Imran Hussain Portrait

Imran Hussain

Labour - Bradford East

First elected: 7th May 2015


Shadow Minister (Levelling Up, Housing, Communities and Local Government)
5th Sep 2023 - 7th Nov 2023
Shadow Minister (Future of Work)
4th Dec 2021 - 5th Sep 2023
Carer’s Leave Bill
2nd Nov 2022 - 9th Nov 2022
Protection from Redundancy (Pregnancy and Family Leave) Bill
26th Oct 2022 - 2nd Nov 2022
Shadow Minister (Employment Rights and Protections)
10th Apr 2020 - 4th Dec 2021
Consolidation Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Mar 2020 - 6th Jul 2020
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Mar 2020 - 6th Jul 2020
Shadow Minister (Justice)
3rd Jul 2017 - 10th Apr 2020
Consolidation Bills (Joint Committee)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow Minister (International Development)
14th Jan 2016 - 3rd Jul 2017
Consolidation Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Nov 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Regulatory Reform
12th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Consolidation, &c., Bills (Joint Committee)
9th Nov 2015 - 3rd May 2017


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 150 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 179 Noes - 294
Speeches
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Oral Answers to Questions
I have recently been inundated with correspondence following the collapse of SSB Law, a legal firm that took thousands of …
Written Answers
Tuesday 20th February 2024
Israel and Occupied Territories: Arms Trade
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what information his Department holds on whether UK-manufactured (a) …
Early Day Motions
Friday 23rd February 2024
Administration of SSB Law
That this House notes with concern the collapse of SSB Law that has left hundreds across the country facing demands …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 12th June 2023
4. Visits outside the UK
Name of donor: National Assembly of Pakistan
Address of donor: Parliament House, Islamabad, Pakistan
Estimate of the probable value (or …
EDM signed
Wednesday 7th February 2024
International Court of Justice Ruling on Gaza and the UK’s duties under the Genocide Convention
That this House notes the ruling of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on 26 January 2024, which found that …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Imran Hussain has voted in 718 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Imran Hussain Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(13 debate interactions)
Andrew Mitchell (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
(12 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(25 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(25 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Imran Hussain's debates

Bradford East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the UK to be neutral in the conflict between Israel and Palestine, and withdraw offers of support for Israel.

We want the Government to seek a ceasefire and also seek to address the root cause of the current conflict by promoting dialogue and advocating for the end of Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

The UK Government should urge the Israeli Government to stop the blockade of Food, Fuel and Electricity to the already impoverished city of Gaza

We demand the Government restore England’s publicly funded, publicly provided NHS by reversing all privatising legislation, ending ongoing PFI contracts, and scrapping plans for Integrated Care Systems and for-profit US-style ‘managed care’.


Latest EDMs signed by Imran Hussain

23rd February 2024
Imran Hussain signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Friday 23rd February 2024

Administration of SSB Law

Tabled by: Imran Hussain (Labour - Bradford East)
That this House notes with concern the collapse of SSB Law that has left hundreds across the country facing demands for payment stretching into thousands of pounds; stresses that a number of those affected by SSB Law’s collapse cannot meet the large demands for payment and will face significant consequences, …
18 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 14
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
23rd February 2024
Imran Hussain signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Friday 23rd February 2024

Defective cavity wall insulation

Tabled by: Imran Hussain (Labour - Bradford East)
That this House expresses serious concern about widespread reports of defective installation of cavity wall insulation leading to mould, damp and structural damage to homes which leads to those affected taking legal action for damages caused; reaffirms that properly installed cavity wall insulation remains one of the best ways to …
23 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 15
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
View All Imran Hussain's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Imran Hussain, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Imran Hussain has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Imran Hussain

Wednesday 23rd March 2022

Imran Hussain has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Imran Hussain has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


364 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
16 Other Department Questions
17th May 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

Although ethnicity pay gap reporting is voluntary, we are currently considering the best way to approach ethnicity pay gap reporting in the Civil Service. The Equality Hub is a business unit of the Cabinet Office and the pay data of their staff will be incorporated into any wider Cabinet Office figures, as is the case for gender pay gap reporting.

We are working with Civil Service HR colleagues and other government departments to work through the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023.

In line with gender pay gap reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used in departments to produce the data.

The outcomes of this development work will inform whether we are able to publish a report for 2023/2024.

More generally the Civil Service is undertaking extensive work both centrally and within departments to promote diversity across its workplaces, including ethnicity.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of grass roots boxing clubs on the (a) physical and (b) mental wellbeing of participants in the sport.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key government priority. We recognise the positive impact participating in sport can have on individuals’ wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

The government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and that participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

The majority of funding to grassroots sports projects is delivered through our Arm’s Length Body, Sport England. Work is currently underway with Sport England to better evidence the impact of the projects they fund.

Since 2019, Sport England has invested more than £11 million into projects and schemes in boxing, including £55,000 of support to boxing clubs in the Bradford East constituency. Clubs can contact Sport England directly to understand what funding pots they are eligible for at https://www.sportengland.org/contact-us.

We appreciate the impact rising energy prices are having on organisations of all sizes including sport clubs such as boxing gyms. That is why we announced the £18 billion Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) in September last year. The EBRS was always time-limited, and has now been replaced with the Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS). Under the EBDS, boxing clubs will continue to receive discounts on their gas and electricity bills during the 12-month period from April 2023 to March 2024.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent assessment she has made of the financial viability of grass roots boxing clubs.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key government priority. We recognise the positive impact participating in sport can have on individuals’ wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

The government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and that participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

The majority of funding to grassroots sports projects is delivered through our Arm’s Length Body, Sport England. Work is currently underway with Sport England to better evidence the impact of the projects they fund.

Since 2019, Sport England has invested more than £11 million into projects and schemes in boxing, including £55,000 of support to boxing clubs in the Bradford East constituency. Clubs can contact Sport England directly to understand what funding pots they are eligible for at https://www.sportengland.org/contact-us.

We appreciate the impact rising energy prices are having on organisations of all sizes including sport clubs such as boxing gyms. That is why we announced the £18 billion Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) in September last year. The EBRS was always time-limited, and has now been replaced with the Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS). Under the EBDS, boxing clubs will continue to receive discounts on their gas and electricity bills during the 12-month period from April 2023 to March 2024.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to make available any additional support to grass roots boxing clubs in response to increases in energy costs.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key government priority. We recognise the positive impact participating in sport can have on individuals’ wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

The government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and that participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

The majority of funding to grassroots sports projects is delivered through our Arm’s Length Body, Sport England. Work is currently underway with Sport England to better evidence the impact of the projects they fund.

Since 2019, Sport England has invested more than £11 million into projects and schemes in boxing, including £55,000 of support to boxing clubs in the Bradford East constituency. Clubs can contact Sport England directly to understand what funding pots they are eligible for at https://www.sportengland.org/contact-us.

We appreciate the impact rising energy prices are having on organisations of all sizes including sport clubs such as boxing gyms. That is why we announced the £18 billion Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) in September last year. The EBRS was always time-limited, and has now been replaced with the Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS). Under the EBDS, boxing clubs will continue to receive discounts on their gas and electricity bills during the 12-month period from April 2023 to March 2024.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to require that unlicensed white collar boxing events comply with the minimum (a) criteria, (b) standards and (c) requirements set by the national governing bodies for boxing.

The safety, wellbeing and welfare of everyone taking part in sport is absolutely paramount. There will always be risks associated with participating in contact sport, but it is important that robust measures are in place to reduce the risk of major injuries and health issues.

It is the responsibility of individual boxing event organisers to ensure that they protect the safety and wellbeing of their participants.

We urge all boxing event organisers to work with the sport’s governing bodies to ensure that robust competition standards are in place to protect the safety of those who take part.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to take steps to improve the safety of white collar boxing events.

The safety, wellbeing and welfare of everyone taking part in sport is absolutely paramount. There will always be risks associated with participating in contact sport, but it is important that robust measures are in place to reduce the risk of major injuries and health issues.

It is the responsibility of individual boxing event organisers to ensure that they protect the safety and wellbeing of their participants.

We urge all boxing event organisers to work with the sport’s governing bodies to ensure that robust competition standards are in place to protect the safety of those who take part.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will take steps to support grass roots boxing clubs with increases in their running costs over the next 12 months.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key government priority. We recognise the positive impact participating in sport can have on individuals’ wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

The government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and that participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

The majority of funding to grassroots sports projects is delivered through our Arm’s Length Body, Sport England. Work is currently underway with Sport England to better evidence the impact of the projects they fund.

Since 2019, Sport England has invested more than £11 million into projects and schemes in boxing, including £55,000 of support to boxing clubs in the Bradford East constituency. Clubs can contact Sport England directly to understand what funding pots they are eligible for at https://www.sportengland.org/contact-us.

We appreciate the impact rising energy prices are having on organisations of all sizes including sport clubs such as boxing gyms. That is why we announced the £18 billion Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) in September last year. The EBRS was always time-limited, and has now been replaced with the Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS). Under the EBDS, boxing clubs will continue to receive discounts on their gas and electricity bills during the 12-month period from April 2023 to March 2024.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she plans to undertake qualitative research on the potential impact of community boxing clubs on (a) local communities and (b) wider society.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key government priority. We recognise the positive impact participating in sport can have on individuals’ wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

The government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and that participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

The majority of funding to grassroots sports projects is delivered through our Arm’s Length Body, Sport England. Work is currently underway with Sport England to better evidence the impact of the projects they fund.

Since 2019, Sport England has invested more than £11 million into projects and schemes in boxing, including £55,000 of support to boxing clubs in the Bradford East constituency. Clubs can contact Sport England directly to understand what funding pots they are eligible for at https://www.sportengland.org/contact-us.

We appreciate the impact rising energy prices are having on organisations of all sizes including sport clubs such as boxing gyms. That is why we announced the £18 billion Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) in September last year. The EBRS was always time-limited, and has now been replaced with the Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS). Under the EBDS, boxing clubs will continue to receive discounts on their gas and electricity bills during the 12-month period from April 2023 to March 2024.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether her Department has made an assessment of the impact of grassroots boxing clubs on local communities.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key government priority. We recognise the positive impact participating in sport can have on individuals’ wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

The government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and that participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

The majority of funding to grassroots sports projects is delivered through our Arm’s Length Body, Sport England. Work is currently underway with Sport England to better evidence the impact of the projects they fund.

Since 2019, Sport England has invested more than £11 million into projects and schemes in boxing, including £55,000 of support to boxing clubs in the Bradford East constituency. Clubs can contact Sport England directly to understand what funding pots they are eligible for at https://www.sportengland.org/contact-us.

We appreciate the impact rising energy prices are having on organisations of all sizes including sport clubs such as boxing gyms. That is why we announced the £18 billion Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) in September last year. The EBRS was always time-limited, and has now been replaced with the Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS). Under the EBDS, boxing clubs will continue to receive discounts on their gas and electricity bills during the 12-month period from April 2023 to March 2024.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what financial support is available to community boxing clubs in England.

Supporting grassroots sport is a key government priority. We recognise the positive impact participating in sport can have on individuals’ wellbeing and the benefits sport clubs have on local communities.

The government believes that sport has the potential to transform lives and that participating in sports such as boxing can teach valuable life lessons, and we believe everyone should have access to these opportunities.

The majority of funding to grassroots sports projects is delivered through our Arm’s Length Body, Sport England. Work is currently underway with Sport England to better evidence the impact of the projects they fund.

Since 2019, Sport England has invested more than £11 million into projects and schemes in boxing, including £55,000 of support to boxing clubs in the Bradford East constituency. Clubs can contact Sport England directly to understand what funding pots they are eligible for at https://www.sportengland.org/contact-us.

We appreciate the impact rising energy prices are having on organisations of all sizes including sport clubs such as boxing gyms. That is why we announced the £18 billion Energy Bill Relief Scheme (EBRS) in September last year. The EBRS was always time-limited, and has now been replaced with the Energy Bills Discount Scheme (EBDS). Under the EBDS, boxing clubs will continue to receive discounts on their gas and electricity bills during the 12-month period from April 2023 to March 2024.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what assessment her Department has made of the impact of gender pay gap reporting by larger companies on gender pay discrepancies since that measure was introduced in 2017.

This Government is committed to the empowerment of women in the workplace. Over the last decade our work has seen the gender pay gap fall considerably with the reporting regulations helping to motivate employers to improve equality in the workplace and strong growth in the number of women in full-time work.

To drive forward this progress we have recently announced a groundbreaking pay transparency pilot, a new STEM returners programme and a Taskforce on Women-Led High-Growth Enterprises.

We are required to carry out a review of the regulations after they’ve been in force for five years; as is the case for many other business regulations. This is being prepared and will fully consider all of the available evidence to assess whether the regulations are achieving their intended impact. It will be published in due course.


14th Jun 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to the Answer of 23 May 2022 to Question 3616 on Vacancies: advertising, for what reason a lack of clarity in pay processes can be a barrier to employers listing salary information on all job adverts.

In March the Equality Hub called on employers to include salary information in all job adverts and stop asking about previous salary during recruitment as part of a new drive on pay transparency. We additionally announced a pilot study to build the evidence on the impact of taking these steps. In order to ensure the results from the pilot are robust, we will be running it as a controlled trial; with specific employers recruited to take part, once the details of the trial have been decided.

The pay setting processes of employers vary widely, and are likely to have changed over the lifetime of the organisations. Many are unlikely to have established a fair and robust pay and reward process from the outset, or performed a job evaluation study. This in turn produces the conditions where unintentional pay disparities may open up. For this reason, for many organisations, moving immediately to a system of full pay transparency is likely to require a period of adjustment. That is why we also announced that we will work with employers to develop a methodology to support them to adopt these measures.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
14th Jun 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to the Answer of 23 May 2022 to Question 3616 on Vacancies: advertising, for what reason historic pay decisions can be a barrier to employers listing salary information on all job adverts.

In March the Equality Hub called on employers to include salary information in all job adverts and stop asking about previous salary during recruitment as part of a new drive on pay transparency. We additionally announced a pilot study to build the evidence on the impact of taking these steps. In order to ensure the results from the pilot are robust, we will be running it as a controlled trial; with specific employers recruited to take part, once the details of the trial have been decided.

The pay setting processes of employers vary widely, and are likely to have changed over the lifetime of the organisations. Many are unlikely to have established a fair and robust pay and reward process from the outset, or performed a job evaluation study. This in turn produces the conditions where unintentional pay disparities may open up. For this reason, for many organisations, moving immediately to a system of full pay transparency is likely to require a period of adjustment. That is why we also announced that we will work with employers to develop a methodology to support them to adopt these measures.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
14th Jun 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to the Answer of 23 May 2022 to Question 3616 on Vacancies: advertising, which employers have been approached to participate in the planned pilot schemes to list salary details on job adverts.

In March the Equality Hub called on employers to include salary information in all job adverts and stop asking about previous salary during recruitment as part of a new drive on pay transparency. We additionally announced a pilot study to build the evidence on the impact of taking these steps. In order to ensure the results from the pilot are robust, we will be running it as a controlled trial; with specific employers recruited to take part, once the details of the trial have been decided.

The pay setting processes of employers vary widely, and are likely to have changed over the lifetime of the organisations. Many are unlikely to have established a fair and robust pay and reward process from the outset, or performed a job evaluation study. This in turn produces the conditions where unintentional pay disparities may open up. For this reason, for many organisations, moving immediately to a system of full pay transparency is likely to require a period of adjustment. That is why we also announced that we will work with employers to develop a methodology to support them to adopt these measures.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
17th May 2022
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether her Department plans to impose a legal duty on employers to list the minimum salary on job advertisements.

On International Women’s Day this year, we called on all employers to provide salary information in all of their job adverts, and to stop asking about previous salary during recruitment.

We recognise that some employers may find it challenging to take these steps, due to historic pay decisions and lack of clarity in pay processes. That is why we also announced that we will work with employers to develop and pilot a methodology to support them to adopt these measures.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
17th May 2023
To ask the Attorney General, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

The Government Legal Department [GLD] is currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting in the Civil Service and is working with Civil Service HR colleagues and other government departments through the details of the reporting guidance published on 17 April 2023.

The Civil Service is looking to develop Ethnicity Pay Gap Reporting in line with current Gender Pay Gap Reporting. The outcomes of this development work will inform whether we are able to publish a report for 2023/2024.

Michael Tomlinson
Minister of State (Minister for Illegal Migration)
17th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish an ethnicity pay gap report for the Prime Minister’s Office for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published by the Department for Business and Trade on 17 April 2023.

The Prime Minister's Office is part of the Cabinet Office for management and staffing purposes.

Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting is voluntary. The Cabinet Office is working with other government departments to consider the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance published in April. More generally the Civil Service is undertaking extensive work both centrally and within departments to promote diversity across its workplaces, including ethnicity.

17th May 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting is voluntary. The Cabinet Office is working with other government departments to consider the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance published in April. More generally the Civil Service is undertaking extensive work both centrally and within departments to promote diversity across its workplaces, including ethnicity.

2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to publish the report of the Future of Work Review.

On 12 May 2022, the former Prime Minister, the Rt Hon Boris Johnson MP, asked Matt Warman MP to lead a review into how the government can best support a thriving future UK labour market. Matt Warman MP’s response was published on GOV.UK on 1 September 2022. This response is available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/future-of-work-review-matt-warman-mp-response

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
5th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many indirectly employed by the Government who are based outside London are paid less than £9.90 per hour.

As at 31 March 2021 there were an estimated 1,440 civil servants based in London earning less than £11.05 an hour.

As at 31 March 2021 there were an estimated 29,100 civil servants based outside London (including overseas) earning less than £9.90 an hour.

Pay for civil servants below the senior civil service is delegated to individual departments to determine. In April 2022, the National Living Wage increased to £9.50 an hour, however at the reference point for these figures (31st March 2021) it was £8.72 an hour.

The Government has committed that the National Living Wage will reach 66% of median UK earnings by 2024. Departments must ensure that they apply the legislative increase to the National Living Wage and National Minimum Wage.

These figures are estimates based on full-time equivalent gross salary earnings, working hours, and location information collected as part of the Annual Civil Service Employment Survey as at 31st March 2021. A small proportion of civil servants do not have a reported location or salary in this centrally held data, and have not been included in these figures. Information on earnings of the broader public sector and all those indirectly employed by the Government is not held centrally.

These estimates may differ from those calculated by aggregating figures directly requested from individual departments.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people directly employed by the Government who are based outside London are paid less than £9.90 per hour.

As at 31 March 2021 there were an estimated 1,440 civil servants based in London earning less than £11.05 an hour.

As at 31 March 2021 there were an estimated 29,100 civil servants based outside London (including overseas) earning less than £9.90 an hour.

Pay for civil servants below the senior civil service is delegated to individual departments to determine. In April 2022, the National Living Wage increased to £9.50 an hour, however at the reference point for these figures (31st March 2021) it was £8.72 an hour.

The Government has committed that the National Living Wage will reach 66% of median UK earnings by 2024. Departments must ensure that they apply the legislative increase to the National Living Wage and National Minimum Wage.

These figures are estimates based on full-time equivalent gross salary earnings, working hours, and location information collected as part of the Annual Civil Service Employment Survey as at 31st March 2021. A small proportion of civil servants do not have a reported location or salary in this centrally held data, and have not been included in these figures. Information on earnings of the broader public sector and all those indirectly employed by the Government is not held centrally.

These estimates may differ from those calculated by aggregating figures directly requested from individual departments.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people directly employed by the Government who are based in London are paid less than £11.05 per hour.

As at 31 March 2021 there were an estimated 1,440 civil servants based in London earning less than £11.05 an hour.

As at 31 March 2021 there were an estimated 29,100 civil servants based outside London (including overseas) earning less than £9.90 an hour.

Pay for civil servants below the senior civil service is delegated to individual departments to determine. In April 2022, the National Living Wage increased to £9.50 an hour, however at the reference point for these figures (31st March 2021) it was £8.72 an hour.

The Government has committed that the National Living Wage will reach 66% of median UK earnings by 2024. Departments must ensure that they apply the legislative increase to the National Living Wage and National Minimum Wage.

These figures are estimates based on full-time equivalent gross salary earnings, working hours, and location information collected as part of the Annual Civil Service Employment Survey as at 31st March 2021. A small proportion of civil servants do not have a reported location or salary in this centrally held data, and have not been included in these figures. Information on earnings of the broader public sector and all those indirectly employed by the Government is not held centrally.

These estimates may differ from those calculated by aggregating figures directly requested from individual departments.

21st Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants employed at Grade 7, or equivalent, and above in each Department identify as BAME.

The Declaration on Government Reform commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Future Leaders Scheme for our Grade 6/7s and Senior Leaders Scheme which is targeted on our SCS Pay Band 1.

The latest data on the Civil Service workforce is published in Civil Service Statistics 2021. This publication includes a breakdown by grade and department. The proportion of ethnic minority civil servants has risen from 9.2% in 2011 to 14.3% in 2021 (up from 13.2% in 2020). This exceeds 13.6%, the proportion of the UK’s economically active population who are from an ethnic minority.

The positive increase in representation has been a steady incremental change over the last four years, underpinned by a programme of work including:

  • a bespoke career progression offer for the G6/7 talent pipeline, including SCS application support, mentoring and sponsorship,

  • greater promotion of internal talent schemes such as the Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme, supporting events organised by participants, and

  • accelerating work on the external SCS talent pool - by creating a Task and Finish group to oversee development of the pool and improve representation of disabled and ethnic minority senior leaders.

Representation is increasing and, whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity, as outlined in the Declaration on Government Reform across our workforce and, in particular, at our most senior grades. To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS.

14th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether it is in the scope of the Taskforce on Innovation, Growth and Regulatory Reform to consider or recommend changes to the Employment Tribunal system.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ174869 on 13 April 2021.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
7th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 6 September 2023 to Question 196273 on Fireworks: Licensing, if she will publish a list of the (a) organisations and (b) stakeholders her Department has met with to (i) listen to and (ii) understand their views on inconsiderate use of fireworks between 2019 and 2023.

The Government engages with a wide range of stakeholders in relation to product safety, both in person but also through regular correspondence. We do not hold a full list of organisations and stakeholders that have been met where fireworks have been discussed. However, our engagement includes, but is not exclusive to, trade associations, animal welfare organisations, the industry, members of the public, parliamentarians and other government departments.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing legislation to (a) reduce the noise levels of all categories of fireworks, (b) ban the sale of category 3 and 4 fireworks and (c) introduce licences for selling fireworks.

The Government endorses the considerate use of fireworks and believes that the existing regulatory framework strikes the right balance between allowing individuals to enjoy fireworks while reducing the risks and disturbances to individuals, animals and property. The majority of individuals who use fireworks do so in a responsible and safe manner and there are enforcement mechanisms in place to tackle situations when fireworks are misused.

The Department has no plans to i) reduce the maximum permitted noise level of fireworks for public sale, ii) ban the sale of category 3 and 4 fireworks or iii) amend the existing licensing scheme for selling fireworks but the Government continues to monitor the situation and engage with stakeholders to listen to and understand their views.

Kevin Hollinrake
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether her Department plans to publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

  • We are currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting in the Civil Service.
  • Ethnicity Pay Gap Reporting is voluntary.
  • In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used in departments to produce the data.
  • The outcomes of this development work will inform whether the Department for Business and Trade (DBT) is able to publish a report for 2023/2024.
  • More generally the Civil Service is undertaking extensive work both centrally and within DBT to promote diversity across its workplaces, including ethnicity.
Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

The Government is currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting in the Civil Service. The Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to produce this data. The Government is working with Civil Service HR to work through the detail of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance which was published on 17 April 2023

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

We are currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting in the Civil Service. The Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used in departments to produce the data.

We are working with Civil Service HR to work through the detail so the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance which was published on 17 April 2023.

27th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many businesses in Bradford East have received support under the Energy Bills Discount Scheme.

None.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the potential impact of the Economic Advisory Council on employment rights and protections.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy meets regularly with my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer to discuss a wide range of policy issues. The Department welcomes the creation of the Economic Advisory Council, values the advice and expertise of the group, and looks forward to such expertise contributing to the Government’s prioritising of economic stability in a period of global economic challenge and volatility.

17th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 28 February 2022 to Question 125224 on Employment Tribunals Service: Data Protection, whether it is his Department's policy to take into consideration the outcomes of previous Employment Tribunal decisions during the recruitment of prospective candidates.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not consider the outcomes of previous Employment Tribunals in relation to the recruitment of prospective candidates. Personal data in relation to candidates is anonymised for selection panels in the early stages of selection.

17th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to his Department's consultation entitled Good Work Plan: Proposals to support families, published on 19 July 2019, whether it is still his Department's policy to bring forward legislative proposals on flexible working; and when he plans to publish a response to that consultation.

The Government responded to the flexible working elements of the “Good Work Plan: Proposals to support families” consultation in September 2021. This document “Making Flexible Working the Default” consulted on a range or proposals to make flexible working more accessible. The government will publish its response in due course.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made a recent assessment of revoking the Working Time Regulations.

We are proud of the UK’s record on employment standards, having raised domestic standards over recent years to make them some of the highest in the world. In leaving the EU we regained the ability to regulate autonomously, and the Government is therefore conducting a comprehensive review of all retained EU law to ensure that our regulations, including worker rights, are tailored to the needs of the UK economy and help create the conditions for growth and investment.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 21 September 2022 to Question 45829 on Conditions of Employment: Enforcement, what his planned timetable is for bringing forward these legislative proposals.

The creation of a single enforcement body will be a significant undertaking which requires primary legislation. No decision has been taken on timing.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Growth Plan 2022, published on 23 September 2022, CP 743, what recent discussions his Department has had with trade unions on bringing forward legislative proposals to require unions to put pay offers to a member vote.

The proposals mentioned above will require Primary legislation. The Government intends to bring this forward when parliamentary time allows. The passage of any Bill will give trade unions the opportunity, via Members of Parliament, to share any concerns or constructive suggestion they may have on this policy.

20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions (a) he and (b) his officials have had with trade union officials since taking up the post on 6 September 2022.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy’s relationship with the trade unions is essential to developing and delivering our policies. Ministers and officials from the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy engage regularly with the trade unions on a variety of issues.

20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the reforms to the Transfer of Undertakings and Protection of Employment regulations on (a) pay and (b) working conditions.

Changes were last made to the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations in 2014. The Regulations were improved to make sure that they continued to provide appropriate levels of protection for employees, while making the process of transferring employees from one organisation to another as smooth as possible for the businesses involved.

20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has made a recent assessment of the potential merits of revoking (a) the Working Time Regulations and (b) other EU regulations on worker rights.

We are proud of the UK’s record on employment standards, having raised domestic standards over recent years to make them some of the highest in the world. In leaving the EU we regained the ability to regulate autonomously, and the Government is therefore conducting a comprehensive review of all retained EU law to ensure that our regulations, including worker rights, are tailored to the needs of the UK economy and help create the conditions for growth and investment.

The UK has one of the best workers’ rights records in the world. In recent years, the Government has brought forward a raft of legislation on employment rights issues. In April this year, we made sure 2.5 million people across the UK received a pay raise by raising the National Minimum Wage and National Living Wage. We have extended the ban on using exclusivity clauses to contracts where a worker’s guaranteed weekly income is below the Lower Earnings Limit, which is currently £123 a week.

Numerous Private Members’ Bills have been introduced on the matter of employment rights, and we are working closely with these members on their proposals. The Neonatal Care (Leave and Pay) Bill and The Employment (Allocation of Tips) Bill have both passed their Second Reading with Government support and will continue to progress through parliament before receiving royal assent and becoming law in England, Scotland and Wales.

29th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what impact assessment the Government has carried out for the Conduct of Employment Agencies and Employment Businesses (Amendment) Regulations 2022.

The Government carried out a consultation on revoking the ban on using agency workers to cover strikes in 2015. It received a large number of substantive responses from a wide range of stakeholders, including employers, agencies and trade unions which have been carefully considered before deciding to proceed with removing Regulation 7 of the Conduct Regulations 2003. In addition, these regulations are subject to the affirmative procedure. Parliament will have the opportunity to debate them before they are made and provide further feedback for the Government to consider, including on their impact.

29th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what impact assessment he has carried out for the Liability of Trade Unions in Proceedings in Tort (Increase of Limits on Damages) Order 2022.

We do not consider that a full impact assessment is necessary as the impacts will be minimal. There will be negligible familiarisation costs for unions and businesses. The impact of raising the limits on damages does not apply to unions that comply with statutory industrial action balloting and other statutory requirements. The impact of raising the limits would therefore only apply to those non-compliant unions that carry out or endorse unofficial strike action.

14th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to bring forward legislation on the umbrella company market following his Department's recent call for evidence and consultation on that market.

The Government recently ran a Call for Evidence on the umbrella company market to ensure it has a detailed and up to date understanding of the market and how it is continuing to evolve. This Call for Evidence, which was issued jointly by HM Treasury, HMRC and BEIS, closed on 22 February 2022. Officials in the three departments are working closely together to consider the evidence submitted and the summary of responses will be published in due course.

6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 25 May 2022 to Question 3621, on Re-employment, by what date his Department plans to publish a draft for consultation of the proposed statutory code of practice on fire and rehire practices.

The Government remains committed to bringing forward a new statutory code on the practice of dismissal and re-engagement. As BEIS officials progress this work, they will be meeting with a wide range of stakeholders with relevant expertise.

We will publish a draft for consultation in due course.

6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 25 May 2022 to Question 3621, on Re-employment, with which stakeholders he and officials in his Department have met to discuss the proposed statutory code of practice on fire and rehire practices.

The Government remains committed to bringing forward a new statutory code on the practice of dismissal and re-engagement. As BEIS officials progress this work, they will be meeting with a wide range of stakeholders with relevant expertise.

We will publish a draft for consultation in due course.

6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Government’s response to the Women and Equalities Committee's fourth report of Session 2021-22 on Ethnicity pay gap reporting, HC 110, published on 13 May 2022, when his Department plans to publish the analysis of consultation responses to the mandatory ethnicity pay reporting consultation which closed on 11 January 2019.

The Government set out its support for a voluntary approach to ethnicity pay reporting in “Inclusive Britain”, the response to the Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities report. We will publish the analysis of the responses to the 2019 consultation in due course.

6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals on the umbrella company market following the Call for Evidence on that subject which closed on 22 February.

The recent Call for Evidence on the umbrella company market, which was run jointly with HM Treasury and HMRC, closed on 22 February 2022. Officials in the three departments are working closely together to consider the evidence submitted and the summary of responses will be published in due course.

6th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 25 May 2022 to Question 3626, on Director of Labour Market Enforcement, by what date his Department plans to publish the summary of responses to the Call for Evidence on the umbrella company market.

The recent Call for Evidence on the umbrella company market, which was run jointly with HM Treasury and HMRC, closed on 22 February 2022. Officials in the three departments are working closely together to consider the evidence submitted and the summary of responses will be published in due course.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to impose a legal duty on employers to consider which flexible working arrangements are available for each role within their organisation.

Employees in Great Britain have a statutory right to request a flexible working arrangement from their employer. Under this framework, employers already have a legal duty to consider whether such requests can be accommodated within their organisation.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to impose a legal duty on employers to state in job advertisements whether flexible working arrangements are available.

The Government’s proposals for flexible working were set set out in our consultation, which was published in September 2021.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with employers on the proposed statutory code of practice on fire and rehire practices.

The Government remains committed to bringing forward a new statutory code on the practice of dismissal and re-engagement (fire and rehire).

Work is underway and BEIS Officials have already met with key stakeholders to discuss the drafting of the statutory code.

We will publish a draft for consultation in due course and bring the code into force when Parliamentary time allows.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with trade unions on the proposed statutory code of practice on fire and rehire practices.

The Government remains committed to bringing forward a new statutory code on the practice of dismissal and re-engagement (fire and rehire).

Work is underway and BEIS Officials have already met with key stakeholders to discuss the drafting of the statutory code.

We will publish a draft for consultation in due course and bring the code into force when Parliamentary time allows.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to introduce its proposed statutory code on fire and rehire.

The Government remains committed to bringing forward a new statutory code on the practice of dismissal and re-engagement (fire and rehire).

Work is underway and BEIS Officials have already met with key stakeholders to discuss the drafting of the statutory code.

We will publish a draft for consultation in due course and bring the code into force when Parliamentary time allows.

17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will bring umbrella companies under the remit of the Director for Labour Market Enforcement.

The role of the Director of Labour Market Enforcement (DLME) is to set strategic direction for the three main labour market enforcement bodies and oversee an annual assessment of the scale and nature of non-compliance.

The Government recently ran a Call for Evidence on the umbrella company market to ensure it has a detailed and up to date understanding of the market and how it is continuing to evolve. The call for evidence closed on 22 February 2022 and the Government will use the information it has gathered to inform future policy development and will publish a summary of responses in due course.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the anonymity of claimants on the Employment Tribunal decisions database where requested.

Personal data is exempt from the provisions of GDPR where it is required to be disclosed by law. Regulation 14(1) of the Employment Tribunals (Constitution and Rules of Procedure) Regulations requires the Lord Chancellor to maintain a public register of all decisions issued by Employment Tribunals. As a result, the online register of employment tribunal decisions is exempt from the provisions of GDPR.

Employment Tribunals may make an order that the identities of specified parties in proceedings should not be disclosed to the public, by anonymisation or otherwise, in any documents entered on the register.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he has taken to ensure that the Employment Tribunal decisions database protects the data privacy rights of claimants.

Personal data is exempt from the provisions of GDPR where it is required to be disclosed by law. Regulation 14(1) of the Employment Tribunals (Constitution and Rules of Procedure) Regulations requires the Lord Chancellor to maintain a public register of all decisions issued by Employment Tribunals. As a result, the online register of employment tribunal decisions is exempt from the provisions of GDPR.

Employment Tribunals may make an order that the identities of specified parties in proceedings should not be disclosed to the public, by anonymisation or otherwise, in any documents entered on the register.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Levelling Up White Paper, whether the policies on delivering higher wages in poorer communities will involve strengthening trade union power.

A key part of levelling up is boosting productivity, pay, jobs and living standards by growing the private sector, especially in those places where they are lagging. As set out in the Levelling Up the United Kingdom White Paper, improvements across all six capitals - physical, human, intangible, financial, social and institutional - are fundamental to achieving increases in productivity and wages.

The Government believes that our Trade Union legislation, as amended by the Trade Union Act 2016, strikes the right balance. The Trade Union Act modernises the UK’s industrial relations framework to better support an effective and collaborative approach to resolving industrial disputes, balancing the interests of unions with the interests of the wider public. The Act makes strike laws fairer for working people by ensuring that strikes only happen as a result of a clear, democratic decision by those entitled to vote, restoring public confidence that where industrial action takes place, it has the strong support of union members. The Act therefore strikes a fairer balance between the rights of unions and the needs of employers and the wider public.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the recommendation by the Innovation, Growth and Regulatory Reform Taskforce, in its report published in June 2021, to reimpose the one in, two out regulatory offset principle.

A joint consultation on “Reforming the Framework for Better Regulation” between the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and the Cabinet Office was launched on 22 July 2021. The consultation examined relevant recommendations from the Taskforce on Innovation, Growth and Regulatory Reform report, including reimposing the one in, two out regulatory offset principle. The consultation received 188 responses from a range of stakeholders including business and trade and industry bodies. The Government response to the consultation will be published in due course.

18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Answer of 10 February 2021 to Question 147880 on Director of Labour Market Enforcement, on what date he plans to make an appointment announcement in respect of the post of Director of Labour Market Enforcement.

As set out in our answer of 10 February, earlier in the year we launched a campaign to appoint a Director of Labour Market Enforcement. Since then, we have been progressing the appointment process which is now nearing its conclusion. We hope to be able to announce the successful candidate in the near future.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many investigations were carried out by the (a) Employment Standards Agency Inspectorate and (b) HMRC National Minimum Wage enforcement team for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

HMRC National Minimum Wage team investigate matters classified as non-payment of the national minimum wage. In spite of the pandemic, 2020/21 was another successful year for HMRC’s minimum wage enforcement activities. HMRC investigated over 2,700 businesses and closed almost 1,000 cases with arrears, secured more than £16.5 million in arrears for more than 155,000 workers, and issued 575 penalties amounting to over £14 million. HMRC continue to take strong action against the most serious non-compliant businesses and as of March 2021 there are 24 employers in a Labour Market Enforcement Undertaking, and 15 employers have been prosecuted for NMW offences since 2007.

Over the course of 2020/21, the HMRC Promote team facilitated nearly 800,000 employers and workers to seek further information in relation to the minimum wage.

This included:

- Sending more than 400,000 texts to apprentices regarding the risk of underpayment from unpaid training time;

- Writing to nearly 200,000 employers and workers;

- Producing a variety of webinars and educational videos that accumulated nearly 20,000 views.

In addition to the above, the “Calculating the Minimum Wage” guidance had nearly 50,000 views; and there were almost 9,000 views of the work experience and intern’s guidance.

There were more than 400 full time employees on average involved in HMRC’s enforcement of the minimum wage over the 2020/21 reporting year.

The Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate also continued to investigate all complaints throughout 2020/21 and undertook proactive inspections of employment businesses. These included issues concerning non-payment or withholding earnings, being charged to find work, contractual disputes, lack of clarity of deductions, advertising of roles, and failure to obtain either sufficient information from a hiring company or work-seeker. It investigated a total of 1631 complaints in the 2020/21 period and undertook 151 pro-active investigations.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many frontline (a) enforcement officers and (b) inspectors were employed on average in the HMRC National Minimum Wage enforcement team for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

HMRC National Minimum Wage team investigate matters classified as non-payment of the national minimum wage. In spite of the pandemic, 2020/21 was another successful year for HMRC’s minimum wage enforcement activities. HMRC investigated over 2,700 businesses and closed almost 1,000 cases with arrears, secured more than £16.5 million in arrears for more than 155,000 workers, and issued 575 penalties amounting to over £14 million. HMRC continue to take strong action against the most serious non-compliant businesses and as of March 2021 there are 24 employers in a Labour Market Enforcement Undertaking, and 15 employers have been prosecuted for NMW offences since 2007.

Over the course of 2020/21, the HMRC Promote team facilitated nearly 800,000 employers and workers to seek further information in relation to the minimum wage.

This included:

- Sending more than 400,000 texts to apprentices regarding the risk of underpayment from unpaid training time;

- Writing to nearly 200,000 employers and workers;

- Producing a variety of webinars and educational videos that accumulated nearly 20,000 views.

In addition to the above, the “Calculating the Minimum Wage” guidance had nearly 50,000 views; and there were almost 9,000 views of the work experience and intern’s guidance.

There were more than 400 full time employees on average involved in HMRC’s enforcement of the minimum wage over the 2020/21 reporting year.

The Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate also continued to investigate all complaints throughout 2020/21 and undertook proactive inspections of employment businesses. These included issues concerning non-payment or withholding earnings, being charged to find work, contractual disputes, lack of clarity of deductions, advertising of roles, and failure to obtain either sufficient information from a hiring company or work-seeker. It investigated a total of 1631 complaints in the 2020/21 period and undertook 151 pro-active investigations.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish a classification of the matters being investigated by the (a) Employment Standards Agency Inspectorate and (b) HMRC National Minimum Wage enforcement team for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

HMRC National Minimum Wage team investigate matters classified as non-payment of the national minimum wage. In spite of the pandemic, 2020/21 was another successful year for HMRC’s minimum wage enforcement activities. HMRC investigated over 2,700 businesses and closed almost 1,000 cases with arrears, secured more than £16.5 million in arrears for more than 155,000 workers, and issued 575 penalties amounting to over £14 million. HMRC continue to take strong action against the most serious non-compliant businesses and as of March 2021 there are 24 employers in a Labour Market Enforcement Undertaking, and 15 employers have been prosecuted for NMW offences since 2007.

Over the course of 2020/21, the HMRC Promote team facilitated nearly 800,000 employers and workers to seek further information in relation to the minimum wage.

This included:

- Sending more than 400,000 texts to apprentices regarding the risk of underpayment from unpaid training time;

- Writing to nearly 200,000 employers and workers;

- Producing a variety of webinars and educational videos that accumulated nearly 20,000 views.

In addition to the above, the “Calculating the Minimum Wage” guidance had nearly 50,000 views; and there were almost 9,000 views of the work experience and intern’s guidance.

There were more than 400 full time employees on average involved in HMRC’s enforcement of the minimum wage over the 2020/21 reporting year.

The Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate also continued to investigate all complaints throughout 2020/21 and undertook proactive inspections of employment businesses. These included issues concerning non-payment or withholding earnings, being charged to find work, contractual disputes, lack of clarity of deductions, advertising of roles, and failure to obtain either sufficient information from a hiring company or work-seeker. It investigated a total of 1631 complaints in the 2020/21 period and undertook 151 pro-active investigations.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many workplace inspections were carried out by the (a) Employment Standards Agency Inspectorate, (b) HMRC National Minimum Wage enforcement team, (c) Health and Safety Executive and (d) Gangmaster Labour Abuse Authority for the annual reporting period 2020-21.

All bodies continued to carry out workplace inspections throughout 2020-21, either remotely or face to face in line with Covid safety guidelines. Please see the figures in the table below.

Body

Number of workplace inspections in 2020-21

Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate

151

HMRC National Minimum Wage

2,740

Health and Safety Executive

14,754 workplace inspections 182,610 spot checks

Gangmaster Labour Abuse Authority

440

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish the Labour Market Enforcement Strategy 2020 to 2021.

We are working with our colleagues at the Home Office to publish the Labour Market Enforcement Strategy 2020-21 in due course. It was important to take the time to work with the former Director of Labour Market Enforcement and the enforcement bodies to ensure that the Strategy is making the right recommendations in the face of the new challenges presented by the coronavirus pandemic. The 2020/21 will be published as an agreed Strategy and so we will be taking forward all the recommendations in the final version.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to improve rights and protections for employees.

This Government is committed to making the UK the best place in the world to work. As laid out in our manifesto, we will bring forward measures to establish an employment framework which is fit for purpose and keeps pace with the needs of modern workplaces. These measures will make workplaces fairer by:

  • providing better support for working families and introducing new support for people facing particularly challenging circumstances.
  • encouraging flexible working while ensuring everyone benefits from the flexibility of our labour market.
  • protecting the majority of businesses who strive to do the right thing by their workers from being undercut by the small minority who seek to avoid their responsibilities.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has appointed an Interim-Director of Labour Market Enforcement to succeed Matthew Taylor.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to appoint a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason his Department decided not to extend Matthew Taylor's contract as the Interim-Director of Labour Market Enforcement until a successor is found.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much his Department has spent on recruitment for the position of Director of Labour Market Enforcement to date.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, for what reason his Department has reopened the recruitment process for the position of Director of Labour Market Enforcement.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many candidates his Department has shortlisted for the position of Director of Labour Market Enforcement.

Matthew Taylor was appointed as interim Director of Labour Market Enforcement in July 2019. His appointment was due to end in July 2020 and we extended it until 31 January 2021 to provide continuity during the early stages of the pandemic. In November 2020, we launched a recruitment campaign for a permanent Director of Labour Market Enforcement However, we received an insufficient number of suitable applications for the role to shortlist, so we have now reopened the recruitment process.. So far, we have not spent anything on recruitment beyond resourcing from departmental staff, but some paid-for activity is planned over the coming weeks. The deadline for applications is 28 February. Once the campaign has closed we will work at pace to recruit a new Director as soon as possible. We have not identified a new interim appointment and cannot make any comments on individual circumstances.

While we work to fill the vacancy as soon as possible, the heads of three enforcement bodies will remain responsible for their overall work and enforcement responsibilities. They will continue to work hard to protect workers and bring enforcement action against employers who break the rules.

17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

Improving representation and inclusion of people from an ethnic minority background is a priority for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). With that in mind, we are working with Civil Service HR and other government departments to review the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023, and how, where possible, we can adopt Ethnicity Pay Reporting (EPR). In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used across departments to produce reliable, informative data. The outcome of this work will inform whether DCMS is able to publish a report for 2023/2024.

28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has had discussions with stakeholders on the potential merits of banning boxing at the Olympic Games.

It is for the International Olympic Committee to make any decisions on which sports should be included in the Olympic programme.

The British Olympic Association are our National Olympic Committee and as such represent us in the International Olympic Committee’s governance and decision making processes. I have recently had discussions with GB Boxing and UK Sport to understand their position on international competition in the sport.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when she will publish the Government's Sport Strategy.

​DCMS has committed to delivering a new Government sport strategy that will set the direction for the government's priorities and its role in the sport sector.

This new strategy will build on the success of the previous strategy, Sporting Future, and will have a specific focus on addressing inactivity levels, the barriers that stop people from participating in sport and making the sector more sustainable for the future.

We are seeking to publish the strategy in the first quarter of 2023.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what funding her Department has provided to the Bradford UK City of Culture 2025 programme as of 24 October 2022; and what additional funding her Department plans to provide to that programme.

DCMS is providing Bradford UK City of Culture 2025 with £275,000 seed funding (awarded on 31 May). The grant has facilitated recruitment for senior roles and early engagement with local communities. DCMS is working with the Bradford team to determine the additional funding requirement subject to the successful approval of a business case.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much funding Bradford will receive through the Youth Investment Fund.

The Youth Investment Fund is a geographically targeted fund levelling up access to youth services in those areas that need it most. Ministerial decisions on eligibility criteria were taken on the basis of high quality, robust and publicly available data. The eligible areas and a detailed explanation of the methodology is available on the gov.uk website here. Bradford is not eligible for the Youth Investment Fund.

DCMS provides funding for a range of youth programmes benefitting young people in Bradford and right across England, such as the National Citizen Service (NCS). DCMS recently announced a new National Youth Guarantee, ensuring that by 2025, every young person in England will have access to regular clubs and activities, adventures away from home and opportunities to volunteer.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools have been surveyed for reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete (RAAC) in (a) Bradford East constituency, (b) the City of Bradford Metropolitan District and (c) Yorkshire and Humber.

Nothing is more important than the safety of children and staff. It has always been the case that where we are made aware of a building that may pose an immediate risk, the Department takes immediate action.

It is the responsibility of those who run schools – academy trusts, Local Authorities, and voluntary-aided school bodies – who work with their schools on a day-to-day basis, to manage the safety and maintenance of their schools and to alert us if there is a concern with a building.

The Department has acted decisively and proactively to tackle this issue. This Government has taken more proactive action on RAAC than any other in the UK. The Department issued comprehensive guidance in 2018, and subsequent years, to all responsible bodies highlighting the potential risks associated with RAAC and supporting them to identify this within their buildings, as well as to take appropriate steps in meeting their obligations to keep buildings safe. The most recent guidance is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reinforced-autoclaved-aerated-concrete-estates-guidance.

There are over 22,000 schools and colleges in England, and the vast majority are unaffected. A significant proportion of the estate was built outside the period where RAAC was used, with around one third of the estate built since 2001, therefore, the Department has focused efforts on buildings built in the post-war decades.

The Department issued a questionnaire in March 2022, asking responsible bodies to inform the Department of any suspected RAAC identified in their estates. Responsible bodies have submitted questionnaires for over 98% of schools with blocks built in the target era, of which there are 14,900. We are pressing all remaining schools to get checks completed, to determine which schools require surveys.

The Department is contacting responsible bodies to help them respond to this request and to advise on what needs to be done, so that they can establish whether they believe they have RAAC. This work will continue until we have a response for all target era schools.

Schools and colleges where RAAC is suspected are being fast tracked for surveying, which is used to confirm whether RAAC is actually present. All schools and colleges that have already told us they suspect they might have RAAC will be surveyed within a matter of weeks, in many cases in a matter of days.

All schools where RAAC is confirmed are provided with a dedicated caseworker to support them and help implement a mitigation plan and minimise the disruption to children’s learning.

Across Government, Departments have been asked to report on the current picture of suspected and confirmed RAAC in their estates as soon as possible. This will be updated on a regular basis as new buildings are identified and surveying and remediation are carried out. The Department for Education published lists of education settings confirmed as having RAAC on Wednesday 6 September, and committed to providing further updates.

Schools will contact parents where RAAC is identified and inform them of any impacts on their child. The vast majority of schools are unaffected. Any parents that are unsure if their child’s school is affected should contact their school directly.

While some short term disruption is inevitable, all available measures will be taken to minimise disruption to pupil learning and ensure that pupils continue to receive face-to-face teaching. Where there is any disturbance to face-to-face education, schools will prioritise attendance for vulnerable children and young people and children of key workers. The guidance published by the Department in August also includes guidance on provision for pupils with SEND and sets out expectations that schools continue to provide free school meals to eligible pupils.

The Department will fund emergency mitigation work needed to make buildings safe, including installing alternative classroom space where necessary. Where schools and colleges need additional help with revenue costs, like transport to locations or temporarily renting a local hall or office, the department will provide that support for all reasonable requests. The Department will also fund longer term refurbishment projects, or rebuilding projects where these are needed, to rectify the RAAC issue in the long term.

All previously confirmed Schol Rebuilding Programme projects announced in 2021 and 2022 will continue to go ahead. A full list of confirmed projects can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme-schools-in-the-programme.

Further information on RAAC in education settings is available on the Education Hub: https://educationhub.blog.gov.uk/2023/09/06/new-guidance-on-raac-in-education-settings/.

4th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools have been instructed to close by her Department due to concerns over reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete (RAAC) in (a) Bradford East constituency, (b) the City of Bradford Metropolitan District and (c) Yorkshire and Humber.

Departments have been asked to report on the current picture of suspected and confirmed RAAC in their estates as soon as possible. This will be updated on a regular basis as new buildings are identified and surveying and remediation are carried out.

The Government published lists of education settings confirmed as having RAAC on Wednesday 6 September, and committed to providing further updates.

4th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools have been identified as containing reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete (RAAC) in (a) Bradford East constituency, (b) the City of Bradford Metropolitan District and (c) Yorkshire and Humber.

Departments have been asked to report on the current picture of suspected and confirmed RAAC in their estates as soon as possible. This will be updated on a regular basis as new buildings are identified and surveying and remediation are carried out.

The Government published lists of education settings confirmed as having RAAC on Wednesday 6 September, and committed to providing further updates.

17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

The Department is currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting in the Civil Service and, although Ethnicity Pay Gap Reporting is voluntary, the Department is keen to publish a report.

The Department, along with Civil Service HR colleagues and other government departments, is working through the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023. This is to consider the approach to a consistent methodology for producing the data. The outcomes of this development work will inform whether the Department is able to publish a report for 2023/24.

15th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of children in households with no recourse to public funds have been provided with free school meals in the period since 1 September 2022.

Free school meals (FSM) eligibility was extended permanently to children from all No Recourse to Public Funds (NRPF) households subject to income thresholds, from the start of the 2022 summer term. These pupils are recorded in school census returns in the same way as the wider FSM cohort and are not identified separately.

From June to July 2022, the Department ran a claims process allowing schools to attract pupil premium funding for pupils who became newly eligible for FSM as a result of the extension to NRPF households. The most recent data on the number of NRPF pupils who were claimed for through this process can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-allocations-and-conditions-of-grant-2022-to-2023.

26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's press release, Education Secretary calls for an end to low value degrees, published on 26 May 2019, whether his Department’s assessment of a low-value degree takes into consideration the disabilities of students in the context of courses where 60 per cent of graduates do not go into professional employment or further study.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the impact of the proposed minimum entry criteria for the student finance system on equality of access to education.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the proportion of students on free school meals who will not qualify for students loans due to the minimum entry criteria for higher education.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made an assessment of the value of university courses.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's press release, Education Secretary calls for an end to low value degrees, published on 26 May 2019, whether his Department’s assessment of a low-value degree takes into consideration the gender composition of students in the context of courses where 60 per cent of graduates do not go into professional employment or further study.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the implications for its policies of the Institute for Fiscal Studies' recently published research on proposed changes to the student loan system.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department's press release, Education Secretary calls for an end to low value degrees, published on 26 May 2019, whether his Department’s assessment of a low-value degree takes into consideration the ethnic backgrounds of students in the context of courses where 60 per cent of graduates do not go into professional employment or further study.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Michelle Donelan
Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120797 on Secondary Education: Regional Planning and Development, what estimate he has made of the amount and proportion of the Government’s (a) additional £4.7 billion by 2024-25 for the core schools budget in England and (b) new package of £1.8 billion over the SR21 period to support education recovery from the covid-19 outbreak that will be allocated directly to schools in Bradford East constituency.

Schools in Bradford East are attracting £130 million in total in the 2022/23 financial year through the schools national funding formula (NFF), a 3.5% cash increase over the 2021/22 financial year. This represents an increase of 2.6% in per pupil funding. On top of this funding through the NFF, additional funding through the Schools Supplementary Grant will provide extra funding to all schools in Bradford East. The breakdown of this will be published in due course. The indicative 2022/23 financial year schools supplementary grant figure for the Bradford local authority is £13.8 million or £156 per pupil on average.

We are only able to confirm NFF funding allocations for the 2022/23 financial year as the NFF is updated annually.

We have committed an additional £1.8 billion of recovery funding in the recent Spending Review to support young people to catch up on missed learning, taking overall direct investment in education recovery to almost £5 billion.

From this additional funding, a £1 billion recovery premium will continue for a further two academic years, 2022/23 and 2023/24. Primary schools will continue to benefit from an additional circa £145 per eligible pupil, and the amount per eligible pupil in secondary schools is expected to nearly double. In broad terms, this will mean a typical secondary school could attract approximately £70,000 a year.

The recovery premium allocations for individual schools in the 2021/22 academic year, including those in East Bradford, have been published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-recovery-premium-funding-allocations. The recovery premium allocations for the 2022/23 academic year will be published in due course.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many ventilation units have been distributed to schools in the Bradford district as of 18 February 2022.

To fulfil all eligible applications, up to 9,000 air cleaning units will be provided to state-funded education providers for poorly ventilated teaching spaces where quick fixes to improve ventilation are not possible. As of 24 January 2022, 1,265 providers were eligible to receive air cleaning units. These were allocated to providers based on need, using the eligibility criteria we have set out in our guidance.

As of 11 February, 6,311 air cleaning units have been delivered to state-funded education providers, including 39 units that have been delivered to 6 schools in Bradford. Most eligible providers will receive their units by the end of February.

Natural ventilation is best where that is achievable, and we have robust evidence that, in the vast majority of cases, teaching spaces and classrooms benefit from sufficient natural ventilation. That evidence includes the responses to our recent survey of providers using the carbon dioxide monitors that we published on 24 January. This showed that only 3% of providers reported sustained high CO2 readings (above 1500ppm) that could not be remedied through quick fixes or remedial building works. The survey findings are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/co2-monitor-survey-and-applications-for-air-cleaning-units.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department records how many school governors are from a Black, Asian and Ethnic Minority background.

The department does not currently collect data on the ethnicity of volunteers in school and academy trust governance. We recognise the importance and positive impact of a diverse board. For this reason, guidance published by the department emphasises that boards should understand the diversity of their schools and the communities they serve and ensure their board is reflective of this. We are committed to working with the sector to increase the diversity of school and academy trust boards.

1st Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools that have had an academy order imposed upon them have waited (a) between 24 and 35 months, (b) between 36 and 47 months, (c) between 48 and 59 months and (d) longer than 60 months before their academisation process was completed.

As of the 1 June 2021, there have been 574 sponsored academies that have opened after the predecessor local authority maintained schools were issued with academy orders following receipt of inadequate Ofsted judgements. 56% of these sponsored academies opened in less than 12 months, and more than 90% opened in less than 24 months of the academy order being issued. Of the remainder:

  • 33 took between 24 and 35 months.
  • 13 took between 36 and 47 months.
  • 4 took between 48 and 59 months.
  • 1 took longer than 60 months.

15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils were excluded in each local authority in each year since 2010 by ethnicity.

The National Statistics release ‘Permanent and fixed-period exclusions in England 2017 to 2018’ includes information on the number and rate of permanent and fixed period exclusions.

The release is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england-2017-to-2018.

The underlying data includes information on exclusions by local authority. The data can be filtered to show local authority, year and school type. There is also a metadata file in the same area that gives details of the data files.

13th Oct 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to remove regulations 9 and 10 of the National Emission Ceilings Regulations 2018 (SI 2018/129) from schedule 1 of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Act 2023.

I do not intend to remove Regulations 9 and 10 of the National Emissions Ceilings Regulations (NECR), which require preparation of and consultation on a National Air Pollution Control Programme (NAPCP), from schedule 1 of the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Act 2023.

The NAPCP format is long, complicated and duplicative, and does nothing to improve the quality of the air we breathe. Of those who expressed an opinion when we consulted on the NAPCP last year, a majority agreed that the format could be improved, with a consensus that it was too lengthy and technical. With this in mind, we are considering how we can simplify the process to reduce administrative burdens and improve transparency.

All other provisions in the NECR remain unchanged, including the emissions reduction targets and reporting requirements which ensure transparency and allow scrutiny of the UK’s progress towards achieving its emissions targets.

1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what guidance her Department provides local authorities on food waste collections; and whether she plans to issue any further guidance.

We will provide support and advice through statutory and non-statutory guidance and ensure best practice is widely available to assist local authorities.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

We are currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting in the Civil Service.

Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting is voluntary.

We are working with Civil Service HR colleagues and other Government departments to work through the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023.

In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used in departments to produce the data. The outcomes of this development work will inform whether we are able to publish a report for 2023/2024.

More generally the Civil Service is undertaking extensive work both centrally and within departments to promote diversity across its workplaces, including ethnicity.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps his Department is taking to prevent the outbreak of covid-19 in refugee camps throughout the world.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment his Department has made of the vulnerability of people in refugee camps to a covid-19 outbreak in refugee camps.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions he has had on steps to prevent covid-19 outbreaks in refugee camps with the Governments of countries hosting those camps.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether there have been any cases of covid-19 in refugee camps throughout the the world.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether his Department plans to make additional funding available to prevent covid-19 outbreaks in refugee camps throughout the world.

The Department for International Development (DFID) is supporting the UK’s global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19 and help the most vulnerable, including refugees in camps and settlements as well as host communities. This includes a contribution of £5 million to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

DFID recognises that individuals in refugee settings, including urban areas, may be vulnerable to acquiring diseases such as COVID-19 as well as facing associated protection risks. UN Resident Coordinators have been tasked by WHO to assess these risks and consider needs at country level, which will include refugee populations. UK officials are in discussion with humanitarian agencies including the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, to ensure that such considerations are factored into evolving plans. UNHCR are not aware of any cases of COVID-19 in refugee camps at present.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, on how many occasions each trade advisory group has met since 1 January 2021; and how long did each of those meetings last.

The duration of each meeting has ranged from one to two hours.

Trade Advisory Group

Number of meetings since 1st January 2021

Agri-food

2

Automotive, Aerospace and Marine

2

British Manufactured and Consumer Goods

2

Chemicals

2

Creative Industries

2

Financial Services

2

Investment

3

Life Sciences

2

Professional Advisory Services

2

Telecoms and Technology

2

Transport

2

17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

The Department is working with Civil Service HR colleagues and other government departments to work through the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023.

In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used in departments to produce the data.

The outcomes of this development work will inform whether the Department is able to publish a report for 2023/2024.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Autumn Statement 2022, CP 751, published on 17 November 2022, whether the commitment to core Northern Powerhouse Rail will include a high-speed rail stop in Bradford.

As confirmed by the Autumn Statement, the Government is committed to delivering the Northern Powerhouse Rail core network set out in the Integrated Rail Plan. We are looking at opportunities and plans for Bradford station and how to connect Bradford up better.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
27th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether it is still his Department's policy that Northern Powerhouse Rail will include a new station in Bradford city centre.

In November 2021, Government published the Integrated Rail Plan for the North and Midlands which committed £17.2bn to a core NPR network between Liverpool and York and Bradford and Leeds. We will assess the case for a new station at Bradford and will engage closely with local leaders and MPs on the next steps for the project.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
27th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether it is still his Department's policy to proceed with the Northern Powerhouse Rail project.

In November 2021, Government published the Integrated Rail Plan for the North and Midlands which committed £17.2bn to a core NPR network between Liverpool and York and Bradford and Leeds. We will assess the case for a new station at Bradford and will engage closely with local leaders and MPs on the next steps for the project.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
17th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether Northern Powerhouse Rail will include a new station in Bradford city centre.

The Prime Minister has made clear the Government’s commitment to delivering Northern Powerhouse Rail in full, including a stop in Bradford. Plans will be set out in due course including potential opportunities for acceleration.

We will engage closely with local leaders and MPs in reaching detailed decisions on the options to deliver this.

14th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Answer of 28 February 2022 to Question 126694 on Calder Valley line, whether travellers from Bradford to Manchester rail stations will see a reduction in journey times under the Integrated Rail Plan.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Answer given on 28 February 2022.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2022 to Question 3624 on Ferries: minimum wage, when his Department will introduce legislation to ensure that seafarers working on vessels that regularly use UK ports are paid at least an equivalent rate to the National Minimum Wage.

Legislation to ensure that seafarers working on vessels that regularly use UK ports are paid at least an equivalent rate to the UK National Minimum Wage, irrespective of the seafarer or flag of the vessel, will be introduced as soon as the Parliamentary timetable allows. Our public consultation closed on 7th June 2022, and we will be publishing a government response to the consultation in due course, following a full analysis of the responses.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will impose a statutory requirement on ports to refuse access to vessels that do not pay their crew the National Minimum Wage.

Legislation will be introduced as soon as Parliamentary time allows that intends to ensure that seafarers working on vessels that regularly use UK ports are paid at least an equivalent rate to National Minimum Wage, irrespective of the nationality of the seafarer or flag of the vessel.

We intend to do this by creating a condition of access to UK ports for such to demonstrate that they are paying their seafarers an equivalent rate to the National Minimum Wage.

We have published a public consultation on this which sets out full details of the proposals, seeking views on the scope of services this should apply to, the compliance process and have published this alongside a supporting impact assessment. We want to sure that potential impacts of the proposed Bill have been considered prior to introduction and have therefore published the impact assessment on which we welcome input from the public.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will impose a statutory requirement for ports to refuse access to ferries that do not pay its crew the national minimum wage.

Legislation will be introduced as soon as Parliamentary time allows that intends to ensure that seafarers working on vessels that regularly use UK ports are paid at least an equivalent rate to National Minimum Wage, irrespective of the nationality of the seafarer or flag of the vessel.

We intend to do this by creating a condition of access to UK ports for such to demonstrate that they are paying their seafarers an equivalent rate to the National Minimum Wage.

We have published a public consultation on this which sets out full details of the proposals, seeking views on the scope of services this should apply to, the compliance process and have published this alongside a supporting impact assessment. We want to sure that potential impacts of the proposed Bill have been considered prior to introduction and have therefore published the impact assessment on which we welcome input from the public.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of allowing ports to refuse access to vessels that do not pay its crew the national minimum wage.

Legislation will be introduced as soon as Parliamentary time allows that intends to ensure that seafarers working on vessels that regularly use UK ports are paid at least an equivalent rate to National Minimum Wage, irrespective of the nationality of the seafarer or flag of the vessel.

We intend to do this by creating a condition of access to UK ports for such to demonstrate that they are paying their seafarers an equivalent rate to the National Minimum Wage.

We have published a public consultation on this which sets out full details of the proposals, seeking views on the scope of services this should apply to, the compliance process and have published this alongside a supporting impact assessment. We want to sure that potential impacts of the proposed Bill have been considered prior to introduction and have therefore published the impact assessment on which we welcome input from the public.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
17th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the potential merits of enabling ports to refuse access to ferries that do not pay their crew the National Minimum Wage.

Legislation will be introduced as soon as Parliamentary time allows that intends to ensure that seafarers working on vessels that regularly use UK ports are paid at least an equivalent rate to National Minimum Wage, irrespective of the nationality of the seafarer or flag of the vessel.

We intend to do this by creating a condition of access to UK ports for such to demonstrate that they are paying their seafarers an equivalent rate to the National Minimum Wage.

We have published a public consultation on this which sets out full details of the proposals, seeking views on the scope of services this should apply to, the compliance process and have published this alongside a supporting impact assessment. We want to sure that potential impacts of the proposed Bill have been considered prior to introduction and have therefore published the impact assessment on which we welcome input from the public.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
26th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with representatives of the Health and Safety Executive on the safety of employees aboard P&O Ferries vessels.

The Health and Safety Executive do not have jurisdiction over the crew of ferries. This jurisdiction lies with the Maritime and Coastguard Agency.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency have a memorandum of understanding with the Health and Safety Executive and Marine Accident Investigation Branch, published online in May 2021, which sets out the responsibilities of each respective agency in the matter of health and safety enforcement and accident investigation.

As the Maritime and Coastguard Agency has full jurisdiction for the safety of seafarers whilst working onboard vessels, the Department for Transport and Maritime and Coastguard Agency have not had discussions with the Health and Safety Executive regarding the safety of the crews onboard P&O Ferries vessels.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
21st Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many additional trains are planned to run from Bradford rail stations to Manchester rail stations each weekday under the Integrated Rail Plan.

Direct services between Manchester and Bradford will remain at typically 2 trains per hour as part of the Integrated Rail Plan. However, a similar journey time should be possible by instead changing at Leeds onto NPR services, making use of the electrification and upgrade of the Calder Valley Line from Bradford to Leeds which will reduce journey times to as low as 12 minutes. That would give up to quadrupling of typical frequency.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many additional trains will run from Bradford to Leeds each day under the Integrated Rail Plan.

The Integrated Rail Plan set out how we will transform connectivity between Bradford and Leeds through electrification and upgrades to the existing Calder Valley Route. We expect this to allow at least two additional services each hour, and a non-stopping journey time as low as 12 minutes. These upgrades will also see improved journey times on local stopping services along the full Calder Valley Route due to the introduction of new and more efficient rolling stock. We will continue to work with Bradford Council on their ambition to drive regeneration and economic growth by improving rail links to Bradford.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will review the decision not to go ahead with the Bradford stop of Northern Powerhouse Rail, in response to the commitments in the Levelling Up White Paper to raise local transport closer to London standards.

The IRP has committed £500 million to deliver electrification and upgrades of the line between Bradford and Leeds, bringing journey times as low as 12 minutes - a saving of almost half compared to today. In addition, the IRP has designated £100 million to assess how best to route high-speed trains from the East Midlands to West Yorkshire which includes starting development work on a West Yorkshire Mass Transit system. These schemes will provide better connections for residents and businesses of Bradford, not just to Leeds but to the rest of the country including London.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

We are currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting in the Civil Service.

DWP is working with Civil Service HR colleagues and other government departments to work through the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023.

In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used in departments to produce the data.

The outcomes of this development work will inform whether we are able to publish a report for 2023/2024.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, whether the Government plans to retain the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012.

An amendment was tabled on 10 May 2023 to replace the current sunset clause in the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill with a schedule of all the retained EU laws (REUL) that government departments intend to revoke by the end of 2023. The schedule includes REUL identified for revocation by the Health and Safety Executive and any remaining REUL will be retained including the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012. This is subject to the amendment being passed.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he plans to introduce additional training and resources to help employers and workers manage the risk of asbestos exposure.

In Great Britain the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 (CAR) are in place to protect workers from asbestos exposure. These regulations require dutyholders to assess whether asbestos is present in their buildings, the condition it is in and to draw up a plan to manage the risk associated with asbestos including removal if it cannot be safely managed in place.

Dutyholders must not undertake any work to remove, or that is liable to disturb, asbestos unless they have assessed the presence and condition of any Asbestos Containing Material (ACM), identified the risks of exposure to asbestos and prepared a written plan of work detailing the activity and controls to protect workers.

Anyone liable to disturb asbestos during their work must have received the correct level of information, instruction, and training to enable them to carry out their work safely, competently and without risk to themselves or others. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) does not have any plans to introduce additional training for dutyholders.

The Second Post Implementation Review (PIR) for CAR found that the regulations are achieving their intended objectives and it is not necessary to amend them or introduce any additional legislation.

For work with ACM’s which is considered high risk HSE operates a licensing regime to ensure that those carrying out such work demonstrate that they are competent and have current knowledge to protect the health & safety of everyone involved with and affected by the work.

HSE are actively engaging with duty holders and other stakeholders to raise awareness of the legal requirements and ensure standards and competence are maintained.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he plans to introduce (a) legislation or (b) regulations to protect workers from asbestos exposure.

In Great Britain the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 (CAR) are in place to protect workers from asbestos exposure. These regulations require dutyholders to assess whether asbestos is present in their buildings, the condition it is in and to draw up a plan to manage the risk associated with asbestos including removal if it cannot be safely managed in place.

Dutyholders must not undertake any work to remove, or that is liable to disturb, asbestos unless they have assessed the presence and condition of any Asbestos Containing Material (ACM), identified the risks of exposure to asbestos and prepared a written plan of work detailing the activity and controls to protect workers.

Anyone liable to disturb asbestos during their work must have received the correct level of information, instruction, and training to enable them to carry out their work safely, competently and without risk to themselves or others. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) does not have any plans to introduce additional training for dutyholders.

The Second Post Implementation Review (PIR) for CAR found that the regulations are achieving their intended objectives and it is not necessary to amend them or introduce any additional legislation.

For work with ACM’s which is considered high risk HSE operates a licensing regime to ensure that those carrying out such work demonstrate that they are competent and have current knowledge to protect the health & safety of everyone involved with and affected by the work.

HSE are actively engaging with duty holders and other stakeholders to raise awareness of the legal requirements and ensure standards and competence are maintained.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to ensure employers in high-risk industries comply with regulations to manage and remove asbestos.

In Great Britain the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 (CAR) are in place to protect workers from asbestos exposure. These regulations require dutyholders to assess whether asbestos is present in their buildings, the condition it is in and to draw up a plan to manage the risk associated with asbestos including removal if it cannot be safely managed in place.

Dutyholders must not undertake any work to remove, or that is liable to disturb, asbestos unless they have assessed the presence and condition of any Asbestos Containing Material (ACM), identified the risks of exposure to asbestos and prepared a written plan of work detailing the activity and controls to protect workers.

Anyone liable to disturb asbestos during their work must have received the correct level of information, instruction, and training to enable them to carry out their work safely, competently and without risk to themselves or others. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) does not have any plans to introduce additional training for dutyholders.

The Second Post Implementation Review (PIR) for CAR found that the regulations are achieving their intended objectives and it is not necessary to amend them or introduce any additional legislation.

For work with ACM’s which is considered high risk HSE operates a licensing regime to ensure that those carrying out such work demonstrate that they are competent and have current knowledge to protect the health & safety of everyone involved with and affected by the work.

HSE are actively engaging with duty holders and other stakeholders to raise awareness of the legal requirements and ensure standards and competence are maintained.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what discussions he has had with the Health and Safety Executive on the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has not received any specific representations from external organisations on the potential merits of retaining the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, however they have been mentioned as a set of regulations that should be retained in several pieces of correspondence and parliamentary questions.

Officials from HSE are actively engaging with a wide range of stakeholders as part of their day-to-day business, covering many matters. HSE has good working knowledge to inform any decisions they need to make in relation to their approach with the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill (REUL Bill). If required, HSE has various established channels of communication with stakeholders to obtain supplementary information.

HSE has discussed and agreed its plans for retained EU Law (REUL) with DWP Ministers. An amendment was tabled on 10 May 2023 to replace the current sunset clause in the REUL Bill with a schedule of all the REUL that government departments intend to revoke by the end of 2023. The schedule includes REUL identified for revocation by HSE and any remaining REUL will be retained including the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012. This is subject to the amendment being passed.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill, what representations he has received from external organisations on the potential merits of retaining the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has not received any specific representations from external organisations on the potential merits of retaining the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, however they have been mentioned as a set of regulations that should be retained in several pieces of correspondence and parliamentary questions.

Officials from HSE are actively engaging with a wide range of stakeholders as part of their day-to-day business, covering many matters. HSE has good working knowledge to inform any decisions they need to make in relation to their approach with the Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform) Bill (REUL Bill). If required, HSE has various established channels of communication with stakeholders to obtain supplementary information.

HSE has discussed and agreed its plans for retained EU Law (REUL) with DWP Ministers. An amendment was tabled on 10 May 2023 to replace the current sunset clause in the REUL Bill with a schedule of all the REUL that government departments intend to revoke by the end of 2023. The schedule includes REUL identified for revocation by HSE and any remaining REUL will be retained including the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012. This is subject to the amendment being passed.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many employers have been fined for failing to protect their employees from asbestos exposure in each year since 2010.

The risks from asbestos are to both employees and non-employees so the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) does not separate the two. Asbestos- specific offences may also be grouped together with other offences and prosecuted under the general provisions of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. The numbers of fines imposed only under the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006 and 2012 for each year from 2010 are set out below but other penalties are available and used by the courts:


Year*

Number of fines

2010 - 2011

20

2011 - 2012

21

2012 - 2013

21

2013 - 2014

15

2014 - 2015

13

2015 - 2016

20

2016 - 2017

5

2017 - 2018

11

2018 - 2019

16

2019 - 2020

7

2020 - 2021

0

2021 - 2022

4

2022 - 2023

2

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will provide a breakdown of the number of people in the UK who have been diagnosed with asbestos-related diseases after exposure at work for each year since 2010.

The number of people in the UK who have been diagnosed with asbestos-related diseases due to exposure at work is not available as the data is not captured in this way.

However, the Department for Work and Pensions and the Health and Safety Executive collect statistics for deaths and new cases assessed for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit (IIDB) in Great Britain. These statistics can give an indication of the scale of annual new cases of asbestos-related disease, the majority of which are attributable to past exposures at work.

Asbestos-related diseases in Great Britain, deaths and new cases assessed for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit (IIDB), 2010 onwards, Great Britain

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Mesothelioma, deaths

2360

2312

2549

2560

2522

2547

2606

2541

2453

2404

2544

N/A

Mesothelioma, new cases assessed for IIDB

1895

1985

2125

2145

2215

2130

2170

2025

2230

2025

1910

1920

Asbestosis, deaths

414

429

464

483

436

468

502

519

507

499

530

N/A

Asbestosis, new cases assessed for IIDB

1015

725

980

900

985

1175

1050

955

950

905

275

675

Asbestos-related lung cancer new cases assessed for IIDB

305

315

250

285

285

305

240

180

200

240

185

180

Pleural thickening, new cases assessed for IIDB

505

440

460

430

425

430

370

450

540

510

185

460

Note. Figures for deaths in 2021 are not yet available since for some deaths there can be a substantial delay in their registration beyond the year in which the death occurred.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many inspections relating to asbestos the Health and Safety Executive conducted in each year since 2010.

HSE grants licences to a small number of companies which carry out high risk types of asbestos work. HSE then visits a sample of these sites to ensure standards are met safely.

Historically HSE has only conducted inspections of organisations who hold a HSE granted asbestos

licence. Inspections of other, non-licenced work with asbestos such as cleaning up small quantities of asbestos-containing materials or drilling holes into asbestos insulating boards were not routinely recorded. Following the Work and Pensions Committee inquiry into HSE’s approach to asbestos management, non-licensed asbestos inspection activity will be recorded separately for 2023/24. Further information is available on HSE’s website here.

The table below show the number of inspections conducted by HSE of organisations holding an asbestos licence each year from 2010:

Year*

Number of inspections

2010 - 2011

1873

2011 - 2012

1755

2012 - 2013

1522

2013 - 2014

1275

2014 - 2015

1065

2015 - 2016

1109

2016 - 2017

1028

2017 - 2018

1052

2018 - 2019

1001

2019 - 2020

907

2020 - 2021

893

2021 - 2022

870

2022 - 2023

882**

*HSE Work Year from 1 April to 31 March - **Provisional

Since 2010, the number of license holders has reduced by 30% along with a 29% reduction in the jobs they carry out, consequently requiring less inspections. HSE also moved to a centralised, electronic system to facilitate improved targeting to asbestos inspections during this period ensuring the right number of inspections to each licensee.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will provide details of the civil servants affected by the closure of the Department site on Leeds Road, Bradford by (a) age, (b) race, (c) gender and (d) disability.

As part of the Department’s plans to reshape how, when and where the Department works, (resulting in a smaller, greener and better estate); we plan to relocate all 198 colleagues and our services from Bradford East, Leeds Road to Bradford, Ambler Mill which is approximately 1.5 miles away by 14 October 2022.

While it is anticipated that, due to the close proximity of the offices, colleagues will be able to move to Bradford Amber Mill, for those colleagues who are unable to move because of their individual circumstances, redeployment will be the priority.

DWP is making every effort to fully support colleagues through this process. As a responsible employer, the Department will make provision for redundancies as necessary. However, this will be a last resort after all efforts to retain, retrain and redeploy colleagues, either within DWP or other Government Departments in the area, have been exhausted.

The Department is fully compliant in its duties under section 149 of the Equality Act 2010. To understand the potential impact of changes to our estate, both for DWP employees and people using its services, Equality Analyses have been carried out wherever our plans are to close an office or relocate colleagues. The findings have been used to understand the potential impact of changes to our estate on people. The initial assessment is based on self-declared data provided by employees and held on the Department’s HR data system. It is only once the one-to-one process is complete that we will have the full detail of the impact on individuals and be able to consider appropriate solutions for colleagues.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of jobs that will be affected by the closure of the Department for Work and Pensions site on Leeds Road, Bradford.

As part of the Department’s plans to reshape how, when and where the Department works, (resulting in a smaller, greener and better estate); we plan to relocate all 198 colleagues and our services from Bradford East, Leeds Road to Bradford, Ambler Mill which is approximately 1.5 miles away by 14 October 2022.

While it is anticipated that, due to the close proximity of the offices, colleagues will be able to move to Bradford Amber Mill, for those colleagues who are unable to move because of their individual circumstances, redeployment will be the priority.

DWP is making every effort to fully support colleagues through this process. As a responsible employer, the Department will make provision for redundancies as necessary. However, this will be a last resort after all efforts to retain, retrain and redeploy colleagues, either within DWP or other Government Departments in the area, have been exhausted.

The Department is fully compliant in its duties under section 149 of the Equality Act 2010. To understand the potential impact of changes to our estate, both for DWP employees and people using its services, Equality Analyses have been carried out wherever our plans are to close an office or relocate colleagues. The findings have been used to understand the potential impact of changes to our estate on people. The initial assessment is based on self-declared data provided by employees and held on the Department’s HR data system. It is only once the one-to-one process is complete that we will have the full detail of the impact on individuals and be able to consider appropriate solutions for colleagues.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether compulsory redundancies will result from the closure of the Department site on Leeds Road, Bradford.

As part of the Department’s plans to reshape how, when and where the Department works, (resulting in a smaller, greener and better estate); we plan to relocate all 198 colleagues and our services from Bradford East, Leeds Road to Bradford, Ambler Mill which is approximately 1.5 miles away by 14 October 2022.

While it is anticipated that, due to the close proximity of the offices, colleagues will be able to move to Bradford Amber Mill, for those colleagues who are unable to move because of their individual circumstances, redeployment will be the priority.

DWP is making every effort to fully support colleagues through this process. As a responsible employer, the Department will make provision for redundancies as necessary. However, this will be a last resort after all efforts to retain, retrain and redeploy colleagues, either within DWP or other Government Departments in the area, have been exhausted.

The Department is fully compliant in its duties under section 149 of the Equality Act 2010. To understand the potential impact of changes to our estate, both for DWP employees and people using its services, Equality Analyses have been carried out wherever our plans are to close an office or relocate colleagues. The findings have been used to understand the potential impact of changes to our estate on people. The initial assessment is based on self-declared data provided by employees and held on the Department’s HR data system. It is only once the one-to-one process is complete that we will have the full detail of the impact on individuals and be able to consider appropriate solutions for colleagues.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, on what date the Department for Work and Pensions' site on Leeds Road, Bradford will close.

As part of the Department’s plans to reshape how, when and where the Department works, (resulting in a smaller, greener and better estate); we plan to relocate all 198 colleagues and our services from Bradford East, Leeds Road to Bradford, Ambler Mill which is approximately 1.5 miles away by 14 October 2022.

While it is anticipated that, due to the close proximity of the offices, colleagues will be able to move to Bradford Amber Mill, for those colleagues who are unable to move because of their individual circumstances, redeployment will be the priority.

DWP is making every effort to fully support colleagues through this process. As a responsible employer, the Department will make provision for redundancies as necessary. However, this will be a last resort after all efforts to retain, retrain and redeploy colleagues, either within DWP or other Government Departments in the area, have been exhausted.

The Department is fully compliant in its duties under section 149 of the Equality Act 2010. To understand the potential impact of changes to our estate, both for DWP employees and people using its services, Equality Analyses have been carried out wherever our plans are to close an office or relocate colleagues. The findings have been used to understand the potential impact of changes to our estate on people. The initial assessment is based on self-declared data provided by employees and held on the Department’s HR data system. It is only once the one-to-one process is complete that we will have the full detail of the impact on individuals and be able to consider appropriate solutions for colleagues.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of removing the two-child limit from universal credit as recommended by the Social Mobility Commission in its State of the Nation 2021 report.

No assessment has been carried out since the Social Mobility Commission’s report. However, latest figures from April 2021 indicate that over 50% of those households with three or more children who are in receipt of Universal Credit, are not affected by the two-child policy, with over 4% of those being in receipt of an exception. Statistics relating to this policy are published annually, most recently on the 15 July 2021, and are available on GOV.UK.

Statistics from the Office for National Statistics show that in 2020, of all families with dependent children, 85% had a maximum of two in their family. For lone parent families, this was 83%.

The government therefore feels it is proportionate to provide support through Universal Credit for a maximum of two children. A benefits structure adjusting automatically to family size is unsustainable.

On 9 July 2021, the Supreme Court handed down its judgment in the judicial review of the two-child policy. The court found the two-child policy lawful and not in breach of the European Convention on Human Rights

This policy ensures fairness by asking families on benefits to make the same financial decisions as families supporting themselves solely through work. We recognise that some claimants are not able to make the same choices about the number of children in their family, which is why exceptions have been put in place to protect certain groups.

.

Exceptions to the two-child policy are any child in a household who is:

  • Adopted, when they would otherwise be in Local Authority care;
  • Children living long term with friends or family, who would otherwise be at risk of entering the care system;
  • A child born to a young person under 16, who is living with their parents or carers (until they make a separate claim upon turning 16);
  • Third and subsequent children who are:

- additional children in a multiple birth;

- likely to have been born as a result of non-consensual conception (which for this

purpose includes rape or where the claimant was in a controlling or coercive

relationship with the child’s other biological parent at the time of conception).

More information regarding this policy and its exceptions, can be found on GOV.UK.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many frontline (a) enforcement officers and (b) inspectors were employed on average in the Health and Safety Executive for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

On average, in 2020/21, HSE employed (a) 85 full-time equivalent (FTE) visiting health and safety officers and (b) 967 FTE Inspectors.

1. Please note that HSE does not use the category ‘enforcement officer’. Visiting health and safety and Inspector figures are provided, as published in The Annual Report and Accounts.

  1. 967 inspectors is the total number of staff in all grades and roles, including trainees, managers and specialists with warrants.
Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish a classification of the matters being investigated by the Health and Safety Executive for the 2020-21 annual reporting period.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has no plans to routinely publish the classification of the matters being investigated.

For information, Table 1 below provides details of incidents which occurred in 2020/21 which were investigated or are under investigation following a report received under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR).

Please note these figures do not include 183,632 COVID related spot checks carried out by HSE in 2020/21

RIDDOR INVESTIGATIONS

Count

Dangerous Occurrences

260

High fall (over 2m)

152

Contact with machinery

146

COVID-19 non-fatal

134

Dangerous Gas Fittings

112

Struck by object

92

Other ill health

88

COVID-19 fatal

68

Low fall (up to & inc. 2m)

67

Struck by moving vehicle

59

Another kind of accident

48

Slip, trip, fall same level

40

Injured by an animal

32

Trapped by something collapsing

32

Exposure to harmful substance

23

Struck against

20

Gas Incidents

19

Contact with electricity

16

Exposed to fire

16

Lifting and handling injuries

13

Physical assault

10

Fall (height not known)

8

Drowned or asphyxiated

5

Exposed to explosion

5

TOTAL

1465

Table 2 below provides details of workplace concerns which were raised in 2020/21 and investigated or are still under investigation by an Inspector.

CONCERNS

Count

Construction

2211

Gas

391

COVID*

1192

Other

5813

Pesticides

37

Working Time

5

TOTAL

9649

Table 2

*in the reporting year 2020/21, HSE dealt with almost 21,000 COVID related workplace concerns with the majority being resolved by the national Concerns and Advisory Team without the need to be passed to an Inspector for investigation.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many full-time equivalent inspectors have been employed in each region of the country by (a) the Health and Safety Executive and (b) Local Authorities in each year since 2009.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) also recently announced an additional £14m funding that has been made available to HSE until March 2021. Changes in intervention approaches have enabled the HSE to remain effective as a regulator despite fewer inspectors however HSE is developing a rolling programme of activity and will draw down funds throughout the year to bring in additional inspectors, call centre staff and equipment.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to increase the availability of NHS dentistry services.

  • Our dental reforms of last July aimed to make NHS work more attractive to dental practices and improve access for patients.

  • We have seen improvements to access. We have seen 23% more Courses of Treatment delivered to patients in 2022-23 compared to the previous year, and the number seen by an NHS dentist has also increased from 2021-22.

  • I held a roundtable with MPs last week and am aware of the challenges still being faced by many. We will publish the dental recovery plan as soon as possible.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many FTE GPs at each (a) main practice and (b) branch surgery in Bradford East constituency were (i) fully qualified and (ii) in training grades as of October 2023.

The following table shows the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) doctors in general practice at each main practice in Bradford East as of October 2023, with the data for branch practices being held at the main practice:

Practice Name

All doctors in general practice, FTE

Fully qualified general practitioners, FTE

General practitioners in training grade, FTE

Thornbury Medical Practice

2.5

2.5

0.0

Farrow Medical Centre

5.7

4.7

1.1

Idle Medical Centre

5.9

5.9

0.0

Little Horton Lane Medical Centre - Raja

1.9

1.9

0.0

Primrose Surgery

2.3

2.3

0.0

Bradford Moor Practice

1.0

1.0

0.0

Haigh Hall Medical Practice

2.6

2.6

0.0

The Ridge Medical Pract.

32.7

15.6

17.1

Moorside Surgery

5.0

4.0

1.1

The Avicenna Medical Practice

2.4

2.4

0.0

Ashcroft Surgery

14.2

6.8

7.4

New Otley Road Medical Practice

1.7

1.7

0.0

Valley View Surgery

2.0

2.0

0.0

Peel Park Surgery

2.3

2.3

0.0

Dr Gilkar

5.6

2.4

3.2

Moor Park Medical Practice

1.4

1.4

0.0

Eccleshill Village Surgery

1.0

1.0

0.0

Notes:

  1. Data does not include estimates for practices that did not provide fully valid staff records
  2. Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) refers to the proportion of full time contracted hours that the post holder is contracted to work. 1 would indicate they work a full set of hours (37.5), 0.5 that they worked half time. In GPs in Training Grade contracts 1 FTE = 40 hours and in this table these FTEs have been converted to the standard wMDS measure of 1 FTE = 37.5 hours for consistency.
  3. Figures shown do not include staff working in Prisons, Army Bases, Educational Establishments, Specialist Care Centres including Drug Rehabilitation Centres, Walk-In Centres and other alternative settings outside of traditional general practice such as urgent treatment centres and minor injury units.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of patients with a GP appointment booked further appointments after (a) 14 days or less, (b) 15 to 28 days and (c) 29 to 56 days since June 2023.

The data is not held in the format requested. Appointment numbers and the estimated time between an appointment being booked and taking place are published at practice level but not aggregated to council or electoral ward level.

In addition, appointment data is not collected centrally for individual patients. The GP practice will be the source of that data.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of GP appointments in (a) Bradford District and (b) Craven took place (i) on the same day as, (ii) one day after, (ii) two to seven days after, (iv) eight to fourteen days after and (v) 15 or more days after booking between September 2021 to September 2023.

The data is not held in the format requested. Appointment numbers and the estimated time between an appointment being booked and taking place are published at practice level but not aggregated to council or electoral ward level.

In addition, appointment data is not collected centrally for individual patients. The GP practice will be the source of that data.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many GP appointments were recorded in (a) Bradford District and (b) Craven in each month from September 2021 to September 2023.

The data is not held in the format requested. Appointment numbers and the estimated time between an appointment being booked and taking place are published at practice level but not aggregated to council or electoral ward level.

In addition, appointment data is not collected centrally for individual patients. The GP practice will be the source of that data.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the White Paper entitled People at the Heart of Care, published in December 2021, what his Department's timescales are for beginning the consultation on increasing the Disabled Facilities Grant cap.

As with all aspects of the Disabled Facilities Grant, the Government will continue to keep the upper limit under review. Local areas also already have discretion to increase the cap on the grant on a case-by-case basis or in line with a locally published housing assistance policy.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will take steps to ensure that the Major Conditions Strategy will include a funded plan for timely diagnoses of dementia.

The Major Conditions Strategy will set out a strong and coherent policy agenda with a shift to integrated, whole-person care. The Strategy will cover prevention and treatment of dementia, including diagnosis.

Over the next phase of the Major Conditions Strategy, we will focus on areas where we believe we will make the greatest impact across all conditions; this focus will include embedding early diagnosis and treatment delivery in the community.

The launch of the Dame Barbara Windsor Dementia Mission, which aims to speed up the development of new treatments, was supported by £95 million of Government funding; £131 million committed to the next five years of the UK Dementia Research Institute; and £11 million investment into digital innovations to detect and diagnose dementia.

This contributes to delivering the Government’s commitment to double funding for dementia research to £160 million a year by 2024/25. This will span all areas of research, including diagnosis and treatment of dementia, enabling the best possible care and quality of life for people with dementia.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to commence the consultation on increasing the upper limit of the Disabled Facilities Grant.

As with all aspects of the Disabled Facilities Grant, Government will continue to keep the upper limit under review. Local areas also already have discretion to increase the cap on the grant on a case-by-case basis or in line with a locally published housing assistance policy.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

The Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance was published on 17 April 2023 and is voluntary. The Department is currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting and working with Civil Service human resource colleagues and other Government Departments to work through the details of the guidance. In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used in Departments to produce the data. The outcomes of this will inform whether we are able to publish a report for 2023/2024. More generally the Civil Service is undertaking extensive work both centrally and within Departments to promote diversity across its workplaces, including ethnicity.

6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of residential care homes that have closed in Bradford East constituency since May 2010.

The Department does not collect data pertaining to care home closures. The below data has been recorded by the Care Quality Commission.

Since 2010, four nursing homes and 10 residential homes have been unregistered in Bradford East constituency, 14 in total.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of care homes were rated as good by the Care Quality Commission in Bradford East constituency as of February 2023.

As of 7 February 2023, nine care homes (52.9%) were rated by Care Quality Commission as good in the Bradford East constituency.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Feb 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of GP surgeries were rated as good by the Care Quality Commission in Bradford East constituency as of 6 February 2023.

As of 7 February 2023, 19 general practice surgeries (100%) were rated by Care Quality Commission as good in Bradford East constituency.

26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate her Department has made of the number of cancelled operations in Bradford East in the last 12 months.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate her Department has made of the number of FTE fully-qualified GPs excluding GPs in a training grade that were practicing in Bradford East constituency (a) on 26 October 2022 and (b) in 2013.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate her Department has made of the number of GP practices open in Bradford East; and what that number was in 2013.

In September 2013, there were 21 practices registered in Bradford East. In October 2022, 19 practices were registered in this region.

Practices close for a variety of reasons, including practice mergers or retirement. A reduction in practice numbers does not indicate a reduction in the quality of care. When a practice closes, patients are informed and advised to register at another local practice of their choice. Practices and commissioners must put in place appropriate measures to ensure that affected patients have access to general practitioner services.

26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate her Department has made of the total number of GP appointments in Bradford East in the last 12 months; and what that number was in 2013.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

26th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of GP appointments in Bradford East were conducted face-to-face in the last 12 months; and what that figure was in 2013.

This information is not collected in the format requested.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help support the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of mental health specialists in Bradford East constituency.

The NHS Long Term Plan stated the aim of increasing the mental health workforce in England by an additional 27,000 professionals by 2023/24. NHS England and Health Education England are working with local integrated care systems, including in Bradford East, to confirm plans for service models, supply, retention and recruitment until 2024.

NHS England continues to support local systems, including in Bradford East, to develop tailored health and wellbeing offers to meet the needs of the local mental health workforce. This includes mental health hubs in each integrated care system and occupational health services which are being supported through the Growing Occupational Health and Wellbeing national programme.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help support the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of midwives in Bradford East constituency.

NHS England retains oversight of local workforce plans and is updated on vacancy rates. However, recruitment and retention is undertaken at trust level.

In 2022, an additional £127 million has been invested in the National Health Service maternity workforce and improving neonatal care, including in Bradford East. This is in addition to the £95 million invested in 2021 to fund a further 1,200 midwives and 100 consultant obstetricians. The NHS People Plan focuses on improving the retention of NHS staff by prioritising staff health and wellbeing. In 2022/23, £45 million has been allocated to support the continuation of 40 mental health hubs, the Professional Nurse Advocates programme and expanding the NHS Practitioner Health service.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment her Department has made of trends in the level of malnutrition in Bradford East constituency.

No specific assessment has been made.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children under the age of (a) four and (b) 11 were admitted to hospital for tooth extraction due to decay in Bradford East constituency in each of the last five years.

This information is not held in the format requested.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people were diagnosed with HIV in Bradford East constituency in each of the last five years.

The information is not collected in the format requested.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people were diagnosed with diabetes in Bradford East constituency in each of the last five years.

The following table shows the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in Bradford East constituency in each year from 2016 to 2020, by diabetes type.

Year of diagnosis

Type 1

Type 2 and other

2016

25

740

2017

25

595

2018

25

685

2019

20

770

2020

20

570

Source: National Diabetes Audit

Notes:

  1. A person may have more than one diabetes diagnosis within the National Diabetes Audit. In this case, an algorithm is used to derive the best diagnosis date and diabetes type for each person. This is used in the analysis above.
  2. Disclosure control has been applied to all figures, as per the National Diabetes Audit publication – all numbers are rounded to the nearest 5, unless the number is 1 to 7, in which case it is rounded to ‘5’.
  3. Diabetes type is reported as ‘type 1’ and ‘type 2 and other’ within the National Diabetes Audit. ‘Type 1’ includes where a person is recorded as having type 1 diabetes in the National Diabetes Audit. ‘Type 2 and other’ includes where a person is recorded as having type 2 diabetes, Maturity-onset Diabetes of the Young, other or non-specified diabetes in the National Diabetes Audit.
Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of trends in the level of healthy life expectancy in Bradford East constituency.

The Government is committed to supporting individuals to live healthier lives and improving access to health and care services, including in Bradford East constituency. The Department continues to review how health disparities can be addressed and further information will be available in due course.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities also works with services in Bradford East constituency to support programmes to reduce health inequalities, including providing evidence and intelligence.

25th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps her Department has taken to help tackle health inequality in Bradford East constituency.

The Government is committed to supporting individuals to live healthier lives and improving access to health and care services, including in Bradford East constituency. The Department continues to review how health disparities can be addressed and further information will be available in due course.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities also works with services in Bradford East constituency to support programmes to reduce health inequalities, including providing evidence and intelligence.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of social care capacity in Bradford East constituency.

No specific assessment has been made. Local authorities have a responsibility under the Care Act 2014 to ensure that the care needs of the local population are met.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help support the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of GPs in Bradford East constituency.

We are working with NHS England, Health Education England and the profession to increase the general practice workforce in England, including in Bradford East. This includes measures to improve recruitment, address the reasons why doctors leave the profession and encourage them to return to practice.

The updated GP Contract Framework announced a number of new schemes, alongside continued support for existing recruitment and retention schemes for the general practice workforce. This includes the GP Retention Scheme, the GP Retention Fund, the National GP Induction and Refresher, the Locum Support Scheme, the New to Partnership Payment and the Supporting Mentors Scheme.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of trends in rates of perinatal mortality in Bradford East constituency.

No specific assessment has been made. The Government’s national maternity safety ambition aims to halve the 2010 rates of stillbirths, neonatal and maternal deaths and brain injuries in babies occurring during or soon after birth, by 2025. Since 2010, the rate of stillbirths has reduced by 19.3%, the rate of neonatal mortality for babies born over 24 weeks gestational age of viability has reduced by 36% and maternal mortality has reduced by 17%.

We have introduced targeted interventions to accelerate progress, such as the Saving Babies Lives Care Bundle and the Brain Injury Reduction Programme. NHS England has also invested £127 million in National Health Service maternity workforce and improving neonatal care. This is in addition to the £95 million investment made in 2021 to fund the establishment of a further 1,200 midwifery and 100 consultant obstetrician posts. NHS England is offering funding and support to trusts to recruit an additional 300 to 500 overseas midwives in the next 12 months.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of trends in the level of life expectancy in Bradford East constituency.

No specific assessment has been made.

‘Our plan for patients’, published on 22 September, sets out the immediate priorities to support individuals to live healthier lives, including improving access to health and care services in all areas and preventing ill-health. Further information on measures to address health disparities will be available in due course.

18th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) financial and (b) other steps her Department is taking to help tackle NHS workforce shortages in Bradford East constituency.

The Department has commissioned NHS England to develop a long-term workforce plan. The plan will consider the number of staff and the roles required and will set out the actions and reforms needed to improve workforce supply and retention, including in Bradford East.

13th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of the NHS dentist provision in Bradford East constituency.

No specific assessment has been made. In September, we announced ‘Our plan for patients’, which outlines how we will meet oral health needs and increase access to dental care, including in Bradford East.

The plan includes improvements to ensure dentists are renumerated fairly for more complex work, allowing greater flexibility to reallocate resources and to utilise dentists with greater capacity to deliver National Health Service treatment, whilst enabling full use of the dental team. The plan also includes streamlining processes for overseas dentists and holding the local NHS to account for dentistry provision. In addition, Health Education England is also reforming dental education to improve the recruitment and retention of dental professionals.

13th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help improve access to NHS dental services in Bradford East constituency.

No specific assessment has been made. In September, we announced ‘Our plan for patients’, which outlines how we will meet oral health needs and increase access to dental care, including in Bradford East.

The plan includes improvements to ensure dentists are renumerated fairly for more complex work, allowing greater flexibility to reallocate resources and to utilise dentists with greater capacity to deliver National Health Service treatment, whilst enabling full use of the dental team. The plan also includes streamlining processes for overseas dentists and holding the local NHS to account for dentistry provision. In addition, Health Education England is also reforming dental education to improve the recruitment and retention of dental professionals.

13th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help increase the uptake of breast cancer screening in Bradford East constituency.

The Department is working with NHS England to finalise the delivery of £10 million for breast screening units, including determining which areas will benefit from this investment.

National Health Service breast screening providers are also encouraged to work with Cancer Alliances, Primary Care Networks, NHS regional teams and the voluntary sector to promote the uptake of breast screening and ensure access to services.

13th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether her Department has provided additional (a) financial and (b) other support to help tackle (i) patient backlogs and (ii) increased workloads in GP surgeries in Bradford East constituency.

The ‘Delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlog of elective care’, published in February 2022, stated the ambition to reduce patient backlogs for planned National Health Service treatments and the Government plans to spend more than £8 billion from 2022/23 to 2024/25. We made £520 million available to expand general practice capacity during the pandemic. This was in addition to at least £1.5 billion announced in 2020 by 2024 which includes supporting increased workloads in general practitioner (GP) surgeries, including in Bradford East. In September 2022, ‘Our plan for patients’ announced measures to support GP practices increase access and manage workloads, such as the provision of 31,000 phone lines and funding to expand the staff roles working in general practice, including in Bradford East.

13th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help support young people with eating disorders in Bradford East constituency.

In September we announced ‘Our Plan for Patients’, which outlines how we will increase access to National Health Service mental health and eating disorder services, including in Bradford East. Making it easier to access general practice through our ABCD priorities will expand this route as a gateway to mental health care.

Through the NHS Long Term Plan, we are investing an additional £2.3 billion a year by 2023/24 to expand these services for adults, children and young people in England, including in Bradford East.

We will invest approximately £1 billion in community mental health care for adults with severe mental illness, including eating disorders, by 2023/24 and an additional £53 million per year in children and young people's community eating disorder services to increase capacity in the 70 community eating disorder teams.

13th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help improve access to mental health services in Bradford East constituency.

In September we announced ‘Our Plan for Patients’, which outlines how we will increase access to National Health Service mental health and eating disorder services, including in Bradford East. Making it easier to access general practice through our ABCD priorities will expand this route as a gateway to mental health care.

Through the NHS Long Term Plan, we are investing an additional £2.3 billion a year by 2023/24 to expand these services for adults, children and young people in England, including in Bradford East.

We will invest approximately £1 billion in community mental health care for adults with severe mental illness, including eating disorders, by 2023/24 and an additional £53 million per year in children and young people's community eating disorder services to increase capacity in the 70 community eating disorder teams.

13th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if her Department will take steps to increase the availability of face-to-face GP appointments in Bradford East constituency.

On 22 September 2022, we announced ‘Our plan for patients’, which contains measures to assist people make an informed choice on their general practitioner (GP) practice, book an appointment more easily, benefit from more care options and increase the diversity of general practice teams. This aims to increase the availability of appointment types, such as face-to-face, in England, including in Bradford East.

NHS England’s guidance states that GP practices must provide face to face appointments and remote consultations and should respect preferences for face-to-face care unless there are good clinical reasons to the contrary.  While remote consultations can provide additional choice, flexibility and convenience for patients, this is not suitable for all patients or in all circumstances.

13th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help reduce waiting times for elective surgeries in Bradford East constituency.

The ‘Delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlog of elective care’ how the National Health Service will recover and expand elective services over the next three years, including in Bradford East. We have allocated more than £8 billion from 2022/23 to 2024/25, in addition to the £2 billion Elective Recovery Fund and £700 million Targeted Investment Fund already made available in 2021/2022 to increase elective activity. This funding aims to deliver the equivalent of approximately nine million additional checks and procedures and 30% further elective activity by 2024/25 than pre-pandemic levels. A proportion of this funding will be invested in workforce capacity and training and we have committed to invest £5.9 billion for new beds, equipment and technology.

The target to eliminate waiting times of two years or more for elective procedures was met in July 2022 and we aim to eliminate waiting time of eighteen months or more by April 2023. This will be achieved through increasing capacity, seeking alternate capacity in other trusts or the independent sector and engaging with patients to understand choices made regarding their care.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Health Promotion Taskforce will meet before the end of 2022.

The Government has agreed an updated Cabinet committee structure to deliver its priorities. The committees can discuss a range of policy areas relevant to its terms of reference. The Health Promotion Taskforce is not a part of this updated structure.

However, as set out in ‘Our plan for patients’, this will include addressing preventable ill-health by collaboration across the Government and the National Health Service.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the letter sent to her by the Inequalities in Health Alliance on 30 September 2022, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of a cross-government strategy to reduce health inequalities.

‘Our plan for patients’, published on 22 September, sets out the immediate priorities to support individuals to live healthier lives, including improving access to health and care services in all areas and preventing ill-health. Further information on measures to address health disparities will be available in due course.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether it remains her policy to narrow the gap in health life expectancy by 2030 by addressing wider determinants of health.

‘Our plan for patients’, published on 22 September, sets out the immediate priorities to support individuals to live healthier lives, including improving access to health and care services in all areas and preventing ill-health. Further information on measures to address health disparities will be available in due course.

19th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he will publish the Health Disparities White Paper.

Further information on the timing and plans for the white paper will be available in due course.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Clinical Commissioning Groups are participating in the National GP Retention Scheme as of 5 July 2022.

The responsibility for the National GP Retention Scheme transferred to integrated care boards (ICBs) from 1 July 2022. The Scheme is available in all 42 integrated care systems in England. A general practitioner can apply to the Scheme via Heath Education England locally, which is then considered by the relevant ICB.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Answer of 22 February 2022 to Question 125230 on Health: Equality, whether the proposed health disparities white paper will include additional funding for GP practices serving patients in areas with higher levels of deprivation.

We will provide further information in due course.

5th Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of GP retention programmes in retaining GPs (a) in Bradford, (b) in Yorkshire and the Humber and (c) nationally.

A number of retention programmes operate in West Yorkshire and Bradford.  These are overseen, monitored and assessed for effectiveness by NHS West Yorkshire Integrated Care Board (ICB). The number of general practitioners (GPs) and primary care teams accessing retention programmes is regularly reviewed and assessed through engagement with participants. NHS Humber and North Yorkshire ICB and NHS South Yorkshire ICB also assess the effectiveness of retention schemes though workforce boards. In England, we are working with the National Health Service and the profession on the implementation of and feedback received on the GP retention schemes, which will be used to evaluate effectiveness and determine potential further opportunities.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, by what date his Department plans to publish the health disparities white paper.

We have announced our intention to bring forward a health disparities white paper later this year.  We will set out further detail on the timings of publication in due course.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been admitted to hospital whilst staying in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel since such facilities were opened.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what pr option of families who have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel have been referred for additional safeguarding since February 2021.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of families who have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel have received support from social workers since February 2021.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children of each age have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel since February 2021.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many (a) families and (b) children aged 12 or younger have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel since February 2021.

The information is not held in the format requested and to obtain it would incur disproportionate cost.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department has provided to families who have been required to stay in a managed covid-19 quarantine hotel.

All managed quarantine hotels provide information about the services and support available, which is set out in a welcome pack provided on arrival. The hotels selected for managed quarantine are able to meet the vast majority of requirements. Hotels will prioritise allocating larger or connecting rooms to families. There are opportunities to exercise outside as arranged with the hotel security guards. Medical and mental health support is provided where needed, together with access to social workers for advice and support.

Food is available throughout the day with a choice of menus accommodating dietary requirements, delivered to the hotel rooms. All rooms have televisions and free WiFi.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have applied for exemption from managed covid-19 quarantine hotel on medical grounds since such facilities were opened.

Since February 2021 around 60 people have been granted exemptions from COVID-19 managed quarantine facilities on medical grounds. We do not have data on how many people have applied for exemption from COVID-19 managed quarantine facilities on medical grounds.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been granted exemption from managed covid-19 quarantine hotels on medical grounds since such facilities were opened.

Since February 2021 around 60 people have been granted exemptions from COVID-19 managed quarantine facilities on medical grounds. We do not have data on how many people have applied for exemption from COVID-19 managed quarantine facilities on medical grounds.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the list of medical conditions that exempt an individual from the requirement to stay in a managed quarantine hotel on their return from a covid-19 red list country.

There are some extremely limited circumstances where due to pre-existing severe medical conditions or vulnerabilities, an individual may be incapable of entering a managed quarantine facility because they cannot be supported there. There is not a pre-defined list of medical conditions that exempt an individual from the requirement to stay in a managed quarantine hotel on arrival from a ‘red list’ country as each case is assessed on an individual basis taking into account the needs of the traveller and the impact that quarantine within a hotel facility would have upon their health and wellbeing.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what financial support his Department is providing to travellers on low incomes with limited savings that are required to pay for a managed quarantine hotel on returning to the UK from countries on the covid-19 red list travel ban.

For those facing significant financial hardship as a result of the managed quarantine charge, there is an opportunity to apply for a deferred repayment plan when booking. We have updated the guidance on GOV.UK as it previously referred only to those on income-related benefits.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that there is adequate capacity in managed covid-19 quarantine hotels to accommodate travellers who are returning from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

An additional seven hotels have been brought into the Managed Quarantine Service to increase hotel availability. In addition, discussions are underway with other regional airports to become designated ‘red list’ arrival ports which will also add additional capacity in areas outside of the South East. We closely monitor future demand against available hotel capacity and adjust the number of hotels contracted to support managed quarantine accordingly.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking with the corporate travel management sector to tackle the issue of travellers returning to the UK from covid-19 red list countries being unable to book accommodation in a managed quarantine hotel.

An additional seven hotels have been brought into the Managed Quarantine Service to increase hotel availability. In addition, discussions are underway with other regional airports to become a designated ‘red list’ arrival ports which will also add additional capacity in areas outside of the South East. We closely monitor future demand against available hotel capacity and adjust the number of hotels accordingly.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to end the use by social care providers of lump-sum payments for staff working sleep-in shifts and to encourage providers to pay staff for all hours spent on sleep-in shifts.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment that workers on ‘sleep-in’ shifts are only entitled to the minimum wage for the time they are awake for the purpose of working.

The vast majority of care workers are employed by private sector providers who ultimately set their pay, independent of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine a fair rate of pay based on local market conditions. The Government is working closely with local authorities and providers in order to consider the implications of the judgement for the sector and next steps.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to encourage social care providers to increase payments to staff working sleep-in shifts.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment that workers on ‘sleep-in’ shifts are only entitled to the minimum wage for the time they are awake for the purpose of working.

The vast majority of care workers are employed by private sector providers who ultimately set their pay, independent of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine a fair rate of pay based on local market conditions. The Government is working closely with local authorities and providers in order to consider the implications of the judgement for the sector and next steps.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that social care providers are not reducing the amount paid to staff working sleep-in shifts following the Supreme Court ruling of 19 March 2021 on sleep-in shifts.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment that workers on ‘sleep-in’ shifts are only entitled to the minimum wage for the time they are awake for the purpose of working.

The vast majority of care workers are employed by private sector providers who ultimately set their pay, independent of central Government. Local authorities work with care providers to determine a fair rate of pay based on local market conditions. The Government is working closely with local authorities and providers in order to consider the implications of the judgement for the sector and next steps.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the average number of hours that social care staff on sleep-in shifts spend (a) working and (b)sleeping.

We have made no such assessment.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the workload of social care staff working sleep-in shifts.

We have made no such assessment.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government plans to bring forward legislation proposals for sleep-in shifts in the social care sector to be considered working time for the purposes of calculating compliance with the National Minimum Wage.

The Supreme Court has upheld the Court of Appeal judgment where workers on ‘sleep-in’ shifts are entitled to the minimum wage for the time they are awake for the purpose of working. The Government is working closely with local authorities and providers in order to consider whether this judgement might have implications with respect to the provision of social care more generally.

The Government is considering the implications of the judgement with care commissioners and providers to consider what action, if any, is needed. We have no plans to bring forward legislative proposals to amend National Minimum Wage regulations.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the list of medical conditions that would exempt an individual from the requirement to stay in a managed quarantine hotel on their return from a covid-19 red list country.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking with Corporate Travel Management to tackle the issue of travellers returning to the UK from covid-19 red list countries unable to book accommodation in a managed quarantine hotel.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what financial support his Department is providing to travellers on low incomes with limited savings that are required to pay for a managed quarantine hotel on returning to the UK from countries on the red list travel ban.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that there is sufficient capacity in managed quarantine hotels to accommodate travellers who are returning from Pakistan and Bangladesh.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the advice from the Joint Biosecurity Centre on expanding the countries on the red list travel ban to include (a) Pakistan and (b) Bangladesh.

Decisions to add countries, including Pakistan and Bangladesh, to the ‘red list’ are taken by Ministers informed by evidence including the Joint Biosecurity Centre’s analysis as well as other relevant information about the risk of the spread of variant. The advice, evidence and methodology which informs these decisions relates to on-going development of Government policy and therefore cannot be published at this time.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many positive tests for covid-19 have been recorded in the City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council local authority area on each day since 1 May 2020 in (a) Pillar 1 tests and (b) Pillar 2 tests.

Public Health England publishes the combined Pillar 1 and Pillar 2 number of confirmed cases in Bradford local authority is available at the following links:

https://coronavirus-staging.data.gov.uk/cases?areaType=ltla&areaName=Bradford

https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/#category=ltlas&map=rate

Local authorities and Directors of Public Health receive data on each case with postcode data.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason postcode level Pillar 2 data from the National Testing Programme dashboard was not provided to local authority Directors of Public Health for their local authority area on a daily basis.

NHS Test and Trace have compiled a detailed local authority dashboard which has been available since 11 June. This includes a total-local authority specific view of the number of tests conducted, the total number of positive cases and a rolling average for Pillar 1 and Pillar 2, as well as information on 111, 999 and online triage cases related to COVID-19. The dashboard is updated by Public Health England daily.

On 24 June we made available secure postcode-level and individual case testing data with all Directors of Public Health with upper tier local authorities – this is available to them at any time to access using their own unique authentication details. As the information contained is personally identifiable, we do need a specific data sharing agreement in place with a specific named individual. Due to data protection laws, the users are typically the Director of Public Health, who are granted access once they have returned the data sharing agreement.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether local authorities are able to share postcode level Pillar 2 covid-19 testing data with local partners.

Data, including pillar 2 testing data, is provided to local authorities through a Data Sharing Agreement (DSA). This DSA grants the local authority data controllership so it is within their gift to determine how and with who they share it, ensuring compliance with the appropriate guidance.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason local authority Directors of Public Health were not automatically granted access to the National Testing Programme dashboard for their local authority area.

From 11 June, NHS Digital, with the support of the Department, made available an operational data dashboard – including counts of total tests, total positives and total voids per local authority - to Directors of Public Health. This was to support Directors of Public Health and local authorities’ operational needs while more detailed data sharing was being put in place. We are now making this even more detailed so users can drill down to Lower Super Output Area – on average 1,700 people.

Public Health England began providing record level positive test data, including postcodes, to local authorities, including Directors of Public Health, on 24 June. As the information contained is personally identifiable, we do need a specific data sharing agreement in place with a specific named individual. Because of data protection, the users are typically the Director of Public Health. They are granted access once they have returned the data sharing agreement.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many applications to access to the National Testing Programme dashboard were granted for each local authority on each day since 8 June 2020.

Since June, we have been working with Public Health England and the Joint Biosecurity Centre to provide local authorities with easy-to-use dashboard of testing and triage data. This can be used to monitor their area for flare-ups of the disease so that they can make critical decisions in their areas.

Public Health England started providing individual-level, test data on the 24 June enabled through a data sharing agreement with Directors of Public Health.

Since 10 June all local authorities have access to their data and the number of local authorities requesting access to the dashboard so far is 1,199 and the number granted is 1,130.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many applications to access the National Testing Programme dashboard were received from each local authority on each day since 8 June 2020.

Since June, we have been working with Public Health England and the Joint Biosecurity Centre to provide local authorities with easy-to-use dashboard of testing and triage data. This can be used to monitor their area for flare-ups of the disease so that they can make critical decisions in their areas.

Public Health England started providing individual-level, test data on the 24 June enabled through a data sharing agreement with Directors of Public Health.

Since 10 June all local authorities have access to their data and the number of local authorities requesting access to the dashboard so far is 1,199 and the number granted is 1,130.

20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children aged under ten years old in Bradford were admitted to hospital for tooth decay in each year since 2010.

A table showing the count of finished admission episodes with a primary diagnosis of dental caries (tooth decay) for patients aged under 10 years old and that are resident in the Bradford area is attached.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the cost was to the public purse of tooth extractions in Bradford in each year since 2010.

The information is not available in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much revenue raised by NHS England's dental practices was re-invested in dental practices in Bradford in each year from 2010.

Data is not held in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much revenue was raised by NHS England from dental practices in Bradford in each year since 2010.

Data is not held in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children under ten years old had tooth extractions in Bradford in each year since 2010.

The data is not held in the format requested.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the final wishes of people in relation to organ donation in the absence of a decision recorded on the NHS Organ Donation Register following the transition to an opt-out system.

The new consent arrangements for organ and tissue donation that the Government aims to introduce from spring 2020, known as ‘opt-out' or ‘deemed consent’, mean that all adults over 18 will be considered potential organ and tissue donors after death, unless they make a decision that they do not want to be a donor, they have nominated a representative to make a decision on their behalf after death, or are in an excluded group.

A decision either to donate or to not donate organs and tissues can be made by recording a decision on the Organ Donor Register, or in other ways, both written and verbal, including telling your family.

Under the new arrangements, the family of the deceased will continue to be consulted and they will still be able to provide information about their loved one's wishes. If they have information that their loved one would not have wanted to donate their organs, organ donation will not go ahead.

8th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what information his Department holds on whether UK-manufactured (a) arms and (b) weapons components have been used in (i) Israel and (ii) the Palestinian Occupied Territories.

The export of strategic goods is controlled by export licensing and the government publishes data on its export licensing decisions: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/strategic-export-controls-licensing-dataLicences. We continue to monitor closely the situation in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories. All export licence applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis against the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria. We will not issue an export licence to any destination where to do so would be inconsistent with the Criteria. Licences are kept under careful review and we are able to amend, suspend or revoke extant licences, or refuse new licence applications, as circumstances require.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Feb 2024
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, what information his Department holds on whether UK-manufactured (a) weapons and (b) components of weapons have been used in countries it has assessed as being in potential breach of (i) the Genocide Convention and (ii) Article 8 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.

The Government operates a robust and thorough assessment of licence applications against the Strategic Export Licensing Criteria, and we will not grant an export licence if to do so would be inconsistent with that Criteria including where there is a clear risk that the items might be used to commit or facilitate a serious violation of International Humanitarian Law.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, if he will hold discussions with his Israeli counterpart on the potential merits of re-opening additional crossings into Gaza for humanitarian access.

The FCDO is actively engaging with international partners and those operating on the ground to do all we can to address the humanitarian crisis in Gaza. The Prime Minister and the Foreign Secretary engage regularly and closely with regional counterparts including Israel and Egypt on the humanitarian response. However, the flow of aid into and through Gaza continues to be insufficient and we are urgently exploring all diplomatic options to increase this, including urging Israel to open other existing land border crossings such as Kerem Shalom. Fuel remains a critical component and without sufficient aid, fuel cannot be distributed by humanitarian organisations and hospitals, bakeries as well as desalination plants cannot operate. We are also actively exploring other routes for aid to get into Gaza. The UK Government has already announced £60 million in humanitarian funding and has sent more than 74 tonnes of emergency relief for civilians in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of the humanitarian pause in the conflict between Israel and Hamas on the provision of humanitarian aid to people in Gaza.

The recent humanitarian pause demonstrated what can be achieved to get vital aid into Gaza including the levels of aid that is possible and it is important that this level of aid is now, at a minimum, sustained. The UK is supportive of humanitarian pauses as part of measures to facilitate the flow of life-saving humanitarian aid and ensure civilians are safe. The FCDO is actively engaging with international partners and those operating on the ground to do all we can to address the humanitarian crisis in Gaza. We will continue to use all the tools of British diplomacy and development to enhance the prospects of peace and stability in the region, working closely with our partners.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Dec 2023
To ask the Minister of State, Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of trends in the level of violence in the West Bank.

We are clear that settler violence and the targeting of Palestinian civilians in the West Bank is completely unacceptable. It undermines security and stability at a time when Israelis and Palestinians are desperate for both and increases the risks of atrocities and intercommunal violence. Israel must prevent these acts and hold those responsible to account, ensuring any perpetrators are arrested and prosecuted. Ultimately, to prevent further conflict, there must be a political solution: a two-state solution which provides justice and security for both Israelis and Palestinians, ending the security threat posed by Hamas and with the Israelis taking more precautions regarding civilians and tackling settler violence.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
13th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether the Prime Minister raised the provision of arms to Myanmar by Indian suppliers with Prime Minister Modi at the G20 Summit.

Discussions between the Prime Minister and Prime Minister Modi covered the breadth and depth of the UK-India relationship, ranging from trade to cooperation on education, research and defence.

Although the provision of arms to Myanmar was not discussed, we continue to raise this issue bilaterally with those who are reported to be providing arms to the Myanmar military.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

The FCDO is liaising with Civil Service HR colleagues and other government departments to work through the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023. In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to produce the data and Ethnicity Pay Reports. The outcomes of this work will inform whether we are able to publish a report for 2023/2024. More generally the Civil Service is undertaking extensive work both centrally and within departments to promote diversity across its workplaces, including ethnicity.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether he has had recent discussions with his counterparts in other high-income countries on investing a higher proportion of Official Development Assistance in foundational literacy and numeracy programmes.

FCDO and likeminded education partners have come together to promote a shared commitment to improving foundational learning for all. At the Transforming Education Summit in September 2022, countries and organisations were invited to endorse a Commitment to Action on Foundational Learning. This aims to build a global coalition of education partners collaborating on foundational learning. The UK is also asking the G7 and G20 to focus on foundational learning, including by prioritising more global Official Development Assistance (ODA) for education. This builds on our 2021 G7 Presidency, where we secured G7 support for two Global Objectives on girls' access and foundational learning objectives.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent steps his Department has taken to intervene in the Rohingya genocide case before the International Court of Justice.

On 25 August 2022, the UK announced its intention to intervene in the International Court of Justice (ICJ) case regarding Myanmar's compliance with its obligations under the Genocide Convention, in relation to acts committed against the Rohingya. The UK is currently working on the scope of its intervention, including detailed consideration of the legal arguments. It intends to make a formal declaration to the Court in due course.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Dec 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of the findings of the report by Amnesty International entitled Deadly Cargo: Exposing the Supply Chain that Fuels War Crimes in Myanmar, published on 3 November 2022, on the supply of aviation fuel to Myanmar.

We welcome Amnesty International's important report on the supply of aviation fuel to Myanmar. It clearly sets out the risks associated with the provision of aviation fuel to Myanmar, which is used to facilitate military airstrikes against the civilian population.

On 28 February 2022, the UK updated its Overseas Business Risk Guidance to make it clear that UK businesses should conduct thorough supply chain due diligence to ensure that commodities such as aviation fuel do not reach the Myanmar military. The UK is also using targeted sanctions and lobbying against those who provide weapons and parts to the Myanmar Air Force.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make it his policy to allocate £170 million to the UN Education Cannot Wait fund over the next three years.

The UK Government is proud to be a co-founding member and leading donor to Education Cannot Wait (ECW). We are working through options for our future commitment to ECW. The Government remains committed to transparency and will provide an update to Parliament on spending plans in due course.

Andrew Mitchell
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office) (Minister for Development)
21st Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the potential impact of reserving posts in the Diplomatic Service and his Department to UK nationals on the (a) efficacy of and (b) recruitment of expertise for UK Official Development Assistance programmes.

The Civil Service Nationality Rules (CSNR) set out who is eligible to be employed in the Civil Service. Under the CSNRs, all posts in the Diplomatic Service were reserved for British nationals only. When the FCDO was formed, the Foreign Secretary decided that a reserved model best meets with the FCDO's security and representational requirements.

FCDO continues to review workforce policies to ensure that it has access to the skills and experience to deliver its objectives.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to help support the Afghan relatives of British citizens who are under threat in that country.

Since the end of Op PITTING, the UK has supported over 4,600 individuals to leave Afghanistan, including British Nationals and their families and other eligible Afghans. We continue to work to ensure that the families of British nationals with entry clearance and those eligible for resettlement through the Afghanistan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) and Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS), are able to come to the UK. The UK is providing £286 million of humanitarian assistance to Afghanistan in 2022/23 and, together with our international allies, we are working to hold the Taliban to their commitments on human rights and safe passage for those wishing to leave the country. We continue to advise against travel to Afghanistan and cannot provide consular services in person in country as our Embassy is closed but have consular teams available in neighbouring countries.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what support her Department is providing to British nationals in Afghanistan in need of urgent medical treatment.

Since 28 August 2021 the British Embassy in Kabul has suspended in-country operations. FCDO Travel Advice for Afghanistan states that only very limited medical facilities are available in Afghanistan and makes clear that consular assistance can only be provided remotely and is extremely limited. British nationals in Afghanistan can continue to access 24 hour consular assistance by phone. We can provide in-person consular assistance in neighbouring countries.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to engage with the Rohingya community as part of the UK’s relations with the Government of Myanmar.

The UK is committed to ensuring that the voices of Rohingya people are at the heart of our policy making. We have worked to keep the Rohingya crisis on the international agenda, at both the UN Security Council and the UN Human Rights Council.

The UK funded Rohingya refugees to attend the International Court of Justice in December 2019 to provide testimony of their experiences. Rohingya leaders have met regularly with FCDO Ministers over the last few years, both in person and virtually. The Minister responsible for South Asia, Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, visited the refugee camps in Cox's Bazar in late 2021, where he spent the day meeting Rohingya refugees and listening to their experiences. My officials have a strong relationship with the Rohingya community based in Bradford, last visiting in October 2019, shortly before the pandemic.

Amanda Milling
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the safe return of British nationals with health concerns who remain stranded abroad during the covid-19 pandemic.

Helping British travellers who need and want to return to the UK is one of the Government's highest priorities. Since the outbreak in Wuhan, we estimate that over 1.3 million people have returned to the UK via commercial routes - the majority supported by our work to keep vital routes open. We have brought home over 38,000 people on 186 special charter flights organised by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, from 57 countries and territories. Our first priority was to bring back those who are vulnerable, who clearly face the greatest risk. We sought to ensure that space was made available on flight for acutely vulnerable British nationals of who we were aware, and - where possible - prioritised passengers by vulnerability.

We believe the vast majority of British travellers seeking to return to the UK - who don't have commercial options - have now done so. Through our embassies, and a dedicated central team, we continue to support British nationals who need consular support and are working to ensure commercial routes are maintained. We are monitoring risks globally and continue to review how best to provide assistance where necessary. Our travel advice and social media pages are also regularly updated to ensure that those wishing to return are aware of further developments.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what estimate his Department has made of the number of British nationals who remain stranded abroad as a result of covid-19 travel restrictions and flight cancellations.

Helping British travellers who need and want to return to the UK is one of the Government's highest priorities. Since the outbreak in Wuhan, we estimate that over 1.3 million people have returned to the UK via commercial routes - the majority supported by our work to keep vital routes open. We have brought home over 38,000 people on 186 special charter flights organised by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, from 57 countries and territories. Our first priority was to bring back those who are vulnerable, who clearly face the greatest risk. We sought to ensure that space was made available on flight for acutely vulnerable British nationals of who we were aware, and - where possible - prioritised passengers by vulnerability.

We believe the vast majority of British travellers seeking to return to the UK - who don't have commercial options - have now done so. Through our embassies, and a dedicated central team, we continue to support British nationals who need consular support and are working to ensure commercial routes are maintained. We are monitoring risks globally and continue to review how best to provide assistance where necessary. Our travel advice and social media pages are also regularly updated to ensure that those wishing to return are aware of further developments.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many UK nationals have been detained in India under Coronavirus laws in that country.

We are aware that British Nationals have been detained across India for breaching coronavirus lockdown laws. One has since returned to the UK and we are in contact with all of the others. We have raised individual medical and welfare concerns with the Indian authorities. Following the conclusion of their legal cases, we will assist with their return to the UK.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what consular contact his Department has provided to UK nationals in India detained under Coronavirus laws in that country.

We are aware that British Nationals have been detained across India for breaching coronavirus lockdown laws. One has since returned to the UK and we are in contact with all of the others. We have raised individual medical and welfare concerns with the Indian authorities. Following the conclusion of their legal cases, we will assist with their return to the UK.

6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the safe return of UK citizens in India who have been detained under coronavirus laws in that country.

We are aware that British Nationals have been detained across India for breaching coronavirus lockdown laws. One has since returned to the UK and we are in contact with all of the others. We have raised individual medical and welfare concerns with the Indian authorities. Following the conclusion of their legal cases, we will assist with their return to the UK.

25th Jan 2024
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether HMRC has made a recent assessment of the adequacy of consumer protection regulation for individuals submitting tax rebate applications to HMRC through accounting companies.

The Government is committed to maintaining trust in the tax system and working with taxpayers to help them get their tax right. However, the Government is aware that some taxpayers face issues and feel misled when using companies that specialise in claiming tax refunds from HMRC.

The Government is working with regulators and other key partners to ensure that the current legal framework is robust in prohibiting harmful business practices to consumer contracts. This includes introducing expectations of transparency in the HMRC Standard for Agents, updated in January 2023, to ensure customers are made aware of the agent’s fees and charging structure.

There are many ways in which a customer can authorise a third party to act on their behalf. HMRC is also developing options for a more modern and secure approach to agent authorisation.

HMRC continues to monitor tax agents and challenge them when there are potential concerns about their practices. HMRC then takes action by either issuing penalties, suspending claims or refusing to deal with an agent, and wherever necessary working with the Police to support their investigations.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department plans to conduct an investigation with HMRC into the practices of Apostle Accounting Ltd following its liquidation.

HMRC cannot comment on any individual or identifiable businesses and their tax affairs due to strict confidentiality rules, and can neither confirm or deny investigations.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has held with HMRC on payment requests issued to Apostle Accounting Ltd customers following HMRC compliance checks.

HMRC cannot comment on any individual or identifiable businesses and their tax affairs due to strict confidentiality.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Autumn Statement 2023 on 22 November 2023, Official Report, column 326, what funding he provides to tackle racism against ethnic minority communities in the UK.

The Government is committed to the right of individuals to freely practise their religion. That is why in June 2023, building on the work of the Places of Worship Protective Security Funding Scheme, the Security Minister pledged £24.5 million of funding in 2023-24 to protect mosques and Muslim faith schools through the Protective Security for Mosques Scheme, providing security measures like CCTV and intruder alarms. In light of the crisis in Israel and Gaza, the Home Secretary announced in October that the Government will grant an additional £3 million to the Community Security Trust to support Jewish communities in the UK. At the Autumn Statement, the Chancellor announced that this would be extended to 2024-25. The Home Office has also increased available funding for the Protective Security for Mosques Scheme by 20%

The Government is also taking strides to combat ethnic discrimination and hate crime. Through the Online Safety Act 2023, we are compelling social media companies to tackle discriminatory content posted on their platforms. The also Government provides £300,000 in annual grant funding to the National Online Hate Crime Hub, which provides expert advice to police investigating hate crimes.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
23rd Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Autumn Statement 2023 on 22 November 2023, Official Report, column 326, what funding he provides to tackle racism against Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities in the UK.

The Government is committed to the right of individuals to freely practise their religion. That is why in June 2023, building on the work of the Places of Worship Protective Security Funding Scheme, the Security Minister pledged £24.5 million of funding in 2023-24 to protect mosques and Muslim faith schools through the Protective Security for Mosques Scheme, providing security measures like CCTV and intruder alarms. In light of the crisis in Israel and Gaza, the Home Secretary announced in October that the Government will grant an additional £3 million to the Community Security Trust to support Jewish communities in the UK. At the Autumn Statement, the Chancellor announced that this would be extended to 2024-25. The Home Office has also increased available funding for the Protective Security for Mosques Scheme by 20%

The Government is also taking strides to combat ethnic discrimination and hate crime. Through the Online Safety Act 2023, we are compelling social media companies to tackle discriminatory content posted on their platforms. The also Government provides £300,000 in annual grant funding to the National Online Hate Crime Hub, which provides expert advice to police investigating hate crimes.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
23rd Nov 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to his Autumn Statement 2023 on 22 November 2023, Official Report, column 326, what funding he provides to tackle Islamophobia in the UK.

The Government is committed to the right of individuals to freely practise their religion. That is why in June 2023, building on the work of the Places of Worship Protective Security Funding Scheme, the Security Minister pledged £24.5 million of funding in 2023-24 to protect mosques and Muslim faith schools through the Protective Security for Mosques Scheme, providing security measures like CCTV and intruder alarms. In light of the crisis in Israel and Gaza, the Home Secretary announced in October that the Government will grant an additional £3 million to the Community Security Trust to support Jewish communities in the UK. At the Autumn Statement, the Chancellor announced that this would be extended to 2024-25. The Home Office has also increased available funding for the Protective Security for Mosques Scheme by 20%

The Government is also taking strides to combat ethnic discrimination and hate crime. Through the Online Safety Act 2023, we are compelling social media companies to tackle discriminatory content posted on their platforms. The also Government provides £300,000 in annual grant funding to the National Online Hate Crime Hub, which provides expert advice to police investigating hate crimes.

Laura Trott
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
17th May 2023
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

We are currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting in the Civil Service.

Although Ethnicity Pay Gap Reporting is voluntary, HM Treasury is keen to publish a report.

In conjunction with the HR expert services team for the Civil Service and other government departments, we are working through the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023.

In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, departments are looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used to produce the data.

The outcomes of this development work will inform whether we are able to publish a report for 2023/2024.

Gareth Davies
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he had discussions with the Prime Minister on the pensions triple lock prior to 19 October 2022.

The Chancellor meets regularly with the Prime Minister. The Government remains committed to the Triple Lock for this Parliament.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
18th Oct 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he will appoint representatives of trade unions to the Economic Advisory Council.

On 17th October, the Chancellor announced that he would establish an Economic Advisory Council. This will act as a consultative forum for the government to be advised on UK and international economics and financial markets. The Council will consist of leading and respected economists.

The Chancellor has announced the initial members to form the council, with further members to be added in due course. All members have been chosen for their personal knowledge and expertise, as relevant to advising the government on the UK economy. Members can be added or removed at the Chancellor’s discretion.

The Council members, alongside the role and purpose of the Council, will be reviewed after six months.

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
17th Oct 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the correspondence from the Chair of Northern Powerhouse Rail to the Prime Minister of 7 September 2022, if he will make it his policy to provide £43 billion of funding for the construction of Northern Powerhouse Rail.

The Integrated Rail Plan (IRP) for the North and the Midlands sets out a £96 billion package to overhaul and modernise rail connections across the North and Midlands over the next 30 years.

As set out in the IRP, the Government will deliver our core commitments first. This includes the first phase of Northern Powerhouse Rail, which will improve journeys from Manchester to Leeds, and from Leeds onto Bradford and York. We will keep options to expand the network under consideration, looking at the delivery of our core commitments, and depending on how demand and economic growth recover.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
17th Oct 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on when the Government will set out a timetable for the (a) funding and (b) construction of Northern Powerhouse Rail.

The Integrated Rail Plan (IRP) for the North and the Midlands sets out a £96 billion package to overhaul and modernise rail connections across the North and Midlands over the next 30 years.

As set out in the IRP, the Government will deliver our core commitments first. This includes the first phase of Northern Powerhouse Rail, which will improve journeys from Manchester to Leeds, and from Leeds onto Bradford and York. We will keep options to expand the network under consideration, looking at the delivery of our core commitments, and depending on how demand and economic growth recover.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Oct 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether it is his Department's intention to publish fiscal plans and economic forecasts on 31 October 2022.

The government will publish the Medium-Term Fiscal Plan on 31 October, accompanied by an independent Office for Budget Responsibility economic and fiscal forecast.

The Fiscal Plan will set out the government’s responsible fiscal approach fully, including how it will reduce debt as a percentage of GDP over the medium term.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when the Government plans to bring forward legislation setting geographic requirements to ensure the provision of withdrawal and deposit facilities to meet cash needs.

The Government has introduced legislation to protect access to cash through Clause 47 and Schedule 8 of the Financial Services and Markets Bill. The Bill intends to establish the Financial Conduct Authority as the lead regulator for cash access and provide it with appropriate powers to seek to ensure reasonable provision of withdrawal and deposit facilities.

The Bill enables HM Treasury to set out the Government’s policy on cash access in respect of cash withdrawal and deposit services, and for urban and rural areas. The FCA will be required to have regard to this in carrying out its responsibilities under the legislation. The Government will set out further details in due course.

Further details about the Financial Services and Markets Bill can be found on the Parliament website: https://bills.parliament.uk/bills/3326

Andrew Griffith
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the marginal rate of tax, taking student loan repayments into consideration, will be for a graduate earning over £50,270 after the Government's National Insurance rise and changes to the student loan system are implemented.

The Health and Social Care Levy introduces a new 1.25 per cent tax. In the 2022-23 tax year this will be collected via a temporary increase to National Insurance contributions (NICs). Revenue raised will be ringfenced to support UK health and social care bodies.

The rate of repayment for student loans remains at 9 per cent on all income above the relevant threshold for Plan 1, Plan 2, and Plan 4 loans. For Post Graduate Loans (PGL) the repayment rate is 6 per cent.

In 2022-23, a graduate employee with earnings of £27,295, excluding a PGL loan, will have a marginal deduction rate of 42.25 per cent. This is made up of Income Tax (20 per cent), NICs (13.25 per cent), and Student Loan deduction (9 per cent).

In contrast, a graduate employee with earnings of £50,270 would have a marginal deduction rate of 52.25 per cent. This is made up of Income Tax (40 per cent), NICs (3.25 per cent), and Student Loan deduction (9 per cent).

Other factors including any reliefs, pension contributions, or receipt of certain means-tested welfare benefits could adjust these marginal deduction rates.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the marginal rate of tax, taking student loan repayments into consideration, will be for a graduate earning over £27,295 after the Government's National Insurance rise and changes to the student loan system are implemented.

The Health and Social Care Levy introduces a new 1.25 per cent tax. In the 2022-23 tax year this will be collected via a temporary increase to National Insurance contributions (NICs). Revenue raised will be ringfenced to support UK health and social care bodies.

The rate of repayment for student loans remains at 9 per cent on all income above the relevant threshold for Plan 1, Plan 2, and Plan 4 loans. For Post Graduate Loans (PGL) the repayment rate is 6 per cent.

In 2022-23, a graduate employee with earnings of £27,295, excluding a PGL loan, will have a marginal deduction rate of 42.25 per cent. This is made up of Income Tax (20 per cent), NICs (13.25 per cent), and Student Loan deduction (9 per cent).

In contrast, a graduate employee with earnings of £50,270 would have a marginal deduction rate of 52.25 per cent. This is made up of Income Tax (40 per cent), NICs (3.25 per cent), and Student Loan deduction (9 per cent).

Other factors including any reliefs, pension contributions, or receipt of certain means-tested welfare benefits could adjust these marginal deduction rates.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of the population will pay more as a result of the National Insurance Contribution rise in April 2022 than they will receive through the Council Tax Rebate.

The Treasury publishes analysis alongside fiscal events setting out the combined impact on households of government tax and spend decisions in the round. Analysis published at Autumn Budget 21 showed that tax and spend changes announced by this government are progressive overall, with low-income households on average contributing the least in tax and receiving most benefit from spending.

Individually, these measures are progressive. The highest earning 15 per cent pay around half of the revenues for the Health and Social Care Levy. Around 80% of households in England are in Council Tax Bands A-D, and so will benefit from this rebate.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the energy bill discount scheme will be mandatory for all who qualify.

All domestic electricity customers in Great Britain will receive a £200 reduction in their electricity costs from this October. This will be delivered via energy suppliers and will be clearly identifiable as a line item on electricity bills.

This will help people with the increase in energy bills by spreading the increased costs over a few years, so they are more manageable for households.

The energy bill reduction is not a loan – there is no interest due on it, no debt attached to it, and it will not affect your credit rating.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether people will be exempt from repaying loans under the energy bill discount scheme as a result of their financial circumstances.

All domestic electricity customers in Great Britain will receive a £200 reduction in their electricity costs from this October. This will be delivered via energy suppliers and will be clearly identifiable as a line item on electricity bills.

This will help people with the increase in energy bills by spreading the increased costs over a few years, so they are more manageable for households. This will give households time for their finances to adjust rather than having to deal with the whole price increase up front, providing relief to millions of households.

The energy bill reduction is not a loan - there is no interest due on it, no debt attached to it, and it will not affect recipients’ credit rating.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether people exempt from paying council tax will qualify for the council tax rebate.

The government has announced a £150 non-repayable council tax rebate from April this year for households in England in council tax bands A-D.

The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities have published guidance on eligibility among households that are exempt from council tax; some of these households might be eligible for the discretionary funding administered by local authorities if they are not eligible for the core scheme.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many applications to the Customs Grant Scheme have been successful.

Since the first wave of the Customs Grant Scheme opened in December 2018 up to 1 June 2021, over 8,500 applications have been successful.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much funding his Department has allocated to businesses under the Customs Grant Scheme.

Since the first wave of the Customs Grant Scheme opened in December 2018 up to 1 June 2021, a total of £81 million has been made available to businesses through the scheme. To date, over £69 million has been paid in total across all waves of the grant.
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many applications his Department has received for the Customs Grant Scheme.

Since the first wave of the Customs Grant Scheme opened in December 2018 up to 1 June 2021, over 14,500 applications have been received.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Government plans to extend the Customs Grant Scheme.

The Customs Grant Scheme first opened in December 2018 and all funding made available through the latest round has now been applied for. There are currently no plans to extend the scheme further.

9th Mar 2021
What recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on the potential economic benefits of including a Bradford city centre stop on the proposed Northern Powerhouse Rail line.

The government will provide better rail connectivity between northern cities, and between London, the Midlands and the north. The Treasury is working closely with the Department for Transport and across government on the Integrated Rail Plan.

This will set out how best to scope, sequence and deliver Northern Powerhouse Rail and other major Network Rail programmes.

The government is committed to transport improvements in West Yorkshire, which has received over £300m in local transport funding. This includes funding to improve transport in Bradford.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reason the membership of the Build Back Better Council does not include representatives of trade unions.

The Build Back Better Business Council has been convened to afford an opportunity to the Government and business leaders to share ideas on achieving the future economic prosperity of the country. The council’s meetings are in addition to the regular and ongoing engagement with trades unions, businesses and business representative groups that takes place across Government. Trades Unions and BROs are important stakeholders and continue to feed into work across Government on economic recovery and future growth. The council’s terms of reference can be found via https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/build-back-better-business-council-terms-of-reference.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions officials in his Department have had with officials in the Department for Transport on the integrated rail plan for the Midlands and the North.

The government is drawing up an Integrated Rail Plan for the Midlands and the north. The Department for Transport is working across government, including with HM Treasury, to look at how best to integrate, scope and deliver Northern Powerhouse Rail, HS2 Phase 2b, Midlands Rail Hub and other major Network Rail enhancement programmes more efficiently and to deliver benefits from investments more quickly.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support has been provided to Bradford Council by his Department to support Afghan refugees leaving interim hotel accommodation.

The UK made an ambitious and generous commitment to help resettle Afghans fleeing persecution and those who served in the UK. Since June 2021, we have brought 24,500 people to safety to the UK.

1,674 people, around half of whom are children, were living in interim accommodation (i.e., hotels/serviced accommodation) at the end of September 2023.

For information on individuals within interim accommodation, including nationality, age, and sex breakdowns, see table Asy_D02 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets: Immigration system statistics quarterly release - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

For data on those in accommodation by location, see the regional and local authority immigration groups data tables.

We are unable to provide a running commentary on interim accommodation and settled accommodation occupation. The next release of Afghan Operational Data is due for release around 22 February 2024.

Local authorities receive integration tariff funding of £20,520 per person, over three years, for each Afghan family they resettle and provide full integration support for this duration.  They have the flexibility to use this funding to contribute towards renting accommodation, including deposit, letting fees and necessary furnishings.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan refugees who left hotel accommodation between 1 and 31 December 2023 have found permanent accommodation in the same local authority area.

The UK made an ambitious and generous commitment to help resettle Afghans fleeing persecution and those who served in the UK. Since June 2021, we have brought 24,500 people to safety to the UK.

1,674 people, around half of whom are children, were living in interim accommodation (i.e., hotels/serviced accommodation) at the end of September 2023.

For information on individuals within interim accommodation, including nationality, age, and sex breakdowns, see table Asy_D02 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets: Immigration system statistics quarterly release - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

For data on those in accommodation by location, see the regional and local authority immigration groups data tables.

We are unable to provide a running commentary on interim accommodation and settled accommodation occupation. The next release of Afghan Operational Data is due for release around 22 February 2024.

Local authorities receive integration tariff funding of £20,520 per person, over three years, for each Afghan family they resettle and provide full integration support for this duration.  They have the flexibility to use this funding to contribute towards renting accommodation, including deposit, letting fees and necessary furnishings.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan refugees housed in interim hotel accommodation were aged (a) zero to three, (b) three to five, (c) five to ten, (d) 10 to 15 and (e) 15 to 18 years old as of 26 December 2023.

The UK made an ambitious and generous commitment to help resettle Afghans fleeing persecution and those who served in the UK. Since June 2021, we have brought 24,500 people to safety to the UK.

1,674 people, around half of whom are children, were living in interim accommodation (i.e., hotels/serviced accommodation) at the end of September 2023.

For information on individuals within interim accommodation, including nationality, age, and sex breakdowns, see table Asy_D02 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets: Immigration system statistics quarterly release - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

For data on those in accommodation by location, see the regional and local authority immigration groups data tables.

We are unable to provide a running commentary on interim accommodation and settled accommodation occupation. The next release of Afghan Operational Data is due for release around 22 February 2024.

Local authorities receive integration tariff funding of £20,520 per person, over three years, for each Afghan family they resettle and provide full integration support for this duration.  They have the flexibility to use this funding to contribute towards renting accommodation, including deposit, letting fees and necessary furnishings.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan refugees were housed in interim hotel accommodation as of (a) 5 December 2023, (b) 12 December 2023, (c) 19 December 2023, (d) 26 December 2023 and (e) 31 December 2023.

The UK made an ambitious and generous commitment to help resettle Afghans fleeing persecution and those who served in the UK. Since June 2021, we have brought 24,500 people to safety to the UK.

1,674 people, around half of whom are children, were living in interim accommodation (i.e., hotels/serviced accommodation) at the end of September 2023.

For information on individuals within interim accommodation, including nationality, age, and sex breakdowns, see table Asy_D02 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets: Immigration system statistics quarterly release - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk).

For data on those in accommodation by location, see the regional and local authority immigration groups data tables.

We are unable to provide a running commentary on interim accommodation and settled accommodation occupation. The next release of Afghan Operational Data is due for release around 22 February 2024.

Local authorities receive integration tariff funding of £20,520 per person, over three years, for each Afghan family they resettle and provide full integration support for this duration.  They have the flexibility to use this funding to contribute towards renting accommodation, including deposit, letting fees and necessary furnishings.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
11th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what his planned timetable is to publish further information about the Government's proposed increases to the minimum income requirement for family visas.

The revised minimum income requirement will be implemented in spring 2024.

The Government will set out any transitional provisions associated with this increase in January.

Any applications already submitted will be considered in line with the existing policy.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
27th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what police protection is provided to (a) individuals, (b) embassies and (c) high commissions on the London diplomatic list.

The UK Government’s protective security system is rigorous and proportionate.

It is our longstanding policy not to provide detailed information on those arrangements, as doing so could compromise their integrity and affect individuals' and sites' security.

Tom Tugendhat
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
4th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers who left West Yorkshire Police had a length of service that was (a) less than one year, (b) one year to less than two years, (c) two years to less than five years, (d) five years to less than 10 years and (e) more than 10 years in the year to 31 March in each year since 2010.

The Home Office collects and publishes information on the length of service of police officers in England and Wales, broken down by Police Force Area (PFA), annually in the ‘Police Workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulleting which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Information on the length of service of police officers employed by West Yorkshire Police can be found in table JL5 of the data tables accompanying each publication for the year ending 31 March 2016 onwards.

The Home Office does not publish information on the length of service of police officers that have left the police service. The Home Office collects and publishes data annually on the number of police officers leaving the police service in the ‘Police Workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin however this does not include information on their length of service.

Data on the number of police officers leaving West Yorkshire Police, in the years ending March 2007 to 2023, can be found in the ‘Leavers Open Data Table’ here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1172932/open-data-table-police-workforce-leavers-260723.ods.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
4th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of police officers had a length of service that was (a) less than one year, (b) one year to less than two years, (c) two years to less than five years, (d) five years to less than 10 years and (e) more than 10 years in West Yorkshire as of 31 March in each year since 2010.

The Home Office collects and publishes information on the length of service of police officers in England and Wales, broken down by Police Force Area (PFA), annually in the ‘Police Workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulleting which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Information on the length of service of police officers employed by West Yorkshire Police can be found in table JL5 of the data tables accompanying each publication for the year ending 31 March 2016 onwards.

The Home Office does not publish information on the length of service of police officers that have left the police service. The Home Office collects and publishes data annually on the number of police officers leaving the police service in the ‘Police Workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin however this does not include information on their length of service.

Data on the number of police officers leaving West Yorkshire Police, in the years ending March 2007 to 2023, can be found in the ‘Leavers Open Data Table’ here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1172932/open-data-table-police-workforce-leavers-260723.ods.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

The Home Office is currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting along with the wider Civil Service. Ethnicity Pay Gap Reporting is voluntary. We are working with Civil Service HR colleagues and other government departments to work through the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023.

In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used in departments to produce the data.The outcomes of this development work will inform whether we are able to publish a report for 2023/2024.

More generally the Department is undertaking extensive work that is aligned with central Cabinet Office led activity to promote diversity in all Civil Service workplaces, including ethnicity.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the UK-Pakistan Readmissions Agreement signed with the Government of Pakistan on 17 August 2022.

The Home Office does not routinely publish Memorandums of Understanding on returns. Publication of such agreements could prejudice relations between the United Kingdom and our international partners. On this occasion we will not be publishing the UK-Pakistan Readmissions Agreement.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps his Department is taking to help people who were placed on a ten year route to settlement in July 2012 and are reaching the end of this ten year period but cannot afford to apply for Indefinite Leave to Remain.

Settlement in the UK is a privilege, not an automatic entitlement. Anyone not qualifying for settlement, including being unable to pay the fee, is able to apply to extend their permission to stay in the UK.

There is already a fee waiver in place for those making applications to extend their permission to stay in the UK who cannot afford the fee, are destitute, at risk of imminent destitution or where the welfare of a child would be put at risk by payment of the fee.

It is right for users of the immigration system, who benefit directly, to be charged a fee. Although a fee waiver is not available for settlement, it is available for an application for permission to stay in the UK and this arrangement allows an individual to continue with their life in the UK, and even to apply for access to public funds if necessary. They can then apply for settlement once they have saved the necessary funds to pay the application fee.

Income from fees charged plays a vital role in the Home Office’s ability to run a sustainable Migration and Borders system and it is the government’s policy those who use and benefit most from the immigration system should contribute towards the cost of operating the system, reducing reliance on the UK taxpayer. Fees levels and access to fee waivers are reviewed regularly.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has plans to introduce a fee waiver for applications for indefinite leave to remain.

Settlement in the UK is a privilege, not an automatic entitlement. Anyone not qualifying for settlement, including being unable to pay the fee, is able to apply to extend their permission to stay in the UK.

There is already a fee waiver in place for those making applications to extend their permission to stay in the UK who cannot afford the fee, are destitute, at risk of imminent destitution or where the welfare of a child would be put at risk by payment of the fee.

It is right for users of the immigration system, who benefit directly, to be charged a fee. Although a fee waiver is not available for settlement, it is available for an application for permission to stay in the UK and this arrangement allows an individual to continue with their life in the UK, and even to apply for access to public funds if necessary. They can then apply for settlement once they have saved the necessary funds to pay the application fee.

Income from fees charged plays a vital role in the Home Office’s ability to run a sustainable Migration and Borders system and it is the government’s policy those who use and benefit most from the immigration system should contribute towards the cost of operating the system, reducing reliance on the UK taxpayer. Fees levels and access to fee waivers are reviewed regularly.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department is taking steps to provide sufficient administrative resources to process renewal applications for limited leave to remain for people with temporary protection status.

The Nationality and Borders Act 2022 contains the powers to differentiate entitlements between two groups of refugees. Those who came to the UK directly, claimed asylum without delay, and are able to show good cause for any illegal entry or presence in the UK are Group 1 refugees. Where an individual fails to meet one or more of these requirements, they are a Group 2 refugee.

Changes to Part 11 of the Immigration Rules, which came into force for asylum claims lodged on or after 28 June 2022, implemented the differentiated asylum system. Section 12 of the Nationality and Borders Act 2022 allows us to differentiate on the length of permission to stay, route to settlement, recourse to public funds and family reunion rights.

An individual who qualifies for refugee status as a result of an asylum claim made on or after 28 June 2022 will be recognised as a Group 1 or Group 2 refugee. Whilst, across the asylum system we work to a number of assumptions, we do not routinely comment on these as they can be affected by a number of external factors.

The Home Office have recruitment strategies in place to continually assess and maintain resources at the required levels to take prompt decisions at all points of the system, for example initial decisions, decisions on applications for further permission to stay for Group 2 refugees and decisions on applications for settlement for Group 1 refugees.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has made projections for the number of refugees expected to be granted Temporary Protection Status under section 12 of the Nationality and Borders Act in the 12 months from 28 June 2022.

The Nationality and Borders Act 2022 contains the powers to differentiate entitlements between two groups of refugees. Those who came to the UK directly, claimed asylum without delay, and are able to show good cause for any illegal entry or presence in the UK are Group 1 refugees. Where an individual fails to meet one or more of these requirements, they are a Group 2 refugee.

Changes to Part 11 of the Immigration Rules, which came into force for asylum claims lodged on or after 28 June 2022, implemented the differentiated asylum system. Section 12 of the Nationality and Borders Act 2022 allows us to differentiate on the length of permission to stay, route to settlement, recourse to public funds and family reunion rights.

An individual who qualifies for refugee status as a result of an asylum claim made on or after 28 June 2022 will be recognised as a Group 1 or Group 2 refugee. Whilst, across the asylum system we work to a number of assumptions, we do not routinely comment on these as they can be affected by a number of external factors.

The Home Office have recruitment strategies in place to continually assess and maintain resources at the required levels to take prompt decisions at all points of the system, for example initial decisions, decisions on applications for further permission to stay for Group 2 refugees and decisions on applications for settlement for Group 1 refugees.

21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department is applying the no recourse to public funds condition to refugees who are granted Temporary Protection Status under Section 12 of the Nationality and Borders Act.

The Nationality and Borders Act 2022 contains the powers to differentiate entitlements between two groups of refugees. Those who came to the UK directly, claimed asylum without delay, and are able to show good cause for any illegal entry or presence in the UK are Group 1 refugees. Where an individual fails to meet one or more of these requirements, they are a Group 2 refugee.

Changes to Part 11 of the Immigration Rules, which came into force for asylum claims lodged on or after 28 June 2022, implemented the differentiated asylum system. Section 12 of the Nationality and Borders Act 2022 allows us to differentiate on the length of permission to stay, route to settlement, recourse to public funds and family reunion rights.

An individual who qualifies for refugee status as a result of an asylum claim made on or after 28 June 2022 will be recognised as a Group 1 or Group 2 refugee. Whilst, across the asylum system we work to a number of assumptions, we do not routinely comment on these as they can be affected by a number of external factors.

The Home Office have recruitment strategies in place to continually assess and maintain resources at the required levels to take prompt decisions at all points of the system, for example initial decisions, decisions on applications for further permission to stay for Group 2 refugees and decisions on applications for settlement for Group 1 refugees.

17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan nationals have been granted UK visas since 1 July 2021.

The Home Office publishes data on entry clearance grants by nationality in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of visas granted to Afghan nationals is published in table Vis_D02 of the ‘entry clearance visa applications and outcomes detailed datasets’. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2022. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the ‘summary tables’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on entry clearance visas.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many visa fee waiver applications for Afghan national spouses and dependents of British nationals have been made since 1 July 2021.

The Home Office publishes data on entry clearance grants by nationality in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of visas granted to Afghan nationals is published in table Vis_D02 of the ‘entry clearance visa applications and outcomes detailed datasets’. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2022. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the ‘summary tables’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on entry clearance visas.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will introduce universal visa fee waivers for Afghan national spouses and dependents of British nationals.

The Home Office publishes data on entry clearance grants by nationality in the 'Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release'. Data on the number of visas granted to Afghan nationals is published in table Vis_D02 of the 'entry clearance visa applications and outcomes detailed datasets'. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the 'Notes' page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2022. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the 'summary tables'. The 'contents' sheet contains an overview of all available data on entry clearance visas.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the 'Research and statistics calendar'

17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many visa fee waivers have been granted for Afghan national spouses and dependents of British nationals since 1 July 2021.

The Home Office publishes data on entry clearance grants by nationality in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of visas granted to Afghan nationals is published in table Vis_D02 of the ‘entry clearance visa applications and outcomes detailed datasets’. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending March 2022. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the ‘summary tables’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on entry clearance visas.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with her counterparts in foreign governments on allowing UK visa applications for Afghan nationals to be completed in neighbouring countries.

This government is committed to providing protection for vulnerable and at-risk people fleeing Afghanistan and is taking a leading role in the international response. Since the end of Op PITTING, we have brought c.4,000 Afghans to the UK from a neighbouring country.

The UK is working with international partners, including non-governmental organisations and other countries, to secure safe routes out of Afghanistan as soon as they become available, starting with those in most need. We also intend to establish a diplomatic presence in Kabul as soon as the security and political situation in Afghanistan allows. We are coordinating this effort with allies.

Biometrics must be provided before entry clearance is granted, to confirm identity and complete performance of national security checks.

There is currently no option to enrol biometrics in Afghanistan. Yet Afghans who have already reached a third country and are able to get to a Visa Application Centre to enrol their biometrics can make an application to resettle in the UK under the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy, or to come to the UK through our wider economic and family routes, in the usual way.

17th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if her Department will make a scheme similar to the Ukraine Sponsorship Scheme (Homes for Ukraine) available to Afghan refugees.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer provided to question 9052 on 9 June 2022.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum decisions relating to applicants from Afghanistan are awaiting a decision.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on asylum applications awaiting an initial decision, by nationality, are published in table ASY_D03 of the ‘asylum and resettlement detailed datasets’. Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the end of September 2021.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people from Afghanistan have been granted Limited Leave to Remain (LLR) since 2001; and how many people with LLR from Afghanistan are in the UK.

The Home Office publishes data on grants of limited leave to remain (extensions) in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’ on GOV.UK:https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release.

Data on Afghan nationals granted an extension (Limited Leave to Remain (LLR)) from 2010 are published in table Exe_D01 of the managed migration detailed datasets. The published data on extensions exclude cases decided under asylum rules. Earlier extensions data can be found in the Control of Immigration: Statistics, United Kingdom publications. These were published in the form of a Command Paper until 2006 and as an online bulletin between 2007 and 2009. Please note that prior to 2006, Afghan nationals were included in the 'Remainder of Asia’ but not identified separately in the data.

Data on Asylum applications, initial decisions and resettlement are published in asylum table Asy_D01 in the Immigration Statistics release.

Information is not available on the number of people with LLR from Afghanistan that are in the UK.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan refugees have been housed in hotels in the Bradford district since August 2021.

There are currently over 12,000 evacuees from Afghanistan in bridging hotel accommodation nationally across the UK. We are proud this country has provided homes for more than 4000 evacuees in such a short space of time.

There is a huge effort underway to get families into settled homes so they can settle and rebuild their lives. We don’t want to see families remain in hotel accommodation for long periods. There is 1 hotel in Bradford with capacity for 100 residents. We do not give running commentaries on how many rooms in which hotels are occupied.

Data on relocation will be published as part of our quarterly release which can be found at this link: Asylum and resettlement datasets - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much has been recovered under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 by each police force in England and Wales in each year from 2010.

The Asset Recovery Statistical Bulletin is published annually and provides data on the total value of the proceeds of crime that have been recovered under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (POCA) by each individual police force in the jurisdictions of England and Wales, Northern Ireland and those with no reported jurisdiction.

Data is available for financial years 2015/16 to 2020/21 and can found in Tables 12a and 12b. In 2020/21 a total of £116.8m was recovered by police forces, including local and regional police forces from an overall total of £219m recovered by all POCA agencies.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding was received under the Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme by each police force in England and Wales in each year from 2010.

The Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme (ARIS) funds are allocated to agencies based on their relative contribution to the total value of delivered receipts into ARIS. Under ARIS, the total amount of funds available for allocation for police force agencies is determined by the total value of receipts received by the Home Office in the financial year and police force agencies will receive 50% of the amount they recover, following any deductions for costs associated with the asset recovery and ARIS Top Slice funding. The 50% allocation may be split across several agencies depending on the asset recovery type and the agencies involved.

We do not routinely publish data on how much funding in total police forces received under the ARIS on a yearly basis. However, in February 2015 there was a review of the ARIS which provides data on the ARIS allocations under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (POCA) by each individual police force in the jurisdictions of England and Wales, Northern Ireland and those with no reported jurisdiction. Data is available for the financial year 2013/14 and can be found in in the Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme Review in Annex A.

In 2014/15 we also created a ‘top slice’ to fund key national asset recovery capabilities and, in 2021/22, increased the investment from £7.5m to £13.9m.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers identifying as from a Black, Asian and Ethnic Minority background were employed by West Yorkshire Police on (a) 31 March 2010, (b) 31 March 2015 and (c) 31 March 2021.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, available here: Police workforce England and Wales statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Information on the total number of police officers by ethnicity and Police Force Area as at the 31st March each year, since 2007, can be found in the ethnicity open data tables published at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1005763/open-data-table-police-workforce-ethnicity-280721.ods

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers were employed by West Yorkshire Police on (a) 31 March 2010, (b) 31 March 2015 and (c) 31 March 2021.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the size of the police workforce in England and Wales on a biannual basis in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, available here: Police workforce England and Wales statistics - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Information on the total number of police officers by ethnicity and Police Force Area as at the 31st March each year, since 2007, can be found in the ethnicity open data tables published at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1005763/open-data-table-police-workforce-ethnicity-280721.ods

14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 April 2021, Official Report, column 86WH, on the Government's policy on the inappropriate use by some employers of fire and rehire as a negotiation tactic, what steps their Department has taken to (a) investigate and (b) discourage the use of fire and rehire negotiation tactics by their Department's executive non-departmental public bodies; and what steps they have taken to communicate the Government's policy on those practices to those bodies.

The Government has been clear it expects employers to treat employees fairly and in the spirit of partnership, working with trade unions, where relevant, constructively. This applies to Home Office sponsored NDPBs as much as to any other employer.

Home Office sponsored NDPBs that employ civil servants must set their terms and conditions of employment in accordance with the rules of the Civil Service Management Code. Bodies covered by the Code are expected to communicate novel and contentious workforce proposals to the Cabinet Office as made clear by paragraph 4.

30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many places of worship in the (a) UK and (b) City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council area have applied for funding under the Places of Worship Protective Security Scheme since its introduction; and how much funding has been allocated under that scheme to places of worship in the (a) UK and (b) City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council area.

Data on Places of Worship is collated by geographic region.

In the first three years of the scheme (2016-2019), we received 431 applications across England and Wales. For the fourth year of the scheme (2019-2020), we received 531 applications, of which 377 met the minimum requirements for consideration. We have awarded approximately £3.4 million to places of worship across England and Wales.

Over the past four years we have received 124 applications from Yorkshire and Humber, and we have allocated £665,524 in funding to that region.

30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding each faith has applied for under the Places of Worship Protective Security Scheme since its introduction.

In the first three years of the scheme (2016-2019), £800,000 was available each year. In the fourth year (2019-2020) this was doubled to £1.6 million. All faiths, apart from the Jewish faith, are eligible to apply for funding under this scheme. The Jewish community has access to a separate funding scheme.

Over the last four years, we have allocated £1,643,732 to mosques, £869,858 to churches, £210,989 to temples, and £676,115 to gurdwaras.

30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding has been allocated to each faith under the Places of Worship Protective Security Scheme since the introduction of that scheme.

In the first three years of the scheme (2016-2019), £800,000 was available each year. In the fourth year (2019-2020) this was doubled to £1.6 million. All faiths, apart from the Jewish faith, are eligible to apply for funding under this scheme. The Jewish community has access to a separate funding scheme.

Over the last four years, we have allocated £1,643,732 to mosques, £869,858 to churches, £210,989 to temples, and £676,115 to gurdwaras.

30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken ensure stakeholder engagement with her Department's consultation entitled, Protecting places of worship consultation, issued on 15 March 2020.

The Home Office met with a number of stakeholders representing various faiths and organisations in order to shape and develop the consultation before launch. These included, but were not limited to, the Community Security Trust (CST), Tell MAMA, Church of England and City Sikhs, as well as interfaith organisations including Stregthening Faith Institutions.

In addition, the Home Office consulted with other government departments including the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and the Department of Education. Key stakeholders were also supplied with an early version of the consultation and the draft was reviewed based on their feedback.

17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

As part of the Ministry of Defence Race Action Plan, Defence has committed to produce ethnicity pay gap reports, for both Defence Civil Servants and members of the Armed Forces. A report for the 2023-24 period will be produced in due course, following the end of that financial year.

Andrew Murrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 April 2021, Official Report, column 86WH, on the Government's policy on the inappropriate use by some employers of fire and rehire as a negotiation tactic, what steps their Department has taken to (a) investigate and (b) discourage the use of fire and rehire negotiation tactics by their Department's executive non-departmental public bodies; and what steps they have taken to communicate the Government's policy on those practices to those bodies.

The Government has been very clear that threatening fire and rehire as a negotiating tactic is completely unacceptable. MOD always expect employers to treat employees fairly and in the spirit of partnership working with trade unions, where relevant, constructively. The Department is confident that MOD’s non-departmental public bodies (NDPB) are aware of the Government’s position on this matter.

The Department works constructively with each of the NDPBs we have responsibility for, and this includes when it comes to workforce management matters, however each is ultimately responsible for the management of their staff.

The relationship between the MOD NDPBs and the department, is established through their Framework Documents. Managing Public Money sets out that each of the boards of the MOD NDPBs have a responsibility towards its staff for the recruitment, retention and motivation of its staff.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what estimate he has made of the number of Afghan refugees previously housed in interim hotel accommodation have spent one or more nights sleeping rough since leaving that accommodation.

On the number of Afghan households previously housed in Home Office interim hotel accommodation who have since become homeless, please refer to our response from 20 December 2023 to Question UIN 6726.

The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities does not collect data on the number of Afghan households previously housed in Home Office provided interim hotel accommodation who have slept rough since leaving that accommodation.

The Department does not regularly publish data on Afghan homelessness.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how many Afghan refugees previously housed in interim hotel accommodation have been made homeless since leaving that accommodation.

On the number of Afghan households previously housed in Home Office interim hotel accommodation who have since become homeless, please refer to our response from 20 December 2023 to Question UIN 6726.

The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities does not collect data on the number of Afghan households previously housed in Home Office provided interim hotel accommodation who have slept rough since leaving that accommodation.

The Department does not regularly publish data on Afghan homelessness.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

The Cabinet Office is working with other government departments to consider the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance published in April. More generally the Civil Service is undertaking extensive work both centrally and within departments to promote diversity across its workplaces, including ethnicity.

14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what support his Department provides to disabled people who require adaption works to their homes costing more than the £30,000 cap on the Disabled Facilities Grant.

The Disabled Facilities Grant is a shared responsibility with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) given that funding for the grant is provided through the Better Care Fund. Officials from both departments meet regularly with a range of stakeholders interested in this policy.

Local areas already have discretion to increase the cap on the grant on a case-by-case basis in line with a locally published housing assistance policy. As with all aspects of the grant, government will keep the upper limit under review.

We do not hold official statistics regarding the number of applications for the DFG submitted and approved in each year from 2010, or the numbers of applications since 2010 that have been submitted for either the maximum amount of £30,000 or for amounts between £25,000-£29,999. However, my Department funds a National Body for Home Improvement Agencies, Foundations who publish an annual report which analyses unaudited, voluntary data from Local Authorities which you may find useful. These reports can be found here.

Since 2010 government has invested £4.8 billion into the Disabled Facilities Grant (2010-11 to 2022-23), delivering an estimated 490,000 home adaptations.

****

F/Year

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

22-23

Total

Amount

£169m

£200m

£220m

£200m

£185m

£220m

£394m

£473m*

£523m**

£505m

£573m***

£573m

£573m

£4.8bn

No of DFGs

45,383

43,986

36,874

42,586

40,645

40,800

46,000

47,850

53,500

58,181

38,566

TBC

TBC

494,371

I recognise that for some home adaptations the cost of the works can be higher. Where this is the case, and where an authority has a locally published Housing Assistance Policy, authorities can take a local decision to provide grants above the existing £30,000 limit on a case-by-case basis. However, I must be clear that these discretionary grants are a local decision, and I am unable to intervene in individual cases.

In addition to providing expert support and advice to local authorities, Foundations also regularly provide information and advice to individual disabled people on applying for a DFG, including advice around other sources of financial support. More information can be found here.

* £431m annual grant plus an additional £42m announced in Autumn Budget 2017

**£468m annual grant plus an additional £55m announced in Budget 2018

***£505m annual grant plus an additional £68m paid to LAs in December 2020

**** Source: Foundations, the national body for home improvement agencies

Footnote: Local authorities in England provide annual data on their DFG delivery, however the data is not audited, and local authorities provide this information on a voluntary basis. The headline totals above are based on estimates provided by Foundations which have been extrapolated from the available data.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what was the total expenditure of the Disabled Facilities Grant in each year since 2010 for which figures are available.

The Disabled Facilities Grant is a shared responsibility with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) given that funding for the grant is provided through the Better Care Fund. Officials from both departments meet regularly with a range of stakeholders interested in this policy.

Local areas already have discretion to increase the cap on the grant on a case-by-case basis in line with a locally published housing assistance policy. As with all aspects of the grant, government will keep the upper limit under review.

We do not hold official statistics regarding the number of applications for the DFG submitted and approved in each year from 2010, or the numbers of applications since 2010 that have been submitted for either the maximum amount of £30,000 or for amounts between £25,000-£29,999. However, my Department funds a National Body for Home Improvement Agencies, Foundations who publish an annual report which analyses unaudited, voluntary data from Local Authorities which you may find useful. These reports can be found here.

Since 2010 government has invested £4.8 billion into the Disabled Facilities Grant (2010-11 to 2022-23), delivering an estimated 490,000 home adaptations.

****

F/Year

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

22-23

Total

Amount

£169m

£200m

£220m

£200m

£185m

£220m

£394m

£473m*

£523m**

£505m

£573m***

£573m

£573m

£4.8bn

No of DFGs

45,383

43,986

36,874

42,586

40,645

40,800

46,000

47,850

53,500

58,181

38,566

TBC

TBC

494,371

I recognise that for some home adaptations the cost of the works can be higher. Where this is the case, and where an authority has a locally published Housing Assistance Policy, authorities can take a local decision to provide grants above the existing £30,000 limit on a case-by-case basis. However, I must be clear that these discretionary grants are a local decision, and I am unable to intervene in individual cases.

In addition to providing expert support and advice to local authorities, Foundations also regularly provide information and advice to individual disabled people on applying for a DFG, including advice around other sources of financial support. More information can be found here.

* £431m annual grant plus an additional £42m announced in Autumn Budget 2017

**£468m annual grant plus an additional £55m announced in Budget 2018

***£505m annual grant plus an additional £68m paid to LAs in December 2020

**** Source: Foundations, the national body for home improvement agencies

Footnote: Local authorities in England provide annual data on their DFG delivery, however the data is not audited, and local authorities provide this information on a voluntary basis. The headline totals above are based on estimates provided by Foundations which have been extrapolated from the available data.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how many applications for the Disabled Facilities Grant were (a) submitted and (b) approved in each year from 2010 for which figures are available.

The Disabled Facilities Grant is a shared responsibility with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) given that funding for the grant is provided through the Better Care Fund. Officials from both departments meet regularly with a range of stakeholders interested in this policy.

Local areas already have discretion to increase the cap on the grant on a case-by-case basis in line with a locally published housing assistance policy. As with all aspects of the grant, government will keep the upper limit under review.

We do not hold official statistics regarding the number of applications for the DFG submitted and approved in each year from 2010, or the numbers of applications since 2010 that have been submitted for either the maximum amount of £30,000 or for amounts between £25,000-£29,999. However, my Department funds a National Body for Home Improvement Agencies, Foundations who publish an annual report which analyses unaudited, voluntary data from Local Authorities which you may find useful. These reports can be found here.

Since 2010 government has invested £4.8 billion into the Disabled Facilities Grant (2010-11 to 2022-23), delivering an estimated 490,000 home adaptations.

****

F/Year

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

22-23

Total

Amount

£169m

£200m

£220m

£200m

£185m

£220m

£394m

£473m*

£523m**

£505m

£573m***

£573m

£573m

£4.8bn

No of DFGs

45,383

43,986

36,874

42,586

40,645

40,800

46,000

47,850

53,500

58,181

38,566

TBC

TBC

494,371

I recognise that for some home adaptations the cost of the works can be higher. Where this is the case, and where an authority has a locally published Housing Assistance Policy, authorities can take a local decision to provide grants above the existing £30,000 limit on a case-by-case basis. However, I must be clear that these discretionary grants are a local decision, and I am unable to intervene in individual cases.

In addition to providing expert support and advice to local authorities, Foundations also regularly provide information and advice to individual disabled people on applying for a DFG, including advice around other sources of financial support. More information can be found here.

* £431m annual grant plus an additional £42m announced in Autumn Budget 2017

**£468m annual grant plus an additional £55m announced in Budget 2018

***£505m annual grant plus an additional £68m paid to LAs in December 2020

**** Source: Foundations, the national body for home improvement agencies

Footnote: Local authorities in England provide annual data on their DFG delivery, however the data is not audited, and local authorities provide this information on a voluntary basis. The headline totals above are based on estimates provided by Foundations which have been extrapolated from the available data.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what recent discussions he has had with disability rights organisations on the Disabled Facilities Grant.

The Disabled Facilities Grant is a shared responsibility with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) given that funding for the grant is provided through the Better Care Fund. Officials from both departments meet regularly with a range of stakeholders interested in this policy.

Local areas already have discretion to increase the cap on the grant on a case-by-case basis in line with a locally published housing assistance policy. As with all aspects of the grant, government will keep the upper limit under review.

We do not hold official statistics regarding the number of applications for the DFG submitted and approved in each year from 2010, or the numbers of applications since 2010 that have been submitted for either the maximum amount of £30,000 or for amounts between £25,000-£29,999. However, my Department funds a National Body for Home Improvement Agencies, Foundations who publish an annual report which analyses unaudited, voluntary data from Local Authorities which you may find useful. These reports can be found here.

Since 2010 government has invested £4.8 billion into the Disabled Facilities Grant (2010-11 to 2022-23), delivering an estimated 490,000 home adaptations.

****

F/Year

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

22-23

Total

Amount

£169m

£200m

£220m

£200m

£185m

£220m

£394m

£473m*

£523m**

£505m

£573m***

£573m

£573m

£4.8bn

No of DFGs

45,383

43,986

36,874

42,586

40,645

40,800

46,000

47,850

53,500

58,181

38,566

TBC

TBC

494,371

I recognise that for some home adaptations the cost of the works can be higher. Where this is the case, and where an authority has a locally published Housing Assistance Policy, authorities can take a local decision to provide grants above the existing £30,000 limit on a case-by-case basis. However, I must be clear that these discretionary grants are a local decision, and I am unable to intervene in individual cases.

In addition to providing expert support and advice to local authorities, Foundations also regularly provide information and advice to individual disabled people on applying for a DFG, including advice around other sources of financial support. More information can be found here.

* £431m annual grant plus an additional £42m announced in Autumn Budget 2017

**£468m annual grant plus an additional £55m announced in Budget 2018

***£505m annual grant plus an additional £68m paid to LAs in December 2020

**** Source: Foundations, the national body for home improvement agencies

Footnote: Local authorities in England provide annual data on their DFG delivery, however the data is not audited, and local authorities provide this information on a voluntary basis. The headline totals above are based on estimates provided by Foundations which have been extrapolated from the available data.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when his Department next plans to review the level of the cap on the Disabled Facilities Grant.

The Disabled Facilities Grant is a shared responsibility with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) given that funding for the grant is provided through the Better Care Fund. Officials from both departments meet regularly with a range of stakeholders interested in this policy.

Local areas already have discretion to increase the cap on the grant on a case-by-case basis in line with a locally published housing assistance policy. As with all aspects of the grant, government will keep the upper limit under review.

We do not hold official statistics regarding the number of applications for the DFG submitted and approved in each year from 2010, or the numbers of applications since 2010 that have been submitted for either the maximum amount of £30,000 or for amounts between £25,000-£29,999. However, my Department funds a National Body for Home Improvement Agencies, Foundations who publish an annual report which analyses unaudited, voluntary data from Local Authorities which you may find useful. These reports can be found here.

Since 2010 government has invested £4.8 billion into the Disabled Facilities Grant (2010-11 to 2022-23), delivering an estimated 490,000 home adaptations.

****

F/Year

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

22-23

Total

Amount

£169m

£200m

£220m

£200m

£185m

£220m

£394m

£473m*

£523m**

£505m

£573m***

£573m

£573m

£4.8bn

No of DFGs

45,383

43,986

36,874

42,586

40,645

40,800

46,000

47,850

53,500

58,181

38,566

TBC

TBC

494,371

I recognise that for some home adaptations the cost of the works can be higher. Where this is the case, and where an authority has a locally published Housing Assistance Policy, authorities can take a local decision to provide grants above the existing £30,000 limit on a case-by-case basis. However, I must be clear that these discretionary grants are a local decision, and I am unable to intervene in individual cases.

In addition to providing expert support and advice to local authorities, Foundations also regularly provide information and advice to individual disabled people on applying for a DFG, including advice around other sources of financial support. More information can be found here.

* £431m annual grant plus an additional £42m announced in Autumn Budget 2017

**£468m annual grant plus an additional £55m announced in Budget 2018

***£505m annual grant plus an additional £68m paid to LAs in December 2020

**** Source: Foundations, the national body for home improvement agencies

Footnote: Local authorities in England provide annual data on their DFG delivery, however the data is not audited, and local authorities provide this information on a voluntary basis. The headline totals above are based on estimates provided by Foundations which have been extrapolated from the available data.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
14th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the maximum funding available under the Disabled Facilities Grant.

The Disabled Facilities Grant is a shared responsibility with the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) given that funding for the grant is provided through the Better Care Fund. Officials from both departments meet regularly with a range of stakeholders interested in this policy.

Local areas already have discretion to increase the cap on the grant on a case-by-case basis in line with a locally published housing assistance policy. As with all aspects of the grant, government will keep the upper limit under review.

We do not hold official statistics regarding the number of applications for the DFG submitted and approved in each year from 2010, or the numbers of applications since 2010 that have been submitted for either the maximum amount of £30,000 or for amounts between £25,000-£29,999. However, my Department funds a National Body for Home Improvement Agencies, Foundations who publish an annual report which analyses unaudited, voluntary data from Local Authorities which you may find useful. These reports can be found here.

Since 2010 government has invested £4.8 billion into the Disabled Facilities Grant (2010-11 to 2022-23), delivering an estimated 490,000 home adaptations.

****

F/Year

10-11

11-12

12-13

13-14

14-15

15-16

16-17

17-18

18-19

19-20

20-21

21-22

22-23

Total

Amount

£169m

£200m

£220m

£200m

£185m

£220m

£394m

£473m*

£523m**

£505m

£573m***

£573m

£573m

£4.8bn

No of DFGs

45,383

43,986

36,874

42,586

40,645

40,800

46,000

47,850

53,500

58,181

38,566

TBC

TBC

494,371

I recognise that for some home adaptations the cost of the works can be higher. Where this is the case, and where an authority has a locally published Housing Assistance Policy, authorities can take a local decision to provide grants above the existing £30,000 limit on a case-by-case basis. However, I must be clear that these discretionary grants are a local decision, and I am unable to intervene in individual cases.

In addition to providing expert support and advice to local authorities, Foundations also regularly provide information and advice to individual disabled people on applying for a DFG, including advice around other sources of financial support. More information can be found here.

* £431m annual grant plus an additional £42m announced in Autumn Budget 2017

**£468m annual grant plus an additional £55m announced in Budget 2018

***£505m annual grant plus an additional £68m paid to LAs in December 2020

**** Source: Foundations, the national body for home improvement agencies

Footnote: Local authorities in England provide annual data on their DFG delivery, however the data is not audited, and local authorities provide this information on a voluntary basis. The headline totals above are based on estimates provided by Foundations which have been extrapolated from the available data.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
21st Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when he will announce the successful bids for the second round of levelling up funding.

Levelling Up and driving growth across the UK is a key priority of this Government.

All bids are currently being assessed in line with our published guidance. We will announce successful bids for round two of the Fund later this autumn.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, pursuant to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120801 on Housing: Regional Planning and Development, whether the planned legally binding Decent Home Standard will include a requirement for all homes to be free of unsanitary toilets, bathrooms and kitchens.

We are committed to driving up standards in private rented accommodation and we will be consulting on introducing a legally binding Decent Homes Standard (DHS) in the Private Rented Sector.

Rented homes must already be free of the most serious ‘category 1’ hazards, which include but are not limited to issues such as electrical and fire safety, dampness and cold assessed using the housing health and safety rating system (HHSRS). We are reviewing the HHSRS to ensure the system is more accessible and easier to understand for landlords and tenants, and facilitates the effective enforcement of housing standards by local authorities.

We will publish a White Paper in spring this year that will set out our proposals for reform of the private rented sector.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, pursuant to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120801 on Housing: Regional Planning and Development, whether the planned legally binding Decent Home Standard will include a requirement for all homes to be free of structural or internal disrepair.

We are committed to driving up standards in private rented accommodation and we will be consulting on introducing a legally binding Decent Homes Standard (DHS) in the Private Rented Sector.

Rented homes must already be free of the most serious ‘category 1’ hazards, which include but are not limited to issues such as electrical and fire safety, dampness and cold assessed using the housing health and safety rating system (HHSRS). We are reviewing the HHSRS to ensure the system is more accessible and easier to understand for landlords and tenants, and facilitates the effective enforcement of housing standards by local authorities.

We will publish a White Paper in spring this year that will set out our proposals for reform of the private rented sector.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, pursuant to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120801 on Housing: Regional Planning and Development, whether the planned legally binding Decent Home Standard will include a requirement for all homes to be free of vermin infestation.

We are committed to driving up standards in private rented accommodation and we will be consulting on introducing a legally binding Decent Homes Standard (DHS) in the Private Rented Sector.

Rented homes must already be free of the most serious ‘category 1’ hazards, which include but are not limited to issues such as electrical and fire safety, dampness and cold assessed using the housing health and safety rating system (HHSRS). We are reviewing the HHSRS to ensure the system is more accessible and easier to understand for landlords and tenants, and facilitates the effective enforcement of housing standards by local authorities.

We will publish a White Paper in spring this year that will set out our proposals for reform of the private rented sector.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120801 on Housing: Regional Planning and Development, whether the planned legally binding Decent Home Standard will include a requirement for all homes to (a) be free of dampness and (b) have heating.

We are committed to driving up standards in private rented accommodation and we will be consulting on introducing a legally binding Decent Homes Standard (DHS) in the Private Rented Sector.

Rented homes must already be free of the most serious ‘category 1’ hazards, which include but are not limited to issues such as electrical and fire safety, dampness and cold assessed using the housing health and safety rating system (HHSRS). We are reviewing the HHSRS to ensure the system is more accessible and easier to understand for landlords and tenants, and facilitates the effective enforcement of housing standards by local authorities.

We will publish a White Paper in spring this year that will set out our proposals for reform of the private rented sector.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, pursuant to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120801 on Housing: Regional Planning and Development, whether the planned legally binding Decent Home Standard will include a requirement for all homes to be free of fire safety issues.

We are committed to driving up standards in private rented accommodation and we will be consulting on introducing a legally binding Decent Homes Standard (DHS) in the Private Rented Sector.

Rented homes must already be free of the most serious ‘category 1’ hazards, which include but are not limited to issues such as electrical and fire safety, dampness and cold assessed using the housing health and safety rating system (HHSRS). We are reviewing the HHSRS to ensure the system is more accessible and easier to understand for landlords and tenants, and facilitates the effective enforcement of housing standards by local authorities.

We will publish a White Paper in spring this year that will set out our proposals for reform of the private rented sector.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120801 on Housing: Regional Planning and Development, whether the planned legally binding Decent Home Standard will include a requirement for all homes to be free of unsafe electrics.

We are committed to driving up standards in private rented accommodation and we will be consulting on introducing a legally binding Decent Homes Standard (DHS) in the Private Rented Sector.

Rented homes must already be free of the most serious ‘category 1’ hazards, which include but are not limited to issues such as electrical and fire safety, dampness and cold assessed using the housing health and safety rating system (HHSRS). We are reviewing the HHSRS to ensure the system is more accessible and easier to understand for landlords and tenants, and facilitates the effective enforcement of housing standards by local authorities.

We will publish a White Paper in spring this year that will set out our proposals for reform of the private rented sector.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, pursuant to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120801 on Housing: Regional Planning and Development, whether the planned legally binding Decent Home Standard will include a requirement for all homes to be free of gas safety risks.

We are committed to driving up standards in private rented accommodation and we will be consulting on introducing a legally binding Decent Homes Standard (DHS) in the Private Rented Sector.

Rented homes must already be free of the most serious ‘category 1’ hazards, which include but are not limited to issues such as electrical and fire safety, dampness and cold assessed using the housing health and safety rating system (HHSRS). We are reviewing the HHSRS to ensure the system is more accessible and easier to understand for landlords and tenants, and facilitates the effective enforcement of housing standards by local authorities.

We will publish a White Paper in spring this year that will set out our proposals for reform of the private rented sector.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, by what date his Department plans to publish its white paper on proposals for reform of the private rented sector.

The Government remains committed to building back fairer and delivering a better deal for renters. We will publish a White Paper that will set out a package of reforms to create a fairer private rented sector this spring.

We are undertaking robust and structured engagement with stakeholders to inform our plans, while also learning from the pandemic’s impact on the sector.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, pursuant to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120801 on Housing: Regional Planning and Development, how many tenancy unions (a) he and (b) Ministers in his Department have met with in the last six months.

We know that understanding tenants’ experiences of the private rented sector is vital to making sure reforms work in the long term. Therefore, we have undertaken extensive engagement with a number of key stakeholders representing tenants.

I have chaired six Roundtables, with the most recent one held on the 9 February 2022. At all the roundtables, groups representing tenants have been in attendance. Additionally, many of the groups attending the roundtable are members of the Renters Reform Coalition which includes tenancy unions.

18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, pursuant to the Answer of 15 February 2022 to Question 120801 on Housing: Regional Planning and Development, what plans he has to engage with tenancy unions.

We know that understanding tenants’ experiences of the private rented sector is vital to making sure reforms work in the long term. We have undertaken extensive engagement with a range of key stakeholders representing tenants and will continue to do so.

We are currently developing our engagement plans to inform the implementation of a Decent Homes Standard and will engage with tenancy unions as part of our work.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what the evidential basis is that the policy proposals set out in the Levelling Up White Paper on reducing the regional inequality in healthy life expectancy will be sufficient to achieve the target.

The missions set out in the Levelling Up White Paper are medium term and will be used to galvanise action across government, business and civil society. The Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities will work with the Department of Health & Social Care and other government departments to ensure that the right policies are in place to contribute to achieving the missions.

The Levelling Up mission for health is underpinned by the government’s manifesto commitment to increase the number of years spent in good health by at least five years nationally. To achieve our mission, we need to increase healthy life expectancy at a faster rate than the current UK average. Based on past learnings, we will need to increase collaboration and innovation, target investment, and ensure interventions are wide-reaching to tackle the biggest disparities in health.

This is why we will set out our strategy to tackle the core drivers of disparities in health in the new Health Disparities White Paper, which we expect to publish later this year. This will set out a series of impactful measures, including legislation, to address health disparities at each stage at which they arise.

The Levelling Up White Paper also sets out a broad range of policies, which will improve the nation’s health and tackle disparities through action on prevention as well as health service provision. This includes commitments on smoking, obesity, substance misuse, early years and Community Diagnostic Centres.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, for what reason there is not a target to raise the performance of secondary school children in the Levelling Up White Paper alongside the target for primary school children.

The missions set out in the Levelling Up White Paper are medium term and will be used to galvanise action across government, business and civil society. The Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities will work with the Department for Education and other government departments to ensure that the right policies are in place to contribute to achieving the missions.

The UK Government has continued to drive secondary school improvement, including by encouraging all schools in England to become part of a strong family of schools by joining a multi-academy trust. The 2021 Spending Review confirmed the Government’s commitment to level up education with an additional £4.7 billion by 2024-25 for the core schools budget in England, over and above the Spending Round 2019 (SR19) settlement for schools in 2022-23; and a new package of £1.8 billion over the SR21 period to support education recovery from the pandemic, which will nearly double the support per pupil in secondary schools.

The forthcoming Schools White Paper will set out a clear vision for further improvements to the schools system, to help raise the attainment of students including those attending secondary schools.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the Levelling Up White Paper, whether he plans to work with and strengthen tenancy unions to help meet the target of reducing the number of non-decent homes by 50 per cent by 2030.

We are committed to drive up standards in private rented accommodation and we will be consulting on introducing a legally binding Decent Homes Standard in the Private Rented Sector. We will publish a White Paper in Spring this year that will set out our proposals for reform of the private rented sector and are very happy to engage with tenancy unions.

8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the Levelling Up White Paper, whether he plans to increase funding for the provision of services by local government to help meet the target of improving wellbeing across all regions.

In total, the Local Government Finance Settlement for 2022/23 – published on 7 February – makes available an additional £3.7 billion to councils, including funding for adult social care reform. This is an increase in local authority funding for 2022/23 of over 4.5% in real terms, which will ensure councils across the country have the resources they need to deliver key services.

Local authorities know their own local priorities best and have a discretion to spend their income according to local need, including on issues relating to wellbeing.

Levelling up is at the heart of the Government's agenda to build back better after the pandemic and was at the centre of the Manifesto on which the Government promised to deliver for the people of the UK. The Government is committed to ensuring that funding allocations for councils are based on an up-to-date assessment of their needs and resources. We will work closely with local partners and take stock of the challenges and opportunities they face, before consulting on any potential funding reform.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
8th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to the Levelling Up White Paper, if his Department will reverse the real term reductions in local government funding to help meet the target of every community feeling pride in their town centre and local community.

In total, the Local Government Finance Settlement for 2022/23 – published on 7 February – makes available an additional £3.7 billion to councils, including funding for adult social care reform. This is an increase in local authority funding for 2022/23 of over 4.5% in real terms, which will ensure councils across the country have the resources they need to deliver key services.

Local authorities know their own local priorities best and have a discretion to spend their income according to local need, including on issues relating to pride of place.

Levelling up is at the heart of the Government's agenda to build back better after the pandemic and was at the centre of the Manifesto on which the Government promised to deliver for the people of the UK. The Government is committed to ensuring that funding allocations for councils are based on an up-to-date assessment of their needs and resources. We will work closely with local partners and take stock of the challenges and opportunities they face, before consulting on any potential funding reform.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what measures are in place to enable freeholders on private estates to dispute increases to land management fees made without their agreement.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. Where people pay estate rentcharges it is not appropriate that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs.

That is why the Government intends to legislate to ensure that the charges that resident freeholders may pay towards the maintenance of communal area are fairer and more transparent.

To this effect, we will legislate to give freeholders on private and mixed tenure estates equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rentcharges, as well as a right to apply to the First-tier Tribunal to appoint a new manager to manage the provision of services.

In addition, we will ensure that where a freeholder pays a rentcharge, the rentcharge owner is not able to take possession or grant a lease on the property where the rentcharge remains unpaid for a short period of time. We will translate these measures into law when parliamentary time allows.

We will also consider the option of introducing a Right to Manage for residential freeholders once we have considered the Law Commission's report and recommendations on changes to the Right to Manage for leaseholders.

14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if his Department will take steps to prevent land management companies from increasing land management fees without the agreement of freeholders on private estates.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. Where people pay estate rentcharges it is not appropriate that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs.

That is why the Government intends to legislate to ensure that the charges that resident freeholders may pay towards the maintenance of communal area are fairer and more transparent.

To this effect, we will legislate to give freeholders on private and mixed tenure estates equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rentcharges, as well as a right to apply to the First-tier Tribunal to appoint a new manager to manage the provision of services.

In addition, we will ensure that where a freeholder pays a rentcharge, the rentcharge owner is not able to take possession or grant a lease on the property where the rentcharge remains unpaid for a short period of time. We will translate these measures into law when parliamentary time allows.

We will also consider the option of introducing a Right to Manage for residential freeholders once we have considered the Law Commission's report and recommendations on changes to the Right to Manage for leaseholders.

14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing a cap on land management fees for freeholders on private estates.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. Where people pay estate rentcharges it is not appropriate that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs.

That is why the Government intends to legislate to ensure that the charges that resident freeholders may pay towards the maintenance of communal area are fairer and more transparent.

To this effect, we will legislate to give freeholders on private and mixed tenure estates equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rentcharges, as well as a right to apply to the First-tier Tribunal to appoint a new manager to manage the provision of services.

In addition, we will ensure that where a freeholder pays a rentcharge, the rentcharge owner is not able to take possession or grant a lease on the property where the rentcharge remains unpaid for a short period of time. We will translate these measures into law when parliamentary time allows.

We will also consider the option of introducing a Right to Manage for residential freeholders once we have considered the Law Commission's report and recommendations on changes to the Right to Manage for leaseholders.

14th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, if he will make it the policy of his Department to regulate land management fees for freeholders on private estates.

The Government is committed to promoting fairness and transparency for homeowners and ensuring that consumers are protected from abuse and poor service. Where people pay estate rentcharges it is not appropriate that these homeowners have limited rights to challenge these costs.

That is why the Government intends to legislate to ensure that the charges that resident freeholders may pay towards the maintenance of communal area are fairer and more transparent.

To this effect, we will legislate to give freeholders on private and mixed tenure estates equivalent rights to leaseholders to challenge the reasonableness of estate rentcharges, as well as a right to apply to the First-tier Tribunal to appoint a new manager to manage the provision of services.

In addition, we will ensure that where a freeholder pays a rentcharge, the rentcharge owner is not able to take possession or grant a lease on the property where the rentcharge remains unpaid for a short period of time. We will translate these measures into law when parliamentary time allows.

We will also consider the option of introducing a Right to Manage for residential freeholders once we have considered the Law Commission's report and recommendations on changes to the Right to Manage for leaseholders.

14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 April 2021, Official Report, column 86WH, on the Government's policy on the inappropriate use by some employers of fire and rehire as a negotiation tactic, what steps their Department has taken to (a) investigate and (b) discourage the use of fire and rehire negotiation tactics by their Department's executive non-departmental public bodies; and what steps they have taken to communicate the Government's policy on those practices to those bodies.

Non-departmental public bodies (NDPBs) are not part of the department and operate at arms-length from Ministers. We work constructively with our NDPBs and this includes issues of workforce management but it is ultimately the responsibility of each NDPB to manage their staff. Whilst we have not communicated on this issue with all our NDPBs, the Government has been very clear that threatening fire and rehire as a negotiating tactic is completely unacceptable. We always expect employers to treat employees fairly and in the spirit of partnership working with trade unions, where relevant, constructively. We are confident that all non-departmental public bodies are aware of the Government’s position on this matter.

17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if their Department will publish an Ethnicity Pay Gap Report for financial year 2023-24 in line with the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance for employers published on 17 April 2023.

Alongside other government departments, we are currently considering the best way to approach Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting in the Civil Service. Ethnicity Pay Gap Reporting is voluntary.

We are working with Civil Service HR colleagues and other government departments to work through the details of the Ethnicity Pay Gap reporting guidance that was published on 17 April 2023.


In line with Gender Pay Gap Reporting, the Civil Service is looking to develop a consistent methodology to be used in departments to produce the data. The outcomes of this development work will inform whether we are able to publish a report for 2023/2024.

More generally the Civil Service is undertaking extensive work both centrally and within departments to promote diversity across its workplaces, including ethnicity.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
27th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will take steps to raise the Burmese Military's actions towards the Rohingya at the international war crimes meeting at Lancaster House in March 2023.

The Justice Ministers Conference in March 2023 is aimed at supporting the International Criminal Court in its efforts to seek accountability for the atrocities being committed in Ukraine. The meeting will bring countries together to discuss further practical support that can be provided to the ICC in areas including evidence gathering and coordination, and support for witnesses.

The UK is clear that there must be accountability for the atrocities committed in Myanmar. We condemn the ongoing serious human rights violations by the Myanmar Armed Forces, as well as previous atrocities against the Rohingya. These actions require further scrutiny, and the UK is supportive of any attempts to bring these issues before the ICC. The UK has provided over £25m since 2017 for the Rohingya and other Muslim communities in Rakhine.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)
20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion employment tribunal awards paid in each year since 2010 were paid (a) in full via a single instalment and (b) in part via multiple instalments

The information requested is not held centrally.

20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many employment tribunal awards were paid in full within (a) one, (b) three, (c) six, (d) 12 and (e) more than 12 months in employment tribunal cases commenced in each year between 2010 to 2020.

The information requested is not held centrally.

20th Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many employment tribunal claims resulted in awards for employees between 1 January 2010 and 31 December 2020.

The information requested for the period between 2010 to 2018 is not held centrally due to GDPR rules.

The information requested for the period between 2019 and 2020 could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to his Answer of 6 July 2020 to Question 66877, what the completion rate was of diversity monitoring forms attached to employment tribunal claims forms in each year from 2010.

The information requested was not collated centrally prior to September 2018. The table below displays the information relating to the volume of online claims submitted from September 2018 to March 2020.

Date Range

Number of online Employment Tribunal claims submitted

Number of ethnic monitoring questionnaires completed

% of ethnic monitoring questionnaires per claim submitted

05/09/2018 31/03/2019

26066

821

3

01/04/2019 31/03/2020

52096

1574

3

Total

78162

2395

3

  • The above data was generated from information stored on the online application system.
  • It is not used for internal or external purposes; therefore, the details are subject to inaccuracies, it is however the only/best data available
  • Completion of the diversity questionnaire is not mandatory.
  • We cannot provide information from 1 April 2020, as that information forms a subset of Employment Tribunal data that is part of Ministry of Justice’s (MoJ) Official Statistics output, which will be published later in 2020 (statistics relating to April to June 2020 is due for publication in September 2020).
Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 6 July 2020 to Question 66875, if his Department will publish all correspondence between his Department and the Law Commission relating to tribunal fees from 26 July 2017.

The Ministry of Justice holds regular discussions with many organisations, including the Law Commission, about various policy areas. We do not routinely publish internal discussions between Government and other organisations, such as the Law Commission.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions his Department has had with the Law Commission on the reintroduction of employment tribunal fees.

The Ministry of Justice hold regular discussions with many organisations, including the Law Commission, about various policy areas. There have been no decisions regarding the re-introduction of fees in the Employment Tribunal. The Government is committed to the effective enforcement of employment rights. Should we bring forward any formal proposals relating to the re-introduction of fees in the Employment Tribunal, they would be subject to a full public consultation.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what discussions his Department has had with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on the reintroduction of employment tribunal fees.

The Ministry of Justice has frequent discussions with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on many aspects of Employment Tribunals. There have been no decisions regarding the re-introduction of fees in the Employment Tribunal. The Government is committed to the effective enforcement of employment rights. Should we bring forward any formal proposals relating to the re-introduction of fees in the Employment Tribunal, they would be subject to a full public consultation.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people in each category of ethnicity have brought employment tribunal claims in each year since 2010.

A diversity monitoring form is attached to the employment tribunal claim form ET1 but the completion of this form is optional. The completion rate is far below the usual 60% threshold used for diversity reporting. Representation rates based on return rates below 60% are not considered statistically valid because they are unlikely to provide a representative picture of all claimants.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of employment tribunal claims were successful in each of the last five years; and what proportion of those claimants came from each ethnic group.

HM Courts & Tribunals Service does not hold the data being requested.

The official statistics can provide information on the percentage of cases successful at hearing but they are not separated by ethnic group.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tribunals-statistics

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many band three to five prison officers had (a) less than three years' experience and (b) three or more years’ service at each high-security institution in each year from 2010.

The number of band 3 to 5 prison officers in each high-security and long-term prison, with less than three years' experience and three or more years’ service, in each year from 2010 are given in the attached table.

The huge number of officers we’ve recently recruited inevitably means there are more staff – and more leavers - with under one year’s experience. But we are working hard to retain experienced staff, including by giving them the biggest pay award in a decade last year and the tools they need to do their job safely including PAVA spray and rigid bar handcuffs.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many expressions of interest he has received to operate innovation partner contracts under the new planned probation model.

We are planning to implement the new model for probation services by June 2021. The competition for Probation Delivery Partner contracts is well underway and we have received sufficient bids for a viable and healthy competition. The total potential Probation Delivery Partner contract value, as published in the Official Journal of the European Union, is £1.26 billion over 8 years. We will launch the competition for providers for the Dynamic Framework competition in the coming months.

All staff that transfer to the National Probation Service will become civil servants upon transfer. It is our intention to harmonise terms and conditions for this group on transfer as this is a key enabler of the forthcoming changes. However, this is subject to ongoing negotiations with Trade Unions.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the timescale is for the full implementation of the new planned probation model.

We are planning to implement the new model for probation services by June 2021. The competition for Probation Delivery Partner contracts is well underway and we have received sufficient bids for a viable and healthy competition. The total potential Probation Delivery Partner contract value, as published in the Official Journal of the European Union, is £1.26 billion over 8 years. We will launch the competition for providers for the Dynamic Framework competition in the coming months.

All staff that transfer to the National Probation Service will become civil servants upon transfer. It is our intention to harmonise terms and conditions for this group on transfer as this is a key enabler of the forthcoming changes. However, this is subject to ongoing negotiations with Trade Unions.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether all staff employed by community rehabilitation companies will be employed on the same terms as National Probation Service staff following the transition to the new planned probation model.

We are planning to implement the new model for probation services by June 2021. The competition for Probation Delivery Partner contracts is well underway and we have received sufficient bids for a viable and healthy competition. The total potential Probation Delivery Partner contract value, as published in the Official Journal of the European Union, is £1.26 billion over 8 years. We will launch the competition for providers for the Dynamic Framework competition in the coming months.

All staff that transfer to the National Probation Service will become civil servants upon transfer. It is our intention to harmonise terms and conditions for this group on transfer as this is a key enabler of the forthcoming changes. However, this is subject to ongoing negotiations with Trade Unions.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the value of all Innovation Partner contracts under the new planned probation model.

We are planning to implement the new model for probation services by June 2021. The competition for Probation Delivery Partner contracts is well underway and we have received sufficient bids for a viable and healthy competition. The total potential Probation Delivery Partner contract value, as published in the Official Journal of the European Union, is £1.26 billion over 8 years. We will launch the competition for providers for the Dynamic Framework competition in the coming months.

All staff that transfer to the National Probation Service will become civil servants upon transfer. It is our intention to harmonise terms and conditions for this group on transfer as this is a key enabler of the forthcoming changes. However, this is subject to ongoing negotiations with Trade Unions.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to exclude private companies holding community rehabilitation company contracts from taking additional contracts under the new planned probation model.

No organisations have been barred from the competition. The Public Procurement Regulations 2015 contain discretionary grounds for disqualifying a supplier, including where there are “significant or persistent deficiencies" in the performance of a substantive requirement under a prior public contract, which led to early termination of the prior contract in question, or to damages or other comparable sanctions.

The criteria for exclusion have not been met – no Community Rehabilitation Company contracts have been terminated for poor performance, and nor has there been cause to claim damages.

Rules on taking account of suppliers’ past performances can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/procurement-policy-note-0415-taking-account-of-suppliers-past-performance

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people are serving custodial sentences for each category of terror offence in each prison; and what the length of sentence is for each person.

Data detailing the number of people convicted under the Terrorism Act serving custodial sentences is available at Gov.uk. The website contains a detailed breakdown of information about the number of offenders by offence and by sentence length. You can access this information here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/operation-of-police-powers-under-the-terrorism-act-2000-quarterly-update-to-september-2019

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what criteria he plans to use to assess bids for Innovation Partner contracts under the new planned probation model.

We are taking assessment criteria to mean evaluation criteria for the purposes of this response.

The Probation Delivery Partner (formerly Innovation Partner) contracts will be evaluated on both quality and price. Tenders will be evaluated on the basis of the evaluation price divided by the quality score to obtain the Price Per Quality Point score (with the lowest score being awarded a Lot subject to restrictions on available market share and minimum capital requirements).

The quality evaluation criteria are: Service Delivery (weighting 61%); Service Enablers (23%); Social Value (6%); Mobilisation & Transition (10%) and Legal, Commercial and Financial (Pass/Fail).

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to publish signed Innovation Partner contracts under the new planned probation model.

The Probation Delivery Partner (formerly Innovation Partner) contracts will be published on the contracts finder website as required upon signature, subject to redaction of commercially sensitive content and personal information where applicable.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the proportion of services commissioned under the dynamic framework of the new planned probation model which will be provided by voluntary sector organisations.

All probation services to be commissioned under the Dynamic Framework will be competed and awarded to the preferred bidder based on their price and quality scores. These will be awarded under fair and open competition and will not be directly awarded to framework members. We have not made any commitments as to what proportion of services will be provided by the voluntary sector. However, we have sought to design the Dynamic Framework in such a way as to reduce barriers to entry for voluntary sector organisations in order to encourage involvement of the sector in future delivery where possible.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department will have the power without breaching contracts to remove poorly performing innovation partners under the new planned probation model.

The draft Probation Delivery Partner contracts are based on the Model Services Contract (a set of model terms and conditions for major services contracts produced by the Crown Commercial Service and the Government Legal Service) and will allow us to terminate (either partly or in full) contracts which are underperforming. We also have a range of levers to rectify and improve performance.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
8th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many children and young people in HM Young Offenders Institutes (a) Werrington, (b) Wetherby, (c) Swinfen Hall, (d) Feltham, (e) Cookham Wood and (f) Aylesbury have accumulated (i) 1-24, (ii) 25-49, (iii) 50-74, (iv) 75-99, (v) 100-149 and (vi) 150 or more additional days of imprisonment as punishment since their arrival.

Discipline procedures are central to the maintenance of a safe, decent and rehabilitative custodial environment. They require adjudications to be conducted lawfully, fairly and justly. All prisoners have a full opportunity to hear what is alleged against them and to present their case. Children and young people in custody are some of the most vulnerable people in society and their safety and welfare is our highest priority. But there are occasions when their behaviour is so challenging and violent that it is necessary to instigate disciplinary procedures. Young or vulnerable prisoners, who may lack experience of adjudications, are encouraged to request help from an advocate.

Only Independent Adjudicators, who are District Judges or Deputy District Judges, can, in cases deemed to be sufficiently serious, make an award of additional days. The adjudicators will follow the punishment guidelines issued by the Chief Magistrate. These are rightly, independent of the Ministry of Justice and a matter for the Chief Magistrate.

The information requested can be found in the tables attached.

14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, with reference to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy of 27 April 2021, Official Report, column 86WH, on the Government's policy on the inappropriate use by some employers of fire and rehire as a negotiation tactic, what steps their Department has taken to (a) investigate and (b) discourage the use of fire and rehire negotiation tactics by their Department's executive non-departmental public bodies; and what steps they have taken to communicate the Government's policy on those practices to those bodies.

My Department has a number of small NDPBs who are mostly resourced by Civil Servants on secondment from the Northern Ireland Civil Service (NICS) and follow NICS policies and guidelines. There has not been any inappropriate use of “fire and rehire” as secondment arrangements are regularly reviewed and staff return to their NICS department at the end of their secondments. The Northern Ireland Office is not the employer and is therefore not in a position to “fire and rehire” as part of any negotiations. For the very small number of instances where NDPBs are not resourced by NICS staff, the employees are not employed as civil servants but the NDPB follows NICS terms and conditions.

8th Feb 2024
To ask the Leader of the House, if she will take steps with Cabinet colleagues to increase parliamentary scrutiny of UK strategic export controls for military goods.

The government recognises the importance of effective Parliamentary scrutiny of strategic export controls and takes these matters very seriously. The UK operates one of the most transparent export licensing systems in the world, publishing quarterly and annual statistics on all of our export licensing decisions, including details of export licences granted, refused and revoked. The government is required by statute to present an Annual Report on UK Strategic Export Controls detailing the government’s approach to export licensing, including international commitments. The most recent quarterly data on strategic export controls is available on gov.uk (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/strategic-export-controls-licensing-statistics-1-april-to-30-june-2023), as is the annual report for 2022 (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-strategic-export-controls-annual-report-2022).

As of January 2024, the Business and Trade Committee is the Parliamentary scrutiny committee with oversight of arms export controls, a role formerly carried out by the Select Committee on Arms Exports Controls (CAEC). A joint report outlining plans for future parliamentary scrutiny of strategic export controls was published by the Business and Trade, Foreign Affairs and International Development Committees on 23rd January 2024 and can be found on parliament.uk (https://committees.parliament.uk/publications/42982/documents/213812/default/).

The Government recognises the important role that the CAEC played in providing Parliamentary scrutiny of export controls and the work of the Export Control Joint Unit (ECJU). While Parliamentary scrutiny is a matter for the House, the government is committed to keeping the Business and Trade Committee updated on the work of the ECJU as it carries out its new scrutiny role. Other relevant select committees will no doubt continue to examine strategic export controls as part of their wider work, allowing a broad range of scrutiny across the House.

Hon and Rt Hon Members can also raise matters relating to the scrutiny of the UK's strategic export controls directly with the Department for Business and Trade.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons