Barry Gardiner Portrait

Barry Gardiner

Labour - Brent North

8,079 (15.6%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 1st May 1997


Public Accounts Committee
21st Sep 2020 - 8th Feb 2022
Shadow Minister (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Climate Change)
14th Jul 2016 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for International Trade
14th Jul 2016 - 6th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change
27th Jun 2016 - 14th Jul 2016
Shadow Minister (Energy and Climate Change)
18th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Oct 2013 - 18th Sep 2015
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
20th Dec 2010 - 4th Nov 2013
Energy and Climate Change Committee
2nd Nov 2010 - 4th Nov 2013
Special Envoy for Forestry
28th Jun 2007 - 15th Sep 2008
Crossrail Bill
14th Nov 2007 - 18th Nov 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) (Biodiversity, Landscape and Rural Affairs)
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Trade and Industry) (Delivery and Efficiency)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Northern Ireland Office)
2nd Apr 2004 - 10th May 2005
Consolidation etc. Bills (Joint Committee)
12th Dec 2001 - 5th May 2005
Public Accounts Committee
10th Jun 1999 - 16th Oct 2002
Procedure Committee
31st Jul 1997 - 25th Jan 2000


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Barry Gardiner has voted in 688 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Barry Gardiner Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lee Rowley (Conservative)
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
(48 debate interactions)
Graham Stuart (Conservative)
(23 debate interactions)
Matthew Pennycook (Labour)
Shadow Minister (Levelling Up, Housing, Communities and Local Government)
(23 debate interactions)
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View all Barry Gardiner's debates

Brent North Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We demand the Government restore England’s publicly funded, publicly provided NHS by reversing all privatising legislation, ending ongoing PFI contracts, and scrapping plans for Integrated Care Systems and for-profit US-style ‘managed care’.


Latest EDMs signed by Barry Gardiner

30th April 2024
Barry Gardiner signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Tuesday 30th April 2024

Price cap on baby milk formula

Tabled by: Barry Gardiner (Labour - Brent North)
This House recognises the impact that food price inflation has had on family budgets in recent years, with annual inflation of 19.1% to March 2023, which was the highest rate of food inflation in 45 years; notes with dismay that some retailers have taken to placing baby milk formula under …
29 signatures
(Most recent: 24 May 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 20
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Scottish National Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
27th February 2024
Barry Gardiner signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 28th February 2024

Diversity of London

Tabled by: Dawn Butler (Labour - Brent Central)
That this House states its admiration for London; celebrates the diversity of the capital city and believes this diversity is its strength; acknowledges the rich contributions of people from all backgrounds; expresses concern about recent statements made by hon. and Rt hon. Members; believes the aforementioned statements are contrary to …
15 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Liberal Democrat: 4
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Barry Gardiner's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Barry Gardiner, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Barry Gardiner has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Barry Gardiner has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Barry Gardiner


A Bill to amend the law relating to workplace information and consultation, employment protection and trade union rights to provide safeguards for workers against dismissal and re-engagement on inferior terms and conditions; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 40%

Last Event - 2nd Reading
Friday 22nd October 2021
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
21st Jul 2021
To ask the President of COP26, whether the Government plans to use the COP26 Conference to discuss the effects of global intensive animal agriculture on (a) climate change and (b) biodiversity loss; and if he will make a statement.

COP26 will hold a Nature Day event in Glasgow highlighting forests, agriculture and wider land use as key priorities to mitigating the climate crisis. We are calling for international action to reduce emissions from agriculture, deforestation and other land use. We are working with international partners to promote sustainable and climate-resilient agriculture; to mobilise increased and more targeted finance for nature; and to build the political consensus for ambitious action.

At the G7 summit, leaders committed to work to accelerate an inclusive global transition to sustainable and climate resilient agriculture, as well as committing to achieving net zero emissions no later than 2050.

The UK has also played a central role in promoting the ‘Leaders’ Pledge for Nature’, which now has over 80 signatories. The pledge sets out ten urgent actions to put nature on a path to recovery by 2030, addressing both biodiversity loss and climate change.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether Deloitte drafted answers to written parliamentary questions on behalf of Government departments other than the Department of Health and Social Care.

Further to the answer to PQ175784 on 13 April 2021, departments are responsible for their responses to written Parliamentary Questions. Deloitte has not drafted answers to written Parliamentary Questions on behalf of the Cabinet Office.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Aug 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the administrative costs for British businesses who are seeking to trade goods into Northern Ireland after the transition period.

In line with the practice of successive administrations, details of internal discussions are not normally disclosed.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to paragraph 22 of the fifth Special Report of the Energy and Climate Change Committee of Session 2010-11 entitled UK Deepwater Drilling: Implications of the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill: Government Response to the Committee's Second Report of Session 2010–11, HC 882, published on 22 March 2011, what recent progress the Government has made on ensuring that oil spill response equipment is designed to take full account of the harsh environment in the West of Shetland.

The response to pollution incidents from offshore hydrocarbon operations is led by Industry and their primary response contractor Oil Spill Response Limited (OSRL). Since the report was published, the Oil Spill Prevention and Response Advisory Group (OSPRAG) cap was developed and been in service since 2011. OSRL have also developed additional higher rated capping devices which have been in service since 2013. OSRL have also extended their response capability to include a base in the Shetland Islands to respond promptly to incidents West of Shetland. This base contains response equipment which has been specially selected for West of Shetland conditions.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether he plans to review the funding rules for the Natural Environment Research Council so that international partners can be costed in with a value up to 30% of a grant proposal.

The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) is a constituent council of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI). UKRI is responsible for managing funding policy across its councils. Where an “international co-applicant” agreement is in place, NERC funds specified direct costs for international collaborators, paying up to 100% of eligible direct costs or a maximum of 30% of the full economic cost value for eligible international costs. UKRI has no immediate plans to review this policy.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
20th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of Natural Environment Research Council funding rules on UK Polar research.

The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), part of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), is the leading funder of natural environment research in the United Kingdom. The British Antarctic Survey (BAS) is part of NERC and operates polar infrastructure and facilities on NERC’s behalf, including the polar research vessel and research stations, to enable polar science and research activity. NERC funding, including to polar research, is delivered via competitive, peer-reviewed application processes. Awards are made to Research Organisations based on terms and conditions detailed in NERC’s Research Grants and Fellowships Handbook. NERC also supports strategic research and national capability programmes.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
3rd Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, whether she has had discussions with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on progress on the actions in the England Rare Diseases Action Plan on the effectiveness of current incentives for innovation in rare diseases.

While direct discussions have not yet taken place, officials in the Office for Life Sciences, a joint unit between the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology and the Department of Health and Social Care, are working closely with officials in the Department of Health and Social Care, who are leading on delivery of the England Rare Diseases Action Plan, to ensure that innovations are utilised for the benefit of patients with rare diseases. This includes joint attendance at ministerial and working level delivery meetings, as appropriate.

21st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the inclusion of biomass in the Energy Charter Treaty on transition to cleaner renewable energy sources including wind and solar.

The UK supports the process to modernise the Energy Charter Treaty in a way that helps the global energy transition, such as the right for States to regulate to reach emissions reduction targets and a stronger focus on climate security issues.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many individual doses of the (a) Pfizer Biontech vaccine and (b) Oxford Astra Zeneca vaccine NHS England had taken delivery of as at 5.00pm on 15 January 2021.

Vaccines are a precious resource and are in very high demand across the world; therefore, for security reasons it is not possible to provide detail about the size of our supplies or give exact detail about future deliveries.

As of 18 January 2021, over 4.6 million people in the UK had been vaccinated with the first dose of the vaccine. We are in the process of understanding the implications of Pfizer’s announcement on 15 January, regarding upgrades to its manufacturing capacity. We continue to work to meet our target of vaccinating all four priority groups, as advised by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation, by the middle of February.

3rd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the findings of the University of Stirling on the Government's response to public health concerns on shale gas exploration, published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health in July 2020; and if he will make a statement.

We are committed to ensuring a rigorous, evidence-based approach to shale gas extraction, and as such welcome any new research that can further enhance our understanding and help inform our policy development.

On the basis of the current scientific evidence, Government has confirmed that it will take a presumption against issuing any further Hydraulic Fracturing Consents in England, which are required before hydraulic fracturing operations can take place. This position, an effective moratorium, will be maintained unless compelling new evidence is provided which addresses the concerns around the prediction and management of induced seismicity.

10th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with the Indian government on the (a) launch of One Sun One World One Grid and (b) formation of a Global Green Grid Alliance.

India is an important partner for the UK and we have a long history of engaging with the Government of India on climate change and clean energy.

To date, the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has not discussed Prime Minister Modi's new One Sun One World One Grid initiative or the formation of the Global Green Grids Alliance with the Government of India. However, we welcome the ambition on the initiatives and will continue to look for opportunities to work with India to increase global action on climate change and clean energy in the run-up to COP26. The British High Commission in India and the Department for International Development have had exploratory discussions with the Government of India and want to learn more about both initiatives.

26th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department took steps to help prevent the closure of the British Youth Council.

I was sorry to learn about the closure of the British Youth Council (BYC). Over its 75 year legacy, the BYC supported thousands of young people to become politically engaged and create positive change both in their local communities and internationally. DCMS was informed of the significant financial challenges faced by the BYC at the end of February 2024. The scale of these challenges unfortunately meant that DCMS could not provide emergency funding as this would not meet the key standards of Managing Public Money.

The Government is absolutely committed to the UK Youth Parliament and to ensuring that it continues to both represent and amplify the voices of young people. We have been working with UK Youth Parliament delivery partners from English regions and the devolved administrations, to understand the implications of the BYC’s closure. We have been working at pace to identify a suitable organisation which can hold overall grant management responsibility for the UKYP 24/25, and will update the house as soon as next steps have been formalised. We are also exploring how best to maintain and develop representation at the local authority level.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to take steps to help maintain youth representation at the local authority level in the context of the closure of the British Youth Council.

I was sorry to learn about the closure of the British Youth Council (BYC). Over its 75 year legacy, the BYC supported thousands of young people to become politically engaged and create positive change both in their local communities and internationally. DCMS was informed of the significant financial challenges faced by the BYC at the end of February 2024. The scale of these challenges unfortunately meant that DCMS could not provide emergency funding as this would not meet the key standards of Managing Public Money.

The Government is absolutely committed to the UK Youth Parliament and to ensuring that it continues to both represent and amplify the voices of young people. We have been working with UK Youth Parliament delivery partners from English regions and the devolved administrations, to understand the implications of the BYC’s closure. We have been working at pace to identify a suitable organisation which can hold overall grant management responsibility for the UKYP 24/25, and will update the house as soon as next steps have been formalised. We are also exploring how best to maintain and develop representation at the local authority level.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of the closure of the British Youth Council on the Youth Parliament.

I was sorry to learn about the closure of the British Youth Council and want to express gratitude for its work over the years. Government is committed to the delivery of the UK Youth Parliament and intends to use funding allocated to BYC in 2024/25 to support the programme. We are working alongside previous UKYP delivery partners from English regions and the devolved administrations, to understand the implications of BYCs closure for programme delivery. We have been working at pace to identify a suitable organisation which can hold overall grant management responsibility for the UKYP 24/25. A preferred candidate has been identified and we are currently undertaking final due diligence checks and negotiating terms and I will update the house as soon as next steps have been formalised.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the permanent closure of the British Youth Council, if she will take steps to ensure that unspent grant funding is re-allocated to support other youth organisations.

I was sorry to learn about the closure of the British Youth Council and want to express gratitude for its work over the years. Government is committed to the delivery of the UK Youth Parliament and intends to use funding allocated to BYC in 2024/25 to support the programme. We are working alongside previous UKYP delivery partners from English regions and the devolved administrations, to understand the implications of BYCs closure for programme delivery. We have been working at pace to identify a suitable organisation which can hold overall grant management responsibility for the UKYP 24/25. A preferred candidate has been identified and we are currently undertaking final due diligence checks and negotiating terms and I will update the house as soon as next steps have been formalised.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department is taking steps to re-deploy staff at the British Youth Council after its permanent closure.

I was sorry to learn about the closure of the British Youth Council and want to express gratitude for its work over the years. Government is committed to the delivery of the UK Youth Parliament and intends to use funding allocated to BYC in 2024/25 to support the programme. We are working alongside previous UKYP delivery partners from English regions and the devolved administrations, to understand the implications of BYCs closure for programme delivery. We have been working at pace to identify a suitable organisation which can hold overall grant management responsibility for the UKYP 24/25. A preferred candidate has been identified and we are currently undertaking final due diligence checks and negotiating terms and I will update the house as soon as next steps have been formalised.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the National Audit Office report Condition of school buildings, published on 28 June, HC1516, which schools pose a risk to the safety of pupils and staff because of potential structural failure due to disrepair or unsafe building materials or methods.

Nothing is more important than the safety of pupils and teachers. This is why the Department has been significantly investing in transforming schools across the country. Where there are serious safety issues with a building, the Department takes immediate and swift action to ensure the safety of pupils and school staff. There are no open areas within schools or college buildings where the Department knows of an imminent risk to life.

The Department has allocated over £15 billion since 2015 for keeping school buildings safe and in good working order, including £1.8 billion committed for 2023/24. In addition, the School Rebuilding Programme will transform buildings at 500 schools, prioritising poor condition and potential safety issues.

It is the responsibility of those who run schools – academy trusts, Local Authorities, and voluntary aided school bodies – who work with their schools day to day to manage the safety and maintenance of their buildings. The Department provides support on a case by case basis if it is alerted to a serious safety issue which responsible bodies cannot manage independently.

Since March 2022, the Department has been working with responsible bodies, schools, and colleges to identify the presence of Reinforced Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (RAAC) in their buildings. Where RAAC is suspected, the Department’s professional surveyors carry out assessments to verify its presence, and if confirmed, the Department provides rapid support to schools on the advice of structural engineers. This could include funding capital works to remove any immediate risk and, where necessary, the provision of temporary buildings. Longer term remediation of RAAC is supported by capital funding provided to the sector, the Department’s rebuilding programme, and urgent capital support.


22nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) independent and (b) state schools have left the Teachers' Pension Scheme in the last five years.

463 independent schools have left the Teachers’ Pension Scheme (TPS) between January 2018 and November 2022. 37 independent schools have joined the Scheme between January 2018 and November 2022.

State schools and academies cannot choose to leave the TPS. The records show that 814 state schools have closed and so have ceased to be registered as scheme employers since January 2018. This is largely as a result of state schools converting to academies. 79 new state schools have been registered in the TPS since January 2018.

22nd Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) independent and (b) state schools have joined the Teachers' Pension Scheme in the last five years.

324 independent schools have left the Teachers’ Pension Scheme (TPS) between August 2019, when this information started to be compiled, and November 2022. 22 independent schools have joined the Scheme between January 2018 and November 2022.

State schools and academies cannot choose to leave the TPS. The records show that 1,008 academies have ceased to be registered as scheme employers and 4,383 new academy employers have been registered in the TPS between January 2018 and November 2022. This is a result of state schools converting to academies and some single academy trusts joining multi-academy trusts.

21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons the Skills Funding Agency (SFA) agreed to change the terms of the 2010 Prospectus to require the University of Cumbria to make payments amounting to £3.4million for shared use of the Newton Rigg campus under an Occupancy Agreement; and what account was taken by the SFA when agreeing to change those terms of the original prospectus' provision for the shared use of those assets for the sum of £1 if demanded.

Commercial arrangements between two independent organisations, Askham Bryan College and the University of Cumbria, were entered into by both parties. This allowed the university to continue using Newton Rigg Campus for research related activities following the transfer of further education provision to Askham Bryan College in 2011.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reasons the Chief Executive of Skills Funding and the Young People’s Learning Agency agreed to execute a legal document on the sale of Newton Rigg in 2011 containing provisions purporting to absolve the parties cited in that legal document from liability for negligence or fraud; and whether that decision to execute a legal document was approved by his Department.

The deed of release was agreed by the Skills Funding Agency and Young People’s Learning Agency in line with the policy on further education assets adopted by its sponsor department (Department for Business, Innovation and Skills at the time).

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Skills Funding Agency took to ensure that the proposed transfer of Newton Rigg assets to Askham Bryan College in 2011 complied with Cabinet Office guidelines for the disposal of public assets, and specifically the appointment of a manager to supervise the contract.

Newton Rigg is not a public asset, having previously been acquired by the University of Cumbria from the University of Central Lancashire and then transferred to Askham Bryan College in 2011. The transfer of Newton Rigg was therefore not subject to Cabinet Office guidelines.

However, following the decision by the University of Cumbria in 2010 to cease delivering the provision of further education funded by the Skills Funding Agency (SFA) and the Young People’s Learning Agency, the SFA led on an open and competitive procurement process, in accordance with Part B of Schedule 3 of the Public Contracts Regulations 2006, to secure an alternative provider or providers for the delivery of arts provision in Carlisle and predominately land-based provision at Newton Rigg. As a result of this competition, the funding for students studying further education at the University’s Brampton Road building was transferred to Carlisle College, and the funding for students studying further education at Newton Rigg, together with the relevant further education assets owned by the University of Cumbria at Newton Rigg, were transferred to Askham Bryan College. The procurement was subject to a review by Cabinet Office in 2011 and its findings are available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/61795/MYSTERY-SHOPPER-CASE-PUBLICATION-JULY-2012.pdf.

The Education and Skills Funding Agency and its predecessor organisations assign individual case managers to each further education provider who hold funding agreements and contracts to deliver publicly funded education and training. Case managers are then responsible for managing the relationship between government and individual further education providers.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason the Skills Funding Agency agreed to a confidential deed of release during the 2011 sale of Newton Rigg.

In line with the policy on further education assets adopted by its sponsor department at the time (the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills), the Skills Funding Agency and its predecessor (the Learning and Skills Council) only sought asset deeds when further education assets were being transferred to other types of organisations, such as higher education institutions. This was to ensure that the assets were used and retained for the benefit of further education. As the assets were transferred to Askham Bryan College, an asset deed was not required as it was an incorporated further education college whose core mission was, and remains, the delivery of further education.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, for what reason the Cumbria Area Review published in 2017, omitted Newton Rigg from the lists and tables of Further Education and Sixth Form Colleges in the county; and what plans he has for the future of Newton Rigg.

Newton Rigg Campus is part of Askham Bryan College Corporation, has no separate legal identity and was therefore out of scope of the Cumbria area based review. As the campus is part of Askham Bryan College, they were included in the wave 4; York, North Yorkshire, East Riding and Hull area-based review, which commenced in September 2016. This approach was consistent with the broad principles of area-based reviews in that colleges should be formal members of only one area review steering group.

The Further Education Commissioner and Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) carried out a comprehensive analysis of local provision needs for Newton Rigg and the surrounding area in 2020. The core objective of this analysis was to establish if there was a need for college provision within the general vicinity of the Newton Rigg campus. It considered the location of neighbouring further education (FE) colleges in relation to travel-to-learn options and identified that most enrolments could be accommodated at other statutory FE institutions.

In total, 286 16 to 18 year old students were enrolled onto land-based further education courses at Newton Rigg, of which 70 were in residential accommodation. Where gaps in provision were identified, specifically agricultural provision, alternative arrangements for the next academic year have been agreed with Myerscough College, in partnership with Ullswater Community College, to ensure continuity of delivery of this provision in the Penrith area after Newton Rigg closes.

If further evidence of gaps in provision are highlighted as a result of the closure of Newton Rigg in support of local authorities’ statutory duty to secure provision in an area, the ESFA will consider requests to fill a gap in provision. Where this cannot be met through negotiation with good existing providers the requirements are put out to tender through open competition.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has plans to update data held by his Department on the number of children that qualify for free school meals to ensure that pupil premium grant funding reflects the increase in the number of children whose families are eligible for that funding as a result of the economic consequences of the covid-19 outbreak.

The January 2021 census will be used to determine pupil premium eligibility for alternative provision and pupil referral units for the financial year 2021-22. Pupil premium eligibility for mainstream and special schools will be based on the October 2020 census.

As part of the October census, schools are required to submit information on free school meals (FSM) eligibility for all of their pupils. The move to using the October census for the pupil premium should not affect the information submitted by schools as part of the census. The only circumstance in which amendments can be made to the October census is if there is an error in the numbers. We look into such cases on a case by case basis when they are reported to us.

Pupil premium will continue to be based on “Ever6 FSM”, whereby all pupils eligible for free school meals at the time of the October census, or at any point in the previous 6 years, will attract pupil premium funding. Per pupil funding rates will be the same as in 2020-21. As a result, we expect a typical school to see an increase in pupil premium funding from 2020-21 to 2021-22 as more children have become eligible for free school meals as a result of the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak, and for total pupil premium funding to increase from £2.4 billion in 2020-21 to more than £2.5 billion in 2021-22. In addition to this, the Government announced a further £300 million for a one-off Recovery Premium which will be allocated to schools based on the same methodology as the pupil premium. In this way, schools with more disadvantaged pupils will receive larger amounts.

The Department will confirm pupil premium allocations for the financial year 2021-22 in June 2021. This will provide the public with information on the specific amounts that regions, local authorities, and schools are receiving through the pupil premium for 2021-22.

The Department publishes information on pupil premium allocations and the number of pupils eligible annually. The most recent publicly available figures can be found via this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2020-to-2021.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will extend the Primary PE and Sports Premium beyond the 2020-21 academic year to enable children who have been in lockdown to catch up with the level of physical skills attainment appropriate to their age.

Physical education (PE) and school sport plays an important role in supporting children and young people to be physically active, particularly during the current COVID-19 restrictions. The Department is working with the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the Department of Health and Social Care on how to support better PE, sport and physical activity provision for all children and young people. This is part of our continuing work to deliver our joint school sport and activity action plan, published in 2019.

The Department is considering arrangements for the primary PE and sport premium for the 2021-22 academic year and will confirm the position as soon as possible.

7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, under which staff-transfer protocol employees of core civil service Departments were transferred to the Marine Management Organisation in 2009; and whether this protocol has been applied to other employee transfers.

Defra follows the correct protocols for each staff transfer as set out in the Statement of Practice.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether Civil Service employees from core departments retained continuity of employment for contractual purposes when they transferred from working for their previous department to work for the Marine Management Organisation in 2009.

Continuous statutory service would be transferred as per the protocols. However, Defra does not keep information on staff who have transferred under Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment)/ Cabinet Office Statement of Practice. All data becomes owned by the organisation that the work moves to, as the staff are theirs as if they had always been their staff.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of treating biopesticides under a separate regulatory system than chemical pesticides.

Microbiologicals formulated into products, semiochemicals, plant extracts, and other substances based on biological materials are regulated as biopesticides, under the same regulatory system as chemical pesticides, if one of their functions is to protect a plant from pests. We currently do not intend to change this.

However, we plan to review regulatory processes and data requirements to identify where approvals and permissions for biopesticides can be made simpler and speedier. Our assessment is that this should reduce regulatory burden on applicants and lead to quicker approval timelines, without compromising environmental and human health standards.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to set a target for a reduction in the use of chemical pesticides.

We have been assessing the potential role of targets to support our policy ambitions to reduce reliance on the use of conventional chemical pesticides We are clear that any targets that we set must be meaningful and designed to deliver our desired outcomes, which are to minimise the risks of pesticides to the environment and encourage sustainable pest management.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the proposed National Landscapes Service on the management of National Parks.

The independent Landscapes Review, led by Julian Glover, set out a compelling vision for more beautiful, more biodiverse and more accessible National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs).

We welcome this ambition, as the Government is committed to ensuring our protected landscapes flourish as havens for nature and are places that everyone can visit and enjoy.

The Landscapes Review included recommendations for long-term structural changes, such as creating a new National Landscape Service and changing National Park and AONB statutory purposes, that would require legislation were they to be taken forward.

We are working closely with National Park Authorities, AONB organisations and wider stakeholders to consider the potential effects of the Landscape Review’s recommendations and to develop a well-informed response to the review, which we will publish in due course.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans the Government has to remove Total Allowable Catch limits from particular stocks.

We have no plans to remove total allowable catch limits. Any decision to remove a stock from management by setting a total allowable catch would need to be guided by robust scientific evidence. Scientific advice for 2020 for most stocks in the North East Atlantic will be published by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea on 30 June.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the cost of the Small Deals Initiative has been to the public purse in each year since its establishment.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) operates at no net cost to the taxpayer. UKEF’s Smaller Deals Initiative is staffed by civil servants employed on standard terms and conditions by UKEF. No costs outside of UKEF’s normal core business have been incurred since the Initiative’s inception.

The Smaller Deals Initiative works on the same “no net cost to the taxpayer” basis as UKEF generally. It collects premiums from transactions supported in exchange for taking on risk on behalf of the taxpayer and to cover the Initiative’s administrative costs.

21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the (a) effectiveness of the Brexit voucher schemes in (i) Ireland and (ii) the Netherlands and (b) the potential merits of introducing a similar scheme in the UK to support SMEs with their trade with European partners after the UK leaves the EU.

As part of work on a new Export Strategy we are examining the range of existing UK export promotion schemes and will consider the effectiveness of voucher schemes used elsewhere.

25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what progress the UK is making in submitting schedules at the WTO.

The UK has submitted independent goods and services schedules to the WTO for certification. The UK’s independent goods schedule was circulated on 24 July 2018, and we have now formally opened negotiations under Article XXVIII of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). The UK’s independent services schedule was circulated in December 2018. There is an outstanding objection to the technical elements from the Russian Federation, and we continue to consult with them to see their objection withdrawn. A WTO member can trade on an uncertified schedule, whilst working to have its schedule certified.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of potential (a) challenges in the negotiations on the UK's proposed schedules at the WTO and (b) amendments, financial settlements or other compensatory measures that may be required as a result of those negotiations.

The independent UK goods and services schedules aim to maintain the existing commitments and the balance of rights and obligations between the UK and our trading partners. The UK has formally opened negotiations under Article XXVIII (GATT) on aspects of our goods schedule. We continue to assess the impacts as we seek to conclude negotiations. The appropriate WTO certification procedure for the UK services schedule does not allow for market access or compensation negotiations. We continue to consult with the Russian Federation to see their outstanding objection to technical elements withdrawn. A WTO member can trade on an uncertified schedule whilst working to have its schedule certified.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps her Department has taken to identify potential export markets for UK renewables; and which countries have been identified for future trade missions with representatives from the renewables industry.

The Department for International Trade works with UK suppliers, foreign Governments, sector focussed trade associations and procuring authorities to identify potential export markets for the renewable energy sectors. Understanding the UK’s capability and matching it with relevant high value export opportunities overseas forms part of the work of our renewable energy sector team.

The Department is currently organising a trade mission to Indonesia in late March, focusing on the waste sector. The programme of activity for the next financial year has not yet been finalised and it will be coordinated alongside the programme for the 26th Conference of Parties.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect of covid-19 on UK business representation at overseas trade shows.

We advise UK businesses to follow FCO travel advice in determining whether to attend overseas trade shows. We are maintaining a log of all cancelled and postponed events which the Department for International Trade was due either to participate in or support companies to attend, such as the ‘MIPIM’ Global Property Event, via for example the Tradeshow Access Programme. We recognise the impact that continued uncertainty will have on UK business and supply chains and will seek to minimise this using our UK and globally based staff and partners.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether her Department plans to participate in Environmental Goods Agreement negotiations at the WTO; and what progress has been made in those negotiations to date.

The UK Government is strongly in favour of seeing negotiations on an Environmental Goods Agreement restart and of playing a key role in them, given the important contribution this agreement would make to tackling climate change. Environmental Goods Agreement negotiations began in the WTO in 2014 but stalled in 2016 due to disagreements in negotiations between prospective signatories.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment her Department has made of the (a) human rights situation in Cambodia and (b) implications for her policies of the decision by the EU to withdraw that country's trade preferences.

The Government remains concerned about the human rights situation in Cambodia and continues to use diplomatic channels to urge Cambodia to show progress.

During the transition period the UK will continue to apply unilateral preferences to developing countries in accordance with the EU’s Generalised Scheme of Preferences. At this stage, we have not taken any decision on continuing any EU suspension of Cambodia’s trade preferences at the end of the Transition Period.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect of support for UK investors to win commercial deals at the UK-Africa Investment Summit on (a) the UK's emission reduction commitments, (b) the UK's priorities at COP26, (c) UK Export Finance's Equator Principles commitments and (d) regional integration and economic cooperation between African nations.

The UK-Africa Investment Summit agreed new lasting partnerships between the UK and African countries to deliver more investment, jobs and growth. This government is committed to tackling climate change and will be targeting ambitious action during our presidency of COP26 this year. The Department for International Trade will continue to promote export and investment opportunities in clean growth sectors.

UK Export Finance rigorously follows the requirements of the OECD Common Approaches and Equator Principles, which set the framework for export credit agencies and international financial institutions in managing environmental, social and human rights risks.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect of covid-19 on (a) Chinese and (b) other overseas demand for UK exports.

It is too early to estimate the scale of the impact, which will depend on how severe and prolonged the COVID-19 outbreak becomes. We remain closely engaged with businesses to monitor developments.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what support her Department is providing to UK businesses affected by coronavirus.

Department for International Trade teams around the globe are supporting British companies facing disruption due to COVID-19. The Department’s officials in China and other affected areas are working with affected or concerned UK businesses to provide support, including engaging with local government and suppliers, and working with business associations to disseminate the latest information on freight services, UK consular and visa services, and accessing UK Export Finance facilities.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the WTO ruling of 2 October 2019 on countermeasures in relation to EU subsidies to Airbus, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of the imposition of tariffs by the US on the level of UK exports to the US.

The tariffs imposed by the US following the 2 October 2019 ruling harm businesses on both sides of the Atlantic. The extent to which these tariff costs will fall onto UK producers will vary by sector and the Department for International Trade is working closely with other departments to monitor the effect of these tariffs on exports to the US. The Government continues to lobby at the highest levels with the US Administration for the removal of the tariffs.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate she has made of the number of SMEs that have started exporting overseas following support through (a) the Small Deals Initiative and (b) other UK Export Finance support.

The Small Deals initiative was set up in October 2017 and supported its first transaction in August 2018. Since then it has supported a further six, with a further one anticipated during the current financial year. Of those deals, 57% have involved Small and Medium-Sized Enterprise (SMEs) exporters.

During the last five financial years, UK Export Finance (UKEF) has supported the following total numbers of exporters:

2018/19 262

2017/18 191

2016/17 221

2015/16 226

Consistently over 70% of businesses directly supported by UKEF are SMEs. In addition, many transactions involving larger businesses further support the UK supply chain, which includes significant numbers of SMEs.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the effect of covid-19 on the viability of UK business supply chains.

The department are actively engaging with business and working with other government departments to understand the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak, including its effects on trade. There is a risk of ongoing disruption to international supply chains, particularly in sectors such as automotive, technology, pharmaceuticals, clothing and apparel, tourism and aviation.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many companies offered direct support for overseas investment or commercial trade deals by (a) UK Export Finance and (b) other parts of her Department have been subject to corruption or bribery investigations in each year since 2016.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) is not an investigatory body. As such, it is only aware of such investigations as have been made public by law enforcement agencies.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) does not hold such data for the 10,000 business interactions it conducts each month across 108 countries.

Both DIT and UKEF have clear policies in place enabling all staff to report any suspicions or suspicious behaviour immediately to the relevant authorities.