Jeremy Hunt Portrait

Jeremy Hunt

Conservative - South West Surrey

5 APPG memberships (as of 14 Jul 2021)
Baby Loss, Burma, First Do No Harm, Japan, Rohingya
1 Former APPG membership
Media Freedom
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs
9th Jul 2018 - 24th Jul 2019
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
8th Jan 2018 - 9th Jul 2018
Secretary of State for Health
6th Sep 2012 - 8th Jan 2018
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
12th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport (also Shadow Deputy Prime Minister)
3rd Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
10th May 2005 - 3rd Jul 2007
International Development Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 24th Jul 2006


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Information Commissioner (Remuneration)
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 359 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 2
Speeches
Thursday 22nd July 2021
Covid-19 Update

May I start by wishing you and your family a ping-free summer, Mr Speaker? Thank you for upholding the values …

Written Answers
Monday 19th July 2021
Sierra Leone: Ebola
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference the UK’s response to the Ebola …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 23rd October 2019
Persecution of Christians
That this House notes the 2019 report of Aid to the Church in Need entitled Persecuted and Forgotten? which shows …
Bills
Thursday 15th September 2016
Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Act 2017
A Bill to make provision in connection with controlling the cost of health service medicines and other medical supplies; to …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 14th June 2021
1. Employment and earnings
9 June 2021, payment of £10,000 from HSBC, 8 Canada Square, London E14 5HQ, for speaking at an event on …
EDM signed
Wednesday 24th February 2021
Political and security situation in Myanmar
That this House condemns the military coup in Myanmar (Burma); demands the immediate release of all political prisoners; extends solidarity …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Jeremy Hunt has voted in 266 divisions, and 3 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Jeremy Hunt voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 29 Conservative Aye votes vs 318 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 300 Noes - 318
22 Mar 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Jeremy Hunt voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative No votes vs 318 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 319 Noes - 297
20 May 2020 - Liaison (Membership) - View Vote Context
Jeremy Hunt voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 316 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 262 Noes - 323
View All Jeremy Hunt Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(91 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(26 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(17 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(105 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Jeremy Hunt's debates

South West Surrey Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Jeremy Hunt has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Jeremy Hunt

24th February 2021
Jeremy Hunt signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 24th February 2021

Political and security situation in Myanmar

Tabled by: Rushanara Ali (Labour - Bethnal Green and Bow)
That this House condemns the military coup in Myanmar (Burma); demands the immediate release of all political prisoners; extends solidarity to fellow Members of Parliament who have been denied the right to exercise their democratically elected mandate; welcomes the establishment by Parliamentarians of representative committees from national, regional and state …
104 signatures
(Most recent: 11 May 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 48
Scottish National Party: 28
Liberal Democrat: 9
Conservative: 5
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Independent: 4
Alba Party: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
17th June 2020
Jeremy Hunt signed this EDM on Thursday 25th June 2020

Press Freedom in Saudi Arabia

Tabled by: Stewart Malcolm McDonald (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South)
That this House condemns the continued detention of at least 32 journalists in Saudi Arabia and calls for their immediate and unconditional release; notes that 17 June 2020 marks eight years since the arrest of blogger Raif Badawi, as well as the birthday of Waleed Abu al-Khair, a human rights …
23 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 10
Conservative: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Independent: 2
Alba Party: 2
Labour: 2
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Alliance: 1
View All Jeremy Hunt's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Jeremy Hunt, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Jeremy Hunt has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Jeremy Hunt has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

4 Bills introduced by Jeremy Hunt


A Bill to make provision in connection with controlling the cost of health service medicines and other medical supplies; to make provision in connection with the provision of pricing and other information by those manufacturing, distributing or supplying those medicines and supplies, and other related products, and the disclosure of that information; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Thursday 27th April 2017 and was enacted into law.


A Bill to reform the law relating to care and support for adults and the law relating to support for carers, to make provision about safeguarding adults from abuse or neglect, to make provision about care standards, to establish and make provision about Health Education England, to establish and make provision about the Health Research Authority, and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 14th May 2014 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 16th March 2011

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 14th December 2011 and was enacted into law.


Authorise things done before the day on which this Act is passed in the purported exercise of functions relating to the approval of registered medical practitioners and clinicians under the Mental Health Act 1983.

This Bill received Royal Assent on Wednesday 31st October 2012 and was enacted into law.

Jeremy Hunt has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


134 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much additional funding has been allocated to protect the UK from cyber attacks.

The National Cyber Security Strategy, supported by a £1.9 billion investment, is delivering transformational change, building new capabilities and intervening to protect the UK from cyber attacks. This is an increase on the first National Cyber Security Strategy which ran from 2011-2015 with an investment of £650 million.

Our manifesto has committed to investing more in cyber security, embracing new technologies and legislating to make the UK the safest place in the world to be online.

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will publish data on UK emissions (a) in total, (b) per PPP$ of GDP and (c) in comparison with each G20 country in each of the last five years.

BEIS publishes absolute GHG emissions estimates, on a territorial basis, annually. Our latest final version is here (to 2019) [1] and our latest provisional version is here (to 2020) [2].

BEIS does not publish anything directly related to emissions per PPP$ of GDP. There are other resources available online, including:

Not all G20 countries publish emissions estimates annually, so it is not possible to provide a direct comparison between the UK and all members of the G20. However, the statistical release accompanying our annual statistics publication referenced earlier (here, [8]), does contain an "International Comparison" section, on page 24, which sets out where UK emissions sit relative to other G20 countries. Additionally, the UNFCCC website contains National Inventory GHG submissions from each country here. [9]

References

[1] 2019 UK greenhouse gas emissions: final figures - statistical release - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/final-uk-greenhouse-gas-emissions-national-statistics

[2] 2020 UK greenhouse gas emissions: provisional figures - statistical release - https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/provisional-uk-greenhouse-gas-emissions-national-statistics

[3] Greenhouse gas emissions intensity, UK: 2018 provisional estimates

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/environmentalaccounts/bulletins/greenhousegasintensityprovisionalestimatesuk/2018provisionalestimates

[4] Atmospheric emissions: greenhouse gas emissions intensity by industry

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/environmentalaccounts/datasets/ukenvironmentalaccountsatmosphericemissionsgreenhousegasemissionsintensitybyeconomicsectorunitedkingdom

[5] UK Environmental Accounts: 2021

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/environmentalaccounts/bulletins/ukenvironmentalaccounts/2021

[6] The decoupling of economic growth from carbon emissions: UK evidence

https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/nationalaccounts/uksectoraccounts/compendium/economicreview/october2019/thedecouplingofeconomicgrowthfromcarbonemissionsukevidence

[7] The World Bank Data Indicators

https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/

[8] 2019 UK greenhouse gas emissions: final figures - statistical release

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/957887/2019_Final_greenhouse_gas_emissions_statistical_release.pdf

[9] UNFCC National Inventory Submissions 2021

https://unfccc.int/ghg-inventories-annex-i-parties/2021

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to help reduce the amount of carbon dioxide emissions associated with goods imported into the UK.

The latest figures show carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions associated with imported goods fell by 1% between 2016 and 2017, and by 16% between 2007 (when they peaked) and 2017.

The latest figures published are at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uks-carbon-footprint but they focus on greenhouse gas emissions rather than just CO2 emissions.

The Government's Resources and Waste Strategy for England sets out its ambition to move from a make, take, use, throw linear economic model to a more circular economy which will reduce our carbon footprint from imported emissions through increasing repair, re-use, remanufacture and other waste prevention activities.

The Environment Bill includes measures that will help consumers to make purchasing decisions that support the market for more sustainable products. It contains powers to introduce clear product labelling, which will enable consumers to identify products that are more durable, reparable and recyclable and will inform them on how to dispose of used products.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to protect the (a) environment and (b) woodlands in the vicinity of the High Speed Two route.

High Speed Two (HS2) aims to be one of the most environmentally responsible infrastructure projects ever delivered in the UK.

The Government and HS2 Limited have committed to provide a range of tailored measures to compensate for its impacts, for example, planting more than 7 million new trees and shrubs, and creating over 900 hectares of new native woodland.

At least 400km of hedgerows will be created or translocated. On top of this, the Government has committed £7 million in establishing the HS2 Woodland Fund, helping landowners within 25 miles of the railway to create and restore woodland. The first £1.6 million of the Fund has already been allocated, supporting around 115ha of new native woodland and around 160ha of plantations on ancient woodland sites.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many Horizon-related prosecutions were brought by her Department prior to relinquishing that function to the Crown Prosecution Service.

DWP relinquished prosecutorial functions to the Crown Prosecution Service in 2012. Due to legal document retention policies, information on individual Horizon cases is no longer available. Therefore, we cannot identify how many cases DWP sent for prosecution, nor their outcomes.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress the UK National Screening Council has made on its review of the potential merits of late pregnancy ultrasounds for undiagnosed breech presentation of babies.

The United Kingdom National Screening Committee (UK NSC) received a proposal to look at fetal presentation as a new screening topic as part of its annual call for topics in 2019. The proposal suggested that all pregnant women could be screened at around 36 weeks gestation using a handheld ultrasound device at routine antenatal appointments to check the positioning of the baby.

The UK NSC’s evaluation group assessed the proposal as being of relevance within the Committee’s remit and agreed that an evidence map should be commissioned to scope the volume and type of evidence available. This was noted by the UK NSC at its February 2020 meeting. The outcome of this evidence map will be presented at the upcoming UK NSC meeting on the 5 March 2021 to consider and recommend next steps.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have had to sell their homes to pay for care in England in each year from 2010 to 2020.

We do not collect this information centrally.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of people aged over 65 are paying £100,000 and above for someone’s care.

We do not collect this information centrally.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of NHS staff have experienced bullying and harassment in the workplace in each year from 2010 to 2020.

The following table shows the percentage of National Health Service provider trust staff, who responded to the NHS Staff Survey, who reported experiencing at least one incident of harassment, bullying or abuse in the previous 12 months. Prior to 2015 the format of questions posed in the survey changed and as such a longer timeseries is not possible.

Year% of NHS staff who have experienced at least one incident of harassment, bullying or abuse at work from patients / service users, their relatives or other members of the public in the last 12 months% of NHS staff who have experienced at least one incident of harassment, bullying or abuse at work from managers in the last 12 months% of NHS staff who have experienced at least one incident of harassment, bullying or abuse at work from other colleagues in the last 12 months
201528.813.518.1
201628.112.917.8
201728.312.818.0
201828.513.219.1
201928.512.319.0


Source: Weighted NHS Staff Survey Results for NHS trusts in England- February 2020 NHS England

The annual NHS Staff survey asks NHS staff in England about their experiences of working for their respective NHS organisations. For the 2019 survey, over 1.1 million NHS employees in England were invited to participate in the survey between September and December 2019 and there was a 48% response rate.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many retired (a) doctors, (b) nurses and (c) other health professionals have signed up to tackle covid-19 as of January 2021.

The former healthcare professionals who came forward to help the NHS in the first wave of the COVID-19 outbreak have wide ranging skills and experience and have been employed across health and social care - for example, within NHS 111, secondary care, mental health and community services. More recently, efforts have focused on matching these former healthcare professionals to the COVID-19 vaccination programme.

Data on the numbers of those on the temporary registers who are employed is not collected centrally. Thousands of these former healthcare professionals remain in touch with NHS England and NHS Improvement’s regional ‘Bring Back Staff’ teams and are available for deployment to a range of clinical settings and programmes, including the Nightingale hospitals.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of adults with smartphones have downloaded the NHS Covid-19 app as of January 2021.

As of 6 January 2021, the NHS COVID-19 app has been downloaded 21,258,726 times. It is estimated that 62% of those with a compatible smartphone aged 16 years old and over in England and Wales have downloaded the app and 56% of smartphone users overall aged 16 years old and over.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many locked mental health rehabilitation facilities there are in England.

Information obtained by the Care Quality Commission from mental health inpatient providers indicates that providers who responded reported 96 locked inpatient mental health rehabilitation wards in England in 2019.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve care for people in segregation in locked mental health rehabilitation facilities.

The mental health rehabilitation workstream of the Getting It Right First Time programme has considered locked mental health rehabilitation facilities to help improve care for people in those facilities. The workstream’s report is expected to be published in early 2021.

The Government is clear that restrictive interventions and restraint should only ever be used as a last resort, when all attempts to de-escalate a situation have been employed. We are working to finalise the draft statutory guidance for the Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Act 2018 and accompanying public consultation and will set out a timetable for publishing the guidance and commencing the Act at the earliest opportunity.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to tackle the use of (a) seclusion and (b) restraint when applied inappropriately in locked mental health rehabilitation facilities.

The Government is clear that, where needed, inpatient care should be high quality, therapeutic and for the shortest time possible. The use of seclusion and any kind of restraint should only be used as a last resort and in line with strict protocols.

We are improving practice and minimising all types of force used on patients in accordance with the aims of the Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Act 2018. We are working to finalise the draft statutory guidance for this Act and accompanying public consultation.

Work is also ongoing with the Care Quality Commission, NHS Digital and NHS England and NHS Improvement to prepare for the implementation and commencement of the Act’s requirements. We will set out a timetable for publishing the statutory guidance and commencing the Act at the earliest opportunity.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to improve training for health, care and education employees in locked mental health rehabilitation facilities to ensure that those employees have the necessary training and skills to work with people in those facilities with (a) learning disabilities and (b) autism who also have complex needs and challenging behaviour.

Health and social care staff working in locked mental health rehabilitation facilities must have the skills and knowledge to make a positive difference to the lives of people with learning disabilities and autistic people. This is a priority for the Government and we are developing plans to introduce the Oliver McGowan mandatory training in learning disability and autism to make sure that this happens.

We are working with Health Education England and Skills for Care to develop and test a standardised training package, backed by £1.4 million investment. Work is already underway to develop the training and testing will take place in a variety of health and social care settings to help shape how it will be rolled out and delivered in future.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of (a) people with learning disabilities and/or autism and (b) other people were held in locked mental health rehabilitation facilities in England in (i) 2018, (ii) 2019 and (iii) 2020.

The latest information available on the number of inpatients in England with a learning disability or autistic people by ward type is set out in the following table.

Inpatient setting

March 2018

% of patients

March 2019

% of patients

March 2020

% of patients

Secure forensic

1,155

49%

1,085

48%

985

47%

Acute learning disability

375

16%

345

15%

315

15%

Acute generic mental illness

230

10%

285

13%

285

14%

Forensic rehabilitation

115

5%

105

5%

110

5%

Complex care/rehabilitation

315

13%

280

12%

245

12%

Other specialist

60

2%

50

2%

45

2%

Other

115

5%

105

5%

115

5%

Source: Assuring Transformation Data, NHS Digital.

The data excludes revisions made by providers after the data was initially collated and the data between years is therefore not directly comparable.

The information relating to the proportion of other people in locked mental health rehabilitation facilities in England is not available in the format requested and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of patients have been in their current psychiatric unit in a locked mental health rehabilitation facility in England for more than (a) one year, (b) two years, (c) three years and (d) four years.

This information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the number of people experiencing delayed discharge from locked mental health rehabilitation facilities.

The NHS Long Term Plan sets out that all health systems in England will deliver new and integrated models of primary and community mental health care for adults and older adults with severe mental illnesses backed by almost £1 billion of new investment per year by 2023/24. These new models will include transformed and improved care for people with community mental health rehabilitation needs, building services in local communities both to prevent people from going into hospital unnecessarily and to support timely discharge for those people who are in need of inpatient care. All health systems in England are expected to be delivering these new models from 2021/22.

The mental health rehabilitation workstream of the Getting It Right First Time programme has considered discharge from acute mental health inpatient care. The workstream’s report is expected to be published in early 2021.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on ensuring that each person who is in segregation on a ward for people with a learning disability and/or autism in a locked mental health rehabilitation unit has a discharge plan.

In 2019, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care committed to conducting independent case reviews for people with a learning disability or autistic people who were identified as being in long term segregation. The reviews of people identified as being in long term segregation in November 2019 have now been completed and recommendations were made in each case to improve individual circumstances and support moving individuals to less restrictive settings.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the number of out of area placements in locked mental health rehabilitation facilities to ensure that patients are not geographically distant from their homes and support networks.

The Care Quality Commission report into the state of care in mental health services from 2014-2017 highlighted concerns about the high number of people in out of area locked rehabilitation wards. Following this, the mental health rehabilitation workstream of the Getting It Right First Time programme has considered locked mental health rehabilitation facilities alongside its consideration of out of area placements. The workstream’s report is expected to be published in early 2021.

NHS England and NHS Improvement expect this report to recommend that all trusts and clinical commissioning groups should develop robust systems to bring patients treated out of area back to their local area. It also expects the report to recommend that clear monitoring arrangements are in place where out-of-area placements are considered necessary.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Spending Review 2020, what steps the Government plans to take to tackle the rising costs of clinical negligence.

The Department is working intensively with the Ministry of Justice, other Government departments and NHS Resolution and will publish a consultation on next steps in 2021.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Spending Review 2020, if he will provide more detail on the pilots aimed at reducing incidence of birth-related brain injuries.

£9.4 million has been provided to support maternity safety pilots through the 2020 Spending Review. The pilots will provide cutting-edge training and expert guidance, to improve practice and avoid harm to babies. This will include:

- Fresh learning from recent investigations and academic research to be used to improve clinical practice during childbirth;

- Pilots to provide cutting-edge training and expert guidance, to improve practice and avoid harm to babies; and

- Funding to also cover the costs of the final year of the Ockenden Review into maternity safety at Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust.

The funding is in addition to existing funding to improve maternity safety by strengthening clinical leadership, implementing best clinical practice and fostering cultures of continuous learning for improvement through reviews and investigations.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Spending Review 2020, what specific steps his Department is taking to improve maternity safety.

£9.4 million has been provided to support maternity safety pilots through the 2020 Spending Review. The pilots will provide cutting-edge training and expert guidance, to improve practice and avoid harm to babies. This will include:

- Fresh learning from recent investigations and academic research to be used to improve clinical practice during childbirth;

- Pilots to provide cutting-edge training and expert guidance, to improve practice and avoid harm to babies; and

- Funding to also cover the costs of the final year of the Ockenden Review into maternity safety at Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust.

The funding is in addition to existing funding to improve maternity safety by strengthening clinical leadership, implementing best clinical practice and fostering cultures of continuous learning for improvement through reviews and investigations.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Spending Review 2020, if he will provide more information on plans for the modernisation of technology across the health and care system.

The funding for technology transformation that was secured in the Spending Review will support local provider organisations to generate a step change in their digital maturity as well as to ensure that there is the right national infrastructure to support them.

We are now planning activity for 2021-22 and we will provide guidance to the system before the start of the next financial year.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Spending Review 2020, what specific steps the Government is taking to scale-up green social prescribing services to help improve mental health outcomes and reduce health inequalities.

Green social prescribing is funded by HM Treasury’s Shared Outcomes Fund and therefore does not form part of the Spending Review 2020. This fund recently awarded £4.27 million to deliver a joint project with the Department of Health and Social Care, the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Natural England, NHS England, Public Health England and the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government to test green social prescribing in multiple pilot locations, run national experimental work to understand its scalability, and deliver a robust project evaluation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to tackle workforce burnout across the NHS and social care during the Covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is committed to supporting the National Health Service and social care workforce. The NHS People Plan, published in July, is focused on the wellbeing of the NHS workforce and on strengthening resilience during COVID-19. We have invested in mental health support with £15 million recently going into the roll out of mental health hubs that will provide proactive outreach to overcome barriers to seeking help for frontline staff.

In September we published a winter plan for adult social care setting out the wellbeing support available to support the adult social care workforce through the winter. We have worked alongside the NHS and other organisations to develop a package of emotional, psychological and practical resources for the workforce and wherever possible the same offer is in place for all social care staff as is for their colleagues in the NHS. We have funded extensions of the Samaritans staff support line and the Hospice UK bereavement and trauma line to all social care staff as well as bespoke support for Registered Managers. We will continue to work with local authorities to improve access to occupational health provision and other wellbeing support for care workers, in line with our commitments in the winter plan.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to tackle the workforce shortage in social care in the (a) short and (b) long term.

We are taking action to increase recruitment into adult social care in both the short and long term. We have launched an online recruitment tool, Join Social Care, to simplify and fast track the recruitment process, and are offering free and rapid induction training via Skills for Care for new and existing staff and volunteers. In the last year we have run a National Recruitment Campaign across broadcast, digital and social media highlighting the vital work care workers do.

The Department for Health and Social Care is also working with the Department for Work and Pensions to promote adult social care careers to jobseekers, including those who may have lost their jobs during the pandemic from other sectors, such as tourism, hospitality and retail. We are continuing to work with the sector and other government departments to understand how we can further support recruitment and retention, and we continue to work to raise the profile of adult social care careers.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to increase support for unpaid carers.

The Carers Action Plan, announced in 2018, set out a cross-Government programme of work to support carers. We continue to implement and build on the commitments made at that time, including committing in our manifesto to extend the entitlement to leave for unpaid carers to one week.

We have also sought to support carers throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. We have provided funding to a range of charities including funding to extend the Carers UK’s helpline opening hours so unpaid carers are able to access trusted information and advice. This funding has been extended to March 2021. A further £500,000 was provided to the Carers Trust to provide support to unpaid carers experiencing loneliness during the pandemic

In addition, to help carers and those they care for, we have worked with the Social Care Institute for Excellence, to publish guidance to help providers make decisions on restarting day services. We have also enabled local authorities to use some of the money provided to them through the Infection Control Fund to help services reopen safely or be reconfigured to work in a COVID-19 secure way.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to improve training and support for social care staff (a) on infection control and (b) in other areas.

The Adult Social Care Winter Plan outlined the latest National Health Service clinical support offer, which includes support for care homes and social care through primary care and community services and the rollout of the Enhanced Health in Care Homes model; and professional leadership and expert advice on infection prevention and control where needed.

The Plan extended the Infection Control Fund until March 2021. This means we have now ringfenced over £1.1 billion for the care sector to take key steps to improve infection prevention and control.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many officials work in the correspondence unit in his Department.

The Department’s Ministerial Correspondence and Public Enquiries (MCPE) unit has a baseline establishment of 51 staff. This is inclusive of correspondence, Freedom of Information (FOI), Subject Access Requests and the call centre.

In 2019 the Department received 29,800 correspondence cases and 1,068 FOI requests. This year, to 23 November 2020, we have received 69,555 correspondence cases and 2,326 FOI requests. This significant increase in volume has been driven by interest in the COVID-19 pandemic.

In response to this the Department has temporarily increased resources in the MCPE unit and there are now 111 members of staff.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to improve the quality of elderly care in care homes across England.

The Government is committed to the sustainable improvement of adult social care, including care for the elderly and will bring forward proposals later this year on plans for reform.

We published a White Paper on 11 February 2021 which sets out proposals to introduce, through the Health and Care Bill, a new duty for the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to review and assess local authorities’ delivery of their adult social care duties and publish their assessment. This is alongside powers for the Secretary of State to intervene and provide support where, following review by the CQC, it is considered that a local authority is failing to meet their duties.

These changes will support improved quality of care and access, with improved oversight and transparency providing insight into how good commissioning works, allowing for best practice to be shared and helping to address inefficiencies and poor practice.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to assist (a) local authorities and (b) the NHS to implement integrated health and care services.

Promoting integrated care is a priority for the Government. We have already made progress in facilitating integrated health and care services through the development of Integrated Care Systems (ICSs). NHS England have set out their goal that all sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) will become ICSs by April 2021. So far, 18 out of 42 STPs have developed into ICSs.

The Better Care Fund (BCF) is the national policy driving forward the integration of health and social care in England. The BCF requires National Health Service clinical commissioners and local authorities to make joint plans and pool budgets for the purposes of integrated care, providing a context in which the they can work together, as partners, towards shared objectives.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to accelerate access to psychological therapies for adults with long-term common mental health conditions.

We continue to expand access to talking and psychological therapies through the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme. Data from 2019/20 shows that there were 1.69 million referrals to IAPT in England and 1.17 million people started a course of treatment within this year.

In addition, we continue to meet our waiting time targets for IAPT. Latest figures for August 2020 indicate that 89.1% of people completing treatment waited less than 6 weeks against a target of 75% and 97.8% waited less than 18 weeks, against a target of 87.5%.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to deliver safer maternity services to (a) ethnic minorities and (b) socially deprived communities.

Work to reduce health inequalities around maternal mortality rates is being led by Professor Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent OBE, Chief Midwifery Officer. This includes understanding why mortality rates are higher, considering evidence about what will reduce mortality rates and taking action.

The NHS Long Term Plan outlines plans to reduce health inequalities and address unwarranted variation in maternity care. Targeted and enhanced continuity of carer can significantly improve outcomes for women. The Long Term Plan sets out that 75% of women from ethnic minority backgrounds and women from the most socially deprived areas will receive continuity of carer by 2024.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to improve mental health services for new fathers experiencing mental health difficulties during the perinatal period.

The NHS Long Term Plan commits the National Health Service to expanding access to evidence-based psychological therapies within specialist perinatal mental health services so that they also include parent-infant, couple, co-parenting and family interventions.

Fathers and partners of women accessing specialist perinatal mental health services and maternity outreach clinics will be offered evidence-based assessments for their mental health and signposting to support as required. This will help the five to 10% of fathers who experience mental health difficulties during the perinatal period and increase access to evidence-based psychological support and therapy, including digital options, in maternity settings.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to encourage schools, CCGs and local education authorities to work more collaboratively to tackle mental health issues in children and young people.

The Government’s Green Paper on children and young people’s mental health aims to improve the provision of mental health support through its key proposals, including creating new Mental Health Support Teams in and near schools and colleges.

These teams will support mental health leads in schools and colleges to put in place effective whole school/college approach to promote and support good mental health. They will work alongside the support that already exists, such as counselling, educational psychologists, school nurses, pastoral care, educational welfare officers, local authority provision and National Health Service mental health services.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospital trusts are rated as (a) inadequate, (b) requires improvement, (c) good and (d) outstanding for maternity and gynaecology.

Acute core services are not rated at trust or provider level, but at location level only. Ratings from inspections of the locations operated by the provider are combined into the overall ratings for the trust under the headings of safe, effective, caring, responsive and well-led.

National Health Service locations providing a core service of ‘maternity and gynaecology’ are rated are shown in the following table:

Inadequate

Requires Improvement

Good

Outstanding

2

47

138

12

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the variation in quality of maternity and bereavement services throughout the NHS.

The Maternity and Neonatal Safety Improvement Programme covers all maternity and neonatal services across England. The programme has been working with trusts to support frontline staff to create the conditions for continuous improvement, a safety culture and a national maternal and neonatal learning system to reduce unwarranted variation in outcomes and care experiences, and provide a high quality healthcare experience for all women, babies and families across maternity and neonatal care settings in England.

The Government also funded Sands, the Stillbirth and Neonatal Death charity to work with other baby loss charities and Royal Colleges to produce and support the roll-out of a National Bereavement Care Pathway to reduce the variation in the quality of bereavement care provided by the National Health Service.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the NHS spent on support safety training for maternity staff in (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) 2020 to date.

National Health Service providers are responsible for delivering safe services and ensuring that staff receive the training they need to provide the highest standard of care.

Health Education England (HEE) allocated £420,000 to directly support maternity safety training in 2019/20. No funds were directly allocated to be spent on maternity safety training in 2018/19 or 2020/21 by the HEE maternity programme.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many neonatal brain (a) injuries and (b) deaths were reported in the NHS in each year from 2010 to 2020.

The numbers of neonatal brain injuries and neonatal deaths in England in years from 2010 is shown in the following table:

Year

Neonatal brain injuries1

Neonatal deaths2

2010

3,3903

2,015

2011

3,5323

2,023

2012

3,404

1,933

2013

3,393

1,774

2014

3,558

1,679

2015

3,445

1,745

2016

3,446

1,832

2017

3,270

1,810

2018

Not yet available

1,742

2019

Not yet available

2020

Not yet available

Notes:

1Source: Imperial College, London, 2017 and 2019. The 2017 report is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safer-maternity-care-progress-and-next-steps

2Source: Office for National Statistics: Child mortality (death cohort) tables in England and Wales, available at https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales

3The original report presents a range for the years 2010 (3,160 to 3,619) and 2011 (3,434 to 3,630) as the available data did not cover all births in England. The table presents the midpoints of these ranges.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps is the Government is taking to ensure that the NHS is the safest healthcare system in the world for both patients and staff.

The Government is clear in its commitment to improve the quality and safety of care and treatment across England.

NHS England and NHS Improvement published the NHS’s first ever Patient Safety Strategy in July 2019. The Strategy sets out a vision to continue to improve patient safety, building on the foundation of a patient safety culture and patient safety system.

A series of programmes are planned and underway to help create a safety culture in the National Health Service and to continuously improve the safety of patients in the NHS. For example, patients are being supported to contribute to their own safety by having patients or their advocates on all safety-related clinical governance committees in NHS organisations.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health Provision: a Green Paper, published by his Department in December 2017, what progress he has made on the pilot of four week waiting time access to specialist NHS children and young people’s mental health services.

We have made good progress on, and remain committed to, carrying out the Green Paper’s core proposals, including piloting a four-week waiting time to access specialist National Health Service children and young people’s mental health services.

In 2018 we announced the first 25 trailblazer sites delivering 59 mental health support teams in and near schools and colleges. Twelve of the trailblazer sites are also testing four-week waiting times specialist NHS services, and they will deliver a recommendation for the phased introduction of an access and waiting time standard for children and young people’s mental health.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Government has to introduce fixed costs in clinical negligence cases up to £25,000 to prevent rising litigation costs within the NHS.

The continued rises in clinical negligence costs are eating into resources available for front-line care; this is unsustainable. This is despite our substantial safety programmes.

In 2017 the Department of Health and Social Care and the Ministry of Justice commissioned the independent Civil Justice Council (CJC) to draw up a new claims handling process for clinical negligence claims of up to £25,000, together with proposals for fixed recoverable costs for these cases.

The CJC published its report with recommendations on a new claims handling process for Clinical negligence claims up to £25,000 in October 2019. We are analysing the report closely and will consult on next steps shortly.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to improve perinatal mental health services (a) during pregnancy and (b) in the first postnatal year.

We remain committed to improving perinatal mental health services for new mothers and their partners - not only during the current pandemic. From April 2019, new and expectant mothers have been able to access specialist perinatal mental health community services in every part of the country.

The NHS Long Term Plan includes a commitment for a further 24,000 women to be able to access specialist perinatal mental health care by 2023/24, building on the additional 30,000 women who will access these services each year by 2020/21 under pre-existing plans. Specialist care will also be available from preconception to 24 months after birth, which will provide an extra year of support.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support is available for young people and adults who self-harm during the covid-19 pandemic; and how much the Government spent in (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) 2020 on self-harm prevention.

We do not have data on how much funding was spent specifically on self-harm prevention in 2018, 2019, and 2020.

National Health Service mental health services have remained open for business throughout the pandemic. Our community, talking therapies and children and young people’s services have deployed innovative digital tool to connect with people and provide ongoing support. For those with severe needs or in crisis, all NHS mental health providers have established 24 hours a day, seven days a week mental health crisis lines.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) NHS workers and (b) social care staff have been infected with covid-19 since (i) March 2020 and (ii) September 2020.

The Department does not hold data in the format requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) NHS workers and (b) social care staff have died from covid-19 since (i) March 2020 and (ii) September 2020.

The Office for National Statistics publishes mortality data for deaths involving COVID-19 for healthcare workers and social care workers in England and Wales. The last iteration of this release showed that in England there were 305 deaths involving COVID-19 among healthcare workers and 307 deaths involving COVID-19 among social care workers.

These were registered between 9 March and 12 October 2020 in England, of those aged 20-64 years, using the last known occupation. The definition of healthcare workers used will include not only those employed in the National Health Service but wider healthcare sector workers.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress the Government has made on the establishment of suicide bereavement support services.

Under the NHS Long Term Plan, we have set out our plans to invest £57 million to support local suicide prevention plans and establish suicide bereavement support services in all areas of England by 2023/24.

We have committed that all local systems will have suicide bereavement support services providing timely and appropriate support to families and staff by 2023/24 and have provided funding to 40% of local systems in 2020/21 for them to establish and deliver such services. This is in line with the planning and delivery expectations set out in the Mental Health Implementation Plan 2019/20-2023/24.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people in England have been diagnosed with (a) depression and (b) anxiety since March 2020.

NHS Digital collects information in the mental health services dataset on people of all ages in contact with secondary mental health services in England who have a recorded diagnosis of a mental disorder, or who have been referred for talking and psychological therapies for conditions such as depression or anxiety.

However, NHS Digital has advised that recording levels of such diagnoses in the dataset are currently too low for any meaningful interpretation.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) stillbirths (b) neonatal deaths occurred in the NHS in each month from 2015 to 2020.

This information is not collected centrally.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) stillbirths and (b) neonatal deaths occurred in the NHS in each month from 2015 to 2020.

This information is not collected centrally.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) mental health and (b) learning disability nurses were employed in the NHS in each year from 2010 to 2020.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS) workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups but not staff working in primary care, local authorities or other providers.

The following table shows the number of mental health and learning disability nurses, full time equivalent (FTE) employed in the National Health Service as at September each year along with the latest figure as of July 2020.

Mental health nurses (FTE)

Learning disabilities nurses (FTE)

September 2010

40,247

5,137

September 2011

39,024

4,667

September 2012

38,135

4,311

September 2013

37,397

4,035

September 2014

36,581

3,776

September 2015

35,671

3,577

September 2016

35,488

3,442

September 2017

35,390

3,305

September 2018

35,835

3,234

September 2019

36,696

3,186

July 2020

37,421

3,217

Source: NHS HCHS monthly workforce statistics, NHS Digital - July 2020

Notes:

Mental health and learning disability service provision is also commissioned by the NHS from private sector providers. The figures do not reflect staffing in the private sector.

Further information, including on different methodologies for counting the mental health workforce, is published by NHS Digital at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/nhs-workforce-statistics/december-2018

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the NHS spent on medication errors in each year from 2005 to 2019 inclusive.

NHS Resolution handles clinical negligence claims on behalf of National Health Service organisations and independent sector providers of NHS care in England.

NHS Resolution has provided the following information:

The following table shows the total value of payments made by NHS Resolution in respect of medication errors in financial years 2005/06 to 2019/20 on behalf of NHS organisations in England.

Financial Year

Costs (£)

2005/06

6,343,218

2006/07

10,842,247

2007/08

6,697,492

2008/09

8,236,777

2009/10

11,331,735

2010/11

13,592,393

2011/12

14,034,990

2012/13

12,497,449

2013/14

12,781,351

2014/15

14,450,193

2015/16

13,113,869

2016/17

21,379,362

2017/18

25,847,450

2018/19

22,915,002

2019/20

24,299,533

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many health care workers have died from covid-19 to date.

The Office for National Statistics publish mortality data for deaths involving COVID-19 for healthcare workers and social care workers in England and Wales. The last iteration of this release showed that in England there were 305 deaths among healthcare workers and 307 deaths among social care workers registered between 9 March and 12 October 2020 in England, of those aged 20-64 years, using last known occupation. The definition of healthcare workers used will include not only those employed in the National Health Service but wider healthcare sector workers.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many in-patient suicides were recorded at mental health hospitals in each year from 2015 to 2019 inclusive.

The data is not available in the format requested.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many prescriptions are dispensed daily on average in (a) the community and (b) hospitals in England.

The average number of prescriptions dispensed daily in the community in England since April 2017 is shown in the following table.

Time Period

Total number of items

Average number of items per day

April 2017 - March 2018

1,106,431,880

3,031,320

April 2018 - March 2019

1,109,084,895

3,038,589

April 2019 - March 2020

1,132,043,733

3,093,016

Information for hospitals is not available in the format requested.

National Health Service prescribing and dispensing data for financial years 2017/18, 2018/19 and 2019/20 has been obtained from aggregated monthly Prescription Cost Analysis data that is published on the NHS Business Services Authority website at the following link:

https://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/prescription-data/dispensing-data/prescription-cost-analysis-pca-data

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many nurses were employed to care for adults in the NHS in each month from 2010 to 2018.

NHS Digital publishes Hospital and Community Health Services workforce statistics. These include staff working in hospital trusts and clinical commissioning groups, but not staff working in primary care, general practitioner surgeries, local authorities or other providers.

The attached table shows the number of adult nurses as at each month between 2010 and 2018. This data contains data on adult nurses and does not include mental health nurses or learning disability nurses.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, in 2012, what estimate his Department has made of the number of nurses that would be needed by the NHS in (a) 2013, (b) 2014, (c) 2015, (d) 2016, (e) 2017 and (f) 2018.

In 2012, any estimates of the number of nurses needed would have been made by strategic health authorities who were abolished as part of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 reforms. Workforce planning moved from being responsibility of strategic health authorities to Health Education England (HEE) and no formal estimates by HEE were made in 2012.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many retired NHS (a) doctors and (b) nurses returned to work during the covid-19 outbreak.

Over 25,000 former doctors and nurses have come forward to assist the National Health Service during the COVID-19 outbreak. We are working with the regulators, NHS England and NHS Improvement and local employers to explore opportunities for those professionals who wish to permanently join the workforce.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the NHS spent on maternity litigation claims in 2018-19.

NHS Resolution manages clinical negligence and other claims against the National Health Service in England.

NHS Resolution spent £952 million on clinical negligence claims relating to NHS maternity services in 2018/19. This represented around 40% of total clinical negligence spend relating to NHS services in 2018/19.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the NHS spent on salaries for (a) maternity doctors, (b) maternity nurses and (c) midwives in 2018-19.

Doctors who work in a maternity setting are part of the specialty of obstetrics and gynaecology. The National Health Service spent £586 million on salaries for this speciality in 2018/19. It is not possible to separate the time doctors spent in working in obstetrics and in gynaecology.

The NHS spent a total of £126 million in 2018/19 on salaries for nurses who work in a maternity setting. The total cost of salaries to the NHS in 2018/19 for midwives totalled £1.038 billion.

These figures include total earnings paid to staff, Employer National Insurance Contributions and Employer Pension Contributions.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospital trusts were put into special measures between September 2012 and July 2018.

The combined total number of individual hospital trusts placed in Special Measures for Quality reasons and/or Special Measures for Financial reasons between September 2012 and July 2018, not double-counting any trusts placed in both types of Special Measures during the specified period, was 39. This figure does not include two ambulance service trusts placed in Special Measures for Quality reasons during the specified period.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many social care workers voluntarily left Social Work England's register in each of the last three years.

Social Work England (SWE) took over the regulation of social workers in England on 2 December 2019 from the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). The figures for 2020 are between the period of 1 January – 18 March 2020.

The number of social workers in England who voluntarily left the register of social workers in England since 2017 is shown in the following table:

Total

2017 HCPC

2018 HCPC

2019 HCPC

2020 (to 18 March) SWE

9,436

1,099

7,090

1,078

169

The number of social workers in England who were struck off the register of social workers in England in since 2017 is shown in the following table:

Total

2017 HCPC

2018 HCPC

2019 HCPC

2020 (to 18 March) SWE

202

71

62

65

4

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many social care workers were struck off Social Work England's register in each of the last three years.

Social Work England (SWE) took over the regulation of social workers in England on 2 December 2019 from the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). The figures for 2020 are between the period of 1 January – 18 March 2020.

The number of social workers in England who voluntarily left the register of social workers in England since 2017 is shown in the following table:

Total

2017 HCPC

2018 HCPC

2019 HCPC

2020 (to 18 March) SWE

9,436

1,099

7,090

1,078

169

The number of social workers in England who were struck off the register of social workers in England in since 2017 is shown in the following table:

Total

2017 HCPC

2018 HCPC

2019 HCPC

2020 (to 18 March) SWE

202

71

62

65

4

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of unpaid carers providing support to a family member.

This information is not held centrally. However, the 2011 Census indicates that about 10% of the population in England were providing informal care, equivalent to approximately 5.4 million people in 20111.

The Department for Work and Pensions’ Family Resources Survey suggests that just below 40% of carers provide care to a parent, and around 20% care for a spouse, partner or cohabitee within the same household2.

Notes:

1 Official Labour Market Statistics, 2016/2017

2 DWP, 2019. Family Resources Survey 2017/18

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) fluid protection face masks, (b) aprons and (c) pairs of latex gloves are held in the personal protective equipment stockpile.

The National Health Service has a stockpile of personal protective equipment (PPE) including facemasks, respirators, protective eyewear, aprons and gloves. These are being ordered and delivered at speed daily so it is not possible to give a specific number as this is changing rapidly. The Department is confident that there is sufficient immediate stock. The central stockpiles held for European Union Exit and pandemic influenza have also been released for use. The Department is working with the NHS and others in the supply chain to ensure these are delivered to the frontline as soon as possible.

The Department is working with wholesalers to ensure a longer-term supply of all aspects of PPE.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the most recent (a) official and (b) modelled prevalence rate of covid-19 is in (i) Hubei province and (ii) mainland China.

The latest cumulative number of cases, as published by the Chinese Health Commission at 24:00 on 11 March 2020 is 80,793 cases in mainland China and 67,781 cases in Hubei province. This data is published here at the following link:

http://www.nhc.gov.cn/xcs/yqtb/202003/37c1536b6655473f8c2120ebdc475731.shtml

The Chinese Health Commission does not publish prevalence rates.

Public Health England stopped modelling China on 12 February 2020. This corresponded with multiple changes to how China counted cases. No figures are held.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many tests for covid-19 per day UK-based laboratories can carry out (a) now and (b) at peak capacity.

The National Health Service with Public Health England (PHE) is undertaking a significant expansion of coronavirus testing, with enhanced labs helping the health service carry out 10,000 tests daily.

PHE has developed a highly sensitive test to detect the virus, one of the first countries in the world to do so, which has been rapidly rolled out to their regional labs across the country.

Approximately 1,500 tests are being processed every day at PHE labs with the great majority of tests being turned around within 24 hours. PHE has processed over 25,000 tests as of 10 March and has not exceeded capacity during this time.

As more people come forward to be tested, the NHS is now scaling up tests by 500%, with NHS England asking expert NHS laboratory services across the country to bring new capacity online, and other labs to begin checks, enabling 8,000 more samples to be analysed every day of the week.

As announced on 27 March, the Government is working with industry, philanthropy and universities to significantly scale up testing.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many covid-19 cases the Government estimates there will be in England at any one time at the peak of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government relies on modelling work undertaken by several academic groups, who report to the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) through its various subgroups. SAGE will continue to publish the evidence that it considers.

From modelling and current data on the outbreak, it is likely that the number of confirmed United Kingdom cases will rise, but it is not possible to estimate how many individuals will be infected currently. This will be dependent on the implementation of and adherence to public health measures, and the success of those measures in suppressing transmission of the virus and the numbers of cases of infection.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of toilets available for use by patients throughout the NHS.

National Health Service organisations make decisions locally on the provision of toilets to patients, visitors and staff. Data on them is not collected centrally.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) fluid repellent face masks, (b) general use aprons and (c) examination gloves the NHS stocked in (i) 2020 and (ii) in each of the last three years.

Information is not held centrally on the stock levels of products and supplies at individual National Health Service bodies.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many critical care beds equipped with respiratory equipment there are in England.

NHS England commissions a total of 15 adult respiratory extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) beds per annum from five providers in England (with a further provider in Scotland), as well as paediatric respiratory ECMO beds from five providers in England (again with further provider in Scotland). Whilst there is no set number of beds per provider because the number of paediatric cases is very small, there are typically no more than three patients requiring respiratory ECMO at any one time. In periods of high demand, adult and paediatric capacity can be increased in line with agreed standard operating procedure.

Highly specialised beds will only be needed by a minority of affected patients. In relation to the Chief Medical Officer’s recent announcement on COVID-19, hospitals have been advised on what next steps they need to take to respond to any outbreak and hardworking staff are working round the clock to test and treat patients with coronavirus and as you'd expect, work is under way to explore all practical options to increase capacity.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many extracorporeal membrane oxygenation beds there are in hospitals in England.

NHS England commissions a total of 15 adult respiratory extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) beds per annum from five providers in England (with a further provider in Scotland), as well as paediatric respiratory ECMO beds from five providers in England (again with further provider in Scotland). Whilst there is no set number of beds per provider because the number of paediatric cases is very small, there are typically no more than three patients requiring respiratory ECMO at any one time. In periods of high demand, adult and paediatric capacity can be increased in line with agreed standard operating procedure.

Highly specialised beds will only be needed by a minority of affected patients. In relation to the Chief Medical Officer’s recent announcement on COVID-19, hospitals have been advised on what next steps they need to take to respond to any outbreak and hardworking staff are working round the clock to test and treat patients with coronavirus and as you'd expect, work is under way to explore all practical options to increase capacity.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many critical care trained (a) nurses and (b) doctors there were working in the NHS in (i) March 2020 and (ii) each of the last three years.

The Department does not hold the information requested.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the recommendations contained in the report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation, published in March 2015, what assessment his Department has made of the implications for his policies of the recommendation that NHS England should consider extending the review of requirements to sustain safe provision to other services to develop and promote a positive way of working in remote and rural environments.

The National Maternity Review report, ‘Better Births - Improving outcomes of maternity services in England, A Five Year Forward View for maternity care’ reviewed maternity services across the country including in rural and isolated areas.

In the 2016/17 clinical commissioning group allocations, NHS England made a change to the allocation funding formulae for remoteness. In part, this funding recognises that services in remote areas, including maternity services, have unavoidably higher costs because the level of activity is too low for services to operate. Further, we know that the challenges faced by services in remote areas are broader than funding which is why we committed in the NHS Long Term Plan to develop new operating models for rural hospitals, as well as to reduce geographical and specialty imbalances in medical posts. As part of this, NHS England and NHS Improvement is working with 35 smaller acute hospitals and local systems leaders to identify and accelerate the spread of new delivery models through peer learning and in partnership with national stakeholders, including the Care Quality Commission and Royal Colleges.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the population has been able to access their medical records (a) online and (b) via an app in each year since 2012.

The Department is committed to ensuring that citizens using the National Health Service are able to access high quality, effective healthcare services that are responsive to patients’ needs. Digital tools, such as the NHS App, are able to support people to access their medical records.

The percentage of the general practitioner (GP) registered population that have registered and are able to access their medical record online is as follows:

Month/Year

% of population that are registered and able to access their medical record online (including via an App)

December 2015

0.6%

December 2016

0.9%

December 2017

4.30%

December 2018

6.77%

December 2019

8.66%

Prior to 2015, no patients were registered to access their medical record online.

The NHS App launched following a period of testing from September 2018 to January 2019, and now has over 250,000 registered users.

The proportion of the GP-registered population who have registered to access and have accessed their medical records via the NHS App is as follows:

Date

Number of people registered for NHS App (% of eligible GP population registered for NHS App)

Number of unique medical record accesses via the NHS App each month

December 2018

3,260 (0.01%)

January 2019

3,886 (0.01%)

February 2019

4,552 (0.01%)

1,248

March 2019

7,666 (0.01%)

1,984

April 2019

15,326 (0.03%)

4,696

May 2019

29,802 (0.06%)

11,828

June 2019

44,759 (0.09%)

19,270

July 2019

64,382 (0.13%)

26,358

August 2019

86,934 (0.17%)

31,807

September 2019

111,076 (0.22%)

36,870

October 2019

144,378 (0.28%)

51,093

November 2019

179,666 (0.35%)

57,586

December 2019

212,633 (0.41%)

57,415

We do not have data on the number of users who have solely accessed their records online. However we do capture the total number of monthly transactions for both online and app access. In the month of December 2019 patients accessed their medical records 1 million times.

Date

Total medical record view transactions (via online and an app)

December 2015

Data quality issues

December 2016

Data quality issues

December 2017

Data quality issues

December 2018

0.7 million

December 2019

1.0 million

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the population have accessed their medical records (a) online and (b) via an app in each year since 2012.

The Department is committed to ensuring that citizens using the National Health Service are able to access high quality, effective healthcare services that are responsive to patients’ needs. Digital tools, such as the NHS App, are able to support people to access their medical records.

The percentage of the general practitioner (GP) registered population that have registered and are able to access their medical record online is as follows:

Month/Year

% of population that are registered and able to access their medical record online (including via an App)

December 2015

0.6%

December 2016

0.9%

December 2017

4.30%

December 2018

6.77%

December 2019

8.66%

Prior to 2015, no patients were registered to access their medical record online.

The NHS App launched following a period of testing from September 2018 to January 2019, and now has over 250,000 registered users.

The proportion of the GP-registered population who have registered to access and have accessed their medical records via the NHS App is as follows:

Date

Number of people registered for NHS App (% of eligible GP population registered for NHS App)

Number of unique medical record accesses via the NHS App each month

December 2018

3,260 (0.01%)

January 2019

3,886 (0.01%)

February 2019

4,552 (0.01%)

1,248

March 2019

7,666 (0.01%)

1,984

April 2019

15,326 (0.03%)

4,696

May 2019

29,802 (0.06%)

11,828

June 2019

44,759 (0.09%)

19,270

July 2019

64,382 (0.13%)

26,358

August 2019

86,934 (0.17%)

31,807

September 2019

111,076 (0.22%)

36,870

October 2019

144,378 (0.28%)

51,093

November 2019

179,666 (0.35%)

57,586

December 2019

212,633 (0.41%)

57,415

We do not have data on the number of users who have solely accessed their records online. However we do capture the total number of monthly transactions for both online and app access. In the month of December 2019 patients accessed their medical records 1 million times.

Date

Total medical record view transactions (via online and an app)

December 2015

Data quality issues

December 2016

Data quality issues

December 2017

Data quality issues

December 2018

0.7 million

December 2019

1.0 million

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what progress he has made in introducing a mechanism to independently scrutinise perinatal and maternal deaths.

Medical examiners have been introduced on a non-statutory basis from April 2019 to scrutinise all non-coronial deaths and ensure the right deaths are referred to coroners. This includes neonatal death.

Since April 2018, the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch has been investigating all term intrapartum stillbirths (at least 37+0 completed weeks of gestation), neonatal deaths of all term babies born following labour when the baby died within the first week of life (0-6 days) of any cause and maternal deaths.

MBRRACE-UK (Mothers and Babies: Reducing Risk through Audits and Confidential Enquiries across the United Kingdom) conduct surveillance of all late fetal losses, stillbirths, neonatal and maternal deaths and produce Confidential Enquires to provide valuable learning and inform service improvement.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that the importance of putting quality first is re-emphasised and local arrangements are reviewed to identify any need for personal or organisational development, including amongst clinical leadership in commissioning organisations.

The Department is committed to ensure that services across the health and care system are of the highest quality through ongoing system regulation and oversight.

The Care Quality Commission is the independent regulator of quality for health and adult social care in England, it uses its powers to provides assurance and encourages improvement.

The new regional architecture has quality embedded into the role and responsibility of Clinical Quality Directors and other regional leads as well as through clinical networks and Local Maternity Systems.

The National Quality Board is reviewing the national model of quality surveillance, specifically the role of Quality Surveillance Groups in monitoring and managing quality issues within local health and care systems.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to (a) establish a proper framework, if necessary statutory, on which future investigations could be promptly established, including setting out the arrangements necessary to maintain independence and work effectively and efficiently and (b) clarify responsibilities of current and former health service staff to cooperate with an investigation.

The Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch was established in 2017 to investigate to improve patient safety and create a learning culture across the National Health Service.

The Health Service Safety Investigations Bill was introduced in the previous Parliament. This legislation will establish a fully independent arms-length patient safety investigation body, create a statutory ‘safe space’ in this body and provide the new body with powers to discharge its investigative function effectively. These include the power to ask individuals, to attend to answer questions or to provide information, documents equipment or other information as required.

The Department will bring forward these proposals when Parliamentary time allows.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to draw up a national protocol setting out the duties of all Trusts and their staff in relation to inquests, including but not be limited to (a) the avoidance of attempts to fend off inquests, (b) a mandatory requirement not to coach staff or provide model answers, (c) the need to avoid collusion between staff on lines to take and (d) the inappropriateness of relying on coronial processes or expert opinions provided to coroners to substitute for incident investigation.

NHS Improvement, in 2016, published national compulsory guidance on the duties, and the current legislation relating to coroner inquests that National Health Service trusts, foundation trusts, and individual clinicians must follow with regards to coronial processes.

Healthcare professional regulators, the Nursing and Midwifery Council and the General Medical Council’s guidance requires nurses, midwives and doctors to cooperate with all investigations, formal inquires and inquests.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department undertook to ensure that professional regulatory bodies investigated the conduct of registrants involved in the care of patients during the time period of that investigation.

As independent bodies, the regulators of healthcare professionals are responsible for operational matters concerning the discharge of their statutory duties. Accordingly, it would not be appropriate for Ministers to become involved with individual fitness to practise cases.

The Morecambe Bay Investigation recommended that healthcare professionals who had provided care that fell short of the expected standards should be held to account. As a result, the General Medical Council and Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) investigated the conduct of the registrants involved. These investigations have been completed.

In May 2018, at the request of both the Department and the NMC, the Professional Standards Authority published a ‘Lessons Learned Review’ into the handling of concerns relating to the handling of the Morecambe Bay fitness to practise cases.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to draw up a protocol on how to manage organisational change that transfers responsibilities and accountabilities.

Since the publication of the Morecambe Bay Investigation, the Department and the National Health Service have put in place a number of measures that are designed to ensure that organisational change is well managed.

These include arrangements to support local integration of services and strengthened regional support and oversight. The NHS has also developed a Long Term Plan to provide clear strategic direction to organisations making local changes.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are responsible for ensuring that organisational changes such as the merger of provider organisations are in the interests of patients and taxpayers and manage any risks effectively.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that (a) all external reviews of suspected service failures be registered with the Care Quality Commission and Monitor and (b) that the Care Quality Commission develops a system to collate learning from those reviews and disseminate it to other Trusts.

National Health Service trusts are asked to submit details of the commissioning and conclusion of relevant external reviews or investigations undertaken in the previous 12 months and describe key outcomes to the Care Quality Commission (CQC) as part of the Routine Provider Information Return.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have agreed to establish an advisory function for independent reviews which they sponsor, commission or oversee. This will advise on the establishment and best practice management of these types of reviews.

The CQC does not have a system for disseminating learning to other trusts. However, Local Maternity Systems (LMSs) and Clinical Networks have a role in sharing learning from reviews and investigations. A recent review of LMSs suggests this is working well with systems for shared learning embedding.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to help ensure that NHS England draws up a protocol to clarify the division of responsibilities for oversight of service quality and the implementation of measures to correct failures.

The National Quality Board (NQB) provides coordinated leadership for quality on behalf of the Department, Public Health England, NHS England, the Care Quality Commission, NHS Improvement, NHS Digital and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

The NQB works to promote quality nationally; support local quality improvement with providers, commissioners and those who use services; and identify new challenges and opportunities to improve quality.

Quality Surveillance Groups bring together different parts of the health and care system, to share intelligence about risks to quality and identify those risks to quality at as early a stage as possible.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to review how it carries out impact assessments of new policies to identify the risks as well as the resources and time required.

The Department’s Impact Assessment process seeks to identify risks and uncertainties associated with proposed policy changes, following best practice guidance for impact assessments and quality assurance set out by HM Treasury in the Green Book and Aqua Book.

Impact assessment procedures have been strengthened by introducing an internal Senior Review Committee who review and quality assure all impact assessments.

Risk and resource implications are a focus throughout the process and are explicitly set out when the Department publishes impact assessments.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to draw up systematic guidance setting out an appropriate framework for external reviews and professional responsibilities in undertaking them.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have agreed to establish an advisory function for independent reviews which they sponsor, commission or oversee. This will advise on the establishment and best practice management of these types of reviews.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to help ensure that the CQC and the Parliamentary and Heath Service Ombudsman draw up a memorandum of understanding specifying (a) roles, (b) relationships and (c) communication.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) in place with the Parliamentary and Heath Service Ombudsman (PHSO). The MoU sets out the framework for the working relationship between the two organisations.

In addition, the CQC and the PHSO are working on a more direct means of sharing final PHSO investigation reports and are drafting an outline information sharing agreement for this purpose which will be published in due course.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to help ensure that a duty is placed on all NHS Boards to openly (a) report the findings of external investigations into (i) clinical services, (ii) governance and (ii) other aspects of the operation of the Trust and (b) promptly notify (A) the Care Quality Commission and (B) Monitor.

Since summer 2018, as part of the Care Quality Commission’s annual Routine Provider Information Return, National Health Service trusts are asked to submit details of the commissioning and conclusion of relevant external reviews or investigations undertaken in the previous 12 months and describe key outcomes. Trusts are prompted to include actions taken resulting from coroner or ombudsman investigations and learning from external reviews of other providers.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have agreed to establish an advisory function for independent reviews which they sponsor, commission or oversee. This will advise on the establishment and best practice management of these types of reviews.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to (a) draw up clear standards for incident (i) reporting and (ii) investigation in maternity services and (b) introduce mandatory (A) reporting and (B) investigation of (1) maternal deaths, (2) late and intrapartum stillbirths and (3) unexpected neonatal deaths.

In July 2019, NHS Improvement published a new NHS Patient Safety Strategy. The strategy commits the National Health Service to developing a new Patient Safety Incident Response Framework (PSIRF), which will replace the Serious Incident Framework (published in March 2015) and support clinicians to identify insights at the point of care.

In April 2018, the Healthcare Safety Investigations Branch (HSIB) began rolling out its new maternity investigation approach, which investigates cases of unexplained severe brain injury, term intrapartum stillbirths and early neonatal deaths (all cases notifiable to the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists under the 'Each Baby Counts' programme) and maternal deaths in England. Since 1 April 2019 HSIB has completed its roll out of investigations to all 130 trusts with maternity services in England.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to review the opportunities and challenges for smaller units in promoting services.

The Health Education England (HEE) working group undertook a comprehensive review of education and training issues for staff working in smaller units and rural areas and published its report in 2016.

The 2019 Maternity Workforce Strategy which superseded the work of the HEE group, recommended that HEE undertake a further review to consider both the benefits and risks of rural settings.

In August 2019 HEE established a Programme Board to oversee the review, agreement and delivery of the equitable distribution of post-foundation medical training posts in England.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, what plans his Department has to improve the 2014 duty of candour for all NHS professionals.

The Government introduced a statutory duty of candour on organisations in response to the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry, and this is regulated as part of the Care Quality Commission inspection regime. Providers must ensure that they have processes in place to ensure staff are supported to deliver the duty of candour and have a system in place to identify and deal with possible breaches by registered staff. There are currently no plans to make further changes to these regulations.

The General Medical Council and the Nursing and Midwifery Council produce professional duty of candour guidance that registered doctors, nurses and midwives must follow.

Tom Kark QC in his Review into the Fit and Proper Persons Test suggested that compliance with the duty of candour should be included in the core competencies of directors to sit on the board of any health providing organisation. NHS England and NHS Improvement are currently considering how best to bring forward this proposal as part of the NHS People Plan.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to conduct a national review of the provision of maternity care and paediatrics in (a) rural areas, (b) areas that are difficult to recruit to or (c) isolated areas.

The National Maternity Review report, ‘Better Births - Improving outcomes of maternity services in England, A Five Year Forward View for maternity care’ reviewed maternity services across the country including in rural and isolated areas. It found that in a number of rural areas, small obstetric units see a low number of births and face challenges in employing sufficient numbers of staff.

As part of the New Care Models programme, NHS England alongside the other arm’s length bodies, has established 50 vanguards to explore how new models of care can address the quality, care and efficiency challenges faced by the National Health Service; this includes services that are rural, geographically isolated or difficult to recruit to. Examples of best practice and shared learning from these Vanguard sites are continually made available to the wider NHS, through reports, publications, press and media.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that regulatory bodies for healthcare professionals issue guidance on (a) the duty of staff to report (i) patient safety and (ii) other concerns about clinical services and (b) the mechanism for reporting those concerns.

In March 2015, the Secretary of State for Health asked Sir Bruce Keogh to review the professional codes of doctors and nurses, and to ensure that the right incentives are in place to prevent health care professionals from covering up mistakes. On 16 July 2015, Sir Bruce confirmed that the professional codes of conduct for doctors and nurses are both fit for purpose.

All professional regulators are overseen by the Professional Standards Authority for health and social care (PSA). The PSA annually reviews each professional regulator’s performance against the following four core functions: guidance and standards; education and training; registration; and fitness to practice.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to (a) establish national standards of the professional duties and expectations of (i) clinical directors, (ii) clinical leads, (ii) heads of service, (iii) medical directors and (iv) nurse directors and (b) ensure that NHS trusts provide evidence of their policies and training to the Care Quality Commission on meeting those national standards.

The Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management is developing the third edition of the Leadership and management standards for medical professionals to be released in 2020.

The interim People Plan published in June 2019 gave a commitment to undertake a system wide engagement on a new ‘NHS Leadership Compact’ that will establish the cultural values and leadership behaviours we expect from National Health Service leaders, together with the support and development that leaders should expect in return. NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to reflect the principles of the leadership compact in an updated version of the CQC’s Well-Led Framework, which will be consulted on and launched by spring 2021.

The NHS Leadership Academy’s Healthcare Leadership Model sets out the behaviours that are required of all NHS leaders in order to deliver effective, high quality care. Additionally, in November 2019, NHS England and NHS Improvement published a competency framework for Chairs and will publish further competency frameworks for executive and non-executive role on NHS boards, in line with the commitment set out in the interim People Plan.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to (a) publish national standards setting out the responsibilities for (i) clinical quality of managers, (ii) executive directors, (iii) middle managers and (iv) non-executives and (b) ensure that NHS Trusts provide evidence to the Care Quality Commission to ensure that standards are met.

The Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management is developing the third edition of the Leadership and management standards for medical professionals to be released in 2020.

The interim People Plan published in June 2019 gave a commitment to undertake a system wide engagement on a new ‘NHS Leadership Compact’ that will establish the cultural values and leadership behaviours we expect from National Health Service leaders, together with the support and development that leaders should expect in return. NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to reflect the principles of the leadership compact in an updated version of the CQC’s Well-Led Framework, which will be consulted on and launched by spring 2021.

The NHS Leadership Academy’s Healthcare Leadership Model sets out the behaviours that are required of all NHS leaders in order to deliver effective, high quality care. Additionally, in November 2019, NHS England and NHS Improvement published a competency framework for Chairs and will publish further competency frameworks for executive and non-executive role on NHS boards, in line with the commitment set out in the interim People Plan.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department has taken to reform the Local Supervising Authority system for midwives.

Both the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman’s and Dr Bill Kirkup’s reports following Morecambe Bay were critical of the Local Supervising Authority system provided for in legislation for midwives.

The Nursing and Midwifery (Amendment) Order 2017 separated the function of midwifery supervision, which is the responsibility of the employer, from regulatory activity, which is the responsibility of the Nursing and Midwifery Council. This brought the regulation of midwives into line with the arrangements for other regulated professions and means that supervisors are no longer involved in regulatory investigations and sanctions.

Subsequently, a new non-statutory model of supervision for midwives has been developed and rolled out in each of the four countries of the United Kingdom with NHS England leading this work in England. The new model focuses on the professional and developmental aspects of the role.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his Department have taken to review the NHS complaints system to (a) strengthen local resolution and improve timeliness, (b) introduce external scrutiny of local resolution and (c) reduce reliance on the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman to intervene in unresolved complaints.

We are currently developing a national strategy which aims to drive improvements in how feedback and concerns from patients are dealt with by the National Health Service so that the NHS listens, learns and acts.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what step has his department taken to introduce a clear national policy on whistleblowing that ensures a systematic and proportionate response is made by Trusts to concerns identified.

The Government has established an independent National Guardian to help drive positive cultural change across the National Health Service so that speaking up becomes business as usual. The National Guardian oversees a network of over 500 Local Guardians covering every trust. We have also enhanced the legal protections available for whistle blowers to prohibit discrimination against job applicants.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the report entitled, The Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation, published in March 2015, what steps he has taken to extend the medical examiners system to (a) stillbirths and (b) neonatal deaths to ensure that appropriate recommendations are made to coroners on the occasional need for inquests in individual cases.

Medical examiners will scrutinise all non-coronial deaths and ensure the right deaths are referred to coroners. This includes neonatal deaths. We remain committed to establishing a statutory system in the National Health Service, that will scrutinise all deaths which do not involve a coroner, as soon as Parliamentary time allows. This will build upon the non-statutory system already being implemented.

There is currently no provision for the medical examiner to become involved in the certification for stillborn babies. This is because the functions of medical examiners, as set out in the Coroners and Justice Act 2009, are limited to scrutinising causes of death. Stillborn babies are not legally classified as having died because Common law does not see this as a death, as they were not born alive. Officials have been analysing responses to the consultation that sets out proposals for giving coroners new powers to investigate term stillbirths. The Government plans to publish a response in the spring or early summer.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation by Dr Bill Kirkup, published in March 2015, what steps his department has taken to improve recording systems for perinatal deaths.

The Government has introduced measures to improve the systematic recording of perinatal deaths.

The Perinatal Mortality Review Tool was launched in 2018 to support National Health Service trusts to undertake systematic, multidisciplinary, high quality reviews of the circumstances and care leading up to and surrounding each stillbirth and neonatal death. Reports from the tool enable organisations providing and commissioning care to identify emerging themes across a number of deaths to support learning and changes in the delivery and commissioning of care to improve future care and prevent the future deaths which are avoidable.

In May 2019, MBRRACE-UK introduced a new real-time data monitoring tool, incorporated into the MBRRACE-UK web-based system. The tool allows registered users of the MBRRACE-UK surveillance system to monitor, filter and summarise the perinatal deaths reported for their organisation, using live surveillance data from the MBRRACE-UK system.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospitals were rated (a) outstanding, (b) good, (c) requires improvement and (d) inadequate after the first cycle of CQC inspections completed in 2015.

The data requested is attached.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many GP practices were rated (a) outstanding, (b) good, (c) requires improvement and (d) inadequate after the first cycle of Care Quality Commission inspections completed in 2015.

The data requested is attached.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospitals are rated (a) outstanding, (b) good, (c) requires improvement and (d) inadequate by the CQC.

The data requested is attached.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many GP practices are rated (a) outstanding, (b) good, (c) requires improvement and (d) inadequate by the CQC.

The data requested is attached.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the NHS spent on (a) agency staff, (b) agency nurses and (c) locum doctors in each of the last five years.

In 2018/19, trusts spent around £2.40 billion on agency staff – £200 million more than the £2.2 billion target, and about the same as the previous year. Since April 2017, agency costs have consistently been below 5% of overall pay costs and have now fallen to 4.4%. The continued reduction in the proportion of agency staff costs to total pay bill is a significant achievement in view of the record levels of demand and the extreme pressure on the acute sector.

The information requested is shown in the following table.

-

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Total agency spend

£3,189,590,000

£3,631,790,000

£2,934,819,560

£2,406,798,108

£2,399,645,137

Staff group

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Medical agency spend

-

-

£1,049,273,727

£949,883,470

£937,864,774

Nursing agency spend

-

-

£966,198,378

£808,661,687

£843,282,221

We do not hold staff group data for 2014/15 and 2015/16.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and which NHS Trusts are failing to meet standard 8 (Ongoing review twice daily if high dependency patients, daily for others) of the priority clinical standards for seven day services.

This information is not available in the format requested.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have published seven day services self-assessment results for NHS Trusts, this data relating to each of the priority clinical standards for seven day services both for weekends, weekdays and overall as at July 2019 (latest data) is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/7-day-hospital-services-self-assessment-results/

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and which NHS Trusts are failing to meet standard 6 (access to consultant-directed interventions) of the priority clinical standards for seven day services.

This information is not available in the format requested.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have published seven day services self-assessment results for NHS Trusts, this data relating to each of the priority clinical standards for seven day services both for weekends, weekdays and overall as at July 2019 (latest data) is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/7-day-hospital-services-self-assessment-results/

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will set out (a) how many and (b) which NHS trusts are failing to meet clinical standard 5 (access to diagnostic tests) of the priority clinical standards for seven day services.

This information is not available in the format requested.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have published seven day services self-assessment results for NHS Trusts, this data relating to each of the priority clinical standards for seven day services both for weekends, weekdays and overall as at July 2019 (latest data) is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/7-day-hospital-services-self-assessment-results/

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and which NHS Trusts are failing to meet standard 2 (time to first consultant review) of the priority clinical standards for seven day services.

This information is not available in the format requested.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have published seven day services self-assessment results for NHS Trusts, this data relating to each of the priority clinical standards for seven day services both for weekends, weekdays and overall as at July 2019 (latest data) is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/7-day-hospital-services-self-assessment-results/

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and which NHS Trusts are failing to meet all four priority clinical standards for seven day services.

This information is not available in the format requested.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have published seven day services self-assessment results for NHS Trusts, this data relating to each of the priority clinical standards for seven day services both for weekends, weekdays and overall as at July 2019 (latest data) is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/7-day-hospital-services-self-assessment-results/

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the individual targets for (a) cancer treatment, (b) A&E waiting times, (c) eliminating infection, (d) elective waiting times and (e) any other NHS treatment targets.

There are acute operational waiting time standards relating to cancer treatment, accident and emergency (A&E) and elective care which the National Health Service reports against on a monthly basis. These are outlined in the following table:

Cancer

Target

Two week wait from urgent general practitioner (GP) referral to see a specialist where cancer is suspected

93%

31 day wait from diagnosis to first definitive treatment

96%

62 day wait from urgent GP referral to first definitive treatment

85%

Two week wait from referral to see a specialist for investigation of breast symptoms, even if cancer is not initially suspected

93%

62 day wait from a national screening service to a first treatment for cancer

90%

31 day wait from a decision to treat to a subsequent treatment for cancer (radiotherapy)

94%

31 day wait from a decision to treat to a subsequent treatment for cancer (surgery)

94%

31 day wait from a decision to treat to a subsequent treatment for cancer (anti-cancer drug regimen).

98%

A&E

Target

Patients admitted, transferred or discharged within 4 hours of arrival in A&E.

95%

Elective care (referral-to-treatment)

Target

Patients with incomplete pathways waiting 18 weeks or less to start consultant-led treatment.

92%

In addition to the acute operational standards mentioned, there are also mental health waiting times targets which are published on either a monthly or a quarterly basis:

Measure

Target

Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT)

75% of people referred to IAPT services should start treatment within 6 weeks of referral and 95% should start treatment within 18 weeks of referral

Eating disorder services for children and young people

By 2020/21, 95% of children with an eating disorder will receive treatment within one week for urgent cases and within four weeks for routine cases

Early intervention in psychosis

By 2020/21, at least 60% of people experiencing a first episode of psychosis commence a National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)-recommended package of care within two weeks of referral

The United Kingdom’s five-year national action plan for antimicrobial resistance includes a strengthened focus on infection prevention and control and sets an ambition to halve levels of healthcare associated Gram-negative blood stream infections by 2023-2024. The draft NHS Standard Contract for 2020/21 includes a proposal for annual targets for trust and clinical commissioning group-level reductions in E. coli, Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas bloodstream infections. The draft contract is out for consultation until 31 January 2020.

The NHS Standard Contract will continue to include targets for both methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile (CDI). The zero-tolerance approach for MRSA bacteraemia will continue, and all acute providers submit monthly data on all positive MRSA bacteraemia specimens. CDI thresholds are published annually by NHS England and NHS Improvement and all acute providers must report positive CDI specimens.

National targets for vaccine preventable disease/immunisation are 95% national coverage for key vaccines, and 50% coverage for the childhood flu vaccine. The UK has also committed to meeting the World Health Organization elimination targets for hepatitis C, hepatitis B and Tuberculosis (TB) ahead of 2030, and is committed to eradicating HIV transmission in England by 2030 (Public Health England’s infectious disease strategy).

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many law suits worth more than £1 million (a) his Department and (b) the NHS settled in relation to babies disabled for life by medical error in the last 12 months.

We are determined to reduce the number of cases where babies are harmed, often permanently, by medical error. Our National Maternity Safety Ambition, launched in November 2015 and updated in November 2017, is to halve the rates of maternal and neonatal deaths, stillbirths, and brain injuries that occur during or soon after birth by 2025. Details can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safer-maternity-care-progress-and-next-steps

NHS Resolution handles clinical negligence claims on behalf of National Health Service organisations and independent sector providers of NHS care in England. NHS Resolution is also responsible for handling the clinical liabilities of former NHS bodies, where the defendant is the Secretary of State.

In the financial year 2018/19 the number of legal cases settled worth more than £1 million in relation to babies disabled for life by medical error were:

- Department of Health and Social Care legacy schemes – five; and

- Clinical Negligence Scheme for Trusts covering the NHS - 105.

It should be noted that this covers the period for the financial year 2018/19, rather than for the last 12 months, as the numbers for cases since April 2019 have not yet been audited.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what information his Department holds on (a) a timeline of the Ebola outbreak in 2014 and (b) how long it took to get that outbreak under control.

The UK Government mounted a comprehensive response to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, which involved ten departments and four arms' length bodies. More than 1,500 British military personnel, 150 NHS volunteers, 425 Public Health England staff and 250 DFID surge staff worked alongside staff at our High Commission in Freetown and in the UK.

The UK Government also provided 1,500 isolation and treatment beds at six Ebola treatment centres and 70 community care centres across the country. Support also included diagnostic laboratories, safe and dignified burials, assistance for households under quarantine, infection prevention and control, social mobilisation and community engagement. The Government committed more than £400 million to ending the Ebola outbreak throughout the crisis period. Sierra Leone was finally declared Ebola free on 17 March 2016.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference the UK’s response to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone in 2014, how many (a) NHS and (b) armed forces personnel took part in tackling the outbreak; and what (i) equipment and (ii) funding did the UK Government provide to tackle that outbreak.

The UK Government mounted a comprehensive response to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, which involved ten departments and four arms' length bodies. More than 1,500 British military personnel, 150 NHS volunteers, 425 Public Health England staff and 250 DFID surge staff worked alongside staff at our High Commission in Freetown and in the UK.

The UK Government also provided 1,500 isolation and treatment beds at six Ebola treatment centres and 70 community care centres across the country. Support also included diagnostic laboratories, safe and dignified burials, assistance for households under quarantine, infection prevention and control, social mobilisation and community engagement. The Government committed more than £400 million to ending the Ebola outbreak throughout the crisis period. Sierra Leone was finally declared Ebola free on 17 March 2016.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps the Government took to tackle HIV and AIDS worldwide in the (a) late 1990s and (b) early 2000s; and how much funding was allocated to that work during that time period.

The Department for International Development (DFID)'s departmental report in 2000 (https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/67962/deptreport2000.pdf) summarised UK efforts to tackle HIV and AIDS worldwide in 1999. This included multilateral support to agencies such as UNAIDS and bilateral sexual and reproductive health programmes in Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, China and India. During 1999, DFID also announced £14 million for global AIDS vaccine research.

In 2001, DFID published a new Strategy on HIV/AIDS, and this was refreshed in 2004. In 2003, DFID established a new HIV/AIDS Policy Team and published a Call for Action on HIV/AIDS as part of intensified efforts to tackle the pandemic. A National Audit Office review of DFID's response to HIV/AIDS in 2004 (https://www.nao.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2004/06/0304664es.pdf) identified "DFID's broad-based approach, its flexibility of response in-country, and its role in supporting research as strengths", the review also included an analysis of spend UK aid spend on HIV and AIDS.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how much funding the Government has allocated to securing universal international access to HIV (a) prevention, (b) treatment, (c) care and (d) support since 2005.

Bilateral Overseas Development Assistance (ODA) for HIV and AIDS prevention, treatment, and care has been consistently tracked using the OECD-DAC sector code "13040 STD control including HIV/AIDS" which includes prevention, treatment and care and "16064 Social mitigation of HIV/AIDS" which includes support. Details of UK aid spend for 2017 to 2019 disaggregated by sector code can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/921034/Data_Underlying_SID_2019.ods. Details of UK aid spend for 2009 to 2016 disaggregated by sector code can be found at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/695435/data-underlying-the-sid2017-revision-March.ods. Details of UK aid Spend pre-2009 disaggregated by sector code can be found on the OECD-DAC CRVS system at: https://stats.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=crs1.

We estimate £1.5 billion of bilateral UK aid has been spent on STD control including HIV and AIDS, and £675,000 has been spent on Social mitigation of HIV and AIDS between 2005 and 2019. This includes support to prevention, treatment and care of HIV and AIDS. The UK continues to be a major funder of the global HIV response alongside our donor partners, including through £340 million support for the WHO and £1.4 billion pledge for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria. This includes a commitment made this month to the Robert Carr Fund to reach inadequately served populations in the HIV response.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the cost to the public purse was of diplomatic entertainment activities of British overseas embassies in the 2018-19 financial year.

​The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) accounts for its hospitality expenditure under Representation of the FCO and Business Hospitality. The total overseas spend in the 2018-19 financial year was £10,990,314.80.

3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress her Department has made on implementing the 2015 counter-extremism strategy; and if she will make a statement.

The Government is committed to tackling all forms of extremism under its Counter-Extremism Strategy published in October 2015. The strategy sets out a programme of action to build our understanding of extremism, to challenge extremism and disrupt extremist activity and to strengthen communities and institutions so that they are better able to resist extremist narratives by building partnerships with all those opposed to extremism.

Three examples of progress we have made in implementing the 2015 strategy are as follows. This list is not exhaustive;

  1. Strengthened communities and challenged extremist narratives and ideologies through our Building a Stronger Britain Together programme. An evaluation of the programme was published in October 2019;
  2. Strengthened institutions, including working with the Charity Commission and local authorities to make it much harder for extremists to exploit charities and gain a foothold in communities;
  3. Published an independent Sharia review in February 2018 and an extremism funding review in July 2017.

The independent Commissioner for Countering Extremism has assessed that the Government has delivered the majority of commitments in the 2015 Strategy in her report published on 7 October 2019. The Government will publish a final assessment of the strategy when it comes to an end.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many additional security and intelligence staff have been employed across all Government agencies since 2015.

Cutting crime is a priority for this Government and we recognise that there are strong links between drug misuse and crime. Tough enforcement is a fundamental part of our approach to tackling drugs and we are working across Government to address the drivers behind drug-related crime and help prevent further substance misuse and offending.

We continue to surge law enforcement action to tackle county lines and its associated violence and exploitation. The Home Secretary has announced £25m of targeted investment across 19-20 and 20-21 to significantly increase law enforcement’s response to the issue. The Home Office has also announced that a UK Drugs Summit will take place on 27 February, which will bring together all four nations of the United Kingdom, to consider the challenges we are facing and to reflect on what more can be done to address drug supply and reduce drug harms.

The Prime Minister has also established a Cabinet committee on crime which will help to drive cross-Government action in this area.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress his Department has made on the development of Joint Force 2025; and if he will make a statement.

In 2015 we set out a step change in our ambition for UK Defence; the ambition to be able to war-fight at scale by 2025. Our headmark for this is Joint Force 2025, a highly capable deployable force of around 50,000 personnel drawn from all services. We have made significant progress in delivering the Maritime Task Group, Army Division, Air Group and Joint Forces that make up this deployable force. But there are still challenges. We know the threat picture for the UK has evolved since 2015, this was acknowledged in our Modernising Defence Programme, and there is still work to be done to ensure we are on track for delivery by 2025. The forthcoming Integrated Review on Security, Defence and Foreign Policy and the Comprehensive Spending Review provide us a unique opportunity to refresh our plans for Defence to make sure that we are delivering the right capability to keep the country safe now and in decades to come.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much and what proportion of his Department's built estate has been released to the public sector for development; what the reduction to the size of that estate has been as a result of the release; and how many properties have been built on land previously owned by his Department in each of the last three years.

Since 2015, the Ministry of Defence's built estate has reduced in size by 1.3% and is currently 73,900 hectares.

The Ministry of Defence releases land for a mix of housing, economic growth and job creation uses. Since 2010, the Department has released land with a Housing Unit Potential of up to 8,321 houses.

The Department holds no information on the number of properties built on land sold for development as this would be a matter for the new owner of the land and local planning authorities.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment he has made of the number of military personnel serving in the (a) Royal Navy, (b) Royal Marines, (c) RAF and (d) Army; and what assessment he has made of the trends in those numbers in the last five years.

While there has been a downward trend in strength over the last five years, the Government is committed to maintaining the overall size of the Armed Forces and is taking forward a range of measures to improve recruitment and retention. Importantly, the Armed Forces continue to meet all their current commitments, keeping the country and its interests safe. The Armed Forces are fully funded to meet their target strength and we continue to increase funding to Defence year on year.

The Ministry of Defence keeps the numbers of military personnel under close review. On a quarterly basis we publish UK Service personnel statistics on strengths, requirements, intake, applications and outflow, by Service. The latest edition, with information as at 1 October 2019 and showing trends since 1 April 2012, can be found at the following website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/quarterly-service-personnel-statistics-2019

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what recent assessment he has made of the number of military personnel serving in the (a) Maritime Reserves, (b) RAF reserves and (c) Army reserves; and what assessment he has made of the trends in those numbers in the last five years.

While there has been a downward trend in strength over the last five years, the Government is committed to maintaining the overall size of the Armed Forces and is taking forward a range of measures to improve recruitment and retention. Importantly, the Armed Forces continue to meet all their current commitments, keeping the country and its interests safe. The Armed Forces are fully funded to meet their target strength and we continue to increase funding to Defence year on year.

The Ministry of Defence keeps the numbers of military personnel under close review. On a quarterly basis we publish UK Service personnel statistics on strengths, requirements, intake, applications and outflow, by Service. The latest edition, with information as at 1 October 2019 and showing trends since 1 April 2012, can be found at the following website:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/quarterly-service-personnel-statistics-2019

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress has been made on the development of an unmanned combat air system programme with France; and if he will make a statement.

The UK is continuing to work with France in the £65 million Future Combat Air Systems Technology Development Co-operation (FCAS TDC) programme. This programme is primarily aimed at improving the interoperability of current and future UK and French combat air platforms.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the expenditure of his Department was in net cash requirement terms in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

Expenditure on net cash requirement in each of the last five years can be found in table 1 of the open data source tables relating to our finance and economics annual statistical bulletin: departmental resources 2019 which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mod-trade-industry-and-contracts-2019/finance-and-economics-annual-statistical-bulletin-trade-industry-and-contracts-2019

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many maritime patrol aircraft his Department has purchased since 2015.

The Ministry of Defence has ordered nine P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft from the US Government by Foreign Military Sale. Of these, the purchase of one aircraft was completed in October 2019, with a second purchase due for completion imminently.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Apache AH1 helicopters are in service; what the annual maintenance cost is of those helicopters; and what the average number of operating hours are for each Apache AH1 helicopter.

There are 44 Apache Mk1 helicopters currently in service.

In 2018-19, based on an in-service fleet of 50 Apache Mk1 helicopters, the total annual maintenance cost was £33 million, and the average annual number of flying hours per Apache Mk1 was 183.3 hours. Six Apache Mk1 helicopters have since been withdrawn from service and are undergoing dismantling for conversion to the AH-64E variant.

Further to the answer I gave on 21 January 2020 to Questions 4324 and 4325, the calculation for the Apache maintenance cost per hour was based on 2019 flying hours. In the footnote to the table this was incorrectly recorded as based on financial year 2018-19 data. To ensure consistency, the table below provides revised Apache maintenance costs, based on financial year 2018-19 information:

Type

Apache

Cost per annum

£33 million

Cost per hour

£3,601

*Numbers are rounded and to the nearest hour.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many British Army units are (a) deployed on operations throughout the world and (b) able to be deployed within 48 hours; and if he will make a statement.

83 British Army units currently have personnel deployed on 32 operations around the world.

There are two units earmarked to deploy headquarters, lead sub-units and specialist capability overseas within 48 hours. In the same timeframe, three further units, as well as an additional 1,500 personnel from across the Army, are ready to support operations within the UK covering support to the Police and civil authorities, for example for flood relief.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Energy and Clean Growth)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the maintenance costs per annum of the (a) AgustaWestland Apache AH1, (b) AgustaWestland AW159 Wildcat, (c) Eurocopter AS365 Dauphin II and (d) Westland Gazelle.

The average per hour and per annum maintenance costs are given below:

Type

Apache1

Wildcat1

Gazelle2

Cost per annum

£33million

£48million

£13million

Cost per hour

£3,451

£4,033

£3,250

* Numbers are rounded and to the nearest hour.

1Apache and Wildcat figures are based on actual figures from financial year 2018/19.

2 Gazelle figures are the annualised cost for the period 1 April 2019 to March 2025 (planned out of service date).

The Dauphin II aircraft is maintained via a civilian contract, on an availability basis, with maintenance cost per flying hour/per annum managed by the contractor. The Ministry of Defence does not therefore hold figures relating to that platform.

Figures are based on estimates and are not official statistics produced by Defence Statistics.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the average per hour maintenance cost for the (a) AgustaWestland Apache AH1, (b) AgustaWestland AW159 Wildcat, (c) Eurocopter AS365 Dauphin II and (d) Westland Gazelle.

The average per hour and per annum maintenance costs are given below:

Type

Apache1

Wildcat1

Gazelle2

Cost per annum

£33million

£48million

£13million

Cost per hour

£3,451

£4,033

£3,250

* Numbers are rounded and to the nearest hour.

1Apache and Wildcat figures are based on actual figures from financial year 2018/19.

2 Gazelle figures are the annualised cost for the period 1 April 2019 to March 2025 (planned out of service date).

The Dauphin II aircraft is maintained via a civilian contract, on an availability basis, with maintenance cost per flying hour/per annum managed by the contractor. The Ministry of Defence does not therefore hold figures relating to that platform.

Figures are based on estimates and are not official statistics produced by Defence Statistics.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)