Barry Gardiner Portrait

Barry Gardiner

Labour - Brent North

Shadow Minister (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Climate Change)
14th Jul 2016 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for International Trade
14th Jul 2016 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
27th Jun 2016 - 14th Jul 2016
Shadow Minister (Energy and Climate Change)
18th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Oct 2013 - 18th Sep 2015
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
20th Dec 2010 - 4th Nov 2013
Energy and Climate Change Committee
2nd Nov 2010 - 4th Nov 2013
Special Envoy for Forestry
28th Jun 2007 - 15th Sep 2008
Crossrail Bill
14th Nov 2007 - 18th Nov 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) (Biodiversity, Landscape and Rural Affairs)
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Trade and Industry) (Delivery and Efficiency)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
2nd Apr 2004 - 10th May 2005
Consolidation etc. Bills (Joint Committee)
12th Dec 2001 - 5th May 2005
Public Accounts Committee
10th Jun 1999 - 16th Oct 2002
Procedure Committee
31st Jul 1997 - 25th Jan 2000


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 27th October 2021
14:00
Environmental Audit Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Net zero aviation and shipping
27 Oct 2021, 2 p.m.
At 2.15pm: Oral evidence
Dr Andy Jefferson - Programme Director at Sustainable Aviation
Dr Chika Miyoshi - Reader in Environmental Systems for Aerospace at Cranfield University
Chris Young - Group Chief Engineer at Rolls-Royce
At 3.15pm: Oral evidence
Simon Bullock - Research Associate at Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Manchester
Sarah Kenny - Chair at Maritime UK
Anna Ziou - Policy Director at UK Chamber of Shipping
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 28th October 2021
09:30
Public Accounts Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Underpayments of the State Pension
28 Oct 2021, 9:30 a.m.
At 10.00am: Oral evidence
Peter Schofield - Permanent Secretary at Department for Work & Pensions
Amanda Reynolds - Director General for Service Excellence at Department for Work & Pensions
Cathy Payne - Deputy Director for State Pensions and Service Excellence at Department for Work & Pensions
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Select Committee Meeting
Monday 1st November 2021
15:30
Public Accounts Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities recall (Homelessness and housing)
1 Nov 2021, 3:30 p.m.
At 4.00pm: Oral evidence
Jeremy Pocklington - Permanent Secretary at Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities
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Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 3rd November 2021
14:00
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 4th November 2021
09:30
Public Accounts Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: DCMS recall (Broadband)
4 Nov 2021, 9:30 a.m.
At 10.00am: Oral evidence
Sarah Healey - Permanent Secretary at Department for Culture, Media and Sport
Susannah Storey - Director General for Digital and Media at Department for Culture, Media and Sport
Imran Shafi - Director for Digital Infrastructure at Department for Culture, Media and Sport
Paul Norris - CE0 at Building Digital UK
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Select Committee Meeting
Monday 15th November 2021
15:30
Public Accounts Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: NHS supply chain finance
15 Nov 2021, 3:30 p.m.
At 4.00pm: Oral evidence
Sir Chris Wormald - Permanent Secretary at Department of Health and Social Care
Simon Tse - Chief Executive at Crown Commercial Service
Michael Brodie - Chief Executive at NHS Business Service Authority
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Scheduled Event
Friday 10th December 2021
Private Members' Bills - Main Chamber
Employment and Trade Union Rights (Dismissal and Re-engagement) Bill: Adjourned debate on Second Reading [22 October]
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Division Votes
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 165 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 220
Speeches
Friday 22nd October 2021
Employment and Trade Union Rights (Dismissal and Re-engagement) Bill

May I just remind the hon. Lady that the comment about capitalism was not, in fact, mine but the Leader …

Written Answers
Friday 10th September 2021
Livestock Industry: Biodiversity and Climate Change
To ask the President of COP26, whether the Government plans to use the COP26 Conference to discuss the effects of …
Early Day Motions
Monday 11th January 2021
COP26 and deep coal mining in the UK
That this House recognises the UK’s historic responsibility as host of COP26 to lead by example on the transition to …
Bills
Wednesday 16th June 2021
Employment and Trade Union Rights (Dismissal and Re-engagement) Bill 2021-22
A Bill to amend the law relating to workplace information and consultation, employment protection and trade union rights to provide …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 18th October 2021
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: Unite the Union
Address of donor: Unite House, 128 Theobalds Road, London WC1Z 8TN
Amount of donation …
EDM signed
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Lakhvinder Ricky Reel
That this House continues to expresses its heartfelt sympathy with the family of the late Lakhvinder Ricky Reel who died …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Barry Gardiner has voted in 246 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Barry Gardiner Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(12 debate interactions)
Kwasi Kwarteng (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
(10 debate interactions)
Kevin Hollinrake (Conservative)
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for International Trade
(22 debate contributions)
Home Office
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Barry Gardiner's debates

Brent North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Brent North signature proportion
Petitions with most Brent North signatures
Barry Gardiner has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Barry Gardiner

18th October 2021
Barry Gardiner signed this EDM on Tuesday 26th October 2021

Lakhvinder Ricky Reel

Tabled by: John McDonnell (Labour - Hayes and Harlington)
That this House continues to expresses its heartfelt sympathy with the family of the late Lakhvinder Ricky Reel who died in suspicious circumstances in 1997 after being racially attacked in Kingston, Surrey; is appalled to learn that his family were spied upon by undercover police officers; acknowledges that over 100,000 …
34 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 23
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Scottish National Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Green Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
22nd September 2021
Barry Gardiner signed this EDM on Wednesday 22nd September 2021

Staffing reductions at the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency

Tabled by: Grahame Morris (Labour - Easington)
That this House acknowledges the work and dedication of staff employed across the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA); notes the agency plays a leading role in protecting and improving public health and supports innovations through research and development; is aware that the MHRA has three centres employing almost …
41 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 29
Plaid Cymru: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
Alba Party: 2
Scottish National Party: 1
Independent: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Conservative: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Barry Gardiner's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Barry Gardiner, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Barry Gardiner has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Barry Gardiner has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Barry Gardiner


A Bill to amend the law relating to workplace information and consultation, employment protection and trade union rights to provide safeguards for workers against dismissal and re-engagement on inferior terms and conditions; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading (Commons)
Friday 22nd October 2021
(Read Debate)

Barry Gardiner has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


68 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
21st Jul 2021
To ask the President of COP26, whether the Government plans to use the COP26 Conference to discuss the effects of global intensive animal agriculture on (a) climate change and (b) biodiversity loss; and if he will make a statement.

COP26 will hold a Nature Day event in Glasgow highlighting forests, agriculture and wider land use as key priorities to mitigating the climate crisis. We are calling for international action to reduce emissions from agriculture, deforestation and other land use. We are working with international partners to promote sustainable and climate-resilient agriculture; to mobilise increased and more targeted finance for nature; and to build the political consensus for ambitious action.

At the G7 summit, leaders committed to work to accelerate an inclusive global transition to sustainable and climate resilient agriculture, as well as committing to achieving net zero emissions no later than 2050.

The UK has also played a central role in promoting the ‘Leaders’ Pledge for Nature’, which now has over 80 signatories. The pledge sets out ten urgent actions to put nature on a path to recovery by 2030, addressing both biodiversity loss and climate change.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
25th Aug 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the administrative costs for British businesses who are seeking to trade goods into Northern Ireland after the transition period.

In line with the practice of successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not normally disclosed.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Deloitte drafted answers to written parliamentary questions on behalf of Government departments other than the Department of Health and Social Care.

Further to the answer to PQ175784 on 13 April 2021, departments are responsible for their responses to written Parliamentary Questions. Deloitte has not drafted answers to written Parliamentary Questions on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the inclusion of biomass in the Energy Charter Treaty on transition to cleaner renewable energy sources including wind and solar.

The UK supports the process to modernise the Energy Charter Treaty in a way that helps the global energy transition, such as the right for States to regulate to reach emissions reduction targets and a stronger focus on climate security issues.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many individual doses of the (a) Pfizer Biontech vaccine and (b) Oxford Astra Zeneca vaccine NHS England had taken delivery of as at 5.00pm on 15 January 2021.

Vaccines are a precious resource and are in very high demand across the world; therefore, for security reasons it is not possible to provide detail about the size of our supplies or give exact detail about future deliveries.

As of 18 January 2021, over 4.6 million people in the UK had been vaccinated with the first dose of the vaccine. We are in the process of understanding the implications of Pfizer’s announcement on 15 January, regarding upgrades to its manufacturing capacity. We continue to work to meet our target of vaccinating all four priority groups, as advised by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, by the middle of February.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
3rd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings of the University of Stirling on the Government's response to public health concerns on shale gas exploration, published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health in July 2020; and if he will make a statement.

We are committed to ensuring a rigorous, evidence-based approach to shale gas extraction, and as such welcome any new research that can further enhance our understanding and help inform our policy development.

On the basis of the current scientific evidence, Government has confirmed that it will take a presumption against issuing any further Hydraulic Fracturing Consents in England, which are required before hydraulic fracturing operations can take place. This position, an effective moratorium, will be maintained unless compelling new evidence is provided which addresses the concerns around the prediction and management of induced seismicity.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with the Indian government on the (a) launch of One Sun One World One Grid and (b) formation of a Global Green Grid Alliance.

India is an important partner for the UK and we have a long history of engaging with the Government of India on climate change and clean energy.

To date, the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has not discussed Prime Minister Modi's new One Sun One World One Grid initiative or the formation of the Global Green Grids Alliance with the Government of India. However, we welcome the ambition on the initiatives and will continue to look for opportunities to work with India to increase global action on climate change and clean energy in the run-up to COP26. The British High Commission in India and the Department for International Development have had exploratory discussions with the Government of India and want to learn more about both initiatives.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department sought advice from Government lawyers at the time of the sale of Newton Rigg in 2011 on the efficacy of a deed of release purporting to absolve the parties pursuant to that sale from liability for negligence or fraud; and whether that deed of release was deemed by Government lawyers to be (a) ultra vires, (b) void for illegality and (c) contrary to public policy.

The government continues to follow the general practice of successive governments not to comment on legal advice that may or may not have been sought or received.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons the Chief Executive of Skills Funding and the Young People’s Learning Agency agreed to execute a legal document on the sale of Newton Rigg in 2011 containing provisions purporting to absolve the parties cited in that legal document from liability for negligence or fraud; and whether that decision to execute a legal document was approved by his Department.

The deed of release was agreed by the Skills Funding Agency and Young People’s Learning Agency in line with the policy on further education assets adopted by its sponsor department (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills at the time).

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons the Skills Funding Agency (SFA) agreed to change the terms of the 2010 Prospectus to require the University of Cumbria to make payments amounting to £3.4million for shared use of the Newton Rigg campus under an Occupancy Agreement; and what account was taken by the SFA when agreeing to change those terms of the original prospectus' provision for the shared use of those assets for the sum of £1 if demanded.

Commercial arrangements between two independent organisations, Askham Bryan College and the University of Cumbria, were entered into by both parties. This allowed the university to continue using Newton Rigg Campus for research related activities following the transfer of further education provision to Askham Bryan College in 2011.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason the Cumbria Area Review published in 2017, omitted Newton Rigg from the lists and tables of Further Education and Sixth Form Colleges in the county; and what plans he has for the future of Newton Rigg.

Newton Rigg Campus is part of Askham Bryan College Corporation, has no separate legal identity and was therefore out of scope of the Cumbria area based review. As the campus is part of Askham Bryan College, they were included in the wave 4; York, North Yorkshire, East Riding and Hull area-based review, which commenced in September 2016. This approach was consistent with the broad principles of area-based reviews in that colleges should be formal members of only one area review steering group.

The Further Education Commissioner and Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) carried out a comprehensive analysis of local provision needs for Newton Rigg and the surrounding area in 2020. The core objective of this analysis was to establish if there was a need for college provision within the general vicinity of the Newton Rigg campus. It considered the location of neighbouring further education (FE) colleges in relation to travel-to-learn options and identified that most enrolments could be accommodated at other statutory FE institutions.

In total, 286 16 to 18 year old students were enrolled onto land-based further education courses at Newton Rigg, of which 70 were in residential accommodation. Where gaps in provision were identified, specifically agricultural provision, alternative arrangements for the next academic year have been agreed with Myerscough College, in partnership with Ullswater Community College, to ensure continuity of delivery of this provision in the Penrith area after Newton Rigg closes.

If further evidence of gaps in provision are highlighted as a result of the closure of Newton Rigg in support of local authorities’ statutory duty to secure provision in an area, the ESFA will consider requests to fill a gap in provision. Where this cannot be met through negotiation with good existing providers the requirements are put out to tender through open competition.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Skills Funding Agency took to ensure that the proposed transfer of Newton Rigg assets to Askham Bryan College in 2011 complied with Cabinet Office guidelines for the disposal of public assets, and specifically the appointment of a manager to supervise the contract.

Newton Rigg is not a public asset, having previously been acquired by the University of Cumbria from the University of Central Lancashire and then transferred to Askham Bryan College in 2011. The transfer of Newton Rigg was therefore not subject to Cabinet Office guidelines.

However, following the decision by the University of Cumbria in 2010 to cease delivering the provision of further education funded by the Skills Funding Agency (SFA) and the Young People’s Learning Agency, the SFA led on an open and competitive procurement process, in accordance with Part B of Schedule 3 of the Public Contracts Regulations 2006, to secure an alternative provider or providers for the delivery of arts provision in Carlisle and predominately land-based provision at Newton Rigg. As a result of this competition, the funding for students studying further education at the University’s Brampton Road building was transferred to Carlisle College, and the funding for students studying further education at Newton Rigg, together with the relevant further education assets owned by the University of Cumbria at Newton Rigg, were transferred to Askham Bryan College. The procurement was subject to a review by Cabinet Office in 2011 and its findings are available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/61795/MYSTERY-SHOPPER-CASE-PUBLICATION-JULY-2012.pdf.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency and its predecessor organisations assign individual case managers to each further education provider who hold funding agreements and contracts to deliver publicly funded education and training. Case managers are then responsible for managing the relationship between government and individual further education providers.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will extend the Primary PE and Sports Premium beyond the 2020-21 academic year to enable children who have been in lockdown to catch up with the level of physical skills attainment appropriate to their age.

Physical education (PE) and school sport plays an important role in supporting children and young people to be physically active, particularly during the current COVID-19 restrictions. The Department is working with the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Department of Health and Social Care on how to support better PE, sport and physical activity provision for all children and young people. This is part of our continuing work to deliver our joint school sport and activity action plan, published in 2019.

The Department is considering arrangements for the primary PE and sport premium for the 2021-22 academic year and will confirm the position as soon as possible.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has plans to update data held by his Department on the number of children that qualify for free school meals to ensure that pupil premium grant funding reflects the increase in the number of children whose families are eligible for that funding as a result of the economic consequences of the covid-19 outbreak.

The January 2021 census will be used to determine pupil premium eligibility for alternative provision and pupil referral units for the financial year 2021-22. Pupil premium eligibility for mainstream and special schools will be based on the October 2020 census.

As part of the October census, schools are required to submit information on free school meals (FSM) eligibility for all of their pupils. The move to using the October census for the pupil premium should not affect the information submitted by schools as part of the census. The only circumstance in which amendments can be made to the October census is if there is an error in the numbers. We look into such cases on a case by case basis when they are reported to us.

Pupil premium will continue to be based on “Ever6 FSM”, whereby all pupils eligible for free school meals at the time of the October census, or at any point in the previous 6 years, will attract pupil premium funding. Per pupil funding rates will be the same as in 2020-21. As a result, we expect a typical school to see an increase in pupil premium funding from 2020-21 to 2021-22 as more children have become eligible for free school meals as a result of the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak, and for total pupil premium funding to increase from £2.4 billion in 2020-21 to more than £2.5 billion in 2021-22. In addition to this, the Government announced a further £300 million for a one-off Recovery Premium which will be allocated to schools based on the same methodology as the pupil premium. In this way, schools with more disadvantaged pupils will receive larger amounts.

The Department will confirm pupil premium allocations for the financial year 2021-22 in June 2021. This will provide the public with information on the specific amounts that regions, local authorities, and schools are receiving through the pupil premium for 2021-22.

The Department publishes information on pupil premium allocations and the number of pupils eligible annually. The most recent publicly available figures can be found via this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2020-to-2021.

23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the proposed National Landscapes Service on the management of National Parks.

The independent Landscapes Review, led by Julian Glover, set out a compelling vision for more beautiful, more biodiverse and more accessible National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs).

We welcome this ambition, as the Government is committed to ensuring our protected landscapes flourish as havens for nature and are places that everyone can visit and enjoy.

The Landscapes Review included recommendations for long-term structural changes, such as creating a new National Landscape Service and changing National Park and AONB statutory purposes, that would require legislation were they to be taken forward.

We are working closely with National Park Authorities, AONB organisations and wider stakeholders to consider the potential effects of the Landscape Review’s recommendations and to develop a well-informed response to the review, which we will publish in due course.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when the Government plans to publish its formal response to the Glover Review.

The independent Landscapes Review, led by Julian Glover, set out a compelling vision for more beautiful, more biodiverse and more accessible National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs).

We welcome this ambition, as the government is committed to ensuring our protected landscapes flourish as havens for nature and are places that everyone can visit and enjoy.

The Landscapes Review included recommendations for long-term structural changes, such as creating a new National Landscape Service and changing National Park and AONB statutory purposes, that would require legislation were they to be taken forward.

We are taking time to carefully consider the recommendations and working with partner organisations to inform and develop our response to the review, which we will publish in due course.

In the meantime, we are working to implement the ambitions of the Review on the ground now. For example, we are leading a £5.77m cross-governmental project to test nature-based social prescribing in seven test and learn sites, run national experimental work to understand its scalability, and deliver a robust project evaluation. This will help improve mental health and wellbeing by connecting more people to nature, including in protected landscapes.

The £80m Green Recovery Challenge Fund, which launched in September 2020, will kickstart a programme of nature-based projects to restore nature, tackle climate change and connect people with the natural environment. Some of these projects will help deliver on the Landscape Review's recommendations, such as the proposal to give every child a night under the stars in a national landscape.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans the Government has to remove Total Allowable Catch limits from particular stocks.

We have no plans to remove total allowable catch limits. Any decision to remove a stock from management by setting a total allowable catch would need to be guided by robust scientific evidence. Scientific advice for 2020 for most stocks in the North East Atlantic will be published by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea on 30 June.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the cost of the Small Deals Initiative has been to the public purse in each year since its establishment.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) operates at no net cost to the taxpayer. UKEF’s Smaller Deals Initiative is staffed by civil servants employed on standard terms and conditions by UKEF. No costs outside of UKEF’s normal core business have been incurred since the Initiative’s inception.

The Smaller Deals Initiative works on the same “no net cost to the taxpayer” basis as UKEF generally. It collects premiums from transactions supported in exchange for taking on risk on behalf of the taxpayer and to cover the Initiative’s administrative costs.

21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the (a) effectiveness of the Brexit voucher schemes in (i) Ireland and (ii) the Netherlands and (b) the potential merits of introducing a similar scheme in the UK to support SMEs with their trade with European partners after the UK leaves the EU.

As part of work on a new Export Strategy we are examining the range of existing UK export promotion schemes and will consider the effectiveness of voucher schemes used elsewhere.

25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the implications for the Government's policies of the multi-party interim appeal arrangement entered into by the EU and 16 other WTO members to settle appeal proceedings in the absence of a functioning WTO appellate body; and what plans the Government has to participate in that arrangement.

The UK remains a strong supporter of the multilateral trading system and the World Trade Organization (WTO) dispute settlement system. A fully-functioning, compulsory, binding, and impartial dispute settlement system with an appeal function is important in providing certainty and stability to the WTO system. The UK notes that some WTO Members are now considering multi-party interim appeal arrangements as a contingency measure whilst the Appellate Body is inquorate. The final proposal for such an interim arrangement has not yet been published, and we will continue to follow developments on this closely.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of potential (a) challenges in the negotiations on the UK's proposed schedules at the WTO and (b) amendments, financial settlements or other compensatory measures that may be required as a result of those negotiations.

The independent UK goods and services schedules aim to maintain the existing commitments and the balance of rights and obligations between the UK and our trading partners. The UK has formally opened negotiations under Article XXVIII (GATT) on aspects of our goods schedule. We continue to assess the impacts as we seek to conclude negotiations. The appropriate WTO certification procedure for the UK services schedule does not allow for market access or compensation negotiations. We continue to consult with the Russian Federation to see their outstanding objection to technical elements withdrawn. A WTO member can trade on an uncertified schedule whilst working to have its schedule certified.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what progress the UK is making in submitting schedules at the WTO.

The UK has submitted independent goods and services schedules to the WTO for certification. The UK’s independent goods schedule was circulated on 24 July 2018, and we have now formally opened negotiations under Article XXVIII of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). The UK’s independent services schedule was circulated in December 2018. There is an outstanding objection to the technical elements from the Russian Federation, and we continue to consult with them to see their objection withdrawn. A WTO member can trade on an uncertified schedule, whilst working to have its schedule certified.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether her Department plans to participate in Environmental Goods Agreement negotiations at the WTO; and what progress has been made in those negotiations to date.

The UK Government is strongly in favour of seeing negotiations on an Environmental Goods Agreement restart and of playing a key role in them, given the important contribution this agreement would make to tackling climate change. Environmental Goods Agreement negotiations began in the WTO in 2014 but stalled in 2016 due to disagreements in negotiations between prospective signatories.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect of covid-19 on (a) Chinese and (b) other overseas demand for UK exports.

It is too early to estimate the scale of the impact, which will depend on how severe and prolonged the COVID-19 outbreak becomes. We remain closely engaged with businesses to monitor developments.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what support her Department is providing to UK businesses affected by coronavirus.

Department for International Trade teams around the globe are supporting British companies facing disruption due to COVID-19. The Department’s officials in China and other affected areas are working with affected or concerned UK businesses to provide support, including engaging with local government and suppliers, and working with business associations to disseminate the latest information on freight services, UK consular and visa services, and accessing UK Export Finance facilities.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect of covid-19 on the viability of UK business supply chains.

The department are actively engaging with business and working with other government departments to understand the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak, including its effects on trade. There is a risk of ongoing disruption to international supply chains, particularly in sectors such as automotive, technology, pharmaceuticals, clothing and apparel, tourism and aviation.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect of covid-19 on UK business representation at overseas trade shows.

We advise UK businesses to follow FCO travel advice in determining whether to attend overseas trade shows. We are maintaining a log of all cancelled and postponed events which the Department for International Trade was due either to participate in or support companies to attend, such as the ‘MIPIM’ Global Property Event, via for example the Tradeshow Access Programme. We recognise the impact that continued uncertainty will have on UK business and supply chains and will seek to minimise this using our UK and globally based staff and partners.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many companies offered direct support for overseas investment or commercial trade deals by (a) UK Export Finance and (b) other parts of her Department have been subject to corruption or bribery investigations in each year since 2016.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) is not an investigatory body. As such, it is only aware of such investigations as have been made public by law enforcement agencies.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) does not hold such data for the 10,000 business interactions it conducts each month across 108 countries.

Both DIT and UKEF have clear policies in place enabling all staff to report any suspicions or suspicious behaviour immediately to the relevant authorities.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate she has made of the number of SMEs that have started exporting overseas following support through (a) the Small Deals Initiative and (b) other UK Export Finance support.

The Small Deals initiative was set up in October 2017 and supported its first transaction in August 2018. Since then it has supported a further six, with a further one anticipated during the current financial year. Of those deals, 57% have involved Small and Medium-Sized Enterprise (SMEs) exporters.

During the last five financial years, UK Export Finance (UKEF) has supported the following total numbers of exporters:

2018/19 262

2017/18 191

2016/17 221

2015/16 226

Consistently over 70% of businesses directly supported by UKEF are SMEs. In addition, many transactions involving larger businesses further support the UK supply chain, which includes significant numbers of SMEs.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the WTO ruling of 2 October 2019 on countermeasures in relation to EU subsidies to Airbus, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of the imposition of tariffs by the US on the level of UK exports to the US.

The tariffs imposed by the US following the 2 October 2019 ruling harm businesses on both sides of the Atlantic. The extent to which these tariff costs will fall onto UK producers will vary by sector and the Department for International Trade is working closely with other departments to monitor the effect of these tariffs on exports to the US. The Government continues to lobby at the highest levels with the US Administration for the removal of the tariffs.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect of support for UK investors to win commercial deals at the UK-Africa Investment Summit on (a) the UK's emission reduction commitments, (b) the UK's priorities at COP26, (c) UK Export Finance's Equator Principles commitments and (d) regional integration and economic cooperation between African nations.

The UK-Africa Investment Summit agreed new lasting partnerships between the UK and African countries to deliver more investment, jobs and growth. This government is committed to tackling climate change and will be targeting ambitious action during our presidency of COP26 this year. The Department for International Trade will continue to promote export and investment opportunities in clean growth sectors.

UK Export Finance rigorously follows the requirements of the OECD Common Approaches and Equator Principles, which set the framework for export credit agencies and international financial institutions in managing environmental, social and human rights risks.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment her Department has made of the (a) human rights situation in Cambodia and (b) implications for her policies of the decision by the EU to withdraw that country's trade preferences.

The Government remains concerned about the human rights situation in Cambodia and continues to use diplomatic channels to urge Cambodia to show progress.

During the transition period the UK will continue to apply unilateral preferences to developing countries in accordance with the EU’s Generalised Scheme of Preferences. At this stage, we have not taken any decision on continuing any EU suspension of Cambodia’s trade preferences at the end of the Transition Period.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
7th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will make an assessment of the merits of bringing forward proposals to amend universal credit regulations to allow her Department to apply discretion on the recovery of advance loans taken out by domestic abuse victims under duress.

The Government is fully committed to the prevention of abuse and the Department for Work and Pensions has a range of measures designed to support people who flee violent and abusive households.

If a Universal Credit claimant has been forced into claiming an advance through domestic abuse, we would urge the claimant to talk to the Department about this. If the advance was taken whilst part of a couple claim, 50% of the outstanding balance would be apportioned upon pursuing a single claim. Additionally, the Department offers deferrals of advance repayments by up to 3 months in exceptional circumstances and will apply discretion wherever possible with the rates of repaying other government debts. A range of other support is available across the Department for those impacted by domestic abuse.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/domestic-violence-and-abuse-help-from-dwp/help-available-from-the-department-for-work-and-pensions-for-people-who-are-victims-of-domestic-violence-and-abuse#universal-credit

The Department will continue to look at ways to further support the victims of domestic abuse.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what mental health support he is providing to NHS workers who are treating covid-19 patients.

We have funded a comprehensive package of support that includes a dedicated staff helpline, specialist bereavement support and free access to mental health and wellbeing apps. The NHS People Plan, published in July 2020, also puts staff wellbeing at its core and includes appointing a wellbeing guardian in every National Health Service organisation, free parking and support to work flexibly and take time off. This is strengthened further by the mental health and wellbeing hubs being set up across the country that are providing rapid outreach and assessment services to help frontline staff.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what measures his Department has put in place for healthcare workers who are shielding from covid-19 and unable to complete their three year nursing revalidation.

As the independent regulator of nurses and midwives in the United Kingdom and nursing associates in England, the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) is responsible for nurse revalidation.

On 30 March 2020, the Department laid a statutory instrument allowing the NMC to respond to the pandemic by adapting some of its operating procedures. To support registrants due to revalidate from March 2020, the NMC has extended revalidation timeframes and broadened the criteria for demonstrating continuing professional development. These changes aim to minimise the incidence of lapsed registrations during COVID-19 whilst maintaining public safety and confidence in the nursing profession.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many answers to written parliamentary questions in respect of NHS Track and Trace were drafted by Deloitte.

As part of their work in helping respond to the pandemic, Deloitte have provided support to civil servants answering Written Questions where required.

Information on the number of questions which have contributions by Deloitte could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Home Secretary on ensuring illegal migrants and overstayers cooperate with public health services during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care has regular discussions with his counterparts across Government.

Vaccination against COVID-19 is a primary care service. It is therefore not within scope of the Charging Regulations and is available free of charge to anyone living in the United Kingdom, including those living here without permission. If an individual is registered with a general practitioner (GP) practice, they will be invited for the vaccine at the appropriate time based on the prioritisation set out by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation. If an individual is not registered with a GP, National Health Service regional teams working with the appropriate local system will contact unregistered people to ensure they are offered the vaccine.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of illegal migrants and overstayers who are reluctant to engage with the NHS during the covid-19 outbreak as a result of concerns over their immigration status.

We have made no such estimate.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment has been made of the relative risk of potentially overwhelming the health service by prioritising people aged 80 and over and prioritising all frontline health care workers in the NHS for the covid-19 vaccine.

No such comparative assessment has been made. The Department has taken advice from the independent Joint Committee on Vaccinations and Immunisation (JCVI) on priority groups for COVID-19 vaccination. The JCVI advised that the first priority for any COVID-19 vaccination programme should be the reduction of COVID-19 mortality and the protection of health and social care staff and systems. All those 80 years of age and over and frontline health and social care workers have been offered vaccinations in priority group two.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS healthcare workers had received the (a) first and (b) second dose of the covid-19 vaccine by Wednesday 20 January 2021.

This information is not available in the format requested.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many non-frontline workers in the NHS had received a (a) first dose and (b) second dose of the covid-19 vaccine by 5pm on 20 January 2021.

This information is not available in the format requested.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people aged 80 years and over did the NHS have recorded as living in each NHS region in England as of 1 January 2021.

The following table shows the number of patients registered at a general practice who were aged 80 years old or over as of 1 January 2021, by region.

Region

Number of patients

London

301,046

South West

355,808

South East

505,103

Midlands

552,288

East of England

360,621

North West

348,910

North East and Yorkshire

446,897

Total

2,870,673

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the proportion of the individual doses of the (a) Pfizer Biontech vaccine and (b) Astra Zeneca vaccine that were distributed to each of the seven English NHS regions before 5pm on 15 January 2021 corresponded to the number of people aged 80 and over and recorded by NHS England as living in each region, as a proportion of the total number of people aged 80 and over in England as a whole.

The number of individual doses of the Pfizer BioNTech and the Oxford/Astra Zeneca COVID-19 vaccines held centrally is not available in the format requested as stock holdings are not static and are constantly changing.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many individual doses of the (a) Pfizer Biontech vaccine and (b) Oxford Astra Zeneca vaccine (i) had been distributed to each of the seven NHS regions in England and (ii) were being held centrally by 5pm on 15 Friday January 2021.

The number of individual doses of the Pfizer BioNTech and the Oxford/Astra Zeneca COVID-19 vaccines held centrally is not available in the format requested as stock holdings are not static and are constantly changing.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what research his Department is undertaking on first episode psychosis and the long-term effect of anti-psychotic drugs.

The Department funds health and care research through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The NIHR is the largest funder of mental health research in the United Kingdom, investing £93.4 million in 2018/19.

Through this investment the NIHR supports a wide portfolio of mental health research, including 21 current awards funded directly through NIHR programmes for research on first-episode psychosis and the effects of anti-psychotic drugs and three new awards due to start in 2020/21 totalling an investment of £30.7 million in these important areas. The NIHR is also providing infrastructure support to over 50 studies through its biomedical research centres, clinical research facilities and applied research centres.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which mental health conditions can be subject to a Community Treatment Order.

Any mental disorder for which someone can be detained under the Mental Health Act (MHA) can also form the basis of a Community Treatment Order (CTO).

The Mental Health Act 1983 makes no distinction between types of mental illness, stating that for its purposes, the general term “mental disorder” means “any disorder or disability of the mind”. While the MHA does not rule in or out particular disorders, learning disability as a condition is exempted from certain provisions of the Act, including that for CTOs, unless “associated with abnormally aggressive or seriously irresponsible conduct”.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of people have been given compulsory Community Treatment Orders following first episode psychosis in each of the last three years.

Information is not collected in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether medical doctors arriving from abroad to work in the UK may avoid having to quarantine for 14 days by submitting to a test for covid-19 antigens.

The Health Protection (Coronavirus, International Travel) (England) Regulations 2020 include an exemption for registered healthcare professionals from the requirement to quarantine, if they are required to return to, or start work within 14 days of arrival in the United Kingdom.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has of the availability of the dry-eye medication Lacrilube; and if he will make a statement.

The Department fully understands that maintaining access to dry eye medications is vitally important to many people in this country.

We are aware that, due to long term manufacturing issues experienced by the sole supplier, Lacri-Lube Eye ointment has not been available since 2018.

We have liaised with the Royal College of Ophthalmologists who has issued advice for clinicians regarding suitable alternative treatments to manage affected patients during this time. We have also communicated the supply issue with the National Health Service and supplies of Lacri-Lube are expected to become available at the end of this year.

We continue to work closely with industry and partners in the health system to help prevent shortages and to ensure that the risks to patients are minimised when supply issues do arise.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government has changed the method by which it calculates the number of covid-19 tests carried out in a 24-hour period, since 1 April 2020.

As the United Kingdom COVID-19 testing programme has significantly increased through April and May, we have adapted our reporting processes to ensure they remain as accurate as possible.

Further detail, including definitions and published data, can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-information-for-the-public

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of Government guidance requiring people at high risk from covid-19 to stay at home and self-isolate for 12 weeks with the content of the frequently asked questions document issued to GPs on 11 April 2020 that states that shielded patients may attend GPs surgeries.

Shielding protects the most clinically vulnerable against COVID-19. However, this protection cannot come at the expense of the clinically extremely vulnerable accessing the health care they need for current health conditions. General practitioners have been asked by the National Health Service to review any ongoing care arrangements for shielded patients at highest risk of severe illness from COVID-19. Wherever possible, patient contact, triage and treatment should be delivered via phone, email or online. However, if a shielding patient needs a face-to-face assessment, they should be seen on a home visit, and not brought into general practice premises unless a designated site has been set up for such purposes. Strict infection prevention and control measures should be followed at all times for the protection of shielded patients.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the scientific and medical advice that he received up to 1 April 2020 on the merits of antigen and antibody testing for covid-19.

COVID-19 testing is core to the Government’s response to the virus, helping to provide care to those who need it, protect the most vulnerable and find new cases to help break the chains of transmission.

The Government continues to be guided by the latest expertise in this area and receives a range of scientific and medical advice, including from Public Health England (PHE) and the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE), which have consistently advised on the importance of testing. SAGE meeting minutes are published on GOV.UK.

Assessments of the various antibody testing assays, including those now in use were performed by PHE, are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-laboratory-evaluations-of-serological-assays

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the advice that he received before 1 April 2020 on the development of herd immunity for covid-19.

Herd immunity has never been part of the Government action plan, but it is a natural by-product of an epidemic. Our aims are to save lives, protect the most vulnerable, and relieve pressure on the National Health Service. Every measure that we have or will introduce will be based on the best scientific evidence. None of our measures are aimed at generating herd immunity but we must be aware of the likely levels of immunity in the country over the coming months, to ensure our planning and response is as accurate and effective as possible.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what preventive plans he put in place to protect elderly residents in the care home sector from covid-19; and on what date each plan was introduced.

The Government, working with the sector and public health experts, has published a range of guidance on GOV.UK to protect residents in the care home sector from COVID-19. Details of published guidance, publication dates and information on updates is shown in the attached table.

We are constantly reviewing our guidance in line with scientific advice.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to his Guyanese counterpart on that Government's decision not to allow two accredited international observers from the Carter Centre to return to Guyana to observe the ongoing election recount and the remainder of Guyana’s electoral process.

As the Foreign Secretary said in his statement of 24 March, a transition of government in Guyana should only take place in line with transparent and democratic principles that lead to credible results. We continue to call upon President Granger to ensure that proper procedures are followed before embarking upon a transition of government. Our High Commissioner, on the Foreign Secretary's behalf, has worked with US, Canadian and EU counterparts to make clear our concerns and disappointment at the refusal to allow the Carter Center and IRI into the country. The UK will continue to call for all to adhere to the democratic principles Guyana has signed up to as a member of the Commonwealth, to ensure the voice and will of the people of Guyana are heard.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the implications for the Government's policies of the EU's proposed carbon border tax.

The European Commission has yet to make a concrete proposal for a carbon border adjustment mechanism, but the Government is following the EU’s debate on possible designs with interest.

The overall destination of Net Zero by 2050 is shared by the UK, and the Government will continue to work with the EU to secure ambitious climate objectives.

27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) detainees and (b) staff of immigration detention centres have been tested for covid-19.

The health of those in immigration removal centres is of the utmost importance but we remain committed to removing foreign national offenders or those who violate our immigration rules. Detention plays a key role in securing our borders and maintaining effective immigration control and it is only right that we protect the public from high-harm individuals, which is why the vast majority of those in detention are foreign national offenders.

Decisions to detain an individual are based on all of the information known at the time. As circumstances change, temporary release may then become the most appropriate option.

We are following all Public Health England guidance and have robust contingency plans in place. Measures such as protective isolation will be considered to minimise the risk of COVID-19 spreading to vulnerable groups in the immigration detention estate.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers.

There are currently no cases of Coronavirus, in detainees, in immigration removal centres.

Provisional management information indicates that as of 27 April four members of IRC supplier staff have tested positive for COVID-19, one of whom has now fully recovered and returned to duty. In addition, there have been two confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detainees. A third individual was identified but after his release from detention had been agreed. Whilst in the IRC the individual was in isolation. He was released as there was no immediate prospect of removal. No other detainees have tested positive for COVID-19.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many detainees in immigration detention centres have tested positive for covid-19.

The health of those in immigration removal centres is of the utmost importance but we remain committed to removing foreign national offenders or those who violate our immigration rules. Detention plays a key role in securing our borders and maintaining effective immigration control and it is only right that we protect the public from high-harm individuals, which is why the vast majority of those in detention are foreign national offenders.

Decisions to detain an individual are based on all of the information known at the time. As circumstances change, temporary release may then become the most appropriate option.

We are following all Public Health England guidance and have robust contingency plans in place. Measures such as protective isolation will be considered to minimise the risk of COVID-19 spreading to vulnerable groups in the immigration detention estate.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers.

There are currently no cases of Coronavirus, in detainees, in immigration removal centres.

Provisional management information indicates that as of 27 April four members of IRC supplier staff have tested positive for COVID-19, one of whom has now fully recovered and returned to duty. In addition, there have been two confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detainees. A third individual was identified but after his release from detention had been agreed. Whilst in the IRC the individual was in isolation. He was released as there was no immediate prospect of removal. No other detainees have tested positive for COVID-19.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been released from immigration detention centres since social distancing measures were introduced.

The health of those in immigration removal centres is of the utmost importance but we remain committed to removing foreign national offenders or those who violate our immigration rules. Detention plays a key role in securing our borders and maintaining effective immigration control and it is only right that we protect the public from high-harm individuals, which is why the vast majority of those in detention are foreign national offenders.

Decisions to detain an individual are based on all of the information known at the time. As circumstances change, temporary release may then become the most appropriate option.

We are following all Public Health England guidance and have robust contingency plans in place. Measures such as protective isolation will be considered to minimise the risk of COVID-19 spreading to vulnerable groups in the immigration detention estate.

All immigration removal centres have dedicated health facilities run by doctors and nurses which are managed by the NHS or appropriate providers.

There are currently no cases of Coronavirus, in detainees, in immigration removal centres.

Provisional management information indicates that as of 27 April four members of IRC supplier staff have tested positive for COVID-19, one of whom has now fully recovered and returned to duty. In addition, there have been two confirmed cases of COVID-19 in detainees. A third individual was identified but after his release from detention had been agreed. Whilst in the IRC the individual was in isolation. He was released as there was no immediate prospect of removal. No other detainees have tested positive for COVID-19.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the number of child refugees approved for family reunification in the UK are detained in refugee camps in Greece following the cancellation of flights during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Home Office does not hold detailed information on the location of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children within European Member States.

Despite Covid-19 restrictions, the UK remains fully committed to meeting our obligations under the Dublin III Regulation. The Home Office continues to process Dublin cases, including children, as far as we are able given the current circumstances and remains open to receiving transfers into the UK.

Arrangements to complete a transfer have always been and still are the responsibility of the sending State. We continue to liaise with our counterparts in Member States so that we can effect transfers as soon as it is safe and practical to do so.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what provision he is making for local authorities to continue the Everyone In campaign to house and support people who were street homeless.

Almost 15,000 vulnerable people, including those who were street homeless, have been housed in emergency accommodation, including hotels, since the start of the COVID-19 lockdown period, according to returns from local authorities to MHCLG.

£3.2 billion has been provided to support councils to respond to the coronavirus pandemic, including supporting homeless people. This is in addition to £3.2 million in targeted funding for councils to support vulnerable rough sleepers.

On 24 May, the Secretary of State announced plans for thousands of long-term, safe homes to support many of the vulnerable rough sleepers who have been supported during the COVID-19 pandemic. Here, individuals taken off the streets during the pandemic can get the support they need to rebuild their lives.

This?unprecedented?commitment?– the biggest of its kind since the Government’s Rough Sleeping Initiative?began?– will be backed by?£160?million?in 2020/21 to inject 3,300 new units of accommodation over the next 12 months, part of?6,000 in total.

This means in 2020/21 we are providing £606 million to tackle homelessness and rough sleeping. This marks a £238 million increase in funding from the previous year and further demonstrates our commitment to assist the most vulnerable in society.

10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent discussions he has had with student accommodation providers to prevent students with tenancies having to pay for properties they cannot reside in safely during the covid-19 outbreak.

If students have already signed an accommodation contract for next year and, because of the COVID-19 outbreak, think it may no longer fit their requirements, they should talk directly to their accommodation provider.

During these unprecedented times, the Government encourages student accommodation providers, landlords, letting agencies and tenants to take a pragmatic, flexible approach and have a frank and open conversation at the earliest?opportunity, to allow both parties to agree a sensible way forward.

In cases where students do not wish to move into the accommodation, they are able to end or surrender their fixed term tenancy if they reach an agreement with their landlord. Where students have a joint tenancy agreement, all tenants will need to agree to the surrender as well as the landlord.

In very limited situations where a student has been legally prevented from living in their accommodation, they may be entitled to a refund from certain accommodation providers. This is dependent on the terms of their contract and their particular circumstances. The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has published guidance on consumer contracts, cancellation and refunds affected by the coronavirus. This sets out the CMA’s view on how the law operates to help consumers understand their rights and help businesses treat their customers fairly. If students need help, organisations such as Citizens Advice offer a free service, providing information and support.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reasons the Judicial Executive Board does not have members from Black and Minority Ethnic communities.

There are no Judicial Executive Board (JEB) members from Black and minority ethnic communities. JEB is chaired by the Lord Chief Justice of England & Wales and comprised of the judges in the most senior leadership roles - the Master of the Rolls, the President of the Queen’s Bench Division, the President of the Family Division, the Chancellor of the High Court, the Senior President of Tribunals and the Senior Presiding Judge for England & Wales, as well as the Chair of the Judicial College and the Chief Executive of Judicial Office. Appointments to the leaderships roles are made through the independent Judicial Appointments Commission. The Lead Diversity Judge also sits on the Board and shows the commitment to diversity at the heart of the senior judicial leadership.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reason the Judges Council which advises the Lord Chancellor does not have any Black and Minority Ethnic members.

The Judges’ Council does not advise the Lord Chancellor. The primary function of the Judges’ Council is to inform and advise the Lord Chief Justice of England & Wales. Members of the Judicial Executive Board (including the Lead Diversity Judge) are also members of the Judges’ Council. Other members are selected by the judicial group which that member represents including, for example, the High Court Judges’ Association, the Council of Her Majesty’s Circuit Judges, the Association of Her Majesty’s District Judges and the Magistrates’ Association. Diversity data for Judges’ Council members is not held separately.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisons have reported inadequate supplies of personal protective equipment during the covid-19 outbreak.

The supply of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) required by the prison service is kept under regular review by the department, making sure that there is sufficient stock to be responsive to changing local contexts. There is currently adequate stock and forward supply of PPE, in accordance with public health advice.

We have stock in the hundreds of thousands for aprons, coveralls, eye protection, pairs of gloves, respirator masks and fluid-resistant surgical masks, as well as hand sanitiser. However, we are making continued preparations and keeping demand for PPE under regular review as we move into the next phase of managing this outbreak.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)