Climate Finance commitment was distributed in financial year 2022-23.

The UK is delivering on our commitment to spend £11.6 billion International Climate Finance (ICF) between 2021/22 and 2025/26 including £3 billion on development solutions that protect and restore nature and balanced between support for adaptation and mitigation. In line with our international obligations our ICF spending is published through the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The most recent data can be found here UK's Eighth National Communication and Fifth Biennial Report under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) the next report, which will cover ICF spent in 2021 and 2022 is due at the end of 2024.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much and what proportion of the £11.6 billion of international climate finance his Department will distribute between the 2021-22 and 2025-26 financial years was distributed in the 2021-22 financial year.

The UK is delivering on our commitment to spend £11.6 billion International Climate Finance (ICF) between 2021/22 and 2025/26 including £3 billion on development solutions that protect and restore nature and balanced between support for adaptation and mitigation. In line with our international obligations our ICF spending is published through the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The most recent data can be found here UK's Eighth National Communication and Fifth Biennial Report under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) the next report, which will cover ICF spent in 2021 and 2022 is due at the end of 2024.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much funding his Department will provide for (a) mitigation, (b) adaptation and (c) other international climate finance in each of the next three financial years.

The UK is delivering on our commitment to spend £11.6 billion International Climate Finance (ICF) between 2021/22 and 2025/26 including £3 billion on development solutions that protect and restore nature and balanced between support for adaptation and mitigation. In line with our international obligations our ICF spending is published through the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The most recent data can be found here UK's Eighth National Communication and Fifth Biennial Report under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) the next report, which will cover ICF spent in 2021 and 2022 is due at the end of 2024.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent progress his Department has made on spending £11.6 billion of international climate finance between the 2021-22 and 2025-26 financial years.

The UK is delivering on our commitment to spend £11.6 billion International Climate Finance (ICF) between 2021/22 and 2025/26 including £3 billion on development solutions that protect and restore nature and balanced between support for adaptation and mitigation. In line with our international obligations our ICF spending is published through the United National Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The most recent data can be found here UK's Eighth National Communication and Fifth Biennial Report under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) the next report, which will cover ICF spent in 2021 and 2022 is due at the end of 2024.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much Official Development Assistance he plans to allocate to Pakistan in (a) 2022, (b) 2023 and (c) 2024.

The FCDO is committed to transparency with the public and predictability with our partners. We will update on planned Official Development Assistance (ODA) allocations for this Spending Review period in due course.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much Official Development Assistance he plans to allocate to Zambia in (a) 2022, (b) 2023 and (c) 2024.

The FCDO is committed to transparency with the public and predictability with our partners. We will update on planned Official Development Assistance (ODA) allocations for this Spending Review period in due course.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much Official Development Assistance he plans to allocate to Malawi in (a) 2022, (b) 2023 and (c) 2024.

The FCDO is committed to transparency with the public and predictability with our partners. We will update on planned Official Development Assistance (ODA) allocations for this Spending Review period in due course.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much Official Development Assistance he plans to allocate to Sudan in (a) 2022, (b) 2023 and (c) 2024.

The FCDO is committed to transparency with the public and predictability with our partners. We will update on planned Official Development Assistance (ODA) allocations for this Spending Review period in due course.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much Official Development Assistance he plans to allocate to Ethiopia (a) 2022, (b) 2023 and (c) 2024.

The FCDO is committed to transparency with the public and predictability with our partners. We will update on planned Official Development Assistance (ODA) allocations for this Spending Review period in due course.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much Official Development Assistance he plans to allocate to Nigeria in (a) 2022, (b) 2023 and (c) 2024.

The FCDO is committed to transparency with the public and predictability with our partners. We will update on planned Official Development Assistance (ODA) allocations for this Spending Review period in due course.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
9th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what engagement the Government had with civil society groups at the negotiations for a UN Binding Treaty in October 2022; and if he will support the Treaty.

The UK Government has consistently supported the United Nations Guiding Principles on business and human rights, which are widely regarded as the authoritative international framework to steer practical action by Governments and businesses worldwide on this important agenda.

The UK has engaged with the UN Working Group looking at proposals for a new international treaty on business and human rights. The UK attended its eighth session in October 2022, setting out the UK's position via a statement which expressed our concerns on the current approach towards a treaty. The UK values the participation of civil society organisations in these negotiations.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what mechanisms his Department has in place to assess the conflict-sensitivity of humanitarian and development assistance funded by UK multi-lateral and non-government agencies.

FCDO places importance on ensuring humanitarian and development assistance is conflict sensitive. Conflict sensitivity advice is provided across FCDO by conflict technical advisers. In relation to assistance provided through multilateral organisation, the UK funds the UN Department of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs and the UN Peacebuilding Fund to place specialist Peace and Development advisers in-country responsible for driving conflict sensitivity in practice. The UK encourages all institutions to take conflict sensitivity seriously as reflected in the World Bank and the IMF Fragility Conflict and Violence strategies. FCDO funds initiatives, for example in Sudan, South Sudan, Lebanon, Yemen and Myanmar which increase coordination in the delivery of conflict sensitive aid.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department is taking steps to provide support to (a) health and (b) education services in areas captured from al-Shabaab in Somalia.

The UK recognises the importance of stabilisation to security in Somalia and the region. We coordinate closely with international partners, the UN and the Somali Government to understand the needs of communities in areas recently recovered from al-Shabaab and to support stabilisation efforts. In November, I met the Somali Defence Minister and National Security Adviser and raised the need for robust planning to meet these needs during and after military operations. Our Early Recovery Initiative supports stabilisation efforts by funding Somali-led responses to priorities identified by communities, including water and protecting critical infrastructure such as bridges. However, due to significant Improvised Explosive Device contamination and the persistent threat of Al-Shabaab counter attacks, it is not feasible for humanitarian and development actors to provide more sustained health and education services in these areas at this time.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much funding his Department has provided to peacebuilding programmes in Somalia in the 2022-23 financial year.

The UK recognises the importance of stabilisation to security in Somalia and the region. We coordinate with international partners, the UN and the Somali Government to understand the needs of communities and support stabilisation efforts, including through our Early Recovery Initiative. The UK supports Somalia's National Programme for the Treatment and Handling of Disengaged Combatants, which aims to establish a safe pathway for low-risk combatants to disengage from non-state armed groups and sustainably reintegrate into communities. The UK also supports the Somalia Stability Fund (SSF), contributing £38 million since 2016 and leveraging a further £52.7 million from others donors over the same period demonstrating their confidence in the Fund and UK leadership. During my visit to Somalia in November, I [Minister Mitchell] pursued these issues as well as proposals to enhance UK support with the Federal Government of Somalia, including President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, the Somali Defence Minister and National Security Adviser.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what plans his Department has to increase the capacity of support for (a) disarmament, (b) demobilization, (c) reintegration and (d) defection programmes in Somalia during the current Somali offensive against al-Shabaab.

The UK recognises the importance of stabilisation to security in Somalia and the region. We coordinate with international partners, the UN and the Somali Government to understand the needs of communities and support stabilisation efforts, including through our Early Recovery Initiative. The UK supports Somalia's National Programme for the Treatment and Handling of Disengaged Combatants, which aims to establish a safe pathway for low-risk combatants to disengage from non-state armed groups and sustainably reintegrate into communities. The UK also supports the Somalia Stability Fund (SSF), contributing £38 million since 2016 and leveraging a further £52.7 million from others donors over the same period demonstrating their confidence in the Fund and UK leadership. During my visit to Somalia in November, I [Minister Mitchell] pursued these issues as well as proposals to enhance UK support with the Federal Government of Somalia, including President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, the Somali Defence Minister and National Security Adviser.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
16th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department has taken recent steps to provide support to (a) disarmament, (b) demobilization, (c) reintegration and (d) defection programmes in Somalia.

The UK recognises the importance of stabilisation to security in Somalia and the region. We coordinate with international partners, the UN and the Somali Government to understand the needs of communities and support stabilisation efforts, including through our Early Recovery Initiative. The UK supports Somalia's National Programme for the Treatment and Handling of Disengaged Combatants, which aims to establish a safe pathway for low-risk combatants to disengage from non-state armed groups and sustainably reintegrate into communities. The UK also supports the Somalia Stability Fund (SSF), contributing £38 million since 2016 and leveraging a further £52.7 million from others donors over the same period demonstrating their confidence in the Fund and UK leadership. During my visit to Somalia in November, I [Minister Mitchell] pursued these issues as well as proposals to enhance UK support with the Federal Government of Somalia, including President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, the Somali Defence Minister and National Security Adviser.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will take steps to ensure that the Government’s support for international accountability mechanisms relating to the conflict in Ukraine prioritises sexual violence and other crimes against children.

The UK is providing £2.5 million support to the Atrocity Crimes Advisory (ACA) Group, to support Ukraine's domestic investigations and prosecution of core international crimes, including sexual violence and crimes against children. We are leading the conflict-related sexual violence strand of the ACA.

The UK has also made a £1 million contribution, in addition to our £10.5 million annual contribution, to support the International Criminal Court (ICC) work. This will increase the ICC's collection of evidence capacity and help provide enhanced psychosocial support to witnesses and survivors in Ukraine.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will take steps to ensure that the implementation of the Government’s new Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Strategy prioritises accountability for conflict-related sexual violence against children.

The Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative (PSVI) Strategy prioritises justice for survivors, including children, as one of four key objectives. As part of strategy implementation, the UK is delivering a new £8.6 million initiative - A.C.T (Accountability Commission & Taskforce) for Survivors - that will support national authorities deliver justice. The initiative aims to bring together expertise and best practice, build capacity, improve national implementation, and increase support to survivors

We continue to use our permanent United Nations Security Council (UNSC) membership to ensure conflict-related child protection issues remain a key part of UNSC discussions and that UN operations address child protection issues, including conflict-related sexual violence.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to support the development of new tools and medicines to tackle the global TB epidemic.

The UK Government through FCDO supports research and development for diseases of poverty such as Tuberculosis (TB) through Product Development Partnerships. This includes funding of £56.4 million to the TB Alliance since 2017. TB Alliance has developed novel treatment regimen that are shorter, safer and more effective including for multi-drug resistant strains of TB. Additionally, FCDO support to the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics has helped to develop novel diagnostics for TB including the GenXpert technology to diagnose resistant TB in under 4 hours now in use in over 140 countries globally.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department is taking steps to provide funding for international programmes to help support people with tuberculosis with the high costs they incur as a consequence of that illness.

The World Health Organisation's 2022 Global Tuberculosis Report estimates that 10.6 million people fell ill with TB in 2021, a 4.5 per cent increase from the previous year. The number of people dying from TB rose from 1.5 to 1.6 million, the second successive yearly rise. The report also shows a 3 per cent increase in the burden of drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), with 450,000 new cases of rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB) in 2021. These increases follow many years of sustained progress to reduce the burden of TB and reflect the impact of COVID-19 on country health systems.

The UK Government supports the World Health Organisation's End TB strategy towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 3.3 target to end the epidemic of tuberculosis by 2030. The UK's £1 billion pledge for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria's seventh replenishment will help the Global Fund and its partners provide TB treatment and care for 1.1 million people, screen 20 million people for TB, and provide 42,000 people with treatment for multidrug-resistant TB. In addition to this the Government also supports research and development in to new tools, evidence and medicine to combat TB; catalytic interventions to bring down prices of new products and tackle barriers to widespread access to TB diagnostics and treatments; and provides bilateral support to TB endemic countries to strengthen their health systems.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the steps his Department can take to help tackle the increase in the number of people dying from TB globally as outlined in the World Health Organisation’s 2022 Global Tuberculosis Report.

The World Health Organisation's 2022 Global Tuberculosis Report estimates that 10.6 million people fell ill with TB in 2021, a 4.5 per cent increase from the previous year. The number of people dying from TB rose from 1.5 to 1.6 million, the second successive yearly rise. The report also shows a 3 per cent increase in the burden of drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), with 450,000 new cases of rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB) in 2021. These increases follow many years of sustained progress to reduce the burden of TB and reflect the impact of COVID-19 on country health systems.

The UK Government supports the World Health Organisation's End TB strategy towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 3.3 target to end the epidemic of tuberculosis by 2030. The UK's £1 billion pledge for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria's seventh replenishment will help the Global Fund and its partners provide TB treatment and care for 1.1 million people, screen 20 million people for TB, and provide 42,000 people with treatment for multidrug-resistant TB. In addition to this the Government also supports research and development in to new tools, evidence and medicine to combat TB; catalytic interventions to bring down prices of new products and tackle barriers to widespread access to TB diagnostics and treatments; and provides bilateral support to TB endemic countries to strengthen their health systems.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to bilaterally facilitate the eradication to TB globally.

The World Health Organisation's 2022 Global Tuberculosis Report estimates that 10.6 million people fell ill with TB in 2021, a 4.5 per cent increase from the previous year. The number of people dying from TB rose from 1.5 to 1.6 million, the second successive yearly rise. The report also shows a 3 per cent increase in the burden of drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), with 450,000 new cases of rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB) in 2021. These increases follow many years of sustained progress to reduce the burden of TB and reflect the impact of COVID-19 on country health systems.

The UK Government supports the World Health Organisation's End TB strategy towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 3.3 target to end the epidemic of tuberculosis by 2030. The UK's £1 billion pledge for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria's seventh replenishment will help the Global Fund and its partners provide TB treatment and care for 1.1 million people, screen 20 million people for TB, and provide 42,000 people with treatment for multidrug-resistant TB. In addition to this the Government also supports research and development in to new tools, evidence and medicine to combat TB; catalytic interventions to bring down prices of new products and tackle barriers to widespread access to TB diagnostics and treatments; and provides bilateral support to TB endemic countries to strengthen their health systems.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure TB is eradicated globally by 2030 in line with SDG 3.3.2.

The World Health Organisation's 2022 Global Tuberculosis Report estimates that 10.6 million people fell ill with TB in 2021, a 4.5 per cent increase from the previous year. The number of people dying from TB rose from 1.5 to 1.6 million, the second successive yearly rise. The report also shows a 3 per cent increase in the burden of drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), with 450,000 new cases of rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB) in 2021. These increases follow many years of sustained progress to reduce the burden of TB and reflect the impact of COVID-19 on country health systems.

The UK Government supports the World Health Organisation's End TB strategy towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 3.3 target to end the epidemic of tuberculosis by 2030. The UK's £1 billion pledge for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria's seventh replenishment will help the Global Fund and its partners provide TB treatment and care for 1.1 million people, screen 20 million people for TB, and provide 42,000 people with treatment for multidrug-resistant TB. In addition to this the Government also supports research and development in to new tools, evidence and medicine to combat TB; catalytic interventions to bring down prices of new products and tackle barriers to widespread access to TB diagnostics and treatments; and provides bilateral support to TB endemic countries to strengthen their health systems.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the World Health Organisation’s 2022 Global Tuberculosis Report.

The World Health Organisation's 2022 Global Tuberculosis Report estimates that 10.6 million people fell ill with TB in 2021, a 4.5 per cent increase from the previous year. The number of people dying from TB rose from 1.5 to 1.6 million, the second successive yearly rise. The report also shows a 3 per cent increase in the burden of drug-resistant TB (DR-TB), with 450,000 new cases of rifampicin-resistant TB (RR-TB) in 2021. These increases follow many years of sustained progress to reduce the burden of TB and reflect the impact of COVID-19 on country health systems.

The UK Government supports the World Health Organisation's End TB strategy towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 3.3 target to end the epidemic of tuberculosis by 2030. The UK's £1 billion pledge for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria's seventh replenishment will help the Global Fund and its partners provide TB treatment and care for 1.1 million people, screen 20 million people for TB, and provide 42,000 people with treatment for multidrug-resistant TB. In addition to this the Government also supports research and development in to new tools, evidence and medicine to combat TB; catalytic interventions to bring down prices of new products and tackle barriers to widespread access to TB diagnostics and treatments; and provides bilateral support to TB endemic countries to strengthen their health systems.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he will be representing the Government at the 2023 UN High-Level Meeting on TB in September 2023.

The UK welcomes the UN High Level Meeting on TB in September 2023 and is aiming for a successful outcome that supports achieving the Sustainable Development Goal target on TB. No decision has yet been made on UK Government representation. This will be confirmed in advance of the High Level Meeting.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the £1.5 billion increase in the UK's climate finance pledge will result in a reduction of spending on international humanitarian programming.

Many countries with the highest levels of humanitarian need are also among those most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Our adaptation funding, including the £1.5 billion in 2025 announced at COP27, will include activities to prepare for and respond to climate-linked disasters and tackle food and water insecurity, helping to build the resilience of communities and reduce humanitarian needs over time.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the £1.5 billion increase in the UK's climate finance pledge will be allocated from previously announced funding.

At COP27 the Prime Minister announced that the UK would increase its funding for climate adaptation to £1.5 billion in 2025. This pledge forms part of the UK's overall commitment to deliver £11.6 billion International Climate Finance.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Humanitarian Plan for Afghanistan is fully funded.

Our commitment to Afghanistan is enduring and work on priority areas, including responding to the humanitarian crisis, remains one of our highest priorities. On 11 January 2022, the UN launched an appeal for $4.4 billion for 2022, the largest humanitarian appeal on record, reflecting the magnitude of the humanitarian challenge ahead. The UK has played a leading role in responding to the humanitarian crisis. On 31 March 2022, the UK co-hosted a donor conference with the UN, Qatar and Germany. At this, the UK committed £286 million humanitarian and development assistance for Afghanistan in this financial year, matching the previous year's commitment. The conference raised over $2.4 billion for the UN's humanitarian appeal. $2.26 billion has been provided to the appeal so far. This is the second largest global contribution in 2022 after Ukraine and we continue to work closely with other donors to ensure funding is available for the humanitarian response in Afghanistan.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to help ensure that girls of all ages can return to school in Afghanistan.

The Government is committed to upholding women and girls' rights in Afghanistan, including the right to an education. We have repeatedly condemned the Taliban's decisions to restrict girls' access to education, including through public statements and UN Security Council and Human Rights Council resolutions, most recently on 19 October. We continue to press the Taliban on women and girls' rights in our political engagement. We are providing education funding through NGO partners, the UN system, and multilateral funds including the World Bank Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund, Education Cannot Wait and the Global Partnership for Education.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of the humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan continues to face a serious and worsening humanitarian crisis, affecting more than half of the population. Over 28 million people are expected to be in humanitarian need in 2023, including an estimated 19.9 million people who lack access to sufficient food with 92% of households struggling to meet daily food needs. Some 4.7 million children and women are currently at risk of acute malnutrition. On 11 January 2022, the UN launched an appeal for $4.4 billion for 2022, the largest humanitarian appeal on record, reflecting the magnitude of the humanitarian challenge ahead. The UK has played a leading role in responding. On 31 March 2022, the UK co-hosted a donor conference with the UN, Qatar and Germany at which the UK committed £286 million for this financial year. The conference raised over $2.4 billion for the UN's humanitarian appeal.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department has taken recent steps to resume development assistance to Afghanistan.

The UK has played a leading role in the release of the almost $2 billion funds held within the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund and Asian Development Bank to support the Afghan people. We have led international conversations on support within the education and livelihoods sectors and are working closely with international partners on future engagement in Afghanistan. We have committed £286 million in aid to Afghanistan this financial year (2022/23), matching the previous year's commitment. Our aid includes support to the UN's Humanitarian Appeal, to UN Agencies such as WFP and UNICEF and NGOs including AfghanAid and the International Rescue Committee. Our aid is providing life-saving support to the most vulnerable, especially women and girls.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with his international counterparts on the charges brought against Mohammad El Halabi by the Israeli authorities.

The UK is aware of the sentencing of former Gaza World Vision Director Mohammad Halabi. We are aware of issues regarding the trial process and are engaged with the Israeli authorities on these issues. We will monitor Mr Halabi's appeal closely.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made for the implications of his policies of the sentencing of Palestinian World Vision aid worker, Mohammad El Halabi, by the Israeli authorities.

The UK is aware of the sentencing of former Gaza World Vision Director Mohammad Halabi. We are aware of issues regarding the trial process and are engaged with the Israeli authorities on these issues. We will monitor Mr Halabi's appeal closely.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of referring the case of Hafez Hureini to the International Criminal Court's investigation into alleged war crimes committed by the Israeli authorities in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

We are aware of Mr Hureini's case and will continue to monitor developments closely. The UK condemns any incidents of violence by settlers against Palestinians. We welcome the efforts of Israeli authorities to address settler violence and urge them to thoroughly investigate every instance to bring those responsible to justice and end the culture of impunity.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department will call for an independent, international investigation into the treatment of Hafez Hureini by the Israeli authorities.

We are aware of Mr Hureini's case and will continue to monitor developments closely. The UK condemns any incidents of violence by settlers against Palestinians. We welcome the efforts of Israeli authorities to address settler violence and urge them to thoroughly investigate every instance to bring those responsible to justice and end the culture of impunity.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made for the implications of his policies of the treatment of 52-year-old Palestinian man, Hafez Hureini, by the Israeli authorities.

We are aware of Mr Hureini's case and will continue to monitor developments closely. The UK condemns any incidents of violence by settlers against Palestinians. We welcome the efforts of Israeli authorities to address settler violence and urge them to thoroughly investigate every instance to bring those responsible to justice and end the culture of impunity.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of lifting the funding suspension on providing aid to Oxfam; and whether that suspension will be lifted.

The allegations that surfaced around Oxfam in the DRC are serious. It is right that is given careful consideration. The FCDO will make a decision shortly regarding whether to allow Oxfam to bid for HMG funding.

22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what progress he has made on opening the third referral pathway in the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme.

The third referral Pathway of the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme was opened on 20 June 2022, when eligible at-risk Chevening alumni and British Council and Gardaworld contractors were invited to submit Expressions of Interest (EOIs). The FCDO received over 11,400 EOIs and are reviewing them to assess if the eligibility criteria have been met. We have started notifying individuals of the outcome.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether HM Treasury's suspension of non-essential aid spend until September resulted in reductions to existing FCDO-funded programmes in developing countries.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office has paused payments in line with HM Treasury's suspension, but this has not reduced existing programming. We have continued to meet our contractual arrangements for activity which has taken place.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the potential impact that the suspension of non-essential aid spend until September has had on developing countries where the FCDO funds programmes.

We are currently assessing impacts of these measures on our programmes and programme participants.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether HM Treasury's suspension of non-essential aid spend until September applied to humanitarian aid spending.

The Government has provided significant support for Ukraine and taken a leading role in international diplomatic, economic, humanitarian, and military assistance. Some of this urgent support to Ukraine is classed as Official Development Assistance (ODA). Given the Government's response to the ongoing crisis in Ukraine, wider ODA pressures, including the ODA-eligible expenditure incurred through the Afghan resettlement programme and the UK's support to people fleeing Ukraine, the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office and other ODA spending departments will need to revisit initial allocations to ensure all ODA-eligible spending is managed within 0.5% of GNI this calendar year.

To achieve this, the Government is currently prioritising critical overseas aid funding, while also meeting needs of people seeking sanctuary in the UK from conflict in Ukraine and Afghanistan. We will prioritise spending that is vital to protect against immediate threat to life and wellbeing, will prevent people falling into humanitarian need, or will prevent delays to accessing healthcare, primary education, sanitation and clean water, in addition to considering the value for money of any decisions.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what her Department counts as non-essential aid in the context of the suspension by HM Treasury of non-essential aid spending until September.

The Government has provided significant support for Ukraine and taken a leading role in international diplomatic, economic, humanitarian, and military assistance. Some of this urgent support to Ukraine is classed as Official Development Assistance (ODA). Given the Government's response to the ongoing crisis in Ukraine, wider ODA pressures, including the ODA-eligible expenditure incurred through the Afghan resettlement programme and the UK's support to people fleeing Ukraine, the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office and other ODA spending departments will need to revisit initial allocations to ensure all ODA-eligible spending is managed within 0.5% of GNI this calendar year.

To achieve this, the Government is currently prioritising critical overseas aid funding, while also meeting needs of people seeking sanctuary in the UK from conflict in Ukraine and Afghanistan. We will prioritise spending that is vital to protect against immediate threat to life and wellbeing, will prevent people falling into humanitarian need, or will prevent delays to accessing healthcare, primary education, sanitation and clean water, in addition to considering the value for money of any decisions.

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 6 June 2022 to Question 9016 on Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office: Public Finance, for what reason the 2021-22 Annual Report and Accounts did not contain a breakdown of Official Development Assistance budget allocations for the financial year 2022-23.

Initial allocations for financial year 2022-23 have been set internally to deliver the priorities set out in the International Development Strategy and the Integrated Review, based on the FCDO's Spending Review 2021 settlement. Given the government's response to the ongoing crisis in Ukraine, wider ODA pressures including the ODA-eligible expenditure incurred through the Afghan resettlement programme and the UK's support to people fleeing Ukraine, the FCDO and other ODA spending departments will need to revisit those allocations to ensure all ODA eligible spending is managed within 0.5% of GNI this calendar year.

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 6 June 2022 to Question 9016 on Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office: Public Finance, if she will provide a breakdown of the Official Development Assistance budget allocations for the financial year 2022-23.

We remain committed to transparency and will provide updates to spending plans in due course.

20th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 6 June 2022 to Question 9016 on Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office: Public Finance, when her Department plans to publish the Official Development Assistance budget allocations for the financial year 2022-23.

We remain committed to transparency and will provide updates to spending plans in due course.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much and what proportion of UK ODA her Department has allocated to sexual and reproductive health and rights programmes in 2022-23.

As set out in the International Development Strategy, the Foreign Secretary has said the UK Government intends to restore bilateral funding for women and girls, which includes programmes focused on universal, comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and rights. The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office is working to complete its business and country planning process as soon as possible, which will allow us to finalise budget allocations, taking account of our Spending Review settlement. We cannot comment on funding allocations until this is finalised.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
14th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much her Department has spent on fossil fuel projects overseas in each of the last three years.

Since 31 March 2021 the UK Government no longer provides any new direct financial support for fossil fuel energy overseas. There are limited exemptions such as health and safety improvements and gas power generation forming part of wider clean energy transitions.

In the last 3 years the main area of Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) funding (and legacy DFID) for international fossil fuel projects has been for energy infrastructure through British International Investment (formerly known as the CDC Group) and the Private Infrastructure Development Group (PIDG). Other areas of assistance include strengthening governance in the fossil fuel sector and accelerating access to clean cooking through the use of gas.

British International Investment (BII) publishes its energy portfolio: data is available for 2019 and 2020. BII's energy portfolio as at 31 December 2021 will be published in due course.

PIDG is a multi-donor programme. The UK is the owner that has provided the largest financial support to PIDG, providing some $1.2 billion of the $1.8 billion of funding provided by owners from 2002-2021. Collectively, the PIDG contributed approximately £47.9 million (2019), £59.5 million (2020), and £32.0 million (2021) to fossil fuel projects - exclusively gas fired electricity generation and storage infrastructure.

FCDO is working closely with other government departments and international partners to scale-up access to renewable energy and transition away from fossil fuels while ensuring affordability and security of supplies.

4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she (a) has made and (b) plans to make an assessment of the potential merits of increasing her Department's funding allocations to (a) East Africa and (b) the Sahel to help prevent famine.

The UK is a major humanitarian donor to the East Africa region, and a committed donor to the Sahel. Between 2019-2021 the UK provided over £160 million in humanitarian aid to the Sahel, and in 2021/2022 we provided more than £230 million to address humanitarian requirements across East Africa.

The UK played a critical role in convening the recent UN Horn of Africa Drought Roundtable which took place in late April in Geneva. This included working with states in the region and the UN to ensure appropriate levels of participation. It helped to bring much needed focus on the drought and mobilised roughly US $400 million in new funding.

My [Minister Ford] recent engagement as the Minister for Africa has included: A ministerial conference on global food security on 24 June; a meeting with the Disasters Emergency Committee to discuss the crisis in East Africa​, comprising UK non-governmental organisations (NGOs); and engaging with World Bank President David Malpass.

On 24 June the Prime Minister pledged £372 million in global food security aid, to be allocated along the following lines; £130 million for the World Food Programme, £133 million for research and development partnerships, £52 million for UN's global emergency response fund, £37 million for the UN International Fund for Agricultural Development, £17.7 million through the FCDO's Green Growth Centre of Expertise, £2 million for the Nutrition Match Fund.

The UK will work closely with these organisations including through our network of country-based advisors to ensure that this money is used effectively and that allocations are made accordingly to need, including in the Sahel and East Africa. We continue to monitor the situation and our response closely.

4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the announcement of 24 June 2022 entitled PM pledges new support for countries on the food security frontline, how much and what proportion of the £372 million will be allocated to (a) East Africa and (b) the Sahel.

The UK is a major humanitarian donor to the East Africa region, and a committed donor to the Sahel. Between 2019-2021 the UK provided over £160 million in humanitarian aid to the Sahel, and in 2021/2022 we provided more than £230 million to address humanitarian requirements across East Africa.

The UK played a critical role in convening the recent UN Horn of Africa Drought Roundtable which took place in late April in Geneva. This included working with states in the region and the UN to ensure appropriate levels of participation. It helped to bring much needed focus on the drought and mobilised roughly US $400 million in new funding.

My [Minister Ford] recent engagement as the Minister for Africa has included: A ministerial conference on global food security on 24 June; a meeting with the Disasters Emergency Committee to discuss the crisis in East Africa​, comprising UK non-governmental organisations (NGOs); and engaging with World Bank President David Malpass.

On 24 June the Prime Minister pledged £372 million in global food security aid, to be allocated along the following lines; £130 million for the World Food Programme, £133 million for research and development partnerships, £52 million for UN's global emergency response fund, £37 million for the UN International Fund for Agricultural Development, £17.7 million through the FCDO's Green Growth Centre of Expertise, £2 million for the Nutrition Match Fund.

The UK will work closely with these organisations including through our network of country-based advisors to ensure that this money is used effectively and that allocations are made accordingly to need, including in the Sahel and East Africa. We continue to monitor the situation and our response closely.

4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she had discussions with her G7 counterparts on the specific needs of girls and women experiencing hunger during the G7 summit in June 2022.

Supporting women and girls is at the heart of UK foreign policy. The Foreign Secretary consistently champions women's and girls' rights in her international engagements. The Foreign Secretary did not attend the G7 Leaders' Summit in June 2022. However, G7 foreign ministers discussed the implications of Russia's war of aggression against Ukraine on global food security in their 14 May 2022 meeting in Germany. During the same meeting, G7 foreign ministers reaffirmed the importance of a gender-transformative mainstreaming approach. The UK is committed to protecting the most vulnerable countries and people suffering from Russia's attack and its global repercussions. We will continue to work closely with our allies in the G7 to mitigate the risk of a global food price crisis and protect food security. The FCDO's food & agriculture development programmes have always focused on improving women's food security, livelihoods and economic empowerment, and will continue to do so.

4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she encouraged her G7 counterparts to commit a larger collective pledge to tackle global food insecurity than the $4.5 billion commitment announced by G7 Leaders on 28 June 2022.

At least 1.6 billion people are already affected by the current surge in food, energy and commodity prices and are impacted in their food security. While Putin continues his brutal war of aggression against Ukraine, the world's poorest people are inching closer to starvation. Rising food and fuel prices, and tightening financial conditions have led to vicious cycles, hitting the poorest hardest.

At the World Bank Spring Meetings, the UK and partners agreed the largest ever commitment to developing countries - $170 billion over the next 15 months, including $30 billion for food security, of which $12 billion is uncommitted. The UK is calling for the G7 and wider international community to step up support to tackle global food insecurity. One important element of the G7 response announced in June is the collective G7 commitment to provide USD 4.5 billion to mitigate the scale of the global food security crisis. We have been consistently calling on our interlocutors to maximise their support. We are also calling on Russia to end its illegal war; supporting UN efforts to unblock the export of Ukrainian grain and urging all countries to keep food trade flowing. We recognise that resources are limited, and our response must be as effective as possible. We are therefore also working to enhance the coherence of the international response, including through the G7 Global Alliance on Food Security.

4th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the announcement of 24 June 2022 entitled PM pledges new support for countries on the food security frontline, what steps she (a) has taken and (b) plans to take to help ensure that the £372 million food security commitment is disbursed urgently to countries in need.

Putin's illegal, unprovoked and premeditated invasion of Ukraine is leading to further steep price rises in commodity markets and is massively exacerbating the disastrous impacts we are now seeing to global food security. Rising food and fuel prices and tightening financial conditions have led to vicious cycles hitting the poorest hardest. All must help to mitigate this unprecedented crisis.

About half of the UK's new £372 million commitment will fund immediate life-saving food assistance delivered through the World Food Programme (£130 million), support an urgent response to seven countries at acute famine risk through the Central Emergency Response Fund (£52 million), and leverage a Nutrition Match Fund (£2 million), to attract national spending and other donors support on addressing wasting in priority countries. Other elements are supporting governments and the private sector to address the food security crisis and build resilience and more sustainable food security in the most affected developing countries in the medium term. This is through various mechanisms, with disbursements across the three years 2022-24. Longer-term commitments include £17.7 million through the FCDO's Green Growth Centre of Expertise to improve the effective use of fertiliser and increase food production, £37 million for the UN International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), and £133 million for research and development partnerships with world-leading agricultural and scientific organisations to improve food security.

9th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps the Government plans to take to ensure that global food and nutrition is prioritised at the upcoming G7 Leaders’ Summit.

The UK attaches a high priority to ensuring a strong and coherent G7 response that mitigates the risk of a global food price crisis and improves global food and nutrition security. We have been taking a leading role in G7 efforts to enable Ukraine to export its stored grain and in ensuring multilateral organisations deliver on their pledges such as the $30 billion from the World Bank Group. We have been fully supportive of the G7 President led Global Alliance on Food Security to scale up support for food production and support to vulnerable peoples in developing countries in a needs-based, coordinated manner - we see it as building on rather than duplicating current structures and as helping to contain fragmentation of responses to the crisis globally.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if the Government will re-commit to enacting and financing the G7 Famine Prevention and Humanitarian Compact 2021.

The Famine Prevention and Humanitarian Crises Compact was agreed during the UK's G7 Presidency and we have provided our share of the $7 billion in humanitarian assistance to the countries one step from famine in 2021. We have allocated a further £3 billion for humanitarian response over the next three years. We continue to deliver on our policy commitments in the Compact. For example, in 2021 we partnered with the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and Germany to co-host the High-Level Event on Anticipatory Action, securing further commitments from the 75 participating Member States to scale up anticipatory action throughout the humanitarian system. In addition, we secured a commitment from the World Bank to double its Early Response Financing to $1 billion to address emerging food security crises.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if the Government will commit new emergency funding to help mitigate the risks from hunger and malnutrition in the Horn of Africa over summer 2022.

The UK is a major humanitarian donor to the East Africa region. In 2022 we have provided £72 million to support more than one million people in Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia and South Sudan affected by conflict, drought and flooding.

The UK played a critical role in convening the recent UN Horn of Africa Drought Roundtable which took place in late April in Geneva. This included working with states in the region and the UN to ensure appropriate levels of participation. It helped to bring much needed focus on the drought and it mobilised roughly US $400 million in new funding.

I have written to World Bank President Malpass this week urging further action on food security in the Horn of Africa.

We continue to monitor the situation and our response closely.

23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether any of British International Investment’s $100 million commitment to Afreximbank through a risk sharing guarantee programme made in 2018 has been used to support Afreximbank loans to the Reserve Bank of Malawi, the government of Malawi or any other Malawi state-owned bodies.

In 2018, British International Investment (BII) made a commitment of $100 million to Afreximbank in the form of a risk sharing guarantee programme to promote trade across Africa. The facility aims to provide working capital to medium and large businesses in sub-Saharan Africa countries by enabling banks to increase their risk appetite.

BII's support of Afreximbank has not involved any loans or credit facilities to the Reserve Bank of Malawi or Government of Malawi or Malawi state-owned bodies.

Trade finance - typically provided by banks and other financial institutions - is crucial to the success of a developing economy. Through services such as letters of credit for importers and guarantees for exporters, trade finance facilitates transactions, allowing businesses in developing countries to buy and sell goods more easily. BII's partnerships with confirming banks such as Afreximbank mean more trade finance products can be offered to businesses in Africa and South Asia.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the OECD DAC ODA Levels in 2021- Preliminary data, Detailed Summary Note, on total vaccine donations, what price the Government allocated to a single dose of the covid-19 vaccine when it was donated and counted as Official Development Assistance.

In 2021 the Government donated 30.8 million Astra Zeneca COVID-19 vaccines, reported 'at cost', in line with guidance from the OECD's Development Assistance Committee.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she plans to continue spending at least 50 per cent of the country/region-specific bilateral Official Development Assistance budget in Africa.

The FCDO is currently finalising Official Development Assistance allocations for the upcoming years, and these will be published in due course.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the OECD DAC ODA Levels in 2021- Preliminary data, Detailed Summary Note, how many vaccines donated and allocated as Official Development Assistance spend in 2021 had more than 10 weeks left until expiry when they were donated.

In 2021 the UK donated 30.8 million Astra Zeneca vaccines as Official Development Assistance spend. Where possible we donated vaccines with at least 8 weeks until expiry as recommended by the World Health Organisation. Of the 5.5 million doses donated bilaterally in 2021, 4.3 million were donated with over 8 weeks left until expiry and all were donated with assurances that the recipient could use them. All UK donations to COVAX have gone straight from the manufacturer to recipient country, maximising shelf life.
Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the OECD DAC ODA Levels in 2021- Preliminary data, Detailed Summary Note, on total vaccine donations, how many doses of the covid-19 vaccine were donated and allocated as Official Development Assistance in 2021.

In 2021 the UK donated 30.8 million Astra Zeneca vaccines. The cost of these was scored as Official Development Assistance.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent steps her Department has taken to help ensure the provision of (a) water, (b) food, (c) healthcare and (d) other essential products to Ukrainian children who have been displaced.

The UK has now committed £395 million in aid to the current crisis. This includes £220 million of humanitarian assistance which will be used to save lives, protect vulnerable people inside Ukraine and in neighbouring countries. This funding will help aid agencies respond to the deteriorating humanitarian situation by providing access to basic necessities and medical supplies UK Government humanitarian experts have also deployed to the region to support those fleeing the violence in Ukraine.

The UK has matched pound for pound the public's first £25 million for the DEC Ukraine Humanitarian Appeal, which has now surpassed £100 million. Donating will help DEC charities provide food, water, shelter and healthcare to refugees and displaced families.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment she has made of the levels of need for humanitarian support for displaced children in (a) Ukraine and (b) Ukraine's neighbouring countries.

The UK has now committed £395 million in aid to the current crisis. This includes £220 million of humanitarian assistance which will be used to save lives, protect vulnerable people inside Ukraine and in neighbouring countries. It will also be used to support refugees, including children, fleeing Ukraine through the provision of logistics, advice and analysis of needs on the ground.

As of 8 March, 2 million people are known to have fled Ukraine to neighbouring countries, according to UNHCR [link: https://data2.unhcr.org/en/situations/ukraine].

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent steps her Department has taken to assist with the provision of education and psychosocial support for Ukrainian children who have been displaced.

The UK has now committed £395 million in aid to the current crisis. This includes £220 million of humanitarian assistance which will be used to save lives, protect vulnerable people inside Ukraine and in neighbouring countries. It will also be used to support refugees, including children, fleeing Ukraine through the provision of logistics, advice and analysis of needs on the ground.

We are working to ensure aid agencies are able to respond to the deteriorating humanitarian situation. The Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) launched its Ukraine Appeal on 2 March which has now reached over £100 million, with the government matching £25 million of the publics donations. This is our largest ever aid-match contribution, which will help DEC charities provide food, water, shelter and healthcare to refugees and displaced families.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Government plans to provide financial support to cover the ancillary costs of each vaccine dose donated to low-income countries.

The UK has worked closely with COVAX on its recently published investment opportunity, including its financing assessments for the purchase and distribution of ancillary vaccination equipment. We are continually assessing the developing global vaccination picture, and considering how best to prioritise UK development spend.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to ensure donated surplus vaccine doses are shared with low-income countries with sufficient time before expiry.

The UK supply chain is carefully managed to ensure that vaccine doses are used and have impact as quickly as possible, either in the UK or elsewhere.

For all bilateral donations we have sought assurances that recipients have the capacity to roll-out the quantity of doses in line with the national vaccination programmes ahead of their expiry date. For donations through COVAX, the UK is working closely with COVAX and its international partners, such as UNICEF, to allocate vaccines according to need, facilitate the rapid delivery of doses and maximise the shelf life available to recipients.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if she will increase UK aid to the Rohingya refugee camps to previous levels in response to the deteriorating prospect of Rohingya refugees being able to return to Myanmar in the near-future.

We are deeply concerned about the worsening conditions for the Rohingya in Myanmar and are monitoring the situation closely. The UK remains a leading donor, despite financial pressures, and have provided over £320 million to the Rohingya crisis in Bangladesh since 2017. We are committed to returning Official Development Assistance to 0.7% of Gross National Income as soon as the fiscal situation allows. Until then, we are ensuring our aid is delivered strategically, using our combined skills on development, humanitarian, diplomacy and defence to further our response to the Rohingya refugee crisis.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what financial support her Department is providing to civil society organisations in Myanmar who are collecting evidence of Myanmar military atrocities.

The UK continues its work to protect the civic space, the human rights and media freedom of the people of Myanmar since the military coup in February 2021. We have maintained support for human rights organisations across Myanmar, including those focussed on gathering evidence of gender-based violence. We have also provided emergency funding for journalists and media organisations to enable them to continue their important efforts in cataloguing evidence of human rights violations. The UK has provided over £1.5 million on human rights monitoring in the past year, including establishing Myanmar Witness; a human rights monitoring mechanism which collects and verifies open-source information on serious human rights violations and ensures there is a spotlight on the military's actions.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps she plans to take to monitor progress towards the two global targets on girls’ education endorsed by G7 leaders in 2021.

We have committed to publish an annual report tracking progress against the two new global objectives, in collaboration with UNESCO and the UN Girls' Education Initiative. The report is due to be published in the summer of 2022 and annually will highlight the progress that low- and middle-income countries have made in getting 40 million more girls into school and 20 million more girls reading by the age of 10, as well as demonstrating the obstacles that are still to be overcome.

24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, for what reason the Government did not make a financial commitment at the recent Tokyo Nutrition for Growth summit.

The FCDO remains committed to tackling malnutrition as a fundamental part of HMG's commitment to ending preventable deaths. Our commitment at the Nutrition for Growth Summit to integrate nutrition objectives across all relevant FCDO programmes means that nutrition will play a key role in achieving our objectives on ending preventable deaths of mothers, babies and children, women and girls, humanitarian aid and global health and we will use the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) nutrition policy marker to hold ourselves to account.

The 2021 Spending Review concluded on 27 October 2021 and set departmental budgets for the next three financial years. The FCDO is currently working through an internal business planning exercise following this which will determine Official Development Assistance for nutrition programming. We are taking a number of steps to increase the impact of aid spending on nutrition and food systems, along with the promotion of nutrition objectives in other sectors.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment she has made of the impact of the Government's lack of financial contribution at the recent Tokyo Nutrition for Growth summit on progress in the Government meeting its commitment to ending the preventable deaths of mothers, newborn babies and children by 2030.

The FCDO remains committed to tackling malnutrition as a fundamental part of HMG's commitment to ending preventable deaths. Our commitment at the Nutrition for Growth Summit to integrate nutrition objectives across all relevant FCDO programmes means that nutrition will play a key role in achieving our objectives on ending preventable deaths of mothers, babies and children, women and girls, humanitarian aid and global health and we will use the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) nutrition policy marker to hold ourselves to account.

The 2021 Spending Review concluded on 27 October 2021 and set departmental budgets for the next three financial years. The FCDO is currently working through an internal business planning exercise following this which will determine Official Development Assistance for nutrition programming. We are taking a number of steps to increase the impact of aid spending on nutrition and food systems, along with the promotion of nutrition objectives in other sectors.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps the Government has taken to advance the two global girls’ education targets since they were endorsed at the G7 in June 2021.

We have built on the momentum of the G7 and UK-hosted Global Education Summit to push forward progress on girls' education. At COP26, we shone a spotlight on the links between education and climate and called for countries to prioritise early learning in their efforts to mitigate climate change. In Afghanistan, the UK has called for girls' right to secondary education to be restored, and UK humanitarian funds are helping provide safe spaces for learning for 38,000 displaced children, including 28,000 girls.

As of mid-December, more than 647 million school children were still affected by partial or full school closures. Ministers are pressing national governments to reopen schools as a matter of priority, while our bilateral education programmes and flagship Girls' Education Challenge continue to support children to catch-up on the learning they have lost. On 26 January, the UK helped launch a new report by the Global Education Evidence Advisory Panel focused on recovering children's education.

17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Government plans to publish a response to the judgement of the Uyghur Tribunal published on 9 December 2021.

We welcome the contribution the Uyghur Tribunal has made to building international awareness and understanding of the human rights violations in Xinjiang. The findings add to our serious and well-known concerns about the severity of the human rights violations being perpetrated against Uyghur Muslims and other ethnic minorities in Xinjiang. Ministers and officials have met Sir Geoffrey Nice on several occasions over the past year to discuss the tribunal's work. Whilst we do not plan to publish a response to the findings, we will continue to take robust action to hold China to account for its human rights violations in the region, working alongside our international partners.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many and what proportion of the target to donate 100 million covid-19 vaccine doses to poorer countries by mid-2022 has been delivered to date.

As of 9 December, the UK has given 19.9 million doses to COVAX, of which over 12.5 million have been delivered to developing countries - the rest are being processed, and will be allocated in due course. A further 6.3 million will be delivered to COVAX directly from AstraZeneca in the coming weeks. We have also delivered 4.6 million doses on a bilateral basis.

6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 4 November 2021 to Question 66206 on Coronavirus: Vaccination, what price the Government allocates to a single dose of a covid-19 vaccine when it is donated to low incomes countries and counted as Official Development Assistance.

The cost per dose of the UK's COVID-19 vaccines is commercially sensitive information, and cannot be disclosed. Donations to countries eligible for Official Development Assistance (ODA) will be reported as ODA. The OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) will shortly issue guidelines on the specific reporting of vaccine donations in 2021.

3rd Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 4 November 2021 to Question 66206 on Coronavirus: Vaccination, what the Government records as the cost to the public purse of covid-19 vaccines donated to low-income countries and included as Official Development Assistance.

Donations to ODA-eligible countries will be reported as Official Development Assistance. The OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) will shortly issue guidelines on the specific reporting of vaccine donations in 2021.

The cost per dose of the UK's COVID-19 vaccines is commercially sensitive information, and cannot be disclosed.

29th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when the Government plans to establish a stakeholder engagement mechanism on the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals as outlined in the commitments made in the UK’s 2019 Voluntary National Review of Progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals.

The Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy reaffirmed our commitment to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

The UK's first Voluntary National Review (VNR) provided a comprehensive account of actions being taken across the UK by government and other actors, on each of the 17 SDGs. As a result of COVID-19, the context since the VNR was published in 2019 has changed significantly. We are discussing with Cabinet Office and other relevant government departments how to appropriately take forward action on the SDGs including commitments arising from the VNR. In addition, all government departments published Outcome Delivery Plans on 15 July 2021. These plans highlight how each department will support the delivery of the SDGs for 2021-22. FCDO continues to regularly engage with a range of stakeholders, such as the Bond SDG Group, UN Global Compact UK and Project Everyone, on matters relating to the SDGs.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what progress the Government has made on achieving the commitments set out in the UK’s Voluntary National Review of Progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals, published in 2019.

The Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy reaffirmed our commitment to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

The UK's first Voluntary National Review (VNR) provided a comprehensive account of actions being taken across the UK by government and other actors, on each of the 17 SDGs. As a result of COVID-19, the context since the VNR was published in 2019 has changed significantly. We are discussing with Cabinet Office and other relevant government departments how to appropriately take forward action on the SDGs, including commitments arising from the VNR. In addition, all government departments published Outcome Delivery Plans on 15 July 2021. These plans highlight how each department will support the delivery of the SDGs for 2021-22.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when the Government plans to publish a follow-up to the 2019 Voluntary National Review of Progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals.

The Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy reaffirmed our commitment to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030.

The UK's first Voluntary National Review (VNR) provided a comprehensive account of actions being taken across the UK by government and other actors, across all 17 SDGs. No decision has been made about a follow-up to the 2019 VNR.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to engage with (a) devolved governments, (b) civil society, (c) businesses and (d) trade unions and (e) other stakeholders on the commitment in the UK Government’s Voluntary National Review of Progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals.

We are committed to working collaboratively with partners on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It is only through collaborative action that we can achieve the SDGs.

Civil society and the private sector are important policy and delivery partners for FCDO and our continued partnership remains critical in ensuring UK aid reaches those most in need and we leave no one behind. We continue to engage regularly with civil society including through bodies such as Bond. We work closely with a range of businesses both directly and through the UN Global Compact Network UK. FCDO engages with trade unions in a number of fora, including through the Ethical Trading Initiative and the board of the UK National Contact Point on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines for multinational enterprises. The devolved administrations remain responsible for implementing the SDGs in areas of devolved competence and we continue to engage them on our shared objectives.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to support civil society around the world to promote SDG implementation and monitoring.

We understand the global importance of the SDGs and are committed to working collaboratively with civil society organisations across the world to deliver change. Civil society organisations are important partners for the FCDO, delivering UK aid to those most in need, supporting policy development and tackling the biggest global challenges of our time. We continue to engage regularly with civil society at senior level including through bodies such as Bond and the organisations it represents, for instance discussing the SDGs at a Bond SDG Group town hall meeting in September. We provide direct support to civil society organisations through our country programmes and through central funds such as UK Aid Match and UK Aid Direct which work towards sustained poverty reduction and the achievement of the SDGs.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to use the Climate Resilient Health Systems Initiative under the Adaptation Action Coalition to strengthen the provision of water, sanitation and hygiene in health care facilities globally.

Water, sanitation and hygiene services (WASH) are crucial to making health systems more resilient to the impacts of climate change. Building on the important Climate Resilient Health Systems Initiative through the Adaptation Action Coalition, the UK has developed the COP26 Health Programme. This programme contains four primary initiatives to promote: climate resilient health systems, low-carbon sustainable health systems, the voice of health professionals on climate and health policy, and action orientated adaptation research. WASH will be an important factor in developing health systems to be climate resilient and sustainable.

In May 2021, the UK led the launch of the Adaptation Action Coalition water workstream, which includes the development and financing of a water tracker, to enhance water resilience in national climate plans. UK support to such initiatives, which will be discussed at COP26, will enable governments to make better use of climate funding and leverage new funding from investors for water, sanitation and hygiene.

16th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when her Department plans to publish the Statistics on International Development: Final UK Aid Spend 2020.

Statistics on International Development: Final UK Aid Spend 2020 will be published on 29th September 2021. This was pre-announced on the gov.uk upcoming statistics publications page.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he plans to take to mitigate the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on child and maternal mortality through the Government’s new action plan on Ending the Preventable Deaths of Mothers, Newborns and Children.

The UK Government remains committed to supporting maternal and child health as part of our manifesto commitment to end preventable deaths of mothers, newborns and children by 2030, including in fragile and conflict settings. This has become more important during the Covid-19 pandemic when essential health services have been disrupted.

Global health is a top priority for the UK government and health system strengthening, including in fragile and conflict settings, is central to efforts to enhance global health security, support countries to achieve universal health coverage or indeed ending the preventable deaths of mothers, babies and children. We are working globally with agencies such as the WHO, GAVI the Vaccine Alliance, and the Global Financing Facility to support governments to strengthen health systems, provide technical assistance, improve quality of care and immunise children.

8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure the health of women and children living in fragile and conflict settings is prioritised in the Government’s Action Plan on Ending the Preventable Deaths of Mothers, Newborns and Children.

The UK Government remains committed to supporting maternal and child health as part of our manifesto commitment to end preventable deaths of mothers, newborns and children by 2030, including in fragile and conflict settings. This has become more important during the Covid-19 pandemic when essential health services have been disrupted.

Global health is a top priority for the UK government and health system strengthening, including in fragile and conflict settings, is central to efforts to enhance global health security, support countries to achieve universal health coverage or indeed ending the preventable deaths of mothers, babies and children. We are working globally with agencies such as the WHO, GAVI the Vaccine Alliance, and the Global Financing Facility to support governments to strengthen health systems, provide technical assistance, improve quality of care and immunise children.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what impact assessment his Department has undertaken on the potential effect of reductions in nutrition aid funding on food-associated greenhouse gas emissions.

The UK recognises the important links between climate change and nutrition, and will continue our work on food systems in order to delivers gains for nutrition, as well as for climate and the environment. Although no specific impact assessment has been undertaken on the potential effect of reductions in nutrition aid funding on food-associated greenhouse gas emissions, the UK commitment to climate action continues, including the COP26 presidency and our international climate finance spending commitment.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what impact assessment his Department has undertaken on the potential effect of reductions in nutrition aid funding on immunity from covid 19.

The FCDO development budget has been allocated in accordance with UK strategic priorities against a challenging financial climate driven by COVID. Officials considered impact on women and girls, the most marginalised and vulnerable, people with disabilities and people from other protected groups, when developing advice to Ministers.

The available evidence does not suggest that individuals with undernutrition in developing countries are at higher risk of severe illness as a result of COVID-19, but we are tracking the emerging evidence on this question closely.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what impact assessment his Department has undertaken on the potential effect of UK nutrition aid programmes on immunity from covid-19.

Nutrition plays a critical role in the immune response to a range of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, diarrhoea, and measles. We do not have strong evidence for the impact of malnutrition on the immune response to COVID-19 in developing countries. The department will continue to review this evidence.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department has plans to add nutrition indicators to (a) health and (b) economic development overseas development aid programmes.

The UK is continuing to promote inclusion of nutrition objectives in different sectors to support efforts to address malnutrition. We are currently developing new guidance on how our agriculture, economic development and social protection programmes can be designed to improve nutrition outcomes and how we can most effectively monitor the nutrition outcomes of these programmes.

The UK worked with other donors to promote the adoption of the new nutrition policy marker by the OECD. The UK's 2019 aid spend data that was published recently included the nutrition policy marker for the first time. The use of this policy marker presents a significant improvement in the accountability of aid spending.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of malnutrition in developing countries on (a) immunity from covid-19 and (b) developing severe illness as a result of that disease.

Nutrition plays a critical role in the immune response to a range of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, diarrhoea, and measles. Though there isn't strong evidence for the impact of malnutrition on the immune response to COVID-19 in developing countries, the UK Government is maintaining close attention to emerging research on these links.

There is strong evidence that obesity increases the risk of severe disease and death from COVID-19, including in developing countries. The available evidence does not suggest that individuals with undernutrition in developing countries are at higher risk of severe illness as a result of COVID-19, but we are tracking the emerging evidence on this question closely.

18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many (a) full-time, (b) part-time and (c) full-time equivalent staff are employed in each of his Department's offices in the UK.

FCDO UK regional presence and working pattern staffing data is published in scope of Civil Service Statistics.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions he has with (a) relevant stakeholders and (b) Cabinet colleagues on the communication by the EU to the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Council of the World Trade Organization proposing a declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health in the circumstances of a pandemic.

The UK Government is currently assessing the proposal submitted by the European Union to the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Council at the World Trade Organization (WTO). The Department for International Trade leads on this issue for the UK.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has had discussions with his US counterpart on the proposed waiver of the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights at the World Trade Organization; and if he will make a statement.

The UK Government is currently assessing the proposal submitted by the European Union to the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Council at the World Trade Organization (WTO). The Department for International Trade leads on this issue for the UK.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the UK's donation of covid-19 vaccine doses to the COVAX programme as announced on 11 June 2021, when he plans to announce details of (a) exact volumes of doses given to date and (b) the timescale for future doses being given.

Our G7 Presidency in June championed equitable access to vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics and confirmed the UK will share 100 million doses within the next year, 30 million of those by the end of 2021. We have already begun discussions to ensure the first 5 million doses are shared by the end of September and we will make an announcement shortly.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent progress his Department has made on its consultations with representatives of (a) the pharmaceutical industry and (b) relevant institutions to catalyse (i) engagement with and (ii) participation in the World Health Organization’s COVID Technology Access Pool.

The UK has engaged extensively with all interested parties on the COVID-19 Technology Access Pool (C-TAP) since the World Health Organisation (WHO) published its concept paper in October 2020. We continue to have ongoing, constructive discussions with the WHO as well as industry and relevant institutions on the initiative. Joining C-TAP is a decision for industry to take and we will continue to act as an interface between the WHO and relevant stakeholders, and share lessons learnt from UK licensing models for voluntary sharing of intellectual property.

The UK has supported efforts to boost vaccine manufacturing through voluntary licensing and technology transfer partnerships, working with partners including through the Access to COVID-19 Tools Accelerator Vaccine Manufacturing Working Group and the COVAX Supply Chain and Manufacturing Task Force. Our contribution to the development of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is well known and is already ensuring more than half a billion doses of vaccine are available across the world at cost. We encourage others to follow this lead and are working to facilitate more partnerships like this.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of covid-19 vaccine doses available to low- and middle-income countries and humanitarian contexts through COVAX relative to requirement, including from the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine; and what steps he plans to take to tackle any shortfall.

The UK was one of the earliest and largest donors to COVAX, committing £548 million to the COVAX Advance Market Commitment. Our early funding helped COVAX secure deals with manufacturers to supply safe and effective vaccines for up to 92 low- and middle-income countries. COVAX has so far helped deliver over 107 million doses to over 135 participants. It aims to provide doses equivalent to up to 30% population in low- and middle-income countries by early 2022. The UK's investment in the research and development of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine has been a key contribution to the global vaccination effort and we are proud that the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine forms a significant part of the COVAX portfolio in support of these efforts.

The UK is proud that our G7 Presidency secured agreement from leaders to support vaccinating the world in 2022 and to share and finance an additional 1 billion doses over the next year to accelerate vaccine roll-out. This includes a commitment from the UK to share 100 million doses, 80% of which will go to COVAX to support countries in need, with 5 million doses to be shared by the end of September beginning in the coming weeks. We continue to work closely with the G7 and international partners on expanding global access, including efforts to mobilise international financing, increase vaccine supply and support in-country delivery, including community mobilisation and efforts to build vaccine confidence.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the expiry dates of (a) domestic surplus covid-19 vaccines and (b) future vaccine donations to the COVAX programme; and what steps he is taking to mitigate potential wastage.

Our G7 Presidency in June championed equitable access to vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics and confirmed the UK will share 100 million doses within the next year, 30 million of those by the end of 2021 with 5 million doses shared by the end of September, beginning in the coming weeks. Expiry of vaccines and the need to ensure no wastage of vaccines takes place remains a significant element in our planning of when and where the UK will share/deploy doses both domestically and with international partners. No vaccines will be shared without an agreement there is time for recipients to distribute and deploy vaccines before expiry.

Decisions on which vaccines will be shared and when will also be based on the continued reliability of supply chains, regulatory restrictions and advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca covid-19 vaccine have been distributed to low-income countries; and how that figure compares to the number of doses distributed by that company globally.

The UK is proud to be playing a leading role in the global effort to develop and distribute COVID-19 vaccines and our investment in the research and development of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine has been a key contribution to this effort. Through voluntary licensing and manufacturing partnerships across the world, more than half a billion doses of the vaccine have so far been distributed worldwide at non-profit prices, with two-thirds of these going to lower- and middle- income countries. This includes a significant portion of COVAX's supply, which has so far shipped over 109 million COVID-19 vaccines to 135 participants worldwide. We encourage others to follow this lead and are working to facilitate more partnerships like this.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the UK’s efforts in ensuring accessibility and availability of covid-19 vaccines across the globe; and what steps he is taking to increase access to those vaccines in low-income countries.

The UK is committed to supporting global access to safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines and has played a leading role in driving international support for the COVAX Facility as an effective multilateral mechanism to deliver this. The UK was one of the earliest and largest donors to COVAX, committing £548 million to COVAX's Advance Market Commitment which, through match funding, leveraged $1 billion from other donors in 2020. Our early funding has been key to helping COVAX secure deals with manufacturers to supply up to 1.8 billion doses of safe and effective vaccines for up to 92 low- and middle-income countries by early 2022. The UK's investment in the research and development of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine has been a key contribution to the global vaccination effort and we are proud that the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine forms a significant part of the COVAX portfolio in support of these efforts.

The Prime Minister also announced at the G7 that the UK will donate 100 million doses within the next year, 80% of which will go to COVAX to further support countries in need. We continue to work closely with the G7 and international partners on expanding and accelerating global access, including efforts to mobilise international financing, increase vaccine supply and support in-country delivery, including community mobilisation and efforts to build vaccine confidence, particularly in low-income countries.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of inequitable global access to covid-19 (a) vaccines and (b) other medical tools on the UK's response to covid-19.

The UK has been clear since the outset of the pandemic of the importance of equitable, global access to safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines, treatments and tests and has played a leading role in these global efforts. The UK stands side by side with our international friends and partners during this deeply challenging time to tackle COVID-19, providing over £1.3 billion of aid to the international response. The UK was one of the earliest and largest donors to the COVAX Facility, committing £548 million to COVAX's Advance Market Commitment which, through match funding, leveraged $1 billion from other donors in 2020. Our early funding has been key to helping COVAX secure deals with manufacturers to supply up to 1.8 billion doses of safe and effective vaccines for up to 92 low- and middle-income countries by early 2022. The Prime Minister also announced at the G7 that the UK will donate 100 million doses within the next year, 80% of which will go to COVAX to further support countries in need. We continue to work closely with the G7 and international partners on expanding and accelerating global access, including efforts to mobilise international financing, increase vaccine supply and support in-country delivery, including community mobilisation and efforts to build vaccine confidence, particularly in low-income countries.

The UK is among the largest donors to the Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator, contributing £813 million. This funds many international organisations working as ACT-Accelerator partners for rapid development and equitable access to COVID-19 medical tools, such as diagnostics, treatments and oxygen supplies, including the World Health Organisation, the Global Fund, Unitaid, the Wellcome Trust and the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to help ensure immediate access to (a) vaccines and (b) treatments in (i) sub-Saharan Africa and (ii) other areas where there is a surge in covid-19 cases and deaths.

The UK has played a leading role in supporting global access to safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines and treatments from the outset of the pandemic and stands side by side with our international friends and partners during this deeply challenging time to tackle COVID-19. The UK is among the largest donors to COVAX, which has so far shipped over 107 million COVID-19 vaccines to 135 participants, including 47 countries in Africa. It aims to provide doses equivalent to up to 30% population in low- and middle-income countries by early 2022. The UK has also pledged up to £40 million to the COVID-19 Therapeutics Accelerator to support the rapid development of, and access to, treatments for COVID-19 in low and middle income countries.

The UK is proud that our G7 Presidency secured agreement from leaders to support vaccinating the world in 2022 and to share and finance an additional 1 billion doses over the next year to accelerate vaccine roll-out. This includes a commitment from the UK to share 100 million doses, 80% of which will go to COVAX to support countries in need, with 5 million doses to be shared by the end of September beginning in the coming weeks. We continue to work closely with the G7 and international partners on expanding global access, including efforts to mobilise international financing, increase vaccine supply and support in-country delivery, including community mobilisation and efforts to build vaccine confidence.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many civil service jobs his Department and its agencies had located in Scotland in (a) March 2011 and (b) the most recent period for which figures are available.

Headcount information prior to 2014 is not held centrally. The figures shown below are based on the headcount as at 31 March in each financial year.

Date

Number of staff based in Scotland

2014

570 - 579

2021

960 - 969

The 2014 figure relates only to former DFID. The former FCO did not have an office in Scotland.

17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to to ensure the safety of aid workers and diplomats in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

All FCDO staff undertake specialist safety training before deployment and are provided with regular security briefs at post on common threats, risks areas, and how to stay safe. The British Embassy has a highly professional and trained guard force based at the Embassy 24/7; a dedicated security provider who acts as first responders to incidents; and a communications alert system. It also security assesses all staff accommodation. A rigorous risk assessment is carried out prior to any field visits for staff and they travel in armoured vehicles where necessary.

We conduct thorough due diligence assessments of our implementing partners including their risk mitigation capabilities. We share urgent security information and best practice, and provide training sessions to ensure they have risk mitigations in place to safeguard their staff.

17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to protect child nutrition services in the immediate and long-term in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The UK remains a committed development partner of the Democratic Republic of Congo, including on child nutrition services. Through our humanitarian and health programmes, UK aid has supported better nutrition for over 4 million children from April 2019 - December 2020. Preventing and treating severe acute malnutrition in children remains a priority for our current and future humanitarian and health programmes.

17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure long-term stability and security in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The UK is deeply concerned about violence, instability and the humanitarian crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo, especially in the east. Protecting communities in the Democratic Republic of Congo from violence is an immediate priority, which is why the UK, alongside other UN Security Council members, has ensured that the protection of civilians remains central to the mandate of the UN peace keeping Mission, MONUSCO. Since 2017, the UK's humanitarian programme has helped over three million people in the Democratic Republic of Congo, with cash, emergency nutrition, water and healthcare. Longer term, the UK's peace and stability programme is providing access to livelihoods, helping secure land access and supporting inclusive dialogue to address the drivers of conflict in conflict-affected communities, and we are working towards the eradication of poverty through the provision of enhanced access to basic services, increased economic opportunities, and by strengthening governance. The Minister for Africa discussed the importance of tackling these issues with President Tshisekedi during his visit to the Democratic Republic of Congo in November 2020 and again during a telephone call in March this year.

17th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of the proposed reduction in Official Development Assistance on ongoing and planned UK aid programmes in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The UK remains a committed development partner of the Democratic Republic of Congo. As one of the largest bilateral donors to the Democratic Republic of Congo, we are providing life-saving assistance to 3 million people, as well as supporting basic health and education services, improving the environment for business, increasing people's incomes, and strengthening stability and governance.

The seismic impact of the pandemic on the UK economy has forced us to take tough but necessary decisions, including temporarily reducing the overall amount we spend on aid to 0.5% of GNI. We will remain a world-leading Official Development Assistance donor and still spend more than £10 billion this year to fight poverty, tackle climate change and improve global health.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that the whole aid portfolio delivered in conflict affected countries is sensitive to the conflict dynamics around them.

Conflict sensitivity is an essential part of UK aid programming. At a minimum, all our aid-funded programmes must ensure they minimize the risk of doing harm in conflict-affected countries. The UK government regularly conducts analyses of evolving conflict dynamics to inform our interventions, and our conflict sensitivity tools and guidance are widely used. Moreover, we have used UK aid to fund resources and technical support on conflict sensitivity open to other donors and implementing partners.

The Integrated Review calls for the government to take a more integrated approach to addressing the long-term drivers of conflict. As part of this, FCDO will continue to ensure our aid-funded work, where appropriate, addresses drivers of conflict and supports stability building and conflict prevention. This will be key to achieving our commitment to reduce the frequency and intensity of conflict and instability to alleviate suffering, harnessing the full range of government capabilities.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential long-term effects of the reduction in Official Development Assistance spending on the potential for peace in conflict-affected states.

The UK is committed to working to reduce the frequency and intensity of conflict and instability. ODA programming is one of a number of tools which will help the UK to address this, along with diplomatic engagement and our ability to provide technical expertise to effectively support peace processes and mediation. It is the effective combination of these tools that enables the UK to play a leadership role in supporting peace processes, and ensuring mediators sustain engagement with all relevant armed actors. The FCDO's new conflict centre will draw on expertise and learning from across HMG and the wider peacebuilding community including from civil society organisations and academia. This new strategic approach will allow us to drive greater impact from our aid budget, notwithstanding the difficult financial position we face.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential long-term effects of the reduction in Official Development Assistance spending on the Government's ability to engage armed groups in dialogue and peace processes.

The UK is committed to working to reduce the frequency and intensity of conflict and instability. ODA programming is one of a number of tools which will help the UK to address this, along with diplomatic engagement and our ability to provide technical expertise to effectively support peace processes and mediation. It is the effective combination of these tools that enables the UK to play a leadership role in supporting peace processes, and ensuring mediators sustain engagement with all relevant armed actors. The FCDO's new conflict centre will draw on expertise and learning from across HMG and the wider peacebuilding community including from civil society organisations and academia. This new strategic approach will allow us to drive greater impact from our aid budget, notwithstanding the difficult financial position we face.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the impact of the reduction in Official Development Assistance spending on the UK’s ability to use learning from peacebuilding organisations in the Government’s policy and programming responses.

The UK is committed to working to reduce the frequency and intensity of conflict and instability. ODA programming is one of a number of tools which will help the UK to address this, along with diplomatic engagement and our ability to provide technical expertise to effectively support peace processes and mediation. It is the effective combination of these tools that enables the UK to play a leadership role in supporting peace processes, and ensuring mediators sustain engagement with all relevant armed actors. The FCDO's new conflict centre will draw on expertise and learning from across HMG and the wider peacebuilding community including from civil society organisations and academia. This new strategic approach will allow us to drive greater impact from our aid budget, notwithstanding the difficult financial position we face.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the impact of the reduction in Official Development Assistance spending on the UK’s capabilities in and contribution to peace and stability.

The UK is committed to working to reduce the frequency and intensity of conflict and instability. ODA programming is one of a number of tools which will help the UK to address this, along with diplomatic engagement and our ability to provide technical expertise to effectively support peace processes and mediation. It is the effective combination of these tools that enables the UK to play a leadership role in supporting peace processes, and ensuring mediators sustain engagement with all relevant armed actors. The FCDO's new conflict centre will draw on expertise and learning from across HMG and the wider peacebuilding community including from civil society organisations and academia. This new strategic approach will allow us to drive greater impact from our aid budget, notwithstanding the difficult financial position we face.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the impact on the UK of the reduction in Official Development Assistance spending on countries that will be affected by climate change.

As stated in the Integrated Review, tackling climate change and biodiversity loss will be the UK's international priority through COP26 and beyond

We are committed doubling our International Climate Finance to at least £11.6 billion between 2021/22 and 2025/26 and we will invest at least £3 billion of our International Climate Finance to protect and restore nature and biodiversity over the next five years.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of the reduction in Official Development Assistance spending on developing countries’ ability to become and remain climate resilient.

We are committed doubling our International Climate Finance (ICF) to at least £11.6 billion over the next five years, between 2021/22 and 2025/26. We aim for a balance between mitigation and adaptation in our ICF. This is crucial both to reducing emissions and helping countries prepare for, and build resilience to, the impacts of climate change.

The UK is using our COP26 Presidency to mobilise action towards the goals of the Paris Agreement, encourage greater political ambition, and turn this into targeted, tangible and practical action to support adaptation and resilience.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what consultation he has conducted on the impact of the reduction in Official Development Assistance spending on individuals living in conflict zones.

Following the move to 0.5%, FCDO Ministers consulted with over 80 NGOs, partners and parliamentarians about the changes to ODA. NGOs, partners and parliamentarians fed in their views on development priorities and programmes to officials and Ministers on a regular basis, including through a roundtable for civil society. The FCDO will spend £419 million bilaterally in 21/22 on open societies and conflict resolution including to harness the UK's unique strengths in conflict management and resolution. The cross-government Conflict, Stability and Security Fund will receive £874 million for 2021-22 to focus on the link between stability, resilience and security, and work with governments and civil society on peace initiatives.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he is developing a conflict prevention strategy.

As announced in the Integrated Review, the FCDO's new conflict centre will support a more integrated HMG approach to conflict prevention, management and resolution, including working with teams across FCDO and HMG to support the wide range of interconnected agendas aimed at building inclusive and stable environments and preventing possible atrocities. A core part of the centre's role will be to draw on expertise from across HMG and beyond to support the UK's work on conflict, including from civil society, academia, and the private sector, and through cooperation with bilateral partners and multilateral organisations.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what plans he has to communicate the decision to defer of start dates of the provisional grants under round 4 of the UK Aid Match programme to people who donated to fundraising campaigns on the basis that (a) their donation would be matched by the Government and (b) projects would begin in June 2021.

In his written ministerial statement to parliament, the Foreign Secretary protected the UK Aid Match programme including all active grants. The reduction in this year's budget has meant that projects scheduled to start between June and November 2021, will now start in April 2022. We continue to work closely with the organisations impacted and encourage them to advise patrons and donors of delays via their communications channels. It is not common for fundraising appeals to detail project start dates as they are often delayed for many reasons. To provide further assurance to the charities and their supporters, we have agreed to exceptionally sign grants in advance, reaffirming FCDO's commitment to match appeal donations pound for pound.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what impact assessment he made of the potential effects of the deferral of start dates of the provisional grants under round 4 of the UK Aid Match programme.

We are monitoring the impact of the ODA budget reductions on our partners, including UK charities, very closely. We have protected all active UK Aid Match projects and we are fully committed to match fund all appeals which were approved under UK Aid Match round 4. Due to the reduction in ODA, we've had to make the difficult decision to defer the start dates for round 4 projects to 1 April 2022. Officials have been in touch with all 16 organisations affected to sign grant agreements in advance to provide additional assurance to their partners and supporters that the FCDO is still matching their fundraising appeal pound for pound.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Written Statement made on 26 January 2021 on development update HCWS735, what plans the Government has to undertake a consultation with (a) civil society and (b) development partners on the development of the International Development Strategy.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Secretary is leading work on the new International Development Strategy, which will be cross-government in scope. We look forward to engaging with partners and stakeholders, including civil society, Parliament and the devolved administrations, over the coming months. This will build on the extensive engagement and call for evidence that was undertaken to inform the Integrated Review.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Written Statement made on 26 January 2021 on development update, HCWS735, when the Government plans to begin targeted engagement with stakeholders on the International Development Strategy.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Secretary is leading work on the new International Development Strategy, which will be cross-government in scope. We look forward to engaging with partners and stakeholders, including civil society, Parliament and the devolved administrations, over the coming months. This will build on the extensive engagement and call for evidence that was undertaken to inform the Integrated Review.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Written Statement on 26 January 2021 on development update HCWS735, when he plans to begin engagement with (a) Parliament, (b) the devolved Administrations, and (c) civil society on the International Development Strategy.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Secretary is leading work on the new International Development Strategy, which will be cross-government in scope. We look forward to engaging with partners and stakeholders, including civil society, Parliament and the devolved administrations, over the coming months. This will build on the extensive engagement and call for evidence that was undertaken to inform the Integrated Review.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 20 April 2021 to Question 181249 on the international development strategy, when the Government plans to consult with (a) partners and (b) other stakeholders on the strategy.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Secretary is leading work on the new International Development Strategy, which will be cross-government in scope. We look forward to engaging with partners and stakeholders, including civil society, Parliament and the devolved administrations, over the coming months. This will build on the extensive engagement and call for evidence that was undertaken to inform the Integrated Review.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Written Statement made on 26 January 2021 on development update HCWS735, what the next steps are for the International Development Strategy; and what consultation he plans to have with civil society groups as part of the development of that strategy.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Secretary is leading work on the new International Development Strategy, which will be cross-government in scope. We look forward to engaging with partners and stakeholders, including civil society, Parliament and the devolved administrations, over the coming months. This will build on the extensive engagement and call for evidence that was undertaken to inform the Integrated Review.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will provide a breakdown of the amount of Official Development Assistance spent on the 2021-22 thematic area trade and economic development in 2019-20.

The thematic areas announced for 2021-22 reflect the Foreign Secretary's strategic framework outlined to parliament on 26 November 2020. The Statistics on International Development (SID) National Statistics, published on GOV.UK, provide an overview of all UK spend on Official Development Assistance (ODA) by calendar year (2019 is the latest available year). Sector groupings reported in the SID are collected and reported in line with the OECD reporting directives, using the international OECD sector categories and will not directly correspond with the thematic areas announced for planned 2021-22 spend.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, he will provide a breakdown of the total amount of Official Development Assistance spent on the 2021-22 thematic area humanitarian preparedness and response in 2019-20.

The thematic areas announced for 2021-22 reflect the Foreign Secretary's strategic Official Development Assistance (ODA) framework outlined to parliament on 26 November 2020. This included a thematic area for humanitarian preparedness and response. The Statistics on International Development (SID) National Statistics, published on GOV.UK, provide an overview of all UK spend on ODA by calendar year (2019 is the latest available year). Sector groupings reported in the SID are collected and reported in line with the OECD reporting directives, using the international OECD sector categories and will not directly correspond with the thematic areas announced for planned 2021-22 spend.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will provide a breakdown of the amount of Official Development Assistance spent on the 2021-22 thematic area climate change and biodiversity in 2019-20.

The thematic areas announced for 2021-22 reflect the Foreign Secretary's strategic framework outlined to parliament on 26 November 2020. The Statistics on International Development (SID) National Statistics, published on GOV.UK, provide an overview of all UK spend on Official Development Assistance (ODA) by calendar year (2019 is the latest available year). Sector groupings reported in the SID are collected and reported in line with the OECD reporting directives, using the international OECD sector categories and will not directly correspond with the thematic areas announced for planned 2021-22 spend.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when partners still waiting for confirmation as to the status of projects due to the changes in funding under the ODA will be informed of the status of these projects.

FCDO Officials are working through the implementation of the budgets set out in the Foreign Secretary's WMS of 21 April 2021, with partners and suppliers.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, when he plans to inform all current government partners of the status of their projects as a result of the changes in funding under the ODA.

FCDO Officials are working through the implementation of the budgets set out in the Foreign Secretary's WMS 21 April 2021. We will continue to engage with all our partners through our regular channels.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the total number of partners waiting for confirmation on the status of projects due to changes to ODA.

FCDO Officials are working through the implementation of the budgets set out in the Foreign Secretary's WMS on 21 April 2021 with partners and suppliers.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will provide a breakdown of the amount of Official Development Assistance spent on the 2021-22 thematic area open societies and conflict in 2019-20.

The thematic areas announced for 2021-22 reflect the Foreign Secretary's strategic framework outlined to parliament on 26 November 2020. The Statistics on International Development (SID) National Statistics, published on GOV.UK, provide an overview of all UK spend on Official Development Assistance (ODA) by calendar year (2019 is the latest available year). Sector groupings reported in the SID are collected and reported in line with the OECD reporting directives, using the international OECD sector categories and will not directly correspond with the thematic areas announced for planned 2021-22 spend.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will provide a breakdown of the amount of Official Development Assistance spent on the 2021-22 thematic area science, research and technology in 2019-20.

The thematic areas announced for 2021-22 reflect the Foreign Secretary's strategic framework outlined to parliament on 26 November 2020.

The Statistics on International Development National Statistics, published on GOV.UK, provide an overview of all UK spend on Official Development Assistance (ODA) by calendar year (2019 is the latest available year). Sector groupings reported in the Statistics on International Development are collected and reported in line with the OECD reporting directives, using the international OECD sector categories and will not directly correspond with the thematic areas announced for planned 2021-22 spend.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Written Statement of 21 April 2021, FCDO update, HCWS935, what the total amount of Official Development Assistance spending was in 2019-20 on the thematic area girls’ education as referenced in that Written Statement for 2021-22.

The Foreign Secretary laid a statement before the House of Commons on 21 April 2021, which sets out how he is directing the FCDO's aid portfolio this year. He announced that the FCDO will spend £400 million of bilateral ODA on girls' education in the financial year 2021/22

Statistics on International Development: Final UK Aid Spend 2020 will be published in the autumn 2021, and will contain a detailed breakdowns of the UK's ODA spend for 2020. Statistics on International Development: Final UK Aid Spend 2019 is already available.

8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Written Statement of 21 April 2021, FCDO update, HCWS935, if he will provide a breakdown of Official Development Assistance spending in 2019-20 in line with the thematic areas the Government has announced for 2021-22.

The thematic areas announced for 2021-22 reflect the Foreign Secretary's strategic framework outlined to parliament on 26 November 2020. The Statistics on International Development (SID) National Statistics, published on GOV.UK, provide an overview of all UK spend on Official Development Assistance (ODA) by calendar year (2019 is the latest available year). Sector groupings reported in the SID are collected and reported in line with the OECD reporting directives, using the international OECD sector categories and will not directly correspond with the thematic areas announced for planned 2021-22 spend.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much funding he has allocated to the Commonwealth Fund programme Women Mediators across the Commonwealth for 2021-22.

We are engaged in ongoing discussions with the Steering Committee of the Women Mediators across the Commonwealth Network (WMC) on the future direction of the network and how best the FCDO can support, along with suitable funding options. We remain committed to supporting women's meaningful engagement in peace processes; inclusion is a cornerstone of our new, integrated foreign, security and development policy.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Statistics on International Development: Provisional UK Aid Spend 2020, published by his Department on 8 April 2021, what plans he has to publish details of the effect of the £712m reduction in Official Development Assistance spending between 2019 and 2020 on UK aid programmes.

Statistics on International Development: Final UK Aid Spend 2020, published in the autumn, will contain detailed breakdowns of the UK's ODA spend for 2020 including bilateral UK ODA by recipient country and sector.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the Statistics on International Development: Provisional UK Aid Spend 2020 published by his Department on 8 April 2021, whether UK aid programmes been (a) reduced and (b) cancelled as a result of the £712m reduction in Official Development Assistance spending in 2020.

The decrease in 2020 ODA spend reflects the decrease in the size of the economy in 2020, therefore a decrease in the value of the 0.7 per cent commitment for 2020, as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. UK aid spend on ODA programmes were reduced or cancelled in line with this decrease.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect of rapid reductions in Official Development Assistance spending in 2021 on existing UK aid programmes.

The Covid pandemic's economic impact has forced the government to take the difficult decision to temporarily reduce ODA to 0.5% of GNI. Despite this reduction, we will remain a world-leading ODA donor, spending around £10 billion on ODA in 2021-22. The Foreign Secretary has set out a strategic approach to ensure maximum impact for our aid spend for 2021-22, laying a Written Ministerial Statement for Parliament in January, summarising overall departmental cross-government allocations of ODA.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the reduction in the Official Development Assistance budget on the UK’s COP26 ambitions.

As set out in the Integrated Review, tackling climate change and biodiversity loss is the number one international priority for the UK in 2021 and beyond. As host of COP26, securing greater global ambition is a priority for this Government and finance is key. We are fulfilling our own pledge to provide £5.8 billion in international climate finance (ICF) to developing countries, and are committed to doubling our ICF to £11.6 billion over the next five years. Since 2011 UK ICF has helped over 66 million people cope with the effects of climate change, and installed 2000 megawatts of clean energy.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of reductions in the Official Development Assistance (ODA) budget on the UK’s ability to fulfil its Paris Agreement requirement that all International Climate Finance be additional to existing ODA.

As set out in the Integrated Review, tackling climate change and biodiversity loss is the number one international priority for the UK in 2021 and beyond. As host of COP26, securing greater global ambition is a priority for this Government and finance is key. We are fulfilling our own pledge to provide £5.8 billion in international climate finance (ICF) to developing countries, and are committed to doubling our ICF to £11.6 billion over the next five years. Since 2011 UK ICF has helped over 66 million people cope with the effects of climate change, and installed 2000 megawatts of clean energy.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of reductions in the Official Development Assistance (ODA) budget on the UK’s COP26 ambitions.

As set out in the Integrated Review, tackling climate change and biodiversity loss is the number one international priority for the UK in 2021 and beyond. As host of COP26, securing greater global ambition is a priority for this Government and finance is key. We are fulfilling our own pledge to provide £5.8 billion in international climate finance (ICF) to developing countries, and are committed to doubling our ICF to £11.6 billion over the next five years. Since 2011 UK ICF has helped over 66 million people cope with the effects of climate change, and installed 2000 megawatts of clean energy.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the reductions in the Official Development Assistance budget on the UK’s COP26 ambitions.

As set out in the Integrated Review, tackling climate change and biodiversity loss is the number one international priority for the UK in 2021 and beyond. As host of COP26, securing greater global ambition is a priority for this Government and finance is key. We are fulfilling our own pledge to provide £5.8 billion in international climate finance (ICF) to developing countries, and are committed to doubling our ICF to £11.6 billion over the next five years. Since 2011 UK ICF has helped over 66 million people cope with the effects of climate change, and installed 2000 megawatts of clean energy.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect of reductions in Official Development Assistance spending in 2021 on civil society organisations.

We are currently working through the implications of the cuts to the ODA budget for individual programmes. Once decisions have been made we will work closely with partners, including civil society organisations, to manage the implications for them and their work, as well as monitoring the impact on the sector as a whole.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Commonwealth Fund will continue to support (a) the network of Women Mediators across the Commonwealth and (b) a programme to provide support to Commonwealth governments seeking to reform legislation that disproportionately affects women and girls and LGBT people.

FCDO Ministers are currently working with officials to finalise ODA budget allocations for 2021/22. Final decisions have not yet been made, including on individual programmes.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if, in response to the military coup in Myanmar and renewed attacks in ethnic areas, he will work with ethnic civil society organisations to find informal mechanisms to ensure aid reaches vulnerable populations, including cross border aid mechanisms.

UK aid provides life-saving humanitarian assistance to around 460,000 conflict affected and displaced people in Myanmar and on the Thai border. We have reviewed our aid programme in Myanmar to ensure that we focus on the most vulnerable people. We are closely monitoring the ongoing impacts of the military coup with our partners, including ethnic civil society organisations, so that our support continues to reach those most in need and can respond to new needs.

8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he has had with the (a) Myanmar military and (b) Myanmar defence attaché in the UK on the military's escalating attacks on civilians in Karen state.

The UK is very concerned about the worsening situation in Karen state and other ethnic regions. In particular we note the repeated breaches of the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement by the Tatmadaw in Karen state. We raised these issues at the Special Session of the Human Rights Council, which we convened with the EU on 12 February.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much funding he has allocated to the Commonwealth Fund programme Women Mediators across the Commonwealth for 2020-22.

The UK has provided £2.6 million to support the Women Mediators across the Commonwealth Network since 2018, including £1 million in 2020/21. Funding for 2021/22 has not yet been confirmed. Despite the need to take tough but necessary decisions, including temporarily reducing the overall amount we spend on ODA, we remain committed to championing the full, equal and meaningful role of women in all aspects of peace and security.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the gender balance is of full-time permanent contract staff in his Department.

As of 31 December 49.5% of FCDO full-time permanent staff are female.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what the gender balance is of temporary contract staff in his Department.

As of 31 December 49.8% of FCDO temporary staff are female. Temporary staff includes staff on fixed term contracts, interchange from another Government department and secondments. The figure does not include contractors.

25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many women were employed by his Department in each year since 2018.

On 2 September 2020 the Department for International Development and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office merged to become the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office. The data below for 2018 and 2019 is separated into DfID and FCO data. The data for 2020 is FCDO.

The data below is taken from 31 December for each of the three years.

For DfID in 2018 there were 1543 women in 2018 and 1517 women in 2019.

For FCO in 2018 and 2019 there were between 2000-2499 women.

As of 31 December 2020 there are between 3500 and 3999 women in the FCDO.

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 9 November 2020 to Question 111558 on Overseas Aid, (a) on what date the in-year review of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office programme budgets was conducted and (b) which Government department or departments applied for the two programmes over £1 million which will be delivered in 2020-21.

The review took place in September 2020 after the International Programme received confirmation of its revised allocation, including £8.4 million for the Gulf Strategy Fund. Both programmes over £1 million were applications by the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, further to written answers 5457 and 103608 in which the Minister stated in January that the allocated budget for the Integrated Activity Fund (IAF)/ Gulf Strategy Fund (GSF) for the financial year 2020-2021 was £20m, but in October stated that this number had been reduced to £8.4m, to account for the reduction in funding allocated to the fund.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office programming, including the International Programme (IP), was temporarily put on hold earlier this year owing to the Covid-19 pandemic, except where the programmes were directly responding to Covid-19 or National Security priorities. Following a Ministerial-led reprioritisation exercise in the summer of 2020, a revised allocation for the IP, which includes £8.4 million for the Gulf Strategy Fund was approved in September to be spent in the remainder of the financial year.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 9 November 2020 to Question 111558, if he will publish information on (a) the total number of applications over £1 million that were made to the Integrated Activity Fund (IAF) in the 2019-20 financial year, (b) which Government departments made those applications and (c) how many applications over £1 million each Government department made.

We do not disclose information related to individual Integrated Activity Fund projects to maintain the confidence and confidentiality of our Gulf partners.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 23 October 2020 to Question 106362 on Overseas Aid, which Departments applied for the 31 projects in 2019-20 not covered by Overseas Security and Justice Assessments; and how many projects each Department applied for.

During the 2019/20 financial year the Integrated Activity Fund, now named the Gulf Strategy Fund, received applications for funding from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, the Crown Prosecution Service, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the Department for International Trade, the Department of Health, the Home Office, HM Revenue and Customs and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of whether there will be sufficient stocks of covid-19 vaccine doses available for the Covax facility to distribute to low and middle income countries after the UK and other high income countries have secured their own bilateral deals for potential covid-19 vaccines.

The COVAX Advance Market Commitment (AMC) aims to provide 1 billion doses for high-risk populations in up to 92 developing countries in 2021, at the same pace as for richer countries. The UK has committed up to £548 million in Official Development Assistance (ODA) to the COVAX AMC. Through this investment, the UK is supporting the fair and equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccines for up to 500 million people in low and middle-income countries during 2021. We have made our financial commitment early precisely to ensure that there will be supplies for AMC countries once safe and effective vaccines are available.

The COVAX AMC is the only ODA mechanism investing in expanding the supply of a portfolio of vaccines explicitly for use in developing countries. It provides the highest chance of successfully securing access for these countries during 2021, regardless of any country's bilateral deals.

4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 23 October 2020 to Question 102832 on Overseas Aid, which Departments applied for the 31 projects in 2018-19 not covered by Overseas Security and Justice Assessments; and how many projects each Department applied for.

I refer the Honourable Member to my response of 27 October to question 106365.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many projects were applied for by the Ministry of Defence under the Integrated Activity Fund in the (a) 2016-17, (b) 2017-18, (c) 2018-19 and (d) 2019-20 financial years; and what the (i) allocated budget and (ii) actual spending was for each project.

We do not disclose information related to Integrated Activity Fund projects to maintain the confidence and confidentiality of our Gulf partners.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many applications over £1 million were made to the Integrated Activity Fund in the (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21 financial years; which Departments submitted those applications; how many of those applications were approved; and which (i) minister or (ii) director approved those applications in each of those financial years.

Six Integrated Activity Fund applications over £1 million were approved in 2019/20. Six programme applications over £1 million were originally made to the 2020/21 Gulf Strategy Fund by the Foreign and Commonwealth office, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. Four applications were approved. Currently only two programmes over £1 million will be delivered in 2020/21 following an in-year review of Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office programme budgets.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if the Government will make it its policy to withdraw from the upcoming G20 in Saudi Arabia unless that country releases (a) human rights (b) women’s rights and (c) senior political detainees.

The UK will participate in the G20 Summit, which is likely to focus on health, the global economic recovery and wider global challenges (including climate change, trade and development). It is a key part of international planning for a sustainable recovery from coronavirus. As current G20 President, Saudi Arabia will play a vital role in coordinating the global health and economic response. We hope that the international platform provided by the G20 Presidency encourages continued progress on domestic reforms.

Our close relationship with Saudi Arabia allows us to raise our concerns about human rights, including on political detainees, in private and in public. We have expressed significant concerns about reports of continuing arrests and arbitrary detentions in Saudi Arabia. We raise concerns about individual cases regularly, using a range of Ministerial and diplomatic channels, including our Embassy in Riyadh. The UK signed a statement at the UN Human Rights Council on 15 September. It noted our human rights concerns in Saudi Arabia, regretted the continued detention of at least five women's human rights defenders, arrested in 2018, and called for the release of all political detainees. We continue to raise concerns at all levels and are monitoring the situation closely.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what discussions he plans to hold with his Saudi counterpart prior to the G20 Summit in Riyadh on the release of (a) Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, (b) Prince Turki bin Abdullah and (c) other political detainees.

The UK will participate in the G20 Summit, which is likely to focus on health, the global economic recovery and wider global challenges (including climate change, trade and development). It is a key part of international planning for a sustainable recovery from coronavirus. As current G20 President, Saudi Arabia will play a vital role in coordinating the global health and economic response. We hope that the international platform provided by the G20 Presidency encourages continued progress on domestic reforms.

Our close relationship with Saudi Arabia allows us to raise our concerns about human rights, including on political detainees, in private and in public. We have expressed significant concerns about reports of continuing arrests and arbitrary detentions in Saudi Arabia. We raise concerns about individual cases regularly, using a range of Ministerial and diplomatic channels, including our Embassy in Riyadh. The UK signed a statement at the UN Human Rights Council on 15 September. It noted our human rights concerns in Saudi Arabia, regretted the continued detention of at least five women's human rights defenders, arrested in 2018, and called for the release of all political detainees. We continue to raise concerns at all levels and are monitoring the situation closely.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many meetings have taken place since January 2019 between Ministers in his Department and members of the Chinese Government on the rights of the Hong Kong people enshrined in the joint Sino-British declaration.

We hold regular discussions with the Chinese Government and the Hong Kong authorities about the situation in Hong Kong. Both are well aware of our serious concerns about the National Security Law, and we will continue to raise these concerns at senior levels with the Chinese and Hong Kong administrations.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether representatives of (a) the Government and (b) non-departmental public bodies have met with representatives of the (i) Hong Kong Government and (ii) Chinese Government to discuss providing training to members of the police and other law enforcement bodies in Hong Kong since January 2019.

We are not aware of any discussions by representatives of (a) the Government and (b) non-departmental public bodies with the Hong Kong or Chinese Governments on the provision of training to members of the police and other law enforcement bodies in Hong Kong since January 2019.

19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many meetings have taken place between Ministers in his Department and members of the Hong Kong Government on the rights of the Hong Kong people under the joint Sino-British declaration, since January 2019.

We hold regular discussions with the Chinese Government and the Hong Kong authorities about the situation in Hong Kong. Both are well aware of our serious concerns about the National Security Law, and we will continue to raise these concerns at senior levels with the Chinese and Hong Kong administrations.

8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that Yemeni civilians are protected from the covid-19 pandemic in the conflict lines of (a) Marib, (b) Hodeidah and (c) Abyan.

We are extremely concerned by the capacity of the Yemen's healthcare system to respond to the threat of a second wave of COVID-19 and continue to disburse our £200 million aid commitment for this financial year (2020/21) promptly to help the UN's response. Ultimately, a permanent ceasefire and co-operation with the UN-led political process is the best defence we have against COVID-19 in Yemen. We continue to call on all parties to the conflict to engage constructively with the peace process.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
6th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure gender equality remains a strategic priority of his Department.

Advancing gender equality and women's rights are a core part of the UK Government's mission, and Global Britain's role as a force for good in the world. For example, between 2015 and 2020, we supported 8.1 million girls gain access to a decent education, and in 2019-20 alone we provided 25.4 million women and girls with modern methods of family planning, saving thousands of lives. The Government remains steadfast in its commitment to this agenda.

As the Foreign Secretary set out in his speech at the United Nations General Assembly on the 1 October, the UK is working with our international partners to ensure gender equality is a central element of the COVID-19 recovery. The FCDO will continue to champion 12 years of quality education for every girl in the world.

This October marks the 20th anniversary of UN Security Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security, next year the UK will take up Presidency of the G7 and COP26, and the UK is already co-leading the new global Generation Equality Action Coalition on gender-based violence to mark the 25th Anniversary of the Beijing Platform for Action on Gender Equality. All these represent moments for the UK to champion gender equality

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps he plans to take to ensure that the UK continues to uphold its Grand Bargain commitments (a) for donors to provide 25 per cent of global humanitarian funding to local and national responders by 2020 and (b) on localisation more widely.

The UK is a signatory to the Grand Bargain and the Good Humanitarian Donorship Principles, which make explicit commitments on localisation, and the UK's Humanitarian Reform Policy recognises national and local organisations and communities as first responders to disasters. We also recognise the value local and national actors have brought to COVID-19 response, playing a critical role in meeting humanitarian needs on the ground in the face of unprecedented challenges.

The UK continues to be one of the biggest humanitarian donors globally. We have been one the largest donors to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs' (UNOCHA) Country-Based Pooled Funds (CBPF). The CBPF is one platform that channels funding to local and national actors and in 2019, they allocated a quarter of their resources to local and national partners.

More broadly, the UK continues to invest in initiatives to support localisation, including the creation of the Start Network, Humanitarian Learning Academy, and the Humanitarian to Humanitarian (H2H) Network, among others.

6th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make it his policy to adopt and implement the Department for International Development's Strategic Vision on Gender Equality as the gender strategy for his Department.

As the Foreign Secretary said in his speech to the United Nations General Assembly on the 1 October, we must use this moment as a catalyst for change, so that all women and girls have equal rights, so that they can fulfil their potential. Global Britain is proud to be a force for good in the world, holding up democracy and human rights as our guiding lights.

As part of the launch of the new FCDO, we will refresh and build on existing strategies, as well as develop new approaches, but we do not see the core ambitions of the Strategic Vision for Gender Equality changing. The challenges of advancing girls' education, sexual reproductive health and rights (SRHR), women's political empowerment, women's economic empowerment advancing the Women Peace and Security agenda, tackling and ending violence against women and girls (VAWG) including conflict related sexual violence, are as acute now, if not more so, as when we published the strategy in 2018.

25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what proportion of staff employed by the Department for International Development were from BAME backgrounds prior to the announcement of the merger of that Department with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on 16 June 2020.

As of 30 June 2020, the proportion of staff who identified as BAME employed by the Department for International Development was 15%. This figure is for Home Civil Service staff only.

As of 30 June 2020, the proportion of staff who identified as BAME employed by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office was 17%. This figure is for Home Civil Service and Diplomatic Service staff only.

25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what proportion of staff employed by his Department identified as BAME immediately prior to the announcement of the merger of the Department for International Development with his Department on 16 June 2020.

As of 30 June 2020, the proportion of staff who identified as BAME employed by the Department for International Development was 15%. This figure is for Home Civil Service staff only.

As of 30 June 2020, the proportion of staff who identified as BAME employed by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office was 17%. This figure is for Home Civil Service and Diplomatic Service staff only.

25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many people were employed by the Department for International Development prior to the announcement of the merger of Department for International Development and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on 16 June 2020.

The total number of staff employed by Department for International Development prior to the announcement of the merger was 3414 (2655 UK based staff and 759 Staff Appointed In Country (SAIC)). The data extract closest to the reference date of 16th June 2020 is 30th June 2020.

25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many people were employed by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office prior to the announcement of the merger of that Department with the Department for International Development on 16 June 2020.

On 31 May 2020, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office employed between 5000 and 5499 UK Based staff and between 8000 and 8499 Locally Employed staff.

25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many people were employed by his Department on 1 September 2020.

On 1 September 2020, the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office employed between 7500 and 7999 Home Civil Service and Diplomatic Service Staff, and between 9000 and 9499 Locally Employed Staff and Staff Appointed in Country.

23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he plans to make at the forthcoming 45th session of the Human Rights Council on the situation of Uyghurs in Xinjiang.

The UK has played a leading role at the Human Rights Council in registering the breadth and depth of international concern about the situation of Uyghurs in Xinjiang, and will continue to do so. Most recently, on 30 June, the UK read out a formal statement on behalf of 28 countries at the 44th session of the UN Human Rights Council highlighting arbitrary detention, widespread surveillance and restrictions, particularly those targeting Uyghurs and other minorities, and urging China to allow the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights meaningful access to Xinjiang.

23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what plans he has to impose sanctions on the people responsible for human rights abuses against Uyghurs in Xinjiang.

On 6 July, the UK Government established the Global Human Rights ('Magnitsky') sanctions regime by laying regulations in Parliament. This sanctions regime enables the UK to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. It is not appropriate to speculate who may be designated under the sanctions regime in the future, as to do so could reduce the impact of the designations. We keep all evidence and potential listings under close review.

15th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to the reported rise in the number of political prisoners at imminent risk of execution in Bahrain, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of UK Official Development Assistance provided to Bahrain to support human rights in that country.

The UK does not provide Official Development Assistance to Bahrain. The technical assistance we provide is kept under regular review to ensure compliance with our human rights obligations and the Overseas Security and Justice Assistance process.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the cases of (a) Mohammed Ramadan and (b) Hussein Moosa were discussed during meetings between Ministers of his Department and Bahrain’s Ministry for Foreign Affairs on 7 September 2020.

During the recent visit to the UK of Bahraini Foreign Minister Abdullatif bin Rashid Al Zayani, I raised the use of the death penalty in Bahrain, reiterating the UK's opposition to the death penalty, in all circumstances, as a matter of principle. Separately, the Minister for Human Rights, Lord Ahmad, raised the cases of Mohammed Ramadhan and Husain Moosa.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will take steps to implement the recommendation of the Bar Human Rights Committee of England and Wales which has called on countries to give effect to their responsibilities under the relevant treaties to create, maintain and utilise international bodies to carry out investigations and due diligence in respect of China’s alleged violations of its obligations and responsibilities concerning its Uyghur and other Turkic Muslim populations.

We are aware of the Bar Human Rights Committee report published on 22 July. We are carefully considering its findings. We regularly raise our serious concerns about the human rights situation in Xinjiang, including at the UN Human Rights Council on 30 June.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he is taking steps to implement the recommendation of the Bar Human Rights Committee of England and Wales and use all available offices and legal means to investigate, apprehend and punish alleged perpetrators of any violations being committed against Uyghur and Turkic Muslim populations.

We are aware of the Bar Human Rights Committee report published on 22 July. We are carefully considering its findings. We regularly raise our serious concerns about the human rights situation in Xinjiang, including at the UN Human Rights Council on 30 June.

11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what plans he has to consult civil society organisations throughout the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

The Integrated Review will be a wholescale reassessment of our foreign, defence, security and development policy. The Review will define and strengthen Britain's place in the world at a time when the global landscape is changing dramatically. We will consult inside and outside Government, ensuring some of the UK's best minds are feeding into its conclusions and challenging traditional Whitehall assumptions and thinking.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will ensure that continuing progress on Sustainable Development Goal 5 is included in the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy.

The Government continues to champion girls' education through the 'Leave No Girl Behind' campaign, and at the UN General Assembly in September 2019, the Prime Minister announced £515 million to provide over 12 million children - half of them girls - with a decent education. We will continue to lead the way globally on preventing and responding to all forms of gender-based violence. The Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative (PSVI) International Conference - Time For Justice: Putting Survivors First, will bring together countries from around the world to focus on justice and accountability.

As we conduct the Integrated Review our guiding lights will remain the values of free trade, liberal democracy, human rights and the international rule of law - values for which we are respected the world over. We want to ensure we are a force for good in the world. This means championing basic human rights.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 11 February 2020 to Question HL1537, whether his Department was consulted by the University of Huddersfield on the establishment of an MSc in Security Science reserved for students at Bahrain's Royal Academy of Policing.

There have not been any discussions with the University of Huddersfield about its provision of an MSc in Security Science exclusively to students at the Royal Academy of Policing.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the findings in the report by the Bahrain Institute for Rights and Democracy entitled Bahrain human rights report 2020, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the finding that the human rights situation in Bahrain continued to deteriorate in 2019.

Our most recent assessment was published as part of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's (FCO) Human Rights and Democracy Report in June 2019. Bahrain remains an FCO human rights priority country, particularly because of the use of the death penalty, allegations of torture and mistreatment in detention and concerns over freedom of expression and assembly. We monitor events in Bahrain closely and continue to encourage the Government of Bahrain to deliver on its international and domestic human rights commitments.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the veracity of the evidence for the charges against the Büyükada group of activists in Turkey; and if he will make a statement.

The British Government remains concerned by the ongoing trial of the Büyükada group of human rights defenders (HRDs) in Turkey. We have been closely following the case since it first came to court in 2017. We note the next hearing is on 19 February. As a modern democracy we expect Turkey to undertake any legal processes fairly, transparently and with full respect for the rule of law and we consistently reiterate this message to our Turkish counterparts at all levels.

We have long encouraged Turkey to work towards the full protection of fundamental rights, particularly in the area of freedom of expression. On 28 January at the 35th Universal Periodic Review on Human Rights, one of the recommendations that the United Kingdom put forward for Turkey is protecting freedom of expression, including for journalists and human rights defenders, by decriminalising defamation. We will continue to engage the Turkish Government on these issues and be clear in our expectation that Turkey live up to its human rights obligations, which is essential to the long-term health of Turkish democracy.

10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment the Government has undertaken on the effectiveness of the Integrated Activity Fund in meeting its objectives since the establishment of the fund.

The British Government monitors programmes and projects under the Integrated Activity Fund throughout the project life-cycle to ensure that they are on track to deliver expected outcomes.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2020 to Question 5457, how the decision to extend the Integrated Activity Fund budget for 2020-21 was reached; when that decision was authorised; and which Minister of his Department authorised that decision.

The budget for the Integrated Activity Fund for 2020-21 was agreed as part of the 2019 Spending Round which was presented to Parliament by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in September 2019.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the human rights situation in Bahrain.

We published our assessment of the human rights situation in Bahrain in the annual Foreign and Commonwealth Office Human Rights Report, most recently in June 2019.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the joint statement published on 8 October 2019 by Human Rights Watch and the Bahrain Institute for Rights and Democracy, entitled Bahrain: Prisoners Denied Medical Care, what steps he has taken to help ensure that Hassan Mushaima and Dr Abdujalil al-Singace (a) have access to medical treatment in accordance with international human rights standards and (b) are released from prison.

We continue to monitor the cases of Hassan Mushaima and Abduljalil al-Singace. We have raised these cases at senior levels with the Bahraini Government. The Government of Bahrain has been clear in public statements that access to medical care, including dental, for those in detention is guaranteed by the Constitution of Bahrain.

We encourage those with concerns about treatment in detention to raise them with the appropriate Bahraini human rights oversight body. We continue to encourage the oversight bodies in Bahrain to carry out thorough and swift investigations into any such claims.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the UN expert report to the Bahraini Government on the cases of Nabeel Rajab, Hajer Mansoor and Medina Ali, what assessment he has made as to whether the Bahraini Government discriminates against political prisoners when granting alternative sentences; and what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of study visits for Bahraini delegations to the UK on alternative sentencing as part of the technical assistance provided by the Government to its Bahraini counterparts.

​Bahrain has brought in new legislation related to alternative sentencing and has started to implement provisions under this new legal framework. British expertise has supported this process, and we welcome this positive move in reforming the judicial system. There are clear provisions in place regarding eligibility of detainees for alternative sentencing. We continue to follow the cases of Nabeel Rajab and Hajer Mansoor. Medina Ali received a Royal pardon in December 2019.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the planned (a) duration and (b) budget is for the Integrated Activity Fund after financial year 2019-20.

​The Integrated Activity Fund will have a budget of £20 million for the financial year 2020/21. Budget allocations beyond 2020/21 will be agreed as part of the forthcoming Spending Review.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will publish the (a) names and (b) organisations (a) delivering and (b) benefiting from training funded through the Integrated Activity Fund to Bahrain in the financial years (i) 2018-19 and (ii) 2019-20.

​The Integrated Activity Fund provides funding in support of a range of programmes across the Gulf Region. These include, but are not limited to, activities focusing on aquaculture, sport and culture, healthcare and institutional capacity building. All of our work is in line with international standards and aims to share the UK's expertise and experience.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the Integrated Activity Fund’s (a) allocated budget and (b) projected spending is for the financial year 2019-20.

​The allocated budget for the Integrated Activity Fund for the 2019/20 financial year is £20 million. Final spend is projected to be £13.9 million.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how much money from the public purse was allocated to the Integrated Activity Fund in the financial year 2018-19; and how much did that fund allocate to Bahrain in 2018-19.

​Overall spend from the Integrated Activity Fund (IAF) in 2018/19 financial year was £17.08 million. The IAF funded activity in all six Gulf Cooperation Council states: Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Oman. Many of the projects and programme activities were delivered regionally, so it is not possible to provide a breakdown by beneficiary state.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, what advice the UK Government provides to British companies on entering into business relationships with the Burmese military.

We offer advice and support on working with responsible local partners and encourage all British companies to undertake their own due diligence on any investment projects. We continue to work with trusted organisations, such as the Myanmar Centre for Responsible Business, to encourage businesses in Myanmar, including UK businesses, to invest responsibly and conduct appropriate due diligence.

Decisions to enter business relationships are the responsibility of the company , as is ensuring they are legally compliant.

As the recent UN Fact Finding Mission report sets out, the Myanmar Military and companies linked to it are entrenched across the economy. Some of the relationships are opaque, and being clear about the precise details of ownership of a company or infrastructure is sometimes very difficult. Following the publication of the UN Fact Finding Mission report, the British Embassy has met regularly with British companies and stressed the importance of undertaking robust due diligence.

13th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions the UK Government has had with Aung San Suu Kyi on the detention of political prisoners in Burma.

The UK Government continues to be concerned about the many journalists and political prisoners who are incarcerated in Myanmar. Myanmar's laws on freedom of expression remain oppressive and are used, particularly by the military, to imprison opponents. In September 2018, , the former Foreign Secretary raised the cases of the two imprisoned Reuters journalists with Aung San Suu Kyi. They were released in May 2019. The British Ambassador continues to raise the issue of political prisoners with other Myanmar Ministers as well as urging reform of repressive legislation.

1st Nov 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the proposal by The Independent Game Developers’ Association to increase video games tax relief from 25 per cent to 32 per cent.

The Government recognises the valuable economic and cultural contribution of the video games industry. The Video Games Tax Relief (VGTR) has supported £5.1 billion of UK expenditure on 1,940 games since its introduction in 2014.

At Spending Review 2021 the government confirmed £8 million for the continuation of the UK Games Fund which provides bespoke support for the UK’s independent video game industry.

The Government regularly receives proposals for changes to tax reliefs. When considering changes, the Government must ensure they provide support to businesses in a fair way and that taxpayer money is effectively targeted. An uplift in the rate of VGTR is not currently under consideration. However, the Government keeps all tax reliefs under review.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has had recent discussions with his international counterparts on the potential merits of (a) suspending, (b) restructuring and (c) cancelling some of Pakistan’s external debt in the context of the recent flooding in that country.

The Government expresses deep concern and condolences for the severe humanitarian and economic impact of flooding in Pakistan. The UK recently announced an uplift in Pakistan flood relief funding, taking the total amount pledged to £16.5m. In addition, at COP26, the UK announced more than £55m of support to help Pakistan tackle climate change.

The Government regularly engages on debt issues with our international partners in a number of fora. The UK acts in concert with its partners in the Paris Club on international debt issues and we stand ready to consider any request through the Paris Club or Common Framework process.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will bring forward legislation to protect (a) Pakistan and (b) other countries affected by climate disasters from being sued in English courts for outstanding debts.

The Government expresses deep concern and condolences for the severe humanitarian and economic impact of flooding in Pakistan. When countries request a debt treatment, the UK is committed to ensuring the private sector participates fully by providing debt relief on comparable terms to that of official bilateral creditors, such as the UK.

The Government does not currently intend to pursue a legislative approach that would force private lenders to participate in debt relief initiatives. Any legislative approach would need to address a number of challenges. For example, legislating may increase the cost – or reduce the availability - of finance for low-income countries.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the impact of increasing levels of sovereign debt repayments on extreme poverty in developing countries.

The UK recognises the significant debt vulnerabilities faced by many low-income countries and that high debt service levels may impact efforts to invest in measures to tackle poverty.

That is why, in May 2020, the UK, together with the G20 and the Paris Club, agreed to the Debt Service Suspension Initiative (DSSI). This aimed to provide eligible countries with additional fiscal space to respond to the Covid-19 pandemic, freeing up resources to fund social, health and economic measures. Preliminary estimates suggest the DSSI has suspended over $12.9 billion in debt service repayments.

The DSSI was a short-term tool to address immediate financing needs. To deliver a longer-term, more sustainable approach to dealing with debt vulnerabilities the UK, along with the G20, also agreed a new Common Framework for Debt Treatments beyond the DSSI. This was designed to provide more efficient, equitable and effective debt treatments that are better able to set countries on a more fiscally sustainable path, freeing up resources to spend on reaching development goals.

The UK is fully committed to implementing the Common Framework in coordination with our international partners.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
29th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Government plans to include the rechannelling of IMF Special Drawing Rights (SDR) to low-income countries within the 0.5 per cent Official Development Assistance budget.

The UK’s channeling of its Special Drawing Rights (SDR) provides valuable financial support to the poorest and the most vulnerable countries.

Departmental ODA budgets will be increasing significantly over the Spending Review period, from the £10 billion that was allocated in 2020 to at least £12.3 billion by 2024-25. The ODA scored through SDR channelling is additional to these growing departmental ODA budgets and will not require cuts to existing programming. As with all ODA eligible spend, it will count towards the UK’s annual ODA spending plans, in line with international rules.

13th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the potential effect of the reduction in Official Development Assistance spending from 0.7 per cent to 0.5 per cent of GNI in 2021 on the UK fiscal situation.

In the context of unprecedented economic and fiscal circumstances, the Government decided at the 2020 Spending Review that sticking rigidly to spending 0.7% of gross national income as Official Development Assistance (ODA) was not an appropriate prioritisation of resources.

To ensure coherence and maximum value for money from the UK’s ODA spending, the Foreign Secretary led a cross-government process after the 2020 Spending Review to review in detail how ODA is allocated against the Government’s priorities. This has ensured that UK ODA is focused on our strategic priorities, spent where it will have the maximum impact, has greater coherence and delivers most value for money.

The Government intends to return to the 0.7% target when the fiscal situation allows. We cannot at this moment predict with certainty when the current fiscal circumstances will have sufficiently improved.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made on the potential effect of reducing Official Development Assistance spending in 2021 from 0.5 per cent to 0.7 per cent of GNI on the value for money of existing UK aid investments.

In the context of unprecedented economic and fiscal circumstances, the Government decided at the 2020 Spending Review that sticking rigidly to spending 0.7% of gross national income as Official Development Assistance (ODA) was not an appropriate prioritisation of resources.

To ensure coherence and maximum value for money from the UK’s ODA spending, the Foreign Secretary led a cross-government process after the 2020 Spending Review to review in detail how ODA is allocated against the Government’s priorities. This has ensured that UK ODA is focused on our strategic priorities, spent where it will have the maximum impact, has greater coherence and delivers most value for money.

The Government intends to return to the 0.7% target when the fiscal situation allows. We cannot at this moment predict with certainty when the current fiscal circumstances will have sufficiently improved.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Oral Statement of 25 November 2020, Official Report, column 830, what plans he has to set out in detail the measurements that will be used to define the fiscal situation under which Official Development Assistance spending can return to .the 0.7 of GNI level.

In the context of unprecedented economic and fiscal circumstances, the Government decided at the 2020 Spending Review that sticking rigidly to spending 0.7% of gross national income as Official Development Assistance (ODA) was not an appropriate prioritisation of resources.

To ensure coherence and maximum value for money from the UK’s ODA spending, the Foreign Secretary led a cross-government process after the 2020 Spending Review to review in detail how ODA is allocated against the Government’s priorities. This has ensured that UK ODA is focused on our strategic priorities, spent where it will have the maximum impact, has greater coherence and delivers most value for money.

The Government intends to return to the 0.7% target when the fiscal situation allows. We cannot at this moment predict with certainty when the current fiscal circumstances will have sufficiently improved.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Oral Statement of 25 November 2020, Official Report, column 830, how his Department will (a) measure and (b) define the fiscal situation to determine whether Official Development Assistance spending can return to 0.7 per cent of GNI.

In the context of unprecedented economic and fiscal circumstances, the Government decided at the 2020 Spending Review that sticking rigidly to spending 0.7% of gross national income as Official Development Assistance (ODA) was not an appropriate prioritisation of resources.

To ensure coherence and maximum value for money from the UK’s ODA spending, the Foreign Secretary led a cross-government process after the 2020 Spending Review to review in detail how ODA is allocated against the Government’s priorities. This has ensured that UK ODA is focused on our strategic priorities, spent where it will have the maximum impact, has greater coherence and delivers most value for money.

The Government intends to return to the 0.7% target when the fiscal situation allows. We cannot at this moment predict with certainty when the current fiscal circumstances will have sufficiently improved.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the average time taken is for investigating and resolving an incorrectly refused Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme claim.

In order to decide if a case has been incorrectly refused, HMRC must obtain evidence of alleged errors and investigate them. Cases differ widely, and the time taken to resolve a case will vary depending on the circumstances and complexity.

HMRC have received a total of 7,293 complaints (up to 4 February 2021) relating to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. Of this figure, 374 have been upheld, 225 have been partially upheld, and 5,579 have been rejected. A further 1,115 claims are currently being investigated.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many incorrectly refused Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme claims are currently being investigated.

In order to decide if a case has been incorrectly refused, HMRC must obtain evidence of alleged errors and investigate them. Cases differ widely, and the time taken to resolve a case will vary depending on the circumstances and complexity.

HMRC have received a total of 7,293 complaints (up to 4 February 2021) relating to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. Of this figure, 374 have been upheld, 225 have been partially upheld, and 5,579 have been rejected. A further 1,115 claims are currently being investigated.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many incorrectly refused Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme claims have been investigated and resolved since the scheme began.

In order to decide if a case has been incorrectly refused, HMRC must obtain evidence of alleged errors and investigate them. Cases differ widely, and the time taken to resolve a case will vary depending on the circumstances and complexity.

HMRC have received a total of 7,293 complaints (up to 4 February 2021) relating to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. Of this figure, 374 have been upheld, 225 have been partially upheld, and 5,579 have been rejected. A further 1,115 claims are currently being investigated.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme claims have been incorrectly refused since the scheme began.

In order to decide if a case has been incorrectly refused, HMRC must obtain evidence of alleged errors and investigate them. Cases differ widely, and the time taken to resolve a case will vary depending on the circumstances and complexity.

HMRC have received a total of 7,293 complaints (up to 4 February 2021) relating to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme. Of this figure, 374 have been upheld, 225 have been partially upheld, and 5,579 have been rejected. A further 1,115 claims are currently being investigated.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme claims that have been approved by HMRC but where a payment was not subsequently received by the applicant.

HMRC do not have an estimate for the number of Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) claims which have been approved by HMRC but not received by applicants, as all claims made within the necessary deadline will be paid six working days after they have been submitted via the online portal. The claims system has been running successfully.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many contractors have worked for HMRC whilst using disguised remuneration schemes.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) are aware of 15 contractors who have used disguised remuneration (DR) schemes while engaged either by the department or by Revenue & Customs Digital Technology Services (RCDTS). In each of the cases, the contractors were engaged via an agency or a company providing a service.

HMRC do not engage in, or enter into, disguised remuneration schemes. It is possible for a contractor providing services to HMRC to use a disguised remuneration scheme without the department’s knowledge or participation. Where HMRC become aware of a contractor who is using a disguised remuneration scheme, they take robust compliance action, including the immediate termination of the engagement. Any contractor identified in the course of HMRC’s compliance work as a scheme user would be investigated in the same way as any other contractor.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people subject to the Loan Charge who were in settlement discussions with HMRC relating to the Loan Charge have reached a settlement on that matter.

HMRC are currently preparing a report to Parliament on the implementation of the independent Loan Charge Review, which is due imminently. The report will include figures up to the 30 September 2020 deadline for taxpayers who settled their use of disguised remuneration tax avoidance schemes.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the number of people who have declared bankruptcy as a result of the Loan Charge.

HMRC do not want to make anybody bankrupt, and insolvency is only ever considered as a last resort. HMRC will work with individuals to reach sustainable and manageable payment plans wherever possible. In line with current practice, HMRC will pause recovery action where a taxpayer has no ability to pay, until there is a significant change of circumstance.

HMRC are not always the only creditor and some individuals may choose to enter insolvency themselves based on their overall financial position.

Anyone who is worried about being able to pay what they owe is encouraged to get in touch with HMRC as soon as possible on 03000 599110.

8th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans his Department has to work with international partners to extend the Debt Service Suspension Initiative beyond the end of 2020; and what plans he has to promote the inclusion of (a) private lenders and (b) multilateral institutions in that agreement.

To date, the Debt Service Suspension Initiative (DSSI) has supported 43 countries which have requested suspensions by freeing up $5 billion to fund their COVID-19 responses. Given the depth of liquidity needs in these countries, the Chancellor supports an extension of the DSSI into 2021 and is working with his G20 counterparts to secure agreement on the extension.

The G20 agreed private sector DSSI participation should be voluntary and at borrowers’ discretion. The Chancellor continues to support this approach, which helps protect these countries’ hard-won market access which will be essential for financing COVID recovery. Where borrowers do make requests, private creditors should implement the DSSI. Where sovereign debt reductions are necessary, it will be important for there to be fair and timely burden sharing between all creditor types, including commercial creditors.

The G20 has supported the Multilateral Development Banks taking a “net positive flows” approach to complement the DSSI, ensuring that borrowing countries receive significantly more funds from the MDBs in 2020 than they repay. For the poorest countries, much of this funding will be on grant terms. This helps ensure the financial model of the MDBs remains sustainable, while allowing donors to target resources to support the most vulnerable countries.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 30 June 2020 to Question 64944, on what dates Departments were (a) asked to identify reductions in their Official Development Assistance spend and (b) required to return that information to his Department.

As mentioned in my reply to you on 30 June, the government regularly discusses with departments the ODA funding allocated to projects, in order to ensure delivery of its commitment to spend 0.7% of GNI on Official Development Assistance (ODA).

Since this commitment is linked to the size of the economy, the level of ODA spend is likely to decrease this year, and therefore commitments of aid spending are being reviewed across all departments.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what (a) impact and (b) risk assessments the Government has made of planned reduced ODA spend across Government departments.

The UK has a legal commitment to spend 0.7% of its gross national income (GNI) each year on Official Development Assistance (ODA). Given the expected fall in GNI this year, commitments of aid spending are being reviewed across all departments.

HM Treasury allocates ODA budgets to departments and is responsible for decisions on changes to these. Departments are responsible for assessing and assuring the impact and value for money of their ODA programmes on an ongoing basis in line with Managing Public Money. HM Treasury take evidence-based spending decisions and ensure departments maintain high standards of programme delivery that are consistent with HMG best practice.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has requested that government departments identify a minimum of 30 per cent reduction in planned Official development Assistance spending for 2020.

The UK has a legal commitment to spend 0.7% of its gross national income (GNI) each year on Official Development Assistance (ODA). The government reviews the ODA funding it allocates to projects on a regular basis in order to ensure delivery of its commitment to spend 0.7% of GNI on ODA. Since this commitment is linked to the size of the economy, the level of ODA spend is likely to decrease this year, and therefore commitments of aid spending are being reviewed across all departments.

HM Treasury allocates ODA budgets to departments and is responsible for decisions on changes to these. We take evidence-based spending decisions and ensure departments maintain high standards of programme delivery that are consistent with HMG best practice.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
19th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing financial incentives to increase the (a) recruitment, (b) retention and (c) availability of key workers during the covid-19 outbreak.

Key workers across the country have already demonstrated their courage and resolve by supporting the public during this difficult time. It is vital that public and other essential services have the workers they need going forward.

The Government is considering appropriate measures to ensure that the public continues to have access to essential services during the COVID-19 outbreak.

For public services, HM Treasury is working closely with departments to take appropriate action so that workforces have the staff they need. Departments will announce measures as soon as they have been agreed.

The Government is also amending pension rules where necessary to remove barriers to retired workers returning to work, including for the NHS, which have already been announced.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the value is of the assets frozen under EU sanctions on targeted Burmese military and security personnel.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) undertakes an annual review of frozen assets in the UK, requiring all persons or institutions that hold or control frozen assets in the UK to report to OFSI. Details of assets reported to OFSI in 2019 are not yet available and will be published in OFSI’s 2019-2020 Annual Review.

Details of assets reported to OFSI in 2018 were published in OFSI’s 2018-2019 Annual Review. As of September 2018, £11.9 billion of frozen funds across all regimes were reported to be held by UK institutions. This figure is provided on an aggregate basis so as not to indirectly disclose the value of funds held by particular individuals.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
14th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has made an assessment of the implications for her policies of reports of intimidation and attempted forced extradition of Uyghur Muslims living in UK.

We continually assess potential threats in the UK, and take protection of individuals’ rights, freedoms, and safety in the UK very seriously. Any attempt by any foreign power to intimidate, harass or harm individuals or communities in the UK will not be tolerated.

All extradition requests to the UK are subject to the safeguards contained in legislation and the full scrutiny of the UK courts. The UK does not have a bilateral extradition treaty with the People’s Republic of China.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
29th Mar 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether funding for the development, processing and integration costs for the UK-Rwanda Migration and Economic Development Partnership will be classified as Overseas Development Assistance.

The funding for the Migration and Economic Development Partnership with Rwanda is separate from, and additional to, the Official Development Assistance (ODA) budget.

8th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much and what proportion of the foreign aid budget was spent on migrant processing (a) centres, (b) facilities and (c) procedures in the South East in the 2021-22 financial year.

Home Office have not used any Official Development Assistance (ODA) funds on migrant processing centres or facilities such as Manston and Western Jet Force.

22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support her Department provides to at-risk (a) third sector and (b) non-governmental organisation staff in Afghanistan with resettlement in the UK.

The Afghan Citizens’ Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) will provide up to 20,000 women, children and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK. It is designed to support those who have assisted UK efforts in Afghanistan and stood up for UK values, as well as vulnerable people, such as women and girls. The scheme is not application based. Instead, eligible people will be prioritised and referred for resettlement to the UK through one of three referral pathways set out in the Statement to Parliament of 6 January 2022:

https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/oral-statement-on-the-afghan-citizens-resettlement-scheme.

Further details on the ACRS referral pathways can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/afghan-citizens-resettlement-scheme.

Under Pathway 3 of the ACRS, in the first year, we will offer resettlement places to up to 1,500 people from the three identified cohorts (British Council, GardaWorld contractors and Chevening alumni) and their eligible family members in Afghanistan and the region.

The online referral process for this pathway closed on 15 August 2022. The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) will be in touch with those eligible to support them through the next steps.

Beyond the first year of Pathway 3, the Government will work with international partners and NGOs to welcome wider groups of Afghans at risk.

Further information on this can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/afghan-citizens-resettlement-scheme-pathway-3-eligibility-for-british-council-and-gardaworld-contractors-and-chevening-alumni.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
22nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support her Department provides to people considered at-risk in Afghanistan who have family naturalised in the UK with resettlement in the UK.

We recognise that the situation in Afghanistan is complex and presents significant challenges, including securing safe passage to another country for those who are eligible for resettlement in the UK.

The Government welcomes its responsibility to those who have worked for, and alongside, British forces in conflict zones. They worked in dangerous and challenging situations, and we would not have been able to carry out our work there without them.

Any current or former staff directly employed by, or for, the UK Government and assessed to be at serious risk of threat to life are eligible to apply for the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP).  To support eligible people in Afghanistan in applying for the ARAP, we have made information available at:

Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy: further information on eligibility criteria, offer details and how to apply - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

The Government provides a safe and legal route to bring families together, through its family reunion policy. This allows a partner, or spouse, and children under 17 of refugees granted protection in the UK, to join them here, if they formed part of the family unit before the sponsor fled their country. To support people in Afghanistan, with family who have been granted protection in the UK, to understand their options, we have provided information on family reunion online, at:

Family reunion - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Those who are not eligible for protection under our resettlement schemes or family reunion policy, will need to apply to come to the UK under our existing economic or family migration rules, which can be viewed at:

https://www.gov.uk/browse/visas-immigration

To bolster the support we’ll offer to those eligible for relocation or family reunion in the UK, we intend to establish a diplomatic presence in Afghanistan as soon as the security and political situation in the country allows.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 8 June 2022 to Question 8024 on Visas: USA, what assessment her Department has made of the potential impact of fees charged by VFS to UK visa applicants in the US on people's ability to visit the UK.

US nationals are not required to apply for a visa before travelling to visit the UK.

US nationals applying in other visa routes do not need to pay to access a biometric appointment, instead they can use the free service run by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) which is available in 136 locations in the US.

If customers wish to opt for additional priority services, they can use one of the 10 Premium Application Centres (PAC) run by our commercial partner, VFS, in the US to provide an enhanced visa service which comes with an associated fee. The PAC service is entirely optional and a customer’s visa decision will not be impacted if they choose not to use this service.

22nd Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 8 June 2022 to Question 8024 on Visas: USA, if her Department will amend its online application system to allow the family members of British citizens to access the VFS premium services in the USA.

Work is underway on the Home Office’s online application system, Access UK (AUK), to allow them to access the VFS premium services in the United States and we would expect this to be implemented by Autumn this year, subject to successful testing.

The PAC service in the United States is an entirely optional premium service and a customer’s visa decision will not be impacted if they do not use this service and apply at a United States Application Support Centre.

24th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether premium application centres provide an accessible service for visa applicants in the US planning to visit the UK.

The Home Office offers a non-premium visa application submission service for customers at 136 locations in the United States (US) run by US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). These locations do not require customers to pay an additional fee to attend.

Customers also have the choice of attending one of our Premium Application Centres (PAC) run by our commercial partner, VFS, and paying an associated fee to do so.

Once customers have completed their online application they will be prompted to book a biometric enrolment appointment at the location of their choice.

Full details on the application process for visa applicants in the US can be found on GOV.UK Apply for a UK visa in the USA - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

It should be noted US citizens are non-visa nationals and do not need to apply for a visa to visit the UK for up to 180 days.

26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will provide a breakdown of her Department’s £915 million Official Development Assistance (ODA) spend in 2021.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her Department's target timeframe is for processing visa applications under the Ukraine Sponsorship Scheme.

The scheme has only been running for a short period so far; details on the number of visas issued will be released in due course.

This is a government led scheme, administered by the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC), to whom further queries can be directed.

7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the risk of children displaced from Ukraine being targeted by smugglers and traffickers.

We stand with Ukraine and will always defend the Ukrainian people’s right to choose their own destiny. Thousands more Ukrainians will be welcomed to the UK as the Government continues its support for Ukraine in their fight against the Russian invasion.

The Government is committed to tackling the heinous crime of human trafficking. We will continue to clamp down on those who continue to exploit vulnerable people while providing tailored support for victims to help their recovery. We will continue to monitor the risk and threat of our Ukraine schemes being exploited by smugglers and traffickers.

The Government’s Ukraine Family Scheme and Homes for Ukraine Scheme have been designed to ensure we meet our safeguarding obligations, particularly for vulnerable children. For example, here caseworkers have concerns about the identity and relationship of an applicant to the Ukraine Family Scheme and their sponsor, they will undertake background checks on the sponsor.

In the Department’s operations, Border Force has a network of specially trained Safeguarding and Modern Slavery officers. Border Force has a key role in identifying victims and perpetrators of human trafficking as they cross the UK border to prevent modern slavery from happening, safeguard other vulnerable persons and help bring to justice those who commit crimes against them too.

7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to increase the number of safe and legal routes to the UK from Ukraine for children and families who have been displaced.

The Government has created two saf e and legal routes for Ukrainians fleeing in fear of their lives clear.

the Home Office’s Ukraine Family Scheme announced on 4 March, and the Homes for Ukraine Scheme announced by the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities on 14 March. It is the first scheme of its kind to be operationalised anywhere in the world

The Ukraine Family Scheme is fee-free and allows British nationals and people settled in the UK to bring family members to the UK, covering immediate family members plus parents, grandparents, children over 18 and siblings, aunts, uncles, nephews, nieces, cousins and in-laws. Individuals will be granted leave for three years and will be able to work and access public services and benefits.

DLUHC’s Homes for Ukraine scheme allows individuals, charities, community groups and businesses in the UK to bring Ukrainians to safety – including those with no family ties to the UK. There will be no limit on the number of arrivals, and those who come to the UK on the scheme will have permission to live and work here for up to three years. They will also have access to public services and benefits. The Scheme launched on 18 March 2022.

27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 27 April 2021 to Question 185914 on British Nationality: Children, by what date she plans to have completed her review into fees for immigration and nationality applications in response to the recent Court of Appeal's ruling on citizenship application fees for children.

The Home Office has acknowledged the Court of Appeal’s judgment and has committed to reviewing the child citizenship registration fee in line with its duties under Section 55.

This review is on-going and the results will be published in due course

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the answer of 13 April 2021 to Question 175906 on British Nationality: Children, what review of fees for immigration and nationality applications has the Department undertaken in response to the Court of Appeal's ruling on citizenship application fees for children.

As advised in the answer to PQ 175906, all fees for immigration and nationality applications are kept under regular review and we ensure they are within the parameters agreed with HM Treasury and Parliament, as set out in Section 68 (9) of the Immigration Act 2014.

The Home Office has acknowledged the recent judgement and is reviewing the fee in line with its duties under Section 55.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it her policy to remove citizenship application fees for children.

We keep fees for immigration and nationality applications under review and ensure they are within the parameters agreed with HM Treasury and Parliament, as set out in Section 68 (9) of the Immigration Act 2014.

19th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the impact of the cyber attack against Capita in March 2023 on the security of civil servants' pensions data.

The Integrity and Security of the Civil Service pension scheme is a matter for the Cabinet Office as the lead Department for the scheme. Any assessment of the impact of the reported Capita data breach on the security of civil servant pension data is a matter for the Cabinet Office and should be directed to them.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent progress his Department has made on processing applications under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy for former employees of Crown Agents and their families who remained in Afghanistan.

Since April 2021 we have relocated over 11,000 ARAP eligible individuals and their families to safety in the UK. It is not possible to provide a breakdown of these figures by job role or specific organisations.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress the Government has made on applications under all four categories of the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Programme.

Of the estimated 16,500 ARAP eligible individuals to which we owe debt of grattitude, we have relocated 11,437 individuals. This figure includes principals and dependants. Data fidelity does not allow for this figure to be broken down by ARAP categories or professions.

We continue to receive a high number of applications, however the majority of these are duplicates or are ineligible. We are now actively processing and issuing decisions on more applications per month than we are receiving, allowing us to make progress on clearing the backlog.

Our primary focus is on identifying and relocating the estimated remaining 5,300 eligible individuals, using HMG employment records to target our efforts. Significant progress has been made to accelerate the process in recent months, including additional Defence resource being made available and an enhanced casework system.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civil service jobs (a) his Department and (b) its agencies had located in Scotland in (i) March 2011 and (ii) in the latest period for which figures are available.

As at March 2011 there were 5,550 Ministry of Defence (MOD) civilian jobs located in Scotland.

The latest published figures confirm that as at 1 April 2020 there were 3,970 MOD civilian jobs located in Scotland.

The figures are full time equivalent and are based on the personnel station location. The March 2011 data includes c104 Meteorological Office personnel. However, as the Meteorological Office has since ceased to be a part of MOD, these are not included in the April 2020 data.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what proportion of recruits to the armed forces in 2020 were female.

The requested information can be found in the ‘Female Intake’ and ‘Gender’ sections of the published 2020 and 2019 Biannual Diversity Statistics:
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/943009/Biannual_Diversity_Statistics_Publication_Oct20.pdf
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/851974/UK_Armed_Forces_Biannual_Diversity_Statistics_-_1_October_2019.pdf

Defence remains dedicated to achieving a more diverse workforce and is undertaking a wide range of activities to increase the number of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) and female recruits into the Armed Forces. In 2015 we set ourselves ambitious targets to increase the diversity of personnel joining the Armed Forces by 2020; for female personnel, this was set at 15 per cent. Although progress has been made and the proportion of women joining increased during this period, we fell just under three per cent short of our target and thus recognise that there is still more to do.

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many women were employed in his Department in each year since 2018.

The Ministry of Defence publishes statistics relating to the number of women employed within the Department in the MOD Diversity Dashboard on Gov.uk website. Details of each year, back to 2018, can be found at the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/mod-diversity-dashboard-index

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the gender balance is of temporary contract staff in his Department.

As of 31 December 2020, the Ministry of Defence including Defence Equipment & Support but excluding Trading Funds and Agencies, directly employed 245 female, 1,082 male and 86 undisclosed gender civilian staff on a temporary contract .

The gender balance of individual consultants and contractors employed through wider service contracts is not centrally held.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many women in his Department have participated in the Crossing Thresholds programme since 2018.

Since 2018, 158 women in the Ministry of Defence have participated, or are participating, in the Crossing Thresholds programme. The Positive Action Pathway is currently being redesigned by Civil Service Learning and is no longer running; however, 134 civilian staff took part in the scheme from when it began in 2018 until it was suspended for redesign.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civilian staff in his Department have taken part in the Positive Action Pathway scheme since 2018.

Since its inception in 2018, 158 women in the Ministry of Defence have participated, or are participating, in the Crossing Thresholds programme. The Positive Action Pathway is currently being redesigned by Civil Service Learning and is no longer running; however, 134 civilian staff took part in the scheme from when it began in 2018 until it was suspended for redesign.

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the gender balance is of full-time permanent contract staff in his Department.

As at 1 October 2020, there were 19,620 male and 13,037 female full-time civilian staff employed on a permanent contract by the Ministry of Defence (MOD).

The most recent publication for the MOD Diversity Dashboard can be found on the Gov.uk website, at the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/mod-diversity-dashboard-index

Johnny Mercer
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister for Veterans' Affairs)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel are stationed at Muharraq air base in Bahrain; which units those personnel belong to; what the cost of those personnel was in financial year 2019-20; and what roles those personnel are fulfilling.

The UK has eight Armed Forces personnel based between Muharraq Air Base and Headquarters Maritime Component Commander in Bahrain. These personnel form the UK Joint Support Detachment and belong to the UK Maritime Component Commander and the UK Air Component Commander. They fulfil a variety of roles to facilitate the entry and departure of UK personnel and stores from Bahrain under Operation KIPION, including postal services and logistics movements. The cost of supporting these personnel in Bahrain was approximately £270,000 during financial year 2019-20

James Heappey
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence) (Minister for the Armed Forces)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what his Department's target timeframe is for matching Ukrainian nationals with organisations that have applied to be sponsors under the Homes for Ukraine scheme.

I refer the Hon Member to the answers given to Question UIN 145857 on 28 March 2022 and Question UIN 144955 on 29 March 2022, which include links to published guidance and information at Gov.uk.

1st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many care-experienced people were part of the prison population in 2022.

This question cannot be answered without incurring disproportionate cost.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
1st Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average (a) prison population and (b) cost per prisoner was in 2022.

The unit costs for 2021/22 are not yet finalised and will be published in due course. In the meantime, the link below contains information around the previous year’s unit costs. This shows that the average population across the year was 78,959 and the overall cost per prisoner was £48,409 per annum.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prison-performance-data-2020-to-2021

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)