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Written Question
Hospitals: Temporary Employment
Monday 28th March 2022

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total cost to NHS hospitals was of using (a) agency and (b) bank staff in each year since 2010-11.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

A table showing agency spend for the years 2011/12 to 2019/20 and bank spend between 2017/18 to 2019/20 is attached. Agency spend data is not available for 2010/11 and bank spend is not available before 2017/18. Data for bank and agency spending in 2020/21 is not yet available.


Written Question
Midwives and Obstetrics: Vacancies
Wednesday 15th December 2021

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of the extent of shortages in (a) midwives and (b) obstetricians in the NHS in England.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The recent Birthrate Plus assessment identified a national differential in England of 844 full-time equivalent (FTE) or 3.5% of midwives between employed FTE staff in post and the total number of funded posts and 1,088 FTE or 4.4% of midwives between the total number of funded posts and the number of posts recommended using the Birthrate Plus midwifery workforce planning tool.

The Department has not made an assessment of the extent of shortages in obstetricians in the National Health Service in England.


Written Question
Midwives
Wednesday 15th December 2021

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many midwives Birthrate Plus suggests the NHS in England currently needs.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The recent Birthrate Plus assessment identified a national differential in England of 844 full-time equivalent (FTE) or 3.5% of midwives between employed FTE staff in post and the total number of funded posts and 1,088 FTE or 4.4% of midwives between the total number of funded posts and the number of posts recommended using the Birthrate Plus midwifery workforce planning tool.

The Department has not made an assessment of the extent of shortages in obstetricians in the National Health Service in England.


Written Question
Ambulance Services
Wednesday 15th December 2021

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the number of ambulance handover delays by trust since 1 April 2021.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

Information on the longest waiting time for a 999 call to be answered by each ambulance service is not routinely collected centrally. Information on the number of ambulance handover delays by trust since 1 April 2021 is not available in the format requested, as the information is not routinely collected centrally outside of the winter period. The following table shows the mean average response times in hours, minutes and seconds for each ambulance category in each month from April to September 2021.

Category 1

Category 2

Category 3

Category 4

April

07:00

20:16

59:21:00

01:45:36

May

07:25

24:35:00

01:24:22

02:31:44

June

07:54

30:42:00

01:54:40

02:30:34

July

08:33

41:04:00

02:33:43

02:57:40

August

08:28

38:39:00

02:14:24

02:39:44

September

09:01

45:30:00

02:35:45

03:07:45

Source: Statistics » Ambulance Quality Indicators (england.nhs.uk)


Written Question
Ambulance Services
Wednesday 15th December 2021

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the average response times for each ambulance category by month from April to September 2021.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

Information on the longest waiting time for a 999 call to be answered by each ambulance service is not routinely collected centrally. Information on the number of ambulance handover delays by trust since 1 April 2021 is not available in the format requested, as the information is not routinely collected centrally outside of the winter period. The following table shows the mean average response times in hours, minutes and seconds for each ambulance category in each month from April to September 2021.

Category 1

Category 2

Category 3

Category 4

April

07:00

20:16

59:21:00

01:45:36

May

07:25

24:35:00

01:24:22

02:31:44

June

07:54

30:42:00

01:54:40

02:30:34

July

08:33

41:04:00

02:33:43

02:57:40

August

08:28

38:39:00

02:14:24

02:39:44

September

09:01

45:30:00

02:35:45

03:07:45

Source: Statistics » Ambulance Quality Indicators (england.nhs.uk)


Written Question
Ambulance Services: Emergency Calls
Wednesday 15th December 2021

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the longest waiting time for a 999 call to be answered by each ambulance service (a) from 1 to 15 October 2021 and (b) for the latest period for which data is available.

Answered by Edward Argar - Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)

Information on the longest waiting time for a 999 call to be answered by each ambulance service is not routinely collected centrally. Information on the number of ambulance handover delays by trust since 1 April 2021 is not available in the format requested, as the information is not routinely collected centrally outside of the winter period. The following table shows the mean average response times in hours, minutes and seconds for each ambulance category in each month from April to September 2021.

Category 1

Category 2

Category 3

Category 4

April

07:00

20:16

59:21:00

01:45:36

May

07:25

24:35:00

01:24:22

02:31:44

June

07:54

30:42:00

01:54:40

02:30:34

July

08:33

41:04:00

02:33:43

02:57:40

August

08:28

38:39:00

02:14:24

02:39:44

September

09:01

45:30:00

02:35:45

03:07:45

Source: Statistics » Ambulance Quality Indicators (england.nhs.uk)


Written Question
Patients: Safety
Tuesday 16th November 2021

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many of the 39 national patient safety recommendations made by the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch in 2020-21 his Department has assessed as having been implemented in full.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

Responsibility for monitoring the implementation of the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch’s (HSIB) national patient safety recommendations rest with the recipient organisations. The National Patient Safety Committee, coordinated by NHS England and NHS Improvement, has established a pilot to examine how the implementation of all the HSIB’s national recommendations could be monitored, the potential resources required and information that may aid future evaluation. The National Patient Safety Committee’s draft report on the pilot is currently undergoing review and is expected to be finalised this year.

Responsibility for monitoring the implementation of the maternity safety recommendations made by the HSIB rests with individual National Health Service trusts. The HSIB works closely with trusts on addressing emerging themes from the investigations and has quarterly review meetings where trusts provide feedback on the actions being taken to implement the recommendations. The HSIB will raise any immediate concerns to the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement via governance and assurance meetings.


Written Question
Patients: Safety
Tuesday 16th November 2021

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, who is responsible for monitoring the implementation of the (a) national patient safety recommendations and (b) maternity safety recommendations made by the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

Responsibility for monitoring the implementation of the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch’s (HSIB) national patient safety recommendations rest with the recipient organisations. The National Patient Safety Committee, coordinated by NHS England and NHS Improvement, has established a pilot to examine how the implementation of all the HSIB’s national recommendations could be monitored, the potential resources required and information that may aid future evaluation. The National Patient Safety Committee’s draft report on the pilot is currently undergoing review and is expected to be finalised this year.

Responsibility for monitoring the implementation of the maternity safety recommendations made by the HSIB rests with individual National Health Service trusts. The HSIB works closely with trusts on addressing emerging themes from the investigations and has quarterly review meetings where trusts provide feedback on the actions being taken to implement the recommendations. The HSIB will raise any immediate concerns to the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement via governance and assurance meetings.


Written Question
Maternity Services: Safety
Tuesday 16th November 2021

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many of the 1,500 maternity safety recommendations made to maternity units in England by the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch in 2020-21 his Department has assessed as having been implemented in full.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

Responsibility for monitoring the implementation of the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch’s (HSIB) national patient safety recommendations rest with the recipient organisations. The National Patient Safety Committee, coordinated by NHS England and NHS Improvement, has established a pilot to examine how the implementation of all the HSIB’s national recommendations could be monitored, the potential resources required and information that may aid future evaluation. The National Patient Safety Committee’s draft report on the pilot is currently undergoing review and is expected to be finalised this year.

Responsibility for monitoring the implementation of the maternity safety recommendations made by the HSIB rests with individual National Health Service trusts. The HSIB works closely with trusts on addressing emerging themes from the investigations and has quarterly review meetings where trusts provide feedback on the actions being taken to implement the recommendations. The HSIB will raise any immediate concerns to the Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement via governance and assurance meetings.


Written Question
Maternity Services: Finance
Wednesday 27th October 2021

Asked by: Jeremy Hunt (Conservative - South West Surrey)

Question to the Department of Health and Social Care:

To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he expects to have completed his consideration of recommendation 1 of the Health and Social Care Select Committee's report on the safety of maternity services in England, HC 19, published on 6 July 2021.

Answered by Maria Caulfield - Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)

The Government response to the Committee’s report set out that we would consider an assessment of midwifery and obstetric workforce levels to inform considerations of future funding. In early 2022, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists will provide information on the number of obstetricians at all grades required in maternity units. By June 2022, a complex workforce tool will be developed which can be used by maternity units to calculate the number of obstetricians required. This information will inform considerations of the Committee’s recommendation.