Imran Hussain

Labour - Bradford East

Shadow Minister (Employment Rights and Protections)

(since April 2020)
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Mar 2020 - 6th Jul 2020
Consolidation Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Mar 2020 - 6th Jul 2020
Shadow Minister (Justice)
3rd Jul 2017 - 10th Apr 2020
Consolidation Bills (Joint Committee)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow Minister (International Development)
14th Jan 2016 - 3rd Jul 2017
Consolidation Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Nov 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Regulatory Reform
12th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Nov 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Department Event
Tuesday 22nd February 2022
11:30
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Oral questions - Main Chamber
22 Feb 2022, 11:30 a.m.
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 26th January 2022
Business without Debate
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 144 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 176
Speeches
Tuesday 25th January 2022
Written Answers
Monday 24th January 2022
Property: Management
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if his Department will take steps to prevent …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 8th December 2015
COMMENTS BY DONALD TRUMP
That this House condemns the recent comments by US Republican Presidential Candidate, Donald Trump, regarding his call for a ban …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th March 2020
4. Visits outside the UK
Name of donor: Government of Pakistan
Address of donor: High Commission for Pakistan, 35-36 Lowndes Square, London SW1X 9JN
Estimate …
EDM signed
Wednesday 5th January 2022
Food insecurity
That this House recognises the horrific levels of food insecurity in the UK being experienced by approximately 11 million people; …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Imran Hussain has voted in 307 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Imran Hussain Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(12 debate interactions)
Robert Buckland (Conservative)
(6 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(5 debate interactions)
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View all Imran Hussain's debates

Bradford East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Imran Hussain has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Imran Hussain

6th December 2021
Imran Hussain signed this EDM on Wednesday 5th January 2022

Food insecurity

Tabled by: Ian Byrne (Labour - Liverpool, West Derby)
That this House recognises the horrific levels of food insecurity in the UK being experienced by approximately 11 million people; acknowledges the profound and devastating consequences of food insecurity on the health, wellbeing and livelihoods of people in our communities; notes with concern that the need for emergency food parcels …
46 signatures
(Most recent: 24 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 29
Scottish National Party: 5
Independent: 3
Liberal Democrat: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Alba Party: 1
Green Party: 1
23rd September 2021
Imran Hussain signed this EDM on Monday 15th November 2021

Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall

Tabled by: Afzal Khan (Labour - Manchester, Gorton)
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; notes that this memorial now includes over 150,000 hand-painted hearts to symbolise all those who lost their lives during the coronavirus pandemic; praises the work of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for …
136 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 97
Scottish National Party: 15
Liberal Democrat: 10
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Conservative: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
View All Imran Hussain's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Imran Hussain, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Imran Hussain has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Imran Hussain has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Imran Hussain has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Imran Hussain has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


115 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4 Other Department Questions
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what measures are in place to enable freeholders on private estates to dispute increases to land management fees made without their agreement.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. Where people pay estate rentcharges it is not appropriate that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs.

That is why the Government intends to legislate to ensure that the charges that resident freeholders may pay towards the maintenance of communal area are fairer and more transparent.

To this effect, we will legislate to give freeholders on private and mixed tenure estates equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rentcharges, as well as a right to apply to the First-tier Tribunal to appoint a new manager to manage the provision of services.

In addition, we will ensure that where a freeholder pays a rentcharge, the rentcharge owner is not able to take possession or grant a lease on the property where the rentcharge remains unpaid for a short period of time. We will translate these measures into law when parliamentary time allows.

We will also consider the option of introducing a Right to Manage for residential freeholders once we have considered the Law Commission's report and recommendations on changes to the Right to Manage for leaseholders.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if his Department will take steps to prevent land management companies from increasing land management fees without the agreement of freeholders on private estates.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. Where people pay estate rentcharges it is not appropriate that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs.

That is why the Government intends to legislate to ensure that the charges that resident freeholders may pay towards the maintenance of communal area are fairer and more transparent.

To this effect, we will legislate to give freeholders on private and mixed tenure estates equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rentcharges, as well as a right to apply to the First-tier Tribunal to appoint a new manager to manage the provision of services.

In addition, we will ensure that where a freeholder pays a rentcharge, the rentcharge owner is not able to take possession or grant a lease on the property where the rentcharge remains unpaid for a short period of time. We will translate these measures into law when parliamentary time allows.

We will also consider the option of introducing a Right to Manage for residential freeholders once we have considered the Law Commission's report and recommendations on changes to the Right to Manage for leaseholders.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing a cap on land management fees for freeholders on private estates.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. Where people pay estate rentcharges it is not appropriate that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs.

That is why the Government intends to legislate to ensure that the charges that resident freeholders may pay towards the maintenance of communal area are fairer and more transparent.

To this effect, we will legislate to give freeholders on private and mixed tenure estates equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rentcharges, as well as a right to apply to the First-tier Tribunal to appoint a new manager to manage the provision of services.

In addition, we will ensure that where a freeholder pays a rentcharge, the rentcharge owner is not able to take possession or grant a lease on the property where the rentcharge remains unpaid for a short period of time. We will translate these measures into law when parliamentary time allows.

We will also consider the option of introducing a Right to Manage for residential freeholders once we have considered the Law Commission's report and recommendations on changes to the Right to Manage for leaseholders.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if he will make it the policy of his Department to regulate land management fees for freeholders on private estates.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. Where people pay estate rentcharges it is not appropriate that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs.

That is why the Government intends to legislate to ensure that the charges that resident freeholders may pay towards the maintenance of communal area are fairer and more transparent.

To this effect, we will legislate to give freeholders on private and mixed tenure estates equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rentcharges, as well as a right to apply to the First-tier Tribunal to appoint a new manager to manage the provision of services.

In addition, we will ensure that where a freeholder pays a rentcharge, the rentcharge owner is not able to take possession or grant a lease on the property where the rentcharge remains unpaid for a short period of time. We will translate these measures into law when parliamentary time allows.

We will also consider the option of introducing a Right to Manage for residential freeholders once we have considered the Law Commission's report and recommendations on changes to the Right to Manage for leaseholders.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether it is in the scope of the Taskforce on Innovation, Growth and Regulatory Reform to consider or recommend changes to the Employment Tribunal system.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ174869 on 13 April 2021.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the recommendation by the Innovation, Growth and Regulatory Reform Taskforce, in its report published in June 2021, to reimpose the one in, two out regulatory offset principle.

A joint consultation on “Reforming the Framework for Better Regulation” between the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and the Cabinet Office was launched on 22 July 2021. The consultation examined relevant recommendations from the Taskforce on Innovation, Growth and Regulatory Reform report, including reimposing the one in, two out regulatory offset principle. The consultation received 188 responses from a range of stakeholders including business and trade and industry bodies. The Government response to the consultation will be published in due course.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 10 February 2021 to Question 147880 on Director of Labour Market Enforcement, on what date he plans to make an appointment announcement in respect of the post of Director of Labour Market Enforcement.

As set out in our answer of 10 February, earlier in the year we launched a campaign to appoint a Director of Labour Market Enforcement. Since then, we have been progressing the appointment process which is now nearing its conclusion. We hope to be able to announce the successful candidate in the near future.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many investigations were carried out by the (a) Employment Standards Agency Inspectorate and (b) HMRC National Minimum Wage enforcement team for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

HMRC National Minimum Wage team investigate matters classified as non-payment of the national minimum wage. In spite of the pandemic, 2020/21 was another successful year for HMRC’s minimum wage enforcement activities. HMRC investigated over 2,700 businesses and closed almost 1,000 cases with arrears, secured more than £16.5 million in arrears for more than 155,000 workers, and issued 575 penalties amounting to over £14 million. HMRC continue to take strong action against the most serious non-compliant businesses and as of March 2021 there are 24 employers in a Labour Market Enforcement Undertaking, and 15 employers have been prosecuted for NMW offences since 2007.

Over the course of 2020/21, the HMRC Promote team facilitated nearly 800,000 employers and workers to seek further information in relation to the minimum wage.

This included:

- Sending more than 400,000 texts to apprentices regarding the risk of underpayment from unpaid training time;

- Writing to nearly 200,000 employers and workers;

- Producing a variety of webinars and educational videos that accumulated nearly 20,000 views.

In addition to the above, the “Calculating the Minimum Wage” guidance had nearly 50,000 views; and there were almost 9,000 views of the work experience and intern’s guidance.

There were more than 400 full time employees on average involved in HMRC’s enforcement of the minimum wage over the 2020/21 reporting year.

The Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate also continued to investigate all complaints throughout 2020/21 and undertook proactive inspections of employment businesses. These included issues concerning non-payment or withholding earnings, being charged to find work, contractual disputes, lack of clarity of deductions, advertising of roles, and failure to obtain either sufficient information from a hiring company or work-seeker. It investigated a total of 1631 complaints in the 2020/21 period and undertook 151 pro-active investigations.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many frontline (a) enforcement officers and (b) inspectors were employed on average in the HMRC National Minimum Wage enforcement team for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

HMRC National Minimum Wage team investigate matters classified as non-payment of the national minimum wage. In spite of the pandemic, 2020/21 was another successful year for HMRC’s minimum wage enforcement activities. HMRC investigated over 2,700 businesses and closed almost 1,000 cases with arrears, secured more than £16.5 million in arrears for more than 155,000 workers, and issued 575 penalties amounting to over £14 million. HMRC continue to take strong action against the most serious non-compliant businesses and as of March 2021 there are 24 employers in a Labour Market Enforcement Undertaking, and 15 employers have been prosecuted for NMW offences since 2007.

Over the course of 2020/21, the HMRC Promote team facilitated nearly 800,000 employers and workers to seek further information in relation to the minimum wage.

This included:

- Sending more than 400,000 texts to apprentices regarding the risk of underpayment from unpaid training time;

- Writing to nearly 200,000 employers and workers;

- Producing a variety of webinars and educational videos that accumulated nearly 20,000 views.

In addition to the above, the “Calculating the Minimum Wage” guidance had nearly 50,000 views; and there were almost 9,000 views of the work experience and intern’s guidance.

There were more than 400 full time employees on average involved in HMRC’s enforcement of the minimum wage over the 2020/21 reporting year.

The Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate also continued to investigate all complaints throughout 2020/21 and undertook proactive inspections of employment businesses. These included issues concerning non-payment or withholding earnings, being charged to find work, contractual disputes, lack of clarity of deductions, advertising of roles, and failure to obtain either sufficient information from a hiring company or work-seeker. It investigated a total of 1631 complaints in the 2020/21 period and undertook 151 pro-active investigations.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish a classification of the matters being investigated by the (a) Employment Standards Agency Inspectorate and (b) HMRC National Minimum Wage enforcement team for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

HMRC National Minimum Wage team investigate matters classified as non-payment of the national minimum wage. In spite of the pandemic, 2020/21 was another successful year for HMRC’s minimum wage enforcement activities. HMRC investigated over 2,700 businesses and closed almost 1,000 cases with arrears, secured more than £16.5 million in arrears for more than 155,000 workers, and issued 575 penalties amounting to over £14 million. HMRC continue to take strong action against the most serious non-compliant businesses and as of March 2021 there are 24 employers in a Labour Market Enforcement Undertaking, and 15 employers have been prosecuted for NMW offences since 2007.

Over the course of 2020/21, the HMRC Promote team facilitated nearly 800,000 employers and workers to seek further information in relation to the minimum wage.

This included:

- Sending more than 400,000 texts to apprentices regarding the risk of underpayment from unpaid training time;

- Writing to nearly 200,000 employers and workers;

- Producing a variety of webinars and educational videos that accumulated nearly 20,000 views.

In addition to the above, the “Calculating the Minimum Wage” guidance had nearly 50,000 views; and there were almost 9,000 views of the work experience and intern’s guidance.

There were more than 400 full time employees on average involved in HMRC’s enforcement of the minimum wage over the 2020/21 reporting year.

The Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate also continued to investigate all complaints throughout 2020/21 and undertook proactive inspections of employment businesses. These included issues concerning non-payment or withholding earnings, being charged to find work, contractual disputes, lack of clarity of deductions, advertising of roles, and failure to obtain either sufficient information from a hiring company or work-seeker. It investigated a total of 1631 complaints in the 2020/21 period and undertook 151 pro-active investigations.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish the Labour Market Enforcement Strategy 2020 to 2021.

We are working with our colleagues at the Home Office to publish the Labour Market Enforcement Strategy 2020-21 in due course. It was important to take the time to work with the former Director of Labour Market Enforcement and the enforcement bodies to ensure that the Strategy is making the right recommendations in the face of the new challenges presented by the coronavirus pandemic. The 2020/21 will be published as an agreed Strategy and so we will be taking forward all the recommendations in the final version.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to improve rights and protections for employees.

This Government is committed to making the UK the best place in the world to work. As laid out in our manifesto, we will bring forward measures to establish an employment framework which is fit for purpose and keeps pace with the needs of modern workplaces. These measures will make workplaces fairer by:

  • providing better support for working families and introducing new support for people facing particularly challenging circumstances.
  • encouraging flexible working while ensuring everyone benefits from the flexibility of our labour market.
  • protecting the majority of businesses who strive to do the right thing by their workers from being undercut by the small minority who seek to avoid their responsibilities.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has appointed an Interim-Director of Labour Market Enforcement to succeed Matthew Taylor.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to appoint a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason his Department decided not to extend Matthew Taylor's contract as the Interim-Director of Labour Market Enforcement until a successor is found.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department has spent on recruitment for the position of Director of Labour Market Enforcement to date.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason his Department has reopened the recruitment process for the position of Director of Labour Market Enforcement.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many candidates his Department has shortlisted for the position of Director of Labour Market Enforcement.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department records how many school governors are from a Black, Asian and Ethnic Minority background.

The department does not currently collect data on the ethnicity of volunteers in school and academy trust governance. We recognise the importance and positive impact of a diverse board. For this reason, guidance published by the department emphasises that boards should understand the diversity of their schools and the communities they serve and ensure their board is reflective of this. We are committed to working with the sector to increase the diversity of school and academy trust boards.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools that have had an academy order imposed upon them have waited (a) between 24 and 35 months, (b) between 36 and 47 months, (c) between 48 and 59 months and (d) longer than 60 months before their academisation process was completed.

As of the 1 June 2021, there have been 574 sponsored academies that have opened after the predecessor local authority maintained schools were issued with academy orders following receipt of inadequate Ofsted judgements. 56% of these sponsored academies opened in less than 12 months, and more than 90% opened in less than 24 months of the academy order being issued. Of the remainder:

  • 33 took between 24 and 35 months.
  • 13 took between 36 and 47 months.
  • 4 took between 48 and 59 months.
  • 1 took longer than 60 months.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils were excluded in each local authority in each year since 2010 by ethnicity.

The National Statistics release ‘Permanent and fixed-period exclusions in England 2017 to 2018’ includes information on the number and rate of permanent and fixed period exclusions.

The release is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2017-to-2018.

The underlying data includes information on exclusions by local authority. The data can be filtered to show local authority, year and school type. There is also a metadata file in the same area that gives details of the data files.

2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps his Department is taking to prevent the outbreak of covid-19 in refugee camps throughout the world.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment his Department has made of the vulnerability of people in refugee camps to a covid-19 outbreak in refugee camps.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions he has had on steps to prevent covid-19 outbreaks in refugee camps with the Governments of countries hosting those camps.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether there have been any cases of covid-19 in refugee camps throughout the the world.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether his Department plans to make additional funding available to prevent covid-19 outbreaks in refugee camps throughout the world.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, on how many occasions each trade advisory group has met since 1 January 2021; and how long did each of those meetings last.

The duration of each meeting has ranged from one to two hours.

Trade Advisory Group

Number of meetings since 1st January 2021

Agri-food

2

Automotive, Aerospace and Marine

2

British Manufactured and Consumer Goods

2

Chemicals

2

Creative Industries

2

Financial Services

2

Investment

3

Life Sciences

2

Professional Advisory Services

2

Telecoms and Technology

2

Transport

2

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of removing the two-child limit from universal credit as recommended by the Social Mobility Commission in its State of the Nation 2021 report.

No assessment has been carried out since the Social Mobility Commission’s report. However, latest figures from April 2021 indicate that over 50% of those households with three or more children who are in receipt of Universal Credit, are not affected by the two-child policy, with over 4% of those being in receipt of an exception. Statistics relating to this policy are published annually, most recently on the 15 July 2021, and are available on GOV.UK.

Statistics from the Office for National Statistics show that in 2020, of all families with dependent children, 85% had a maximum of two in their family. For lone parent families, this was 83%.

The government therefore feels it is proportionate to provide support through Universal Credit for a maximum of two children. A benefits structure adjusting automatically to family size is unsustainable.

On 9 July 2021, the Supreme Court handed down its judgment in the judicial review of the two-child policy. The court found the two-child policy lawful and not in breach of the European Convention on Human Rights

This policy ensures fairness by asking families on benefits to make the same financial decisions as families supporting themselves solely through work. We recognise that some claimants are not able to make the same choices about the number of children in their family, which is why exceptions have been put in place to protect certain groups.

.

Exceptions to the two-child policy are any child in a household who is:

  • Adopted, when they would otherwise be in Local Authority care;
  • Children living long term with friends or family, who would otherwise be at risk of entering the care system;
  • A child born to a young person under 16, who is living with their parents or carers (until they make a separate claim upon turning 16);
  • Third and subsequent children who are:

- additional children in a multiple birth;

- likely to have been born as a result of non-consensual conception (which for this

purpose includes rape or where the claimant was in a controlling or coercive

relationship with the child’s other biological parent at the time of conception).

More information regarding this policy and its exceptions, can be found on GOV.UK.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many frontline (a) enforcement officers and (b) inspectors were employed on average in the Health and Safety Executive for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

On average, in 2020/21, HSE employed (a) 85 full-time equivalent (FTE) visiting health and safety officers and (b) 967 FTE Inspectors.

1. Please note that HSE does not use the category ‘enforcement officer’. Visiting health and safety and Inspector figures are provided, as published in The Annual Report and Accounts.

  1. 967 inspectors is the total number of staff in all grades and roles, including trainees, managers and specialists with warrants.
Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish a classification of the matters being investigated by the Health and Safety Executive for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has no plans to routinely publish the classification of the matters being investigated.

For information, Table 1 below provides details of incidents which occurred in 2020/21 which were investigated or are under investigation following a report received under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR).

Please note these figures do not include 183,632 COVID related spot checks carried out by HSE in 2020/21

RIDDOR INVESTIGATIONS

Count

Dangerous Occurrences

260

High fall (over 2m)

152

Contact with machinery

146

COVID-19 non-fatal

134

Dangerous Gas Fittings

112

Struck by object

92

Other ill health

88

COVID-19 fatal

68

Low fall (up to & inc. 2m)

67

Struck by moving vehicle

59

Another kind of accident

48

Slip, trip, fall same level

40

Injured by an animal

32

Trapped by something collapsing

32

Exposure to harmful substance

23

Struck against

20

Gas Incidents

19

Contact with electricity

16

Exposed to fire

16

Lifting and handling injuries

13

Physical assault

10

Fall (height not known)

8

Drowned or asphyxiated

5

Exposed to explosion

5

TOTAL

1465

Table 2 below provides details of workplace concerns which were raised in 2020/21 and investigated or are still under investigation by an Inspector.

CONCERNS

Count

Construction

2211

Gas

391

COVID*

1192

Other

5813

Pesticides

37

Working Time

5

TOTAL

9649

Table 2

*in the reporting year 2020/21, HSE dealt with almost 21,000 COVID related workplace concerns with the majority being resolved by the national Concerns and Advisory Team without the need to be passed to an Inspector for investigation.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many full-time equivalent inspectors have been employed in each region of the country by (a) the Health and Safety Executive and (b) Local Authorities in each year since 2009.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) also recently announced an additional £14m funding that has been made available to HSE until March 2021. Changes in intervention approaches have enabled the HSE to remain effective as a regulator despite fewer inspectors however HSE is developing a rolling programme of activity and will draw down funds throughout the year to bring in additional inspectors, call centre staff and equipment.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been admitted to hospital whilst staying in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel since such facilities were opened.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what pr option of families who have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel have been referred for additional safeguarding since February 2021.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of families who have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel have received support from social workers since February 2021.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children of each age have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel since February 2021.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) families and (b) children aged 12 or younger have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel since February 2021.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been granted exemption from managed covid-19 quarantine hotels on medical grounds since such facilities were opened.

Since February 2021 around 60 people have been granted exemptions from COVID-19 managed quarantine facilities on medical grounds. We do not have data on how many people have applied for exemption from COVID-19 managed quarantine facilities on medical grounds.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department has provided to families who have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel.

All managed quarantine hotels provide information about the services and support available, which is set out in a welcome pack provided on arrival. The hotels selected for managed quarantine are able to meet the vast majority of requirements. Hotels will prioritise allocating larger or connecting rooms to families. There are opportunities to exercise outside as arranged with the hotel security guards. Medical and mental health support is provided where needed, together with access to social workers for advice and support.

Food is available throughout the day with a choice of menus accommodating dietary requirements, delivered to the hotel rooms. All rooms have televisions and free WiFi.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the list of medical conditions that exempt an individual from the requirement to stay in a managed quarantine hotel on their return from a covid-19 red list country.

There are some extremely limited circumstances where due to pre-existing severe medical conditions or vulnerabilities, an individual may be incapable of entering a managed quarantine facility because they cannot be supported there. There is not a pre-defined list of medical conditions that exempt an individual from the requirement to stay in a managed quarantine hotel on arrival from a ‘red list’ country as each case is assessed on an individual basis taking into account the needs of the traveller and the impact that quarantine within a hotel facility would have upon their health and wellbeing.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what financial support his Department is providing to travellers on low incomes with limited savings that are required to pay for a managed quarantine hotel on returning to the UK from countries on the covid-19 red list travel ban.

For those facing significant financial hardship as a result of the managed quarantine charge, there is an opportunity to apply for a deferred repayment plan when booking. We have updated the guidance on GOV.UK as it previously referred only to those on income-related benefits.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that there is adequate capacity in managed covid-19 quarantine hotels to accommodate travellers who are returning from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

An additional seven hotels have been brought into the Managed Quarantine Service to increase hotel availability. In addition, discussions are underway with other regional airports to become designated ‘red list’ arrival ports which will also add additional capacity in areas outside of the South East. We closely monitor future demand against available hotel capacity and adjust the number of hotels contracted to support managed quarantine accordingly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking with the corporate travel management sector to tackle the issue of travellers returning to the UK from covid-19 red list countries being unable to book accommodation in a managed quarantine hotel.

An additional seven hotels have been brought into the Managed Quarantine Service to increase hotel availability. In addition, discussions are underway with other regional airports to become a designated ‘red list’ arrival ports which will also add additional capacity in areas outside of the South East. We closely monitor future demand against available hotel capacity and adjust the number of hotels accordingly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to end the use by social care providers of lump-sum payments for staff working sleep-in shifts and to encourage providers to pay staff for all hours spent on sleep-in shifts.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment that workers on ‘sleep-in’ shifts are only entitled to the minimum wage for the time they are awake for the purpose of working.

The vast majority of care workers are employed by private sector providers who ultimately set their pay, independent of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine a fair rate of pay based on local market conditions. The Government is working closely with local authorities and providers in order to consider the implications of the judgement for the sector and next steps.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to encourage social care providers to increase payments to staff working sleep-in shifts.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment that workers on ‘sleep-in’ shifts are only entitled to the minimum wage for the time they are awake for the purpose of working.

The vast majority of care workers are employed by private sector providers who ultimately set their pay, independent of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine a fair rate of pay based on local market conditions. The Government is working closely with local authorities and providers in order to consider the implications of the judgement for the sector and next steps.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that social care providers are not reducing the amount paid to staff working sleep-in shifts following the Supreme Court ruling of 19 March 2021 on sleep-in shifts.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment that workers on ‘sleep-in’ shifts are only entitled to the minimum wage for the time they are awake for the purpose of working.

The vast majority of care workers are employed by private sector providers who ultimately set their pay, independent of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine a fair rate of pay based on local market conditions. The Government is working closely with local authorities and providers in order to consider the implications of the judgement for the sector and next steps.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the average number of hours that social care staff on sleep-in shifts spend (a) working and (b)sleeping.

We have made no such assessment.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the workload of social care staff working sleep-in shifts.

We have made no such assessment.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government plans to bring forward legislation proposals for sleep-in shifts in the social care sector to be considered working time for the purposes of calculating compliance with the National Minimum Wage.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment where workers on ‘sleep-in’ shifts are entitled to the minimum wage for the time they are awake for the purpose of working. The Government is working closely with local authorities and providers in order to consider whether this judgement might have implications with respect to the provision of social care more generally.

The Government is considering the implications of the judgement with care commissioners and providers to consider what action, if any, is needed. We have no plans to bring forward legislative proposals to amend National Minimum Wage regulations.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the list of medical conditions that would exempt an individual from the requirement to stay in a managed quarantine hotel on their return from a covid-19 red list country.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking with Corporate Travel Management to tackle the issue of travellers returning to the UK from covid-19 red list countries unable to book accommodation in a managed quarantine hotel.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what financial support his Department is providing to travellers on low incomes with limited savings that are required to pay for a managed quarantine hotel on returning to the UK from countries on the red list travel ban.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that there is sufficient capacity in managed quarantine hotels to accommodate travellers who are returning from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the advice from the Joint Biosecurity Centre on expanding the countries on the red list travel ban to include (a) Pakistan and (b) Bangladesh.

Decisions to add countries, including Pakistan and Bangladesh, to the ‘red list’ are taken by Ministers informed by evidence including the Joint Biosecurity Centre’s analysis as well as other relevant information about the risk of the spread of variant. The advice, evidence and methodology which informs these decisions relates to on-going development of Government policy and therefore cannot be published at this time.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many positive tests for covid-19 have been recorded in the City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council local authority area on each day since 1 May 2020 in (a) Pillar 1 tests and (b) Pillar 2 tests.

Public Health England publishes the combined Pillar 1 and Pillar 2 number of confirmed cases in Bradford local authority is available at the following links:

https://coronavirus-staging.data.gov.uk/cases?areaType=ltla&areaName=Bradford

https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/#category=ltlas&map=rate

Local authorities and Directors of Public Health receive data on each case with postcode data.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason postcode level Pillar 2 data from the National Testing Programme dashboard was not provided to local authority Directors of Public Health for their local authority area on a daily basis.

NHS Test and Trace have compiled a detailed local authority dashboard which has been available since 11 June. This includes a total-local authority specific view of the number of tests conducted, the total number of positive cases and a rolling average for Pillar 1 and Pillar 2, as well as information on 111, 999 and online triage cases related to COVID-19. The dashboard is updated by Public Health England daily.

On 24 June we made available secure postcode-level and individual case testing data with all Directors of Public Health with upper tier local authorities – this is available to them at any time to access using their own unique authentication details. As the information contained is personally identifiable, we do need a specific data sharing agreement in place with a specific named individual. Due to data protection laws, the users are typically the Director of Public Health, who are granted access once they have returned the data sharing agreement.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many applications to access to the National Testing Programme dashboard were granted for each local authority on each day since 8 June 2020.

Since June, we have been working with Public Health England and the Joint Biosecurity Centre to provide local authorities with easy-to-use dashboard of testing and triage data. This can be used to monitor their area for flare-ups of the disease so that they can make critical decisions in their areas.

Public Health England started providing individual-level, test data on the 24 June enabled through a data sharing agreement with Directors of Public Health.

Since 10 June all local authorities have access to their data and the number of local authorities requesting access to the dashboard so far is 1,199 and the number granted is 1,130.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many applications to access the National Testing Programme dashboard were received from each local authority on each day since 8 June 2020.

Since June, we have been working with Public Health England and the Joint Biosecurity Centre to provide local authorities with easy-to-use dashboard of testing and triage data. This can be used to monitor their area for flare-ups of the disease so that they can make critical decisions in their areas.

Public Health England started providing individual-level, test data on the 24 June enabled through a data sharing agreement with Directors of Public Health.

Since 10 June all local authorities have access to their data and the number of local authorities requesting access to the dashboard so far is 1,199 and the number granted is 1,130.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether local authorities are able to share postcode level Pillar 2 covid-19 testing data with local partners.

Data, including pillar 2 testing data, is provided to local authorities through a Data Sharing Agreement (DSA). This DSA grants the local authority data controllership so it is within their gift to determine how and with who they share it, ensuring compliance with the appropriate guidance.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason local authority Directors of Public Health were not automatically granted access to the National Testing Programme dashboard for their local authority area.

From 11 June, NHS Digital, with the support of the Department, made available an operational data dashboard – including counts of total tests, total positives and total voids per local authority - to Directors of Public Health. This was to support Directors of Public Health and local authorities’ operational needs while more detailed data sharing was being put in place. We are now making this even more detailed so users can drill down to Lower Super Output Area – on average 1,700 people.

Public Health England began providing record level positive test data, including postcodes, to local authorities, including Directors of Public Health, on 24 June. As the information contained is personally identifiable, we do need a specific data sharing agreement in place with a specific named individual. Because of data protection, the users are typically the Director of Public Health. They are granted access once they have returned the data sharing agreement.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children aged under ten years old in Bradford were admitted to hospital for tooth decay in each year since 2010.

A table showing the count of finished admission episodes with a primary diagnosis of dental caries (tooth decay) for patients aged under 10 years old and that are resident in the Bradford area is attached.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the cost was to the public purse of tooth extractions in Bradford in each year since 2010.

The information is not available in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much revenue raised by NHS England's dental practices was re-invested in dental practices in Bradford in each year from 2010.

Data is not held in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much revenue was raised by NHS England from dental practices in Bradford in each year since 2010.

Data is not held in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children under ten years old had tooth extractions in Bradford in each year since 2010.

The data is not held in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the final wishes of people in relation to organ donation in the absence of a decision recorded on the NHS Organ Donation Register following the transition to an opt-out system.

The new consent arrangements for organ and tissue donation that the Government aims to introduce from spring 2020, known as ‘opt-out' or ‘deemed consent’, mean that all adults over 18 will be considered potential organ and tissue donors after death, unless they make a decision that they do not want to be a donor, they have nominated a representative to make a decision on their behalf after death, or are in an excluded group.

A decision either to donate or to not donate organs and tissues can be made by recording a decision on the Organ Donor Register, or in other ways, both written and verbal, including telling your family.

Under the new arrangements, the family of the deceased will continue to be consulted and they will still be able to provide information about their loved one's wishes. If they have information that their loved one would not have wanted to donate their organs, organ donation will not go ahead.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support her Department is providing to British nationals in Afghanistan in need of urgent medical treatment.

Since 28 August 2021 the British Embassy in Kabul has suspended in-country operations. FCDO Travel Advice for Afghanistan states that only very limited medical facilities are available in Afghanistan and makes clear that consular assistance can only be provided remotely and is extremely limited. British nationals in Afghanistan can continue to access 24 hour consular assistance by phone. We can provide in-person consular assistance in neighbouring countries.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to engage with the Rohingya community as part of the UK’s relations with the Government of Myanmar.

The UK is committed to ensuring that the voices of Rohingya people are at the heart of our policy making. We have worked to keep the Rohingya crisis on the international agenda, at both the UN Security Council and the UN Human Rights Council.

The UK funded Rohingya refugees to attend the International Court of Justice in December 2019 to provide testimony of their experiences. Rohingya leaders have met regularly with FCDO Ministers over the last few years, both in person and virtually. The Minister responsible for South Asia, Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, visited the refugee camps in Cox's Bazar in late 2021, where he spent the day meeting Rohingya refugees and listening to their experiences. My officials have a strong relationship with the Rohingya community based in Bradford, last visiting in October 2019, shortly before the pandemic.

Amanda Milling
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the safe return of British nationals with health concerns who remain stranded abroad during the covid-19 pandemic.

Helping British travellers who need and want to return to the UK is one of the Government's highest priorities. Since the outbreak in Wuhan, we estimate that over 1.3 million people have returned to the UK via commercial routes - the majority supported by our work to keep vital routes open. We have brought home over 38,000 people on 186 special charter flights organised by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, from 57 countries and territories. Our first priority was to bring back those who are vulnerable, who clearly face the greatest risk. We sought to ensure that space was made available on flight for acutely vulnerable British nationals of who we were aware, and - where possible - prioritised passengers by vulnerability.

We believe the vast majority of British travellers seeking to return to the UK - who don't have commercial options - have now done so. Through our embassies, and a dedicated central team, we continue to support British nationals who need consular support and are working to ensure commercial routes are maintained. We are monitoring risks globally and continue to review how best to provide assistance where necessary. Our travel advice and social media pages are also regularly updated to ensure that those wishing to return are aware of further developments.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the number of British nationals who remain stranded abroad as a result of covid-19 travel restrictions and flight cancellations.

Helping British travellers who need and want to return to the UK is one of the Government's highest priorities. Since the outbreak in Wuhan, we estimate that over 1.3 million people have returned to the UK via commercial routes - the majority supported by our work to keep vital routes open. We have brought home over 38,000 people on 186 special charter flights organised by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, from 57 countries and territories. Our first priority was to bring back those who are vulnerable, who clearly face the greatest risk. We sought to ensure that space was made available on flight for acutely vulnerable British nationals of who we were aware, and - where possible - prioritised passengers by vulnerability.

We believe the vast majority of British travellers seeking to return to the UK - who don't have commercial options - have now done so. Through our embassies, and a dedicated central team, we continue to support British nationals who need consular support and are working to ensure commercial routes are maintained. We are monitoring risks globally and continue to review how best to provide assistance where necessary. Our travel advice and social media pages are also regularly updated to ensure that those wishing to return are aware of further developments.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many UK nationals have been detained in India under Coronavirus laws in that country.

We are aware that British Nationals have been detained across India for breaching coronavirus lockdown laws. One has since returned to the UK and we are in contact with all of the others. We have raised individual medical and welfare concerns with the Indian authorities. Following the conclusion of their legal cases, we will assist with their return to the UK.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the safe return of UK citizens in India who have been detained under coronavirus laws in that country.

We are aware that British Nationals have been detained across India for breaching coronavirus lockdown laws. One has since returned to the UK and we are in contact with all of the others. We have raised individual medical and welfare concerns with the Indian authorities. Following the conclusion of their legal cases, we will assist with their return to the UK.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many applications to the Customs Grant Scheme have been successful.

Since the first wave of the Customs Grant Scheme opened in December 2018 up to 1 June 2021, over 8,500 applications have been successful.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much funding his Department has allocated to businesses under the Customs Grant Scheme.

Since the first wave of the Customs Grant Scheme opened in December 2018 up to 1 June 2021, a total of £81 million has been made available to businesses through the scheme. To date, over £69 million has been paid in total across all waves of the grant.
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many applications his Department has received for the Customs Grant Scheme.

Since the first wave of the Customs Grant Scheme opened in December 2018 up to 1 June 2021, over 14,500 applications have been received.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Government plans to extend the Customs Grant Scheme.

The Customs Grant Scheme first opened in December 2018 and all funding made available through the latest round has now been applied for. There are currently no plans to extend the scheme further.

9th Mar 2021
What recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on the potential economic benefits of including a Bradford city centre stop on the proposed Northern Powerhouse Rail line.

The government will provide better rail connectivity between northern cities, and between London, the Midlands and the north. The Treasury is working closely with the Department for Transport and across government on the Integrated Rail Plan.

This will set out how best to scope, sequence and deliver Northern Powerhouse Rail and other major Network Rail programmes.

The government is committed to transport improvements in West Yorkshire, which has received over £300m in local transport funding. This includes funding to improve transport in Bradford.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions officials in his Department have had with officials in the Department for Transport on the integrated rail plan for the Midlands and the North.

The government is drawing up an Integrated Rail Plan for the Midlands and the north. The Department for Transport is working across government, including with HM Treasury, to look at how best to integrate, scope and deliver Northern Powerhouse Rail, HS2 Phase 2b, Midlands Rail Hub and other major Network Rail enhancement programmes more efficiently and to deliver benefits from investments more quickly.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan refugees have been housed in hotels in the Bradford district since August 2021.

There are currently over 12,000 evacuees from Afghanistan in bridging hotel accommodation nationally across the UK. We are proud this country has provided homes for more than 4000 evacuees in such a short space of time.

There is a huge effort underway to get families into settled homes so they can settle and rebuild their lives. We don’t want to see families remain in hotel accommodation for long periods. There is 1 hotel in Bradford with capacity for 100 residents. We do not give running commentaries on how many rooms in which hotels are occupied.

Data on relocation will be published as part of our quarterly release which can be found at this link: Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much has been recovered under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 by each police force in England and Wales in each year from 2010.

The Asset Recovery Statistical Bulletin is published annually and provides data on the total value of the proceeds of crime that have been recovered under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (POCA) by each individual police force in the jurisdictions of England and Wales, Northern Ireland and those with no reported jurisdiction.

Data is available for financial years 2015/16 to 2020/21 and can found in Tables 12a and 12b. In 2020/21 a total of £116.8m was recovered by police forces, including local and regional police forces from an overall total of £219m recovered by all POCA agencies.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding was received under the Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme by each police force in England and Wales in each year from 2010.

The Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme (ARIS) funds are allocated to agencies based on their relative contribution to the total value of delivered receipts into ARIS. Under ARIS, the total amount of funds available for allocation for police force agencies is determined by the total value of receipts received by the Home Office in the financial year and police force agencies will receive 50% of the amount they recover, following any deductions for costs associated with the asset recovery and ARIS Top Slice funding. The 50% allocation may be split across several agencies depending on the asset recovery type and the agencies involved.

We do not routinely publish data on how much funding in total police forces received under the ARIS on a yearly basis. However, in February 2015 there was a review of the ARIS which provides data on the ARIS allocations under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (POCA) by each individual police force in the jurisdictions of England and Wales, Northern Ireland and those with no reported jurisdiction. Data is available for the financial year 2013/14 and can be found in in the Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme Review in Annex A.

In 2014/15 we also created a ‘top slice’ to fund key national asset recovery capabilities and, in 2021/22, increased the investment from £7.5m to £13.9m.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers identifying as from a Black, Asian and Ethnic Minority background were employed by West Yorkshire Police on (a) 31 March 2010, (b) 31 March 2015 and (c) 31 March 2021.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, available here: Police workforce England and Wales statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Information on the total number of police officers by ethnicity and Police Force Area as at the 31st March each year, since 2007, can be found in the ethnicity open data tables published at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1005763/open-data-table-police-workforce-ethnicity-280721.ods

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers were employed by West Yorkshire Police on (a) 31 March 2010, (b) 31 March 2015 and (c) 31 March 2021.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, available here: Police workforce England and Wales statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Information on the total number of police officers by ethnicity and Police Force Area as at the 31st March each year, since 2007, can be found in the ethnicity open data tables published at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1005763/open-data-table-police-workforce-ethnicity-280721.ods

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people from Afghanistan have been granted Limited Leave to Remain (LLR) since 2001; and how many people with LLR from Afghanistan are in the UK.

The Home Office publishes data on grants of limited leave to remain (extensions) in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’ on GOV.UK:https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release.

Data on Afghan nationals granted an extension (Limited Leave to Remain (LLR)) from 2010 are published in table Exe_D01 of the managed migration detailed datasets. The published data on extensions exclude cases decided under asylum rules. Earlier extensions data can be found in the Control of Immigration: Statistics, United Kingdom publications. These were published in the form of a Command Paper until 2006 and as an online bulletin between 2007 and 2009. Please note that prior to 2006, Afghan nationals were included in the 'Remainder of Asia’ but not identified separately in the data.

Data on Asylum applications, initial decisions and resettlement are published in asylum table Asy_D01 in the Immigration Statistics release.

Information is not available on the number of people with LLR from Afghanistan that are in the UK.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 April 2021, Official Report, column 86WH, on the Government's policy on the inappropriate use by some employers of fire and rehire as a negotiation tactic, what steps their Department has taken to (a) investigate and (b) discourage the use of fire and rehire negotiation tactics by their Department's executive non-departmental public bodies; and what steps they have taken to communicate the Government's policy on those practices to those bodies.

The Government has been clear it expects employers to treat employees fairly and in the spirit of partnership, working with trade unions, where relevant, constructively. This applies to Home Office sponsored NDPBs as much as to any other employer.

Home Office sponsored NDPBs that employ civil servants must set their terms and conditions of employment in accordance with the rules of the Civil Service Management Code. Bodies covered by the Code are expected to communicate novel and contentious workforce proposals to the Cabinet Office as made clear by paragraph 4.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many places of worship in the (a) UK and (b) City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council area have applied for funding under the Places of Worship Protective Security Scheme since its introduction; and how much funding has been allocated under that scheme to places of worship in the (a) UK and (b) City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council area.

Data on Places of Worship is collated by geographic region.

In the first three years of the scheme (2016-2019), we received 431 applications across England and Wales. For the fourth year of the scheme (2019-2020), we received 531 applications, of which 377 met the minimum requirements for consideration. We have awarded approximately £3.4 million to places of worship across England and Wales.

Over the past four years we have received 124 applications from Yorkshire and Humber, and we have allocated £665,524 in funding to that region.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding each faith has applied for under the Places of Worship Protective Security Scheme since its introduction.

In the first three years of the scheme (2016-2019), £800,000 was available each year. In the fourth year (2019-2020) this was doubled to £1.6 million. All faiths, apart from the Jewish faith, are eligible to apply for funding under this scheme. The Jewish community has access to a separate funding scheme.

Over the last four years, we have allocated £1,643,732 to mosques, £869,858 to churches, £210,989 to temples, and £676,115 to gurdwaras.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding has been allocated to each faith under the Places of Worship Protective Security Scheme since the introduction of that scheme.

In the first three years of the scheme (2016-2019), £800,000 was available each year. In the fourth year (2019-2020) this was doubled to £1.6 million. All faiths, apart from the Jewish faith, are eligible to apply for funding under this scheme. The Jewish community has access to a separate funding scheme.

Over the last four years, we have allocated £1,643,732 to mosques, £869,858 to churches, £210,989 to temples, and £676,115 to gurdwaras.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken ensure stakeholder engagement with her Department's consultation entitled, Protecting places of worship consultation, issued on 15 March 2020.

The Home Office met with a number of stakeholders representing various faiths and organisations in order to shape and develop the consultation before launch. These included, but were not limited to, the Community Security Trust (CST), Tell MAMA, Church of England and City Sikhs, as well as interfaith organisations including Stregthening Faith Institutions.

In addition, the Home Office consulted with other government departments including the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and the Department of Education. Key stakeholders were also supplied with an early version of the consultation and the draft was reviewed based on their feedback.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 April 2021, Official Report, column 86WH, on the Government's policy on the inappropriate use by some employers of fire and rehire as a negotiation tactic, what steps their Department has taken to (a) investigate and (b) discourage the use of fire and rehire negotiation tactics by their Department's executive non-departmental public bodies; and what steps they have taken to communicate the Government's policy on those practices to those bodies.

The Government has been very clear that threatening fire and rehire as a negotiating tactic is completely unacceptable. MOD always expect employers to treat employees fairly and in the spirit of partnership working with trade unions, where relevant, constructively. The Department is confident that MOD’s non-departmental public bodies (NDPB) are aware of the Government’s position on this matter.

The Department works constructively with each of the NDPBs we have responsibility for, and this includes when it comes to workforce management matters, however each is ultimately responsible for the management of their staff.

The relationship between the MOD NDPBs and the department, is established through their Framework Documents. Managing Public Money sets out that each of the boards of the MOD NDPBs have a responsibility towards its staff for the recruitment, retention and motivation of its staff.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 April 2021, Official Report, column 86WH, on the Government's policy on the inappropriate use by some employers of fire and rehire as a negotiation tactic, what steps their Department has taken to (a) investigate and (b) discourage the use of fire and rehire negotiation tactics by their Department's executive non-departmental public bodies; and what steps they have taken to communicate the Government's policy on those practices to those bodies.

Non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs) are not part of the department and operate at arms-length from Ministers. We work constructively with our NDPBs and this includes issues of workforce management but it is ultimately the responsibility of each NDPB to manage their staff. Whilst we have not communicated on this issue with all our NDPBs, the Government has been very clear that threatening fire and rehire as a negotiating tactic is completely unacceptable. We always expect employers to treat employees fairly and in the spirit of partnership working with trade unions, where relevant, constructively. We are confident that all non-departmental public bodies are aware of the Government’s position on this matter.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 April 2021, Official Report, column 86WH, on the Government's policy on the inappropriate use by some employers of fire and rehire as a negotiation tactic, what steps their Department has taken to (a) investigate and (b) discourage the use of fire and rehire negotiation tactics by their Department's executive non-departmental public bodies; and what steps they have taken to communicate the Government's policy on those practices to those bodies.

The use of ‘fire and rehire negotiation tactics’ is not an approach that my Department deploys.

The Government has been very clear that threatening fire and rehire as a negotiating tactic is completely unacceptable. We always expect employers to treat employees fairly and in the spirit of partnership working with trade unions, where relevant, constructively. We are confident that all non-departmental public bodies are aware of the Government’s position on this matter.

We work constructively with each non-departmental public body we have responsibility for and this includes when it comes to workforce management matters, however each is ultimately responsible for the management of their staff.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to his Answer of 6 July 2020 to Question 66877, what the completion rate was of diversity monitoring forms attached to employment tribunal claims forms in each year from 2010.

The information requested was not collated centrally prior to September 2018. The table below displays the information relating to the volume of online claims submitted from September 2018 to March 2020.

Date Range

Number of online Employment Tribunal claims submitted

Number of ethnic monitoring questionnaires completed

% of ethnic monitoring questionnaires per claim submitted

05/09/2018 31/03/2019

26066

821

3

01/04/2019 31/03/2020

52096

1574

3

Total

78162

2395

3

  • The above data was generated from information stored on the online application system.
  • It is not used for internal or external purposes; therefore, the details are subject to inaccuracies, it is however the only/best data available
  • Completion of the diversity questionnaire is not mandatory.
  • We cannot provide information from 1 April 2020, as that information forms a subset of Employment Tribunal data that is part of Ministry of Justice’s (MoJ) Official Statistics output, which will be published later in 2020 (statistics relating to April to June 2020 is due for publication in September 2020).
Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 6 July 2020 to Question 66875, if his Department will publish all correspondence between his Department and the Law Commission relating to tribunal fees from 26 July 2017.

The Ministry of Justice holds regular discussions with many organisations, including the Law Commission, about various policy areas. We do not routinely publish internal discussions between Government and other organisations, such as the Law Commission.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions his Department has had with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the reintroduction of employment tribunal fees.

The Ministry of Justice has frequent discussions with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on many aspects of Employment Tribunals. There have been no decisions regarding the re-introduction of fees in the Employment Tribunal. The Government is committed to the effective enforcement of employment rights. Should we bring forward any formal proposals relating to the re-introduction of fees in the Employment Tribunal, they would be subject to a full public consultation.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people in each category of ethnicity have brought employment tribunal claims in each year since 2010.

A diversity monitoring form is attached to the employment tribunal claim form ET1 but the completion of this form is optional. The completion rate is far below the usual 60% threshold used for diversity reporting. Representation rates based on return rates below 60% are not considered statistically valid because they are unlikely to provide a representative picture of all claimants.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions his Department has had with the Law Commission on the reintroduction of employment tribunal fees.

The Ministry of Justice hold regular discussions with many organisations, including the Law Commission, about various policy areas. There have been no decisions regarding the re-introduction of fees in the Employment Tribunal. The Government is committed to the effective enforcement of employment rights. Should we bring forward any formal proposals relating to the re-introduction of fees in the Employment Tribunal, they would be subject to a full public consultation.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many expressions of interest he has received to operate innovation partner contracts under the new planned probation model.

We are planning to implement the new model for probation services by June 2021. The competition for Probation Delivery Partner contracts is well underway and we have received sufficient bids for a viable and healthy competition. The total potential Probation Delivery Partner contract value, as published in the Official Journal of the European Union, is £1.26 billion over 8 years. We will launch the competition for providers for the Dynamic Framework competition in the coming months.

All staff that transfer to the National Probation Service will become civil servants upon transfer. It is our intention to harmonise terms and conditions for this group on transfer as this is a key enabler of the forthcoming changes. However, this is subject to ongoing negotiations with Trade Unions.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timescale is for the full implementation of the new planned probation model.

We are planning to implement the new model for probation services by June 2021. The competition for Probation Delivery Partner contracts is well underway and we have received sufficient bids for a viable and healthy competition. The total potential Probation Delivery Partner contract value, as published in the Official Journal of the European Union, is £1.26 billion over 8 years. We will launch the competition for providers for the Dynamic Framework competition in the coming months.

All staff that transfer to the National Probation Service will become civil servants upon transfer. It is our intention to harmonise terms and conditions for this group on transfer as this is a key enabler of the forthcoming changes. However, this is subject to ongoing negotiations with Trade Unions.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether all staff employed by community rehabilitation companies will be employed on the same terms as National Probation Service staff following the transition to the new planned probation model.

We are planning to implement the new model for probation services by June 2021. The competition for Probation Delivery Partner contracts is well underway and we have received sufficient bids for a viable and healthy competition. The total potential Probation Delivery Partner contract value, as published in the Official Journal of the European Union, is £1.26 billion over 8 years. We will launch the competition for providers for the Dynamic Framework competition in the coming months.

All staff that transfer to the National Probation Service will become civil servants upon transfer. It is our intention to harmonise terms and conditions for this group on transfer as this is a key enabler of the forthcoming changes. However, this is subject to ongoing negotiations with Trade Unions.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the value of all Innovation Partner contracts under the new planned probation model.

We are planning to implement the new model for probation services by June 2021. The competition for Probation Delivery Partner contracts is well underway and we have received sufficient bids for a viable and healthy competition. The total potential Probation Delivery Partner contract value, as published in the Official Journal of the European Union, is £1.26 billion over 8 years. We will launch the competition for providers for the Dynamic Framework competition in the coming months.

All staff that transfer to the National Probation Service will become civil servants upon transfer. It is our intention to harmonise terms and conditions for this group on transfer as this is a key enabler of the forthcoming changes. However, this is subject to ongoing negotiations with Trade Unions.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many band three to five prison officers had (a) less than three years' experience and (b) three or more years’ service at each high-security institution in each year from 2010.

The number of band 3 to 5 prison officers in each high-security and long-term prison, with less than three years' experience and three or more years’ service, in each year from 2010 are given in the attached table.

The huge number of officers we’ve recently recruited inevitably means there are more staff – and more leavers - with under one year’s experience. But we are working hard to retain experienced staff, including by giving them the biggest pay award in a decade last year and the tools they need to do their job safely including PAVA spray and rigid bar handcuffs.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to exclude private companies holding community rehabilitation company contracts from taking additional contracts under the new planned probation model.

No organisations have been barred from the competition. The Public Procurement Regulations 2015 contain discretionary grounds for disqualifying a supplier, including where there are “significant or persistent deficiencies" in the performance of a substantive requirement under a prior public contract, which led to early termination of the prior contract in question, or to damages or other comparable sanctions.

The criteria for exclusion have not been met – no Community Rehabilitation Company contracts have been terminated for poor performance, and nor has there been cause to claim damages.

Rules on taking account of suppliers’ past performances can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/procurement-policy-note-0415-taking-account-of-suppliers-past-performance

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people are serving custodial sentences for each category of terror offence in each prison; and what the length of sentence is for each person.

Data detailing the number of people convicted under the Terrorism Act serving custodial sentences is available at Gov.uk. The website contains a detailed breakdown of information about the number of offenders by offence and by sentence length. You can access this information here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000-quarterly-update-to-september-2019

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what criteria he plans to use to assess bids for Innovation Partner contracts under the new planned probation model.

We are taking assessment criteria to mean evaluation criteria for the purposes of this response.

The Probation Delivery Partner (formerly Innovation Partner) contracts will be evaluated on both quality and price. Tenders will be evaluated on the basis of the evaluation price divided by the quality score to obtain the Price Per Quality Point score (with the lowest score being awarded a Lot subject to restrictions on available market share and minimum capital requirements).

The quality evaluation criteria are: Service Delivery (weighting 61%); Service Enablers (23%); Social Value (6%); Mobilisation & Transition (10%) and Legal, Commercial and Financial (Pass/Fail).

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to publish signed Innovation Partner contracts under the new planned probation model.

The Probation Delivery Partner (formerly Innovation Partner) contracts will be published on the contracts finder website as required upon signature, subject to redaction of commercially sensitive content and personal information where applicable.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the proportion of services commissioned under the dynamic framework of the new planned probation model which will be provided by voluntary sector organisations.

All probation services to be commissioned under the Dynamic Framework will be competed and awarded to the preferred bidder based on their price and quality scores. These will be awarded under fair and open competition and will not be directly awarded to framework members. We have not made any commitments as to what proportion of services will be provided by the voluntary sector. However, we have sought to design the Dynamic Framework in such a way as to reduce barriers to entry for voluntary sector organisations in order to encourage involvement of the sector in future delivery where possible.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department will have the power without breaching contracts to remove poorly performing innovation partners under the new planned probation model.

The draft Probation Delivery Partner contracts are based on the Model Services Contract (a set of model terms and conditions for major services contracts produced by the Crown Commercial Service and the Government Legal Service) and will allow us to terminate (either partly or in full) contracts which are underperforming. We also have a range of levers to rectify and improve performance.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many children and young people in HM Young Offenders Institutes (a) Werrington, (b) Wetherby, (c) Swinfen Hall, (d) Feltham, (e) Cookham Wood and (f) Aylesbury have accumulated (i) 1-24, (ii) 25-49, (iii) 50-74, (iv) 75-99, (v) 100-149 and (vi) 150 or more additional days of imprisonment as punishment since their arrival.

Discipline procedures are central to the maintenance of a safe, decent and rehabilitative custodial environment. They require adjudications to be conducted lawfully, fairly and justly. All prisoners have a full opportunity to hear what is alleged against them and to present their case. Children and young people in custody are some of the most vulnerable people in society and their safety and welfare is our highest priority. But there are occasions when their behaviour is so challenging and violent that it is necessary to instigate disciplinary procedures. Young or vulnerable prisoners, who may lack experience of adjudications, are encouraged to request help from an advocate.

Only Independent Adjudicators, who are District Judges or Deputy District Judges, can, in cases deemed to be sufficiently serious, make an award of additional days. The adjudicators will follow the punishment guidelines issued by the Chief Magistrate. These are rightly, independent of the Ministry of Justice and a matter for the Chief Magistrate.

The information requested can be found in the tables attached.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 April 2021, Official Report, column 86WH, on the Government's policy on the inappropriate use by some employers of fire and rehire as a negotiation tactic, what steps their Department has taken to (a) investigate and (b) discourage the use of fire and rehire negotiation tactics by their Department's executive non-departmental public bodies; and what steps they have taken to communicate the Government's policy on those practices to those bodies.

My Department has a number of small NDPBs who are mostly resourced by Civil Servants on secondment from the Northern Ireland Civil Service (NICS) and follow NICS policies and guidelines. There has not been any inappropriate use of “fire and rehire” as secondment arrangements are regularly reviewed and staff return to their NICS department at the end of their secondments. The Northern Ireland Office is not the employer and is therefore not in a position to “fire and rehire” as part of any negotiations. For the very small number of instances where NDPBs are not resourced by NICS staff, the employees are not employed as civil servants but the NDPB follows NICS terms and conditions.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)