Elliot Colburn Portrait

Elliot Colburn

Conservative - Carshalton and Wallington


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 30th June 2021
14:30
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 27th July 2021
14:30
Division Votes
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Information Commissioner (Remuneration)
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 359 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 2
Speeches
Tuesday 15th June 2021
Oral Answers to Questions

As chair of the all-party parliamentary group on Tamils and on behalf of Tamils in Carshalton and Wallington, I thank …

Written Answers
Friday 11th June 2021
Social Media: Hate Crime
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 21 May 2021 …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 21st December 2020
2. (a) Support linked to an MP but received by a local party organisation or indirectly via a central party organisation
Name of donor: Martin C Armstrong
Address of donor: private
Amount of donation or nature and value if donation in …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Elliot Colburn has voted in 292 divisions, and 5 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Elliot Colburn voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 253
23 Jun 2020 - Independent Complaints and Grievance Scheme - View Vote Context
Elliot Colburn voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 45 Conservative Aye votes vs 235 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 243 Noes - 238
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Elliot Colburn voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
27 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Elliot Colburn voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative No votes vs 320 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 256
28 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Elliot Colburn voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative No votes vs 321 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 256
View All Elliot Colburn Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(28 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(8 debate interactions)
Paul Scully (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(7 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Elliot Colburn's debates

Carshalton and Wallington Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Carshalton and Wallington signature proportion
Petitions with most Carshalton and Wallington signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

Leading veterinary and welfare bodies are concerned by the alarming rise in ear-cropped dogs in the UK. Ear cropping is illegal in the UK and an unnecessary, painful mutilation with no welfare benefit. The practice involves cutting off part of the ear flap, often without anaesthesia or pain relief.

I would like the Government to:
• make running conversion therapy in the UK a criminal offence
• forcing people to attend said conversion therapies a criminal offence
• sending people abroad in order to try to convert them a criminal offence
• protect individuals from conversion therapy

I want the Government to prevent any restrictions being placed on those who refuse to have any potential Covid-19 vaccine. This includes restrictions on travel, social events, such as concerts or sports. No restrictions whatsoever.

To not decide to scrap free travel for those who are under 18. As a teenager who has relied so much on free travel, it has allowed for me to go to school without the worry of an extra expense and explore around the beautiful city of London also. Destroying free travel would hurt so many of us.

Weddings take months and even years of intricate planning. Myself and many others believe the maximum number of guests authorised at wedding ceremonies should be increased. The number of guests permitted at weddings should be calculated according to venue capacity.

Extend funding to nightclubs, dance music events and festivals as part of the £1.57bn support package announced by the government for Britain's arts and culture sector to survive the hit from the pandemic. #LetUSDance

Every year more and more people, animals and wildlife get hurt by fireworks. It’s time something was fine to stop this. There are enough organised firework groups around for us to still enjoy fireworks safely so please help me stop the needless sale of them to the public!


Latest EDMs signed by Elliot Colburn

Elliot Colburn has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Elliot Colburn, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Elliot Colburn has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Elliot Colburn has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Elliot Colburn has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Elliot Colburn has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


105 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
30th Jun 2020
To ask the hon. Member for City of Chester, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, when the Commission plans to lay before Parliament the draft Order to give affect to the Local Government Boundary Commission for England's recommended boundary changes for the London Borough of Sutton.

The Local Government Boundary Commission for England published its final recommendations for future electoral arrangements in the London Borough of Sutton on 30 June. It expects to lay a draft order in September 2020 to bring the recommendations into effect. The draft order is subject to the 40-sitting days negative resolution procedure.

Christian Matheson
Shadow Minister (Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Oct 2020
What steps he is taking to help ensure that SMEs are awarded public procurement contracts.

The Government introduced a number of measures to address the barriers that SMEs face in the procurement process. Last financial year, we spent almost £2bn more than the previous year with SMEs.

Leaving the EU is an opportunity to further reform our procurement rules. We will cut red tape, drive innovation and make it easier for small businesses to win public sector business, delivering better value for taxpayers.

Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 21 May 2021 to Question 3171 on Social Media: Antisemitism and with reference to the priority harms to be set out in secondary legislation under the planned Online Safety Bill announced in the Queen's Speech 2021, whether he plans to include in those priority harms (a) anti-Semitic abuse, (b) homophobic abuse, (c) abuse on the grounds of disability and (d) abuse on the grounds of other protected characteristics defined in the Equality Act 2010.

We know that groups with protected characteristics or with particular mental or physical health conditions are currently more likely to experience harm and abuse online. We are continuing to work with stakeholders, Parliamentarians and Ofcom to identify specific priority harms and to determine how to formulate these in legislation. The list of primary harms will need to capture online abuse, both where it is legal and where it constitutes a criminal offence.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure that the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of antisemitism is included in any discussions with a potential regulator on holding social media companies accountable for content hosted on their platforms.

The Government is committed to tackling racism, including the spread of antisemitic content online. On 12 May 2021, we published the draft Online Safety Bill, which sets out new expectations on companies to keep their users safe online. Under a new legal duty of care, in-scope companies, including social media, will need to tackle illegal antisemitic content and activity on their services.

In addition, companies providing high-risk, high-reach services will need to assess the risk to adults of legal but harmful content on their services and set clear terms and conditions stating what legal but harmful material they accept (and do not accept) on their service. Companies will have to do this for both priority harms which the government will set out in secondary legislation and for any emerging harms they identify in their risk assessments.

These duties will apply to antisemitic hate speech, which does not meet the threshold of a criminal offence. Companies will need to enforce their terms and conditions consistently and transparently, and could face enforcement action if they do not. All companies in scope will be required to have effective and accessible user reporting and redress mechanisms.

From now onwards we will be working with stakeholders and parliamentarians alike on identifying priority harms, and they will be subject to the usual secondary legislation processes. Ofcom will be responsible for advising the government regarding the list of priority categories of harm, based on evidence of the prevalence and impact of harmful content. Government will not be bound to follow this advice.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of differentiating the regulatory response of illegal and legal but harmful content in the up-coming Online Harms Bill; and if he will make a statement.

The government is clear that the new regulatory framework must be targeted where the potential for impact is greatest. As announced in the full government response to the Online Harms White Paper, published in December, the Online Safety Bill will require all companies in scope to tackle illegal material on their services. All companies will also be required to assess the likelihood of children accessing their services and provide additional protections for them.

Only companies who provide services with the largest audiences and high-risk features will have a legal responsibility to take action with respect to content or activity on their services which is legal but harmful to adults.

We know that online behaviour or content which may not be illegal can still cause serious harm, but we are clear that requirements must be proportionate and reflect the importance of free expression online. An overly broad scope risks imposing disproportionate regulatory burdens and could dilute efforts to tackle the most serious illegal activity including CSEA and terrorist content.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when he plans to publish the Government's response to its consultation on decriminalising TV licence evasion.

We believe that it is right to look again at whether the criminal sanction remains appropriate for TV licence fee evasion given ongoing concerns about whether the criminal sanction is unfair and disproportionate.

In February 2020, the Government launched a public consultation on decriminalising TV licence evasion. The consultation closed in April after receiving over 150,000 responses. We will listen carefully to those that have responded before setting out our next steps.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to increase accessibility to sign language coverage on television.

Under the Communications Act 2003 and Broadcasting Acts of 1990 and 1996, broadcasters are required to meet accessibility requirements for their linear TV services. Statutory targets are set by Ofcom which sets five and ten year targets on subtitling, sign language and audio description for licensed television services.

The government recognises that as part of a digitally inclusive society, television content should be accessible for all UK audiences. That is why, as part of implementing provisions in the Digital Economy Act 2017, the Government asked Ofcom to provide recommendations on how legislation could make on demand services more accessible.

Ofcom published its report in December 2018 and since then my Department has been working with Ofcom to develop the legislative framework for future requirements. As a result, in November 2019, my officials wrote to Ofcom requesting that they complete a further targeted consultation looking at how the regulations should work in practice. Ofcom published this second consultation on 8 July and it closes on 16 September. Once Ofcom have reported back to DCMS and we have reviewed the recommendations, we will set out next steps.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Nov 2020
What steps he is taking to build new schools.

Through the free schools programme, this government has funded thousands of high quality new school places across the country.

We have approved 225 applications from groups that we are now working with to establish new free schools. This includes 73 special and 9 alternative provision free schools.

The Priority Schools Building Programme is replacing or refurbishing buildings at 537 schools.

Gavin Williamson
Secretary of State for Education
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the press release entitled, Build build build: Prime Minister announces New Deal for Britain, how much funding he plans to allocate to school building upgrade projects in Carshalton and Wallington constituency.

The Government has announced a transformative, ten-year programme to rebuild school buildings. This will replace poor condition and ageing school buildings with modern, energy efficient designs, transforming education for thousands of pupils.

We have committed over £1 billion to fund the first 50 projects of the ten-year programme. These projects will be confirmed in the autumn, and construction on the first sites is expected to begin in autumn 2021. Further details of the new ten-year rebuilding programme, including additional funding, will be set out following the Spending Review.

We are also providing £560 million of additional condition funding for the school system this year to support essential maintenance projects. This comes on top of over £1.4 billion capital funding already provided for school maintenance in the financial year 2020-21. We will set out details of how the additional capital funding will be allocated shortly.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the provision in the Special Educational Needs and Disability Code of Practice for local authorities to use their own criteria to decide when it is necessary to carry out an Education, Health and Care needs assessment.

The Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Code of Practice states that local authorities may develop criteria as guidelines to help them decide when it is necessary to carry out an Education, Health and Care (EHC) needs assessment. However, as set out in the Code, local authorities must also be prepared to depart from those criteria where there is a compelling reason to do so in any particular case and demonstrate their willingness to do so where individual circumstances warrant such a departure. Local authorities must not apply a ‘blanket’ policy to particular groups of children or certain types of need, as this would prevent the consideration of a child’s or young person’s needs individually and on their merits as is required under the Children and Families Act 2014.

The Code of Practice also requires that the health care provision specified in section G of the EHC plan must be agreed by the relevant Clinical Commissioning Group (or, where relevant, NHS England) and any health care provision should be agreed in time to be included in the draft EHC plan sent to the child’s parent or to the young person for whom the plan has been created. As part of the joint commissioning arrangements, partners must have clear disagreement resolution procedures where there is disagreement on the services to be included in an EHC plan.

Ultimately, it is for local authorities to ensure that EHC plans are produced in a timely manner and that they include all relevant information to ensure the needs of the child or young person who is subject to the plan are clearly defined, that appropriate support is identified, and that appropriate outcomes are included.

However, we recognise that there are concerns with the SEND system. We announced the SEND Review in September 2019 to ensure the system is working best for all families, and that support in different areas is consistent, available and joined up across health, care and education services.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that local authorities do not dictate to medical professionals what to write in Education, Health and Care Plans.

The Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Code of Practice states that local authorities may develop criteria as guidelines to help them decide when it is necessary to carry out an Education, Health and Care (EHC) needs assessment. However, as set out in the Code, local authorities must also be prepared to depart from those criteria where there is a compelling reason to do so in any particular case and demonstrate their willingness to do so where individual circumstances warrant such a departure. Local authorities must not apply a ‘blanket’ policy to particular groups of children or certain types of need, as this would prevent the consideration of a child’s or young person’s needs individually and on their merits as is required under the Children and Families Act 2014.

The Code of Practice also requires that the health care provision specified in section G of the EHC plan must be agreed by the relevant Clinical Commissioning Group (or, where relevant, NHS England) and any health care provision should be agreed in time to be included in the draft EHC plan sent to the child’s parent or to the young person for whom the plan has been created. As part of the joint commissioning arrangements, partners must have clear disagreement resolution procedures where there is disagreement on the services to be included in an EHC plan.

Ultimately, it is for local authorities to ensure that EHC plans are produced in a timely manner and that they include all relevant information to ensure the needs of the child or young person who is subject to the plan are clearly defined, that appropriate support is identified, and that appropriate outcomes are included.

However, we recognise that there are concerns with the SEND system. We announced the SEND Review in September 2019 to ensure the system is working best for all families, and that support in different areas is consistent, available and joined up across health, care and education services.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to issue guidance to special educational needs co-ordinators on (a) the services they are expected to provide from the mainstream budget, (b) when an Education, Health and Care Plan is required and (c) other aspects of the Children and Families Act 2014.

We recognise the important role that Special Educational Needs Co-ordinators (SENCOs) play in schools in supporting children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND).

We do not currently have plans to issue specific guidance to SENCOs as the role and responsibilities of SENCOs are set out in the SEND Code of Practice, which is the statutory guidance that schools must have due regard to.

In addition, we have provided funding to the Whole School SEND Consortium (WSS) to develop resources specifically to support SENCOs. This includes a SENCO Induction Pack to help new SENCOs in their role, which can be accessed at: www.sendgateway.org.uk/whole-school-send/sencos-area. The induction pack includes further information on the statutory framework; Education, Health and Care Plans; and managing SEND provision.

The WSS is also developing an ‘Effective SENCO Deployment Guide’ to help school leaders consider how they can best support the SENCO in their school. Furthermore, we are reviewing the learning outcomes for the National Award in SEN Co-ordination to ensure it best prepares SENCOs for their role.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what impact assessment his Department has carried out to assess the amount of work required by schools to implement the statutory teaching of Relationships and Sex Education from September 2020.

The Department is committed to supporting all schools in their preparations for the introduction of relationships education (RE), relationships and sex education (RSE) and health education from September 2020.

In July 2018, as part of the consultation on the draft regulations and statutory guidance, the Department published a draft impact assessment, which set out the assessment the Department had made of the impact of the requirement to teach compulsory RE and RSE on independent and maintained schools. The assessment was made in line with requirements set out in the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015, and responses to the consultation helped finalise the regulations, statutory guidance and impact assessment. The Government response can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/780768/Government_Response_to_RSE_Consultation.pdf.

The Department is investing in a central support package to support all schools to increase the confidence and quality of their teaching practice. We are currently developing a new online service featuring training materials, case studies and support to access resources. This will be available from April 2020 with additional content added through the summer term, covering all of the teaching requirements in the statutory guidance. The implementation guide will also be provided to all schools as part of this service, and training offers will be available for schools that need additional support.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to review the (a) sale and (b) use of rodent glue traps across the UK; and whether he has plans to (i) introduce an outright ban, (ii) prohibit public sale and use and (iii) regulate use by other operators of those traps.

The use of glue traps is being considered very closely as part of the Government's continued drive to maintain the highest animal welfare standards in the world.

We will look to restrict the use of glue traps as a means of pest control to help make sure rodents are despatched in a humane manner. Glue traps can cause immense suffering to rodents and other animals that inadvertently fall victim to their use.

Anyone using glue traps already has a responsibility under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 to act within the law to ensure their activities do not cause any unnecessary suffering.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to encourage a shift from conventional single use plastic films to certified compostable alternatives; and if he will set a target under the Environment Bill to accelerate that process.

While compostable materials may be seen as a solution to reduce the impact of waste, they can also be more environmentally damaging than non-compostable materials if disposed of incorrectly. The Government is concerned that, some claims about the compostability of plastic-based products cannot be verified.

In order to consider impacts carefully, Defra and BEIS published a call for evidence to help us consider the development of standards or certification criteria for bio-based, biodegradable, and compostable plastics, and to better understand their effects on the environment and our waste management system. We are currently analysing responses to the call for evidence and will publish the Government’s response shortly.

Our Resources and Waste Strategy sets out our ambition to transition to a circular economy by keeping resources in the system for longer and extracting maximum value from them, before recycling materials when they can no longer be reused. We have recently published consultations on introducing Extended Producer Responsibility for packaging and introducing a Deposit Return Scheme for drinks containers. These consultations will inform policy that will transform the economic incentives on packaging producers by encouraging an increase in the amount and quality of unavoidable plastic packaging that is recycled or reused, so driving up recycling rates and helping to move us towards a circular economy.

We are also preparing to launch a second consultation on increasing the consistency of materials collected for recycling from households, businesses and other organisations in England, which will seek views on the collection and disposal of compostable and biodegradable materials and the recycling of plastic films.

The UK Plastics Pact is targeting plastic film as a coordinated effort involving the entire value chain to fix the system to create a circular economy for single use plastic films. Last year the Plastics Pact published a roadmap ‘Creating a Circular Economy for Flexible Plastic Packaging’, which sets out the high-level actions that need to be taken by each part of the value chain. The new roadmap sets out five key areas where efforts should be focused in order to develop a circular economy for flexible plastics. These are: designing packaging that can be recycled and sorted; capitalising on existing front of store collection points; implementing kerbside collection by all local authorities; investing in sorting and reprocessing capacity and capabilities; and ensuring strong and stable end markets for recycled flexible plastic packaging.

The Environment Bill requires the Government to set at least one long-term, legally binding target in four priority areas, including Resource Efficiency and Waste Reduction. This will not be focused on increasing the use of compostable plastics, instead the target will ensure a holistic approach to all materials. These targets will be set following a robust, evidence-led process that includes seeking independent expert advice, a role for stakeholders and the public, and parliamentary scrutiny.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the increase in supermarket deliveries since the start of the covid-19 outbreak on the use of single use plastic bags by supermarkets.


Since 5 October 2015, large retailers in England have been required by law to charge a minimum of 5p for single-use carrier bags (SUCBs) and to report on the amount they sell each year. The data for the year 2020-2021 will be published in the summer.

The full datasets for each reporting year are on Gov.UK and can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/carrier-bag-charge-summary-of-data-in-england.

The obligation for supermarkets to charge for SUCBs supplied with online deliveries (online grocery delivery bags) was temporarily removed in response to the first Covid-lockdown. These changes were only temporary, from 21 March 2020 to 21 September 2020. This exemption was made as a precautionary measure and in order to allow retailers time to adapt their delivery systems. As well as the charge exemption, the obligation to report during this time period was waived. The charge for these bags was reinstated in September 2020 along with the reporting requirement. Therefore the dataset for the year 2020-2021, will not include data from this period on bags used for online deliveries.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many and what proportion of local authorities with responsibility for waste recycling centres have introduced charges for the use of waste recycling services; and if he will provide details of (a) which local authorities have introduced those charges and (b) how much each of those local authorities is charging for those services.

Defra does not hold records on which household and waste recycling centres (HWRCs) charge for the disposal of waste. The Controlled Waste Regulations 2012 set out charging arrangements for different categories of waste, including waste delivered to HWRCs. Charges made by local authorities to dispose of DIY waste vary and some do not charge for this service.

In our Resources and Waste Strategy we committed to ensuring that charging arrangements in the Controlled Waste Regulations are clear, especially in relation to waste arising from small scale DIY construction activities carried out by ordinary householders with no specialist skills, which the government has been clear should not be charged for. We will review the Household Waste Recycling Centre services and the Controlled Waste Regulations and, subject to consultation, will amend them to ensure they remain fit for purpose, charges are fairly applied, and that services are accessible, support high levels of recycling and deliver value for money.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to encourage local authorities to collect and scan cats injured or killed in road traffic accidents for a microchip and inform their owners.

It is established good practice for local authorities to scan any cat or dog found on the streets so that the owner can be informed. Cats Protection reports that 80% of councils in England routinely scan cats involved in accidents.

Additionally, Highways England has clear guidelines for contractors to follow when they find a deceased cat or dog. This process is designed with owners in mind, giving them the best chance of being informed of the incident to allow closure. The process is laid out in the Network Management Manual and in 2015 the necessary arrangements were made in all Highways England’s contracts to collect and identify cats and dogs killed on the strategic road network and to contact their owners.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Cats report entitled Cats as Companions: Can Cats Help Tackle Loneliness, published July 2020, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care of the effectiveness of pet ownership on (a) reducing loneliness and (b) reducing cost to the NHS.

I recognise the important role that pets play in providing companionship to owners of all ages in this country. Recent events have highlighted how much we, as a nation of animal lovers, value this companionship, as we experienced restrictions in social contact and saw an increased demand for pets, including cats, both for purchase and rehoming. I agree with the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Cats that cats can help alleviate loneliness.

Defra officials will engage with the Department of Health and Social Care in relation to any actions they wish to take relating to those aspects and recommendations in the report covering mental health issues and associated NHS costs.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of pregnant dogs illegally imported into the UK in 2020.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) only holds records of pregnant dogs where other non-compliances were found at time of interception on entry to Great Britain. APHA does not record details of compliant animals which were pregnant at time of interception.

According to APHA records, eight dogs were seized in 2020 under Council Regulation (EC) no 1/2005, Annex I, FITNESS FOR TRANSPORT, Chapter I, 2(c) ‘pregnant females for whom 90% or more of the expected gestation period has already passed’. An additional 11 pregnant bitches not in their last 10% were seized in 2020.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent steps he has taken to ensure that (a) dog and (b) cat meat is not being consumed in the UK.

The Government shares the public's high regard for animal welfare, including the welfare of dogs and cats. The UK is a leader when it comes to the protection of animals, and we intend to go even further now that we have left the EU.

The Government is appalled by the prospect of dogs and cats being consumed. However, it is already illegal to sell dog and cat meat for human consumption and we have seen no evidence that dog or cat meat is being sold or consumed in this country. The organisation behind the recent campaign to ban the consumption of dog and cat meat in this country acknowledged this point.

We are confident that our current position sends a clear message that the slaughter and consumption of dogs and cats will never be acceptable. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office raises concerns about the welfare of animals with other governments at every suitable opportunity, and we are pleased to hear that authorities in China are proposing to ban the consumption of dog and cat meat.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) adequacy of the regulation and enforcement of pet imports, (b) trends in the level of pet imports during the covid-19 outbreak and (c) effect of the UK leaving the EU on pet imports.

Defra takes the illegal importation of pets seriously. It is an abhorrent trade which causes suffering to animals and puts the health of pets and people in the UK at risk.

In terms of the regulation and enforcement of non-commercial pet travel movements, we operate one of the most rigorous and robust pet travel checking regimes in the world. All pet animals entering Great Britain on approved routes under the EU Pet Travel Scheme undergo documentary and identity checks, and the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) works collaboratively with Border Force and other operational partners at ports, airports and inland, sharing intelligence to enforce the Pet Travel Scheme, disrupt illegal imports and seize non-compliant animals. Any animals found to be non-compliant with the Pet Travel Scheme rules may be refused entry or detained until compliant.

Regarding changing levels of pet imports (both commercial and non-commercial) during the COVID-19 lockdown, APHA has confirmed that during the initial period of lockdown (March-April 2020), we saw a reduction of pet movements. This increased to relatively routine figures as COVID-19 movement restrictions were eased. On non-commercial pet travel, 14,718 pets were moved into Great Britain in March 2020. Numbers of movements then fell to 1,834 in April 2020 and rose to 4,810 in May 2020. On the commercial imports of cats, dogs and ferrets under the Balai Directive, 2,506 animals were imported into the UK in March 2020, falling to 1,114 in April 2020. Numbers of commercial imports are steadily rising again and now sit at 6,741 for the month of August 2020.

The end of the Transition Period may open up new opportunities for managing our own commercial and non-commercial import and pet travel arrangements. The Government will be considering our pet travel and import arrangements (including for puppies and kittens) as part of cracking down on puppy smuggling in line with our manifesto commitment.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans her Department has to bring forward legislative proposals to strengthen the rules of the Pet Travel Scheme.

The Government takes the welfare of all animals seriously, and that is why we have committed to cracking down on puppy smuggling. Looking to the future, leaving the EU after the transition period may open up new opportunities for managing our own pet travel arrangements, including ensuring there are robust controls on disease and animal welfare.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of the recommendations of Dogs Trust’s 2018 report entitled, Puppy Smuggling: When will this cruel trade end.

Defra takes the issue of puppy smuggling seriously. It is an abhorrent trade which causes suffering to puppies and puts the health of pets and people in the UK at risk. We continue to work closely with Dogs Trust to address this issue and understand the evolving trade.

The Government is developing a range of options to strengthen our efforts to tackle puppy smuggling, taking into consideration the recommendations of Dogs Trust and other stakeholders. As part of this work, we have conducted a renewed rabies risk assessment and have commissioned assessments to understand the risks posed by tapeworms, as well as ticks and tick-borne disease. The results of these will be used to inform our future policy options.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many invalid emission reporting results there were at the Viridor energy recovery facility incinerator on Beddington lane in south London during January 2020.

The Environment Agency (EA) as the regulatory body for the site will receive the returns from the operator for January 2020. These will be submitted to the EA in April 2020 as part of the quarterly reporting process. This information is then reviewed and validated by the EA. Following this process the EA will be able to confirm the number of invalid emissions, if any.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the level of carbon monoxide emissions from the Viridor energy recovery facility incinerator on Beddington Lane in South London during January 2020.

The Environment Agency (EA) regulates the Energy Recovery Facility (Erf) in Beddington Lane, Sutton through an Environmental Permit under the Environmental Permitting Regulations 2010. The permit has strict conditions relating to acceptable levels of emissions of substances. The ErF operator (Viridor) is required to continuously and periodically monitor the emissions from the Erf stacks and submit the monitoring data quarterly to the EA.

The EA assesses all data submitted including breaches in emission limits for trends and requires the operator to investigate issues and take actions to rectify them.

The quarterly monitoring data that covers January 2020 is due to be submitted to the EA before end of April 2020. The EA have not received any notifications for breaches in emission limits during January 2020.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of trends in the level of air pollutants generated by the Viridor energy recovery facility incinerator on Beddington Lane in South London.

The Environment Agency (EA) regulates the Energy Recovery Facility (Erf) in Beddington Lane, Sutton through an Environmental Permit under the Environmental Permitting Regulations 2010. The permit has strict conditions relating to acceptable levels of emissions of substances. The ErF operator (Viridor) is required to continuously and periodically monitor the emissions from the Erf stacks and submit the monitoring data quarterly to the EA.

The EA assesses all data submitted including breaches in emission limits for trends and requires the operator to investigate issues and take actions to rectify them.

The quarterly monitoring data that covers January 2020 is due to be submitted to the EA before end of April 2020. The EA have not received any notifications for breaches in emission limits during January 2020.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of trends in the level of air pollution in (a) the UK and (b) Carshalton and Wallington constituency.

Air quality is generally improving in the UK, as set out in the annual National Statistics report at the following URL: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/air-quality-statistics.

There are 171 automatic national monitoring stations producing hourly air quality measurements in the UK operated by the Environment Agency on behalf of Defra. Near real-time measurements from these sites and further data tools can be found on the UK-AIR website (https://uk-air.defra.gov.uk).

There are no automatic national monitoring stations in Carshalton and Wallington constituency. However, the London Borough of Sutton also assesses air quality using three automatic monitors within the constituency boundary: two are industrial monitoring stations at Beddington Lane, and the other site is a roadside site in central Wallington. Near real-time measurements from these sites can be found on the London Air website which is managed by King’s College London (http://londonair.org.uk). Air quality is improving at all three sites, with only the Wallington site providing an exceedance of the annual mean limit value for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in 2019 (based on provisional data).

The Borough also uses 15 passive monitors to measure NO2 within the constituency boundaries; measurements are made available through Annual Status Reports (https://www.sutton.gov.uk/info/200497/pollution/1232/air_pollution/3). Only two exceedances of the annual mean limit value for NO2 were observed in 2018 (at Rosehill Roundabout and London Road, Hackbridge) with levels at most sites either showing a lower or similar value compared with 2017 levels.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department has taken to help prevent the occurrence of fire incidents at waste incinerator sites.

No assessment has been made of trends in the number of fires being reported at waste incinerator sites since 2015.

In England all incinerators that are regulated by the Environment Agency (such as energy from waste plants that burn municipal waste) are required to have a management system which identifies and minimises the risk of pollution due to accidents, which will include fires. All new incinerators must also have an approved fire prevention plan before they are allowed to start operating.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of trends in the number of fires being reported at waste incinerator sites since 2015.

No assessment has been made of trends in the number of fires being reported at waste incinerator sites since 2015.

In England all incinerators that are regulated by the Environment Agency (such as energy from waste plants that burn municipal waste) are required to have a management system which identifies and minimises the risk of pollution due to accidents, which will include fires. All new incinerators must also have an approved fire prevention plan before they are allowed to start operating.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what comparative assessment she has made of the environmental effects of mechanical biological treatment waste processes and waste incineration processes.

Defra has not made such an assessment. Residual waste should be treated in accordance with the waste hierarchy.

To assist decision makers, the department published information on the mechanical biological treatment of waste in 2013. This can be found on the GOV.UK website at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/mechanical-biological-treatment-of-municipal-solid-waste.

Information on energy from waste (incineration with energy recovery) was published in 2014 at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/energy-from-waste-a-guide-to-the-debate.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will take steps to ensure that collisions involving a motor vehicle with a horse and a rider on a public highway are treated the same as a collision with any other vulnerable road user even if the rider is unhurt.

Provisions within the Road Traffic Act 1988 set out the duties which exist in the event of a collision between a motor vehicle and animal, including a horse. A driver who causes injury to a horse must provide their name and address to anyone reasonably requiring it, failing which they must report the incident to the police. If the driver fails to do any of this, they are guilty of an offence, for which they could be arrested and prosecuted. There is no requirement for the police to attend the incident.

The Department is taking steps to improve safety for horse riders using the highway through updates to The Highway Code which will introduce safe passing speeds and distances. The Highway Code in its current form already mentions horse riders and the need for drivers to exercise special care in relation to them.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the level of police involvement is in the event where a ridden horse is hit by a motor vehicle on a public highway and killed and the rider is uninjured.

Provisions within the Road Traffic Act 1988 set out the duties which exist in the event of a collision between a motor vehicle and animal, including a horse. A driver who causes injury to a horse must provide their name and address to anyone reasonably requiring it, failing which they must report the incident to the police. If the driver fails to do any of this, they are guilty of an offence, for which they could be arrested and prosecuted. There is no requirement for the police to attend the incident.

The Department is taking steps to improve safety for horse riders using the highway through updates to The Highway Code which will introduce safe passing speeds and distances. The Highway Code in its current form already mentions horse riders and the need for drivers to exercise special care in relation to them.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when a decision will be made on the bid for funding from the second round of Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund for step-free access at Carshalton Beeches station.

We will be announcing the outcome of the second round of the Restoring Your Railway Ideas Fund in the coming weeks.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will hold discussions with (a) Transport for London and (b) the Mayor of London on TfL's decision to suspend funding for the tramlink extension to Sutton.

In May the Government agreed a £1.6 billion funding and finance package with Transport for London (TfL) to enable them to continue operating essential services, transporting passengers safely and protecting staff during the pandemic.

Transport in London is devolved to the Mayor and there are difficult choices to be made to ensure that he is minimising the call on the government funding package in the interest of the taxpayer.

Government is currently undertaking a review of TfL’s finances which will consider TfL’s revenues and costs over the next five years.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to improve transport connectivity in Carshalton and Wallington constituency.

Government works with all key partners across the country, including Transport for London (TfL) and London Boroughs, to ensure consideration is given to transport connectivity from the earliest stages of the development of proposals.

In addition, as part of the Extraordinary Funding and Finance Agreement, agreed to by the Mayor of London and the Deputy Mayor for Transport, TfL are pushing forward with an ambitious Active Travel Plan to promote cycling and walking, including new segregated cycle lanes, closures of roads to traffic and pavement extensions across London, which is supported by £55 million from the funding package.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of allocating funding to support a platform extension at Hackbridge station.

No assessment has been made of the merits of making platform extensions at Hackbridge. As part of its ongoing programme of network planning, the Department has received no indication from Network Rail that platform extensions at Hackbridge would be a priority for enhancement funding at this time.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, who has been (a) present and (b) given apologies for all meetings between his Department and (i) Transport for London and (ii) the Mayor of London and Office of the Mayor of London from 1 January 2020 to date.

Ministers and officials at the Department for Transport meet regularly with representatives of the Mayor’s office and Transport for London to discuss a wide range of topics. During the COVID 19 outbreak these meetings have necessarily increased, and are often held daily. Due to the frequency of these meetings, it would be impractical to provide a definitive list of attendees and apologies for all of these meetings.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what representations he has received from (a) Transport for London and (b) the Mayor of London on the potential merits of increasing the congestion charge in London.

As part of the funding package agreed with the Mayor of London to allow Transport for London to continue operating essential services in London during the COVID 19 outbreak, the Mayor agreed to reinstate the congestion charge. The decision to temporarily increase the congestion charge was taken by the Mayor and will be considered as part of the upcoming Government lead review of TfL’s financial position.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to reduce emissions from vehicle idling.

Powers to tackle vehicle idling are available to Local Authorities, including the ability to issue Fixed Penalty Notices where necessary. However, this issue will not be solved simply through fining motorists. Local Authorities should utilise a range of methods to encourage motorists to change their behaviour, including public information campaigns. Better technology can play a part in addressing idling, such as stop-start technology and low- or -zero-emission vehicles. In particular the growth in Electric Vehicle sales is expected to assist in lowering emissions.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to improve accessibility at Carshalton Beeches railway station.

The Access for All programme provides accessibility improvements over and above those required by the rail industry. Carshalton Beeches was nominated for the programme but not selected as it was difficult to justify its inclusion ahead of other busier stations with a higher industry priority.

However, I am committed to improving access at all stations, and will continue to seek further opportunities, and funding, to make more improvements.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of delayed and cancelled Southern rail services scheduled to depart Wallington station at (a) 07.32am and (b) 08.02am for London Bridge station since January 2019.

I have not made an assessment of Southern rail services departing Wallington at this time. However, please note that, on the whole, since January 2019, we have recorded On Time figures of 71%, with cancellations recording 4.1%

The Department monitors each train operator’s overall performance against its performance benchmarks regularly and there are clear actions set out in the franchise agreement should performance drop below what is expected.

From February 2019 to February 2020 for Govia Thameslink Railway, the Moving Annual Average (MAA) Passenger Performance Measure (PPM), was 85.2%. This is a 3.1% improvement on the previous year.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of Southern Rail’s performance in 2019.

From February 2019 to February 2020 for Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR), the operator of Southern services, the Moving Annual Average Passenger Performance Measure (PPM), which measures trains arriving at their destination within 5 minutes of their scheduled arrival time, was 85.2%. This is a 3.1 point improvement on the previous year. Southern is the best performing of GTR’s brands with a PPM figure of 86.1% for the most recent four-week period. There is still room for improvement and the Government is committed to investing around £48 billion in maintaining and upgrading the rail network in the period from 2019 to 2024, focused on increasing reliability and punctuality for passengers.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the punctuality of Southern Rail services (a) calling at and (b) departing from (i) Wallington, (ii) Hackbridge, (iii) Carshalton and (iv) Carshalton Beeches railway stations in 2019.

For these stations, the annual averages for trains calling within one minute of the scheduled time are: 74.0% of services at Wallington, 70.0% of services at Hackbridge, 86.6% of services at Carshalton and 78.1% of services at Carshalton Beeches. The Department monitors each train operator’s overall performance against its performance benchmarks (cancellations, delay minutes and capacity) regularly and there are clear actions set out in the franchise agreement should performance drop below what is expected.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the passenger capacity of Southern Rail services (a) calling at and (b) departing from (i) Wallington, (ii) Hackbridge, (iii) Carshalton and (iv) Carshalton Beeches railway stations in 2019.

The Department monitors each train operator’s overall performance against its performance benchmarks, and this includes the capacity regime, which measures the number of short formations during the peaks. Govia Thameslink Railway is currently meeting the required levels. However should it fail to do so there are clear actions set out in the franchise agreement in order to remedy any underperformance.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to encourage Southern Rail to improve the (a) punctuality and (b) passenger capacity of services (i) calling at and (ii) departing from (A) Wallington, (B) Hackbridge, (C) Carshalton and (D) Carshalton Beeches railway stations.

The Department monitors each train operator’s overall performance against its performance benchmarks (cancellations, delay minutes and capacity) regularly and there are clear actions set out in the franchise agreement should performance drop below what is expected. The Department is committed to working with Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) in driving punctuality higher and, in partnership with Network Rail and other industry partners, GTR is focused on continuous improvement through the joint On Time Railway initiative.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of eligible people who are not claiming pension credit; and what assessment she has made of the reasons people are not claiming that benefit.

Estimates of the number of families entitled to pension but not claiming it can be found in the following publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/income-related-benefits-estimates-of-take-up-financial-year-2018-to-2019

Information regarding the research carried out by the department around why those entitled to Pension Credit do not claim can be found in the following publication: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pension-credit-eligible-non-recipients-barriers-to-claiming-rr819

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of men with suspected prostate cancer who were able to access and receive diagnostic tests through private sector capacity block purchased by the NHS during the covid-19 outbreak, by region.

No estimate has been made.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure hospital patients from the Jewish community are being served fresh Kosher foods that allow a comparable choice at mealtimes, without compromising on the strict dietary laws that they must follow.

The independent review of National Health Service hospital food was published on the 20 October 2020 and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-review-of-nhs-hospital-food

It includes recommendations to improve hospital food for patients, staff and visitors, including the religious requirements of patients, visitors and staff. An expert group is being assembled to implement the recommendations of this report, with a sub-group to look at how food is best provided to patients given their medical conditions, personal or cultural preferences and religious requirements. This sub-group will include representatives from religious organisations. While Kosher foods are not mentioned specifically, it is part of wider cultural and diversity work.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of trends in the level of prescription of anti-psychotic medication in the care of people with dementia.

NHS England and NHS Improvement continue to monitor the monthly data published by NHS Digital on the prescribing of anti-psychotic medication for people diagnosed with dementia. They have regular conversations with regional clinical network leads and local services to understand the patterns in prescribing and potential reasons for these trends.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to prioritise prostrate cancer in a new cancer strategy for England; and if he will make a statement.

The Department’s cancer strategy is incorporated as part of the NHS Long Term Plan. Prostate cancer priorities are included as part of the Long Term Plan such as the introduction of a faster diagnosis standard. This includes the delivery of optimal timed diagnostic pathways for specific cancers, including prostate cancer.

Personalised stratified follow up pathways for prostate cancer are being launched across England to empower patients to take control of their care. Prostate cancer is one of the first three cancers for which this is being implemented.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that men with advanced prostate cancer have access to quality patient care and innovative treatments.

Treatment options for prostate cancer are always expanding and in February 2021, NHS England and NHS Improvement’s specialised commissioning team announced that it would make available external beam radiotherapy to treat hormone sensitive, low volume prostate cancer. In addition to external beam radiotherapy, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence will review several new treatment options for prostate cancer in the next 12 months.

Following treatment for prostate cancer, patients move to a Personalised Stratified Follow-Up pathway that suits their needs and ensures they can get rapid access to clinical support where they are worried that their cancer may have recurred. This stratified follow-up approach was established in all trusts for prostate cancer in 2020. In response to the pandemic, the NHS also made available a range of ‘COVID-19 friendly’ treatments, offering benefits such as fewer hospital visits or a reduced impact on the patient’s immune system. This includes targeted hormone therapies such as enzalutamide for prostate cancer treatment.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the findings published by the Disabled Children’s Partnership in February 2021 that 70 per cent of disabled children have been unable to get therapies for their development during the covid-19 lockdown, what plans his Department has to ensure that disabled children receive the therapies they need for their development.

NHS England and NHS Improvement published guidance entitled ‘COVID-19 restoration of community health services for children and young people: second phase of NHS response in the community health restoration’ on 3 June 2020 and updated this on 31 July 2020. This makes clear that community services, including therapies such as speech and language therapy, occupational therapy and physiotherapy, must be prioritised for children and young people with special educational needs and disabilities aged up to 25 years old and who have an Education Health and Care Plan in place or who are going through an assessment for one. These services fall under the category of ‘continue essential services’.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing tomosynthesis to digital mammography to improve the accuracy of breast screening.

Research is underway in the Prospective Trial of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis, carried out by Kings College Hospital NHS Trust in breast screening. This trial involves 100,000 women participating in screening to assess whether tomosynthesis is a useful addition to the routine breast screening programme. The United Kingdom National Screening Committee will review the results of the research expected to be published in 2024.

Tomosynthesis has been approved for use in the National Health Service breast screening programme as an optional extra tool in the assessment of screen detected soft tissue breast abnormalities, following the primary screen.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will direct NHS England to prioritise women with dense breast tissue when tackling the cancer screening backlog accrued as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

In addressing the cancer screening backlog resulting from COVID-19, NHS England and NHS Improvement have made prioritisation decisions based upon expert clinical advice and engagement with Public Health England (PHE). On the basis of a United Kingdom National Screening Committee evidence review, PHE has advised that breast density measurements are not yet accurate enough to be safely used in routine breast screening. There is also no readily available breast density measurement for women currently in the programme. It is therefore not advisable or feasible to prioritise invitations for breast screening by breast tissue density.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing AI-driven mammography to (a) support radiologists and (b) increase capacity in the breast cancer screening programme.

There is currently no published evidence in large scale prospective trials that Artificial intelligence (AI) would be equivalent or better than the current model of having two independent human mammogram readers. AI continues to generate huge amounts of interest for its potential role in the NHS. There is interest in AI for breast screening, where it could replace a human reader of mammograms.

The United Kingdom National Screening Committee (UK NSC) and Public Health England have developed interim guidance for AI developers to help consider key metrics required that would assist the UK NSC to make a recommendation on the use of AI. Both are working with the NHS Accelerated Access Collaborative who are funding a large study in 2021 to understand whether AI can be a useful support to the programme. More information is available at the following link: https://www.england.nhs.uk/aac/

More information about AI and screening can be found at the following link; https://phescreening.blog.gov.uk/2021/02/02/advice-for-nhs-breast-screening-services-on-the-use-of-ai/

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what methodology his (a) Department and (b) NHS England have used to calculate the volume of the backlog of cancer patients awaiting (a) screening and (b) treatment that has accrued as a result of the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will publish those calculations.

National Health Service screening programmes do not hold waiting lists, therefore there is no published waiting time data. Eligible patients are invited to participate in NHS screening programmes at intervals according to the specific programme.

Data sources used by for cancer treatment include cancer waiting times data which give month by month figures on activity, referrals and waiting times, as well as management information which can provide a week to week view of activity and the current scale of the waiting list. Hospital Episode Statistics, and the secondary uses service are used alongside specific sources of information such as the Radiotherapy Dataset or the Diagnostic Imaging Dataset. Data are considered by geography, provider trust, tumour pathway and treatment modality to pinpoint areas for further action.

From March, local systems will be expected to carry out local plans formed as part of the Cancer Services Recovery Plan and continue the progress that has already been made.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to (a) make an assessment of the effectiveness of the NHS Cancer Recovery Plan and (b) provide additional funding to improve capacity in cancer services to tackle the covid-19-outbreak-induced cancer treatment and diagnostic backlogs.

The Cancer Recovery Plan aims to restore urgent referrals at least to pre-pandemic levels, to reduce the number of people waiting over 62 days from urgent referral and ensure sufficient capacity to meet demand. The latest published data for November 2020 showed urgent referrals 2% above pre-pandemic levels, the number of people waiting over 62 days 24% above pre-pandemic levels and the number of people starting a first cancer treatment within 31 days at 95% of pre-pandemic levels.

In August 2020, the National Health Service announced a £160 million initiative to extend access to ‘COVID-friendly’ cancer treatments, in October, issued £150 million in funding to expand diagnostic capacity. A further £325 million funding of diagnostics equipment was announced in November’s Spending Review and cancer patients will continue to be prioritised within the NHS and will benefit from the additional £1 billion to begin tackling the elective backlog. Departmental officials regularly engage with their counterparts at HM Treasury regarding upcoming fiscal events.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions officials of his Department have had with officials of the Treasury on ensuring that the 2021 Spring Budget includes sufficient funding for cancer (a) diagnostic and (b) treatment services to help tackle the increasing backlogs in those areas that have accrued as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Cancer Recovery Plan aims to restore urgent referrals at least to pre-pandemic levels, to reduce the number of people waiting over 62 days from urgent referral and ensure sufficient capacity to meet demand. The latest published data for November 2020 showed urgent referrals 2% above pre-pandemic levels, the number of people waiting over 62 days 24% above pre-pandemic levels and the number of people starting a first cancer treatment within 31 days at 95% of pre-pandemic levels.

In August 2020, the National Health Service announced a £160 million initiative to extend access to ‘COVID-friendly’ cancer treatments, in October, issued £150 million in funding to expand diagnostic capacity. A further £325 million funding of diagnostics equipment was announced in November’s Spending Review and cancer patients will continue to be prioritised within the NHS and will benefit from the additional £1 billion to begin tackling the elective backlog. Departmental officials regularly engage with their counterparts at HM Treasury regarding upcoming fiscal events.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the Government will publish its response to the Advancing our health: prevention in the 2020’s Green Paper consultation.

The Government response to the consultation has been delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the announcement of the National Institute for Health Protection in August, we are also considering the best future arrangements for the wide range of Public Health England’s non-health protection functions that are vital to support health improvement, prevention and delivery of health services and we will be setting out further details of our approach in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of (a) the effectiveness of the tiers system in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and (b) the use of alternative therapeutic approaches for children who have experienced trauma.

‘Future in Mind’, published by the Department and NHS England in 2015, recommended that children and young people’s mental health services move away from the concept of tiers, in which the system is defined by the services that provide the care, towards models that are defined by how they address patients’ needs.

NHS England has worked with Health Education England to deliver the children and young people’s improving access to psychological therapies programme. It trains new and existing staff working in children and young people’s mental health services and includes evidence-based trauma informed practice.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has made recommendations on the psychological interventions for the prevention and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder in children and young people in its guideline.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that (a) children who do not meet the thresholds for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services and (b) other children with poor mental health can access support.

I refer my hon. Friend to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Strangford (Jim Shannon MP) on 8 October 2020 to Question 99607.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to review the suspension of face-to-face community rehabilitation services in England.

All community services, including rehabilitation, that were previously stopped or partially stopped, should now be fully reinstated. This includes, where needed, home visits for vulnerable adults, subject to appropriate infection control protections.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve eye health services.

Prevention, early detection and access to timely treatment are all key to improving eye health. The Government has well-established programmes on reducing smoking and obesity, both long terms risk factors for vision loss.

Free National Health Service sight tests, a vital eye health check, are available to all children, those aged 60 and over, individuals on low incomes or at increased risk of certain eye diseases. Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes which can lead to sight loss. The diabetic retinopathy screening programme continues to offer screening to those eligible.

NHS England and NHS Improvement’s national outpatient transformation programme is also looking to improve secondary care ophthalmology outpatient services, to improve patient experience, access to care and outcomes.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to bring forward a long-term social care reform proposal by the end of 2020 which recognises the additional cost of dementia care.

The Government’s number one priority for adult social care is for everyone who relies on care to get the care they need throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

We are committed to bringing forward a plan for social care reform and want to ensure that everyone is treated with dignity and offered the security they deserve, and that nobody needing care is forced to sell their home to pay for it. We want to find long-term solutions for one of the biggest challenges we face as a society. There are complex questions to address and it is important that we give these issues our full consideration in the light of current circumstances.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to support the reopening of sexual health services after the covid-19 outbreak.

Sexual and reproductive health services remained open during the pandemic. However physical access remains more limited. Services are maintaining access during this time through scaling up of online services including increasing eligibility through current provision or utilising a neighbours’ service for residents of another local authority. Public Health England has recently launched the National Framework for e-Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare. This new national framework will allow local authorities and service providers to purchase an expanded range of online services including emergency contraception and the contraceptive pill.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department is providing to local authorities to enable them to meet their obligation under the Care Act 2014 to ensure that pets, which are considered property of an individual, are looked after if an individual is hospitalised as a result of covid-19.

Under the Care Act 2014, local authorities have a duty to protect the moveable property (which includes pets) of adults with care and support needs, who are in hospital or are away from home in accommodation such as care homes.

We have provided £3.7 billion to local authorities through un-ringfenced grants so they can address the expenditure pressures they are facing in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish guidance on the use of PPE in social care settings for people who (a) are deaf and (b) have communication needs.

It is critical that personal protective equipment (PPE) supply reflects equality needs. We are working to understand the different types of PPE that may be needed by those with protected characteristics (as covered under equalities legislation) and how best to distribute that PPE, to address equality for health and social care workers.

The Government recognises that some health and care workers have reported difficulties with the practical use of some PPE. We are committed to understanding the needs of frontline staff, including those for people with different protected characteristics.

We are currently piloting the use of clear masks in social care settings via Local Resilience Forums.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the safety issues identified with Randox testing kits will have an effect on the publication date of his care home visitation guidance.

The recall of Randox test kits during the summer has not had any impact on the publication of Care Home visiting guidance.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jun 2020
What progress his Department has made on the building of new hospitals.

Considerable progress has been made since the announcement of the Health Infrastructure Plan (HIP) schemes last September, despite coronavirus impacts. A number of the six HIP 1 schemes for new hospitals are approaching early enabling works. HIP 2 schemes have received seed funding and are working up their business cases at pace. We remain committed to, and on target to deliver, on our pledge to build 40 new hospitals.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to hold its stakeholder roundtable events on the national sexual health and reproductive health strategy.

Work on the development of a new national sexual and reproductive health strategy is underway with the Department working with Public Health England, NHS England and Improvement, local government and other partners. Some initial engagement with stakeholders has already taken place and we are also considering the responses to the Green Paper ‘Advancing our Health’ and the suggestions for priority areas for the new strategy we received through the consultation process. Details of the strategy’s scope, plans for more formal engagement with external organisations, including roundtables, timing of publication and implementation will be announced in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to publish its national sexual health and reproductive health strategy.

Work on the development of a new national sexual and reproductive health strategy is underway with the Department working with Public Health England, NHS England and Improvement, local government and other partners. Some initial engagement with stakeholders has already taken place and we are also considering the responses to the Green Paper ‘Advancing our Health’ and the suggestions for priority areas for the new strategy we received through the consultation process. Details of the strategy’s scope, plans for more formal engagement with external organisations, including roundtables, timing of publication and implementation will be announced in due course.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish further information on how (a) routine commissioning of PrEP will be (i) implemented and (ii) funded and (b) local health commissioners will be supported during the rollout of that routine commissioning.

Anyone requesting pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) through the Impact Trial must meet the agreed eligibility criteria. A core function of the trial’s Community Advisory Board (CAB) is to raise awareness and uptake of PrEP in key populations. Further information about PrEP Impact Trial CAB activities and participating community groups can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/blood-and-infection-group-f/f03/prep-trial-updates/

The Impact Trial website includes a map showing the distribution of the 154 clinics level 3 Sexual Health Services participating in the trial at the following link:

www.prepimpacttrial.org.uk

The Department is continuing to work closely with NHS England and NHS Improvement, Public Health England and local authorities to plan for routine commissioning of PrEP from April 2020. NHS England and NHS Improvement have already agreed to fund the on-going costs of drugs for PrEP going forward. We will provide information on how other elements of the programme will be funded and how commissioners will be supported very shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure access for all to PrEP prior to routine commissioning starting in April 2020.

Anyone requesting pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) through the Impact Trial must meet the agreed eligibility criteria. A core function of the trial’s Community Advisory Board (CAB) is to raise awareness and uptake of PrEP in key populations. Further information about PrEP Impact Trial CAB activities and participating community groups can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/blood-and-infection-group-f/f03/prep-trial-updates/

The Impact Trial website includes a map showing the distribution of the 154 clinics level 3 Sexual Health Services participating in the trial at the following link:

www.prepimpacttrial.org.uk

The Department is continuing to work closely with NHS England and NHS Improvement, Public Health England and local authorities to plan for routine commissioning of PrEP from April 2020. NHS England and NHS Improvement have already agreed to fund the on-going costs of drugs for PrEP going forward. We will provide information on how other elements of the programme will be funded and how commissioners will be supported very shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of cancer treatment outcomes in the (a) Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals and (b) Royal Marsden NHS Trusts.

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust has a strong track record of providing high quality care to people with suspected or confirmed cases of cancer in a timely manner. Last year, the Trust met all of the waiting time standards we expect for cancer patients, including seeing 97.2% of patients with a suspected cancer within two weeks of their general practitioners (GPs) referral, 99.1% of patients began treatment with 31 days of diagnosis, and 89% of patients began treatment within 62 days of their initial referral.

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust is working on plans to improve the patient’s experience through their cancer journey. This includes access to a clinical nurse specialist or key worker, and they have recently appointed three Advanced Nurse Practitioners and funding approved to increase number of clinical nurse specialists. The Trust is introducing ‘Living With and Beyond Cancer’ – a new work stream to improve patient experience and care beyond their diagnosis and initial treatment and improving quality of life for those living with cancer. This includes NHS England and NHS Improvement data collection on long term quality of life metrics, stratified follow up pathways, reducing and managing long term outcomes of treatment, and Holistic Needs Assessments.

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust is a research active organisation, with an academic partnership with The Institute of Cancer Research, and, together, are ranked third in the world for impact of their research. The Royal Marsden is continually looking to improve the treatment options and facilities they offer to patients, including the first linear accelerators (LINAC) in the country and third in the world, which is now treating patients across six tumour types as part of clinical trials.

The Royal Marsden is also the host of RM Partners, the only cancer alliance in England to achieve the 62 day target consistently during 2018/19 and which was awarded a further £10 million in funding from NHS England to continue to improve cancer outcomes for the population across west London.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking improve cancer treatment in the (a) Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust and (b) Royal Marsden NHS Trust.

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust has a strong track record of providing high quality care to people with suspected or confirmed cases of cancer in a timely manner. Last year, the Trust met all of the waiting time standards we expect for cancer patients, including seeing 97.2% of patients with a suspected cancer within two weeks of their general practitioners (GPs) referral, 99.1% of patients began treatment with 31 days of diagnosis, and 89% of patients began treatment within 62 days of their initial referral.

Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust is working on plans to improve the patient’s experience through their cancer journey. This includes access to a clinical nurse specialist or key worker, and they have recently appointed three Advanced Nurse Practitioners and funding approved to increase number of clinical nurse specialists. The Trust is introducing ‘Living With and Beyond Cancer’ – a new work stream to improve patient experience and care beyond their diagnosis and initial treatment and improving quality of life for those living with cancer. This includes NHS England and NHS Improvement data collection on long term quality of life metrics, stratified follow up pathways, reducing and managing long term outcomes of treatment, and Holistic Needs Assessments.

The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust is a research active organisation, with an academic partnership with The Institute of Cancer Research, and, together, are ranked third in the world for impact of their research. The Royal Marsden is continually looking to improve the treatment options and facilities they offer to patients, including the first linear accelerators (LINAC) in the country and third in the world, which is now treating patients across six tumour types as part of clinical trials.

The Royal Marsden is also the host of RM Partners, the only cancer alliance in England to achieve the 62 day target consistently during 2018/19 and which was awarded a further £10 million in funding from NHS England to continue to improve cancer outcomes for the population across west London.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve quality of care for patients in the (a) Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals and (b) Royal Marsden NHS Trusts.

Both Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust are committed to improving patient care.

The latest Care Quality Commission (CQC) reports on Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust show for the first time the trust being rated as Good overall. CQC findings indicated improvements and progress in most areas of care.

The CQC continued to rate the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust as outstanding overall.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the average age of patients in the (a) Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals and (b) Royal Marsden NHS Trusts.

A consultation is currently underway. The consultation document sets out potential improvements in clinical outcomes for patients under three different options. This includes a new specialist emergency care hospital.

The potential impact of the proposals on accessibility and travel times has been analysed as part of the consultation process and further detail can be found at the following link:

https://improvinghealthcaretogether.org.uk/?s=baseline+travel+analysis

The attached table shows the finished consultant episodes (FCE) and average age in Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust for the last three years.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment his Department has made of patient travel times to each of the location options for the Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals and Royal Marsden NHS Trusts proposed specialist emergency care hospital.

A consultation is currently underway. The consultation document sets out potential improvements in clinical outcomes for patients under three different options. This includes a new specialist emergency care hospital.

The potential impact of the proposals on accessibility and travel times has been analysed as part of the consultation process and further detail can be found at the following link:

https://improvinghealthcaretogether.org.uk/?s=baseline+travel+analysis

The attached table shows the finished consultant episodes (FCE) and average age in Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust for the last three years.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of travel times to acute hospital services on outcomes for elderly patients.

A consultation is currently underway. The consultation document sets out potential improvements in clinical outcomes for patients under three different options. This includes a new specialist emergency care hospital.

The potential impact of the proposals on accessibility and travel times has been analysed as part of the consultation process and further detail can be found at the following link:

https://improvinghealthcaretogether.org.uk/?s=baseline+travel+analysis

The attached table shows the finished consultant episodes (FCE) and average age in Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust for the last three years.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of a new hospital to serve the Epsom and St Helier University Hospital and Royal Marsden NHS trusts.

A consultation is currently underway. The consultation document sets out potential improvements in clinical outcomes for patients under three different options. This includes a new specialist emergency care hospital.

The potential impact of the proposals on accessibility and travel times has been analysed as part of the consultation process and further detail can be found at the following link:

https://improvinghealthcaretogether.org.uk/?s=baseline+travel+analysis

The attached table shows the finished consultant episodes (FCE) and average age in Epsom and St Helier University Hospitals NHS Trust and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust for the last three years.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, with reference to recent reports of the inhumane treatment of dogs in a government-run facility in Mauritius, if he or officials of his Department will make representations to the Government of Mauritius on taking steps to ensure the humane treatment of dogs held in that facility.

The mistreatment of any animal is to be deplored. The UK Government is committed to raising standards of animal welfare at home and abroad, and we believe that it is necessary to work with governments around the world to gain agreement to animal welfare standards. Our High Commissioner in Port Louis raised the issue of the treatment of stray and abandoned dogs recently with the Mauritian authorities. The High Commission regularly meets representatives of the Mauritian Government to discuss values championed by the UK and will continue to do so.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to end preventable child deaths.

The UK is committed to ending the preventable deaths of mothers, new-born babies and children by 2030, as part of our leadership on global health. This is more important than ever, given the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the last 20 years, UK aid has helped immunise over 760 million children, saving over 13 million lives.

We will maintain our position as a global health leader, investing in Gavi, the Vaccines Alliance; the Global Fund for Aids, TB and Malaria; and the International Finance Facility for Immunisation. The UK is also partnering with countries to improve investments in health systems, including sexual and reproductive health and nutrition services, working towards universal health coverage. This will help to end preventable deaths, and address the impacts of COVID-19 on health systems in our partner countries.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Nov 2020
What recent assessment he has made of the extent of human rights violations in Sri Lanka.

The UK Government takes the human rights situation in Sri Lanka very seriously.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, Minister for South Asia, raised a number of human rights concerns, including harassment of civil society and militarisation of civilian functions, when he spoke with Sri Lankan Foreign Minister Gunawardena on 5 November.

We have urged Sri Lanka to address concerns in our statements to the UN Human Rights Council in February, June and September.

The UK will continue to highlight our concerns to the Government of Sri Lanka, and we will support human rights through our programme work including resettlement of victims of conflict and improving responses to sexual and gender based violence.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of supporting an independent investigation headed by a foreign delegation to review the Chunnakam water pollution incident in the Jaffna Peninsula of Sri Lanka.

We are aware of the challenges Sri Lanka faces around water management and quality and the unique challenges faced by communities in northern Sri Lanka. Staff at the British High Commission in Colombo raised the issue of water quality during a visit to the North in July. A number of public bodies in Sri Lanka, including the national water supply and drainage board, have conducted tests and compensation was offered to those affected by water pollution caused by the Chunnakam Power plant. We will continue to engage with local government in the North to ensure these concerns around water management and quality are understood, and that measures are taken to ensure clean water.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
18th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing incentives such as tax credits to encourage rapid adoption of new technologies in the legal services sector.

The Government regularly receives proposals for sector specific tax reliefs. When considering any new tax reliefs, HM Treasury must ensure they provide support to businesses across the economy in a fair way and effectively target taxpayer money.

At the Budget, the Chancellor announced the Help to Grow programme to support over 100k SMEs across the UK improve their productivity and performance though management training and digital adoption. This includes Help to Grow: Digital, comprising free online advice and a discount on software that could help SMEs from all sectors and across the UK save time and cut costs.

The Help to Grow: Digital platform will help businesses to understand the benefits of different types of software and identify which could help deliver their business goals. Support will be provided through interactive tools and technology-specific guides. Through the platform, eligible businesses will be able to access a voucher providing up to 50% discount on the costs of buying new software, worth up to £5,000 a year per business. Vouchers are expected to be available for software that helps businesses: build customer relationships and increase sales; make the most of selling online; and manage their accounts and finances digitally.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the proportion of the plastic used in food packaging that will be liable for the plastic packaging tax.

From April 2022, the Plastic Packaging Tax will encourage the use of recycled plastic instead of new material within plastic packaging. This will create greater demand for recycled plastic, and in turn stimulate increased levels of recycling and collection of plastic waste, diverting it away from landfill or incineration. Hand in hand with Defra’s wider packaging reforms, this tax will provide the necessary incentives for producers to make more sustainable packaging, and ensure the UK does its part in tackling this global issue.

Packaging used to protect food makes up a significant proportion of packaging in the UK and many types of food packaging already include recycled plastic or use alternative materials to plastic. Without being included in the tax, the types of food packaging where it is currently challenging to increase the level of recycled content would have fewer incentives to find new ways to overcome issues for including recycled material in the production of plastic packaging. However, the Government will continue to monitor progress in this area.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many small breweries there are at each of the following levels of production in hectolitres (a) 0-1000, (b) 1001-2000, (c) 2001-3000, (d) 3001-4000, (e) 4001-5000, (f) 5001-6000, (g) 6001-7000, (h) 7001-8000, (i) 8001-9000, (j) 9001-10,000 and (k) above 10,000.

Information on the levels of small brewery production is due to be published within the technical consultation on Small Brewers Relief later this year.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to publish a summary of the evidence provided by brewers to the 2019 consultation as part of the review of Small Brewers’ Relief.

The consultation document for the review of Small Brewers Relief will be published later this year.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she plans to take to support police forces to implement HIV awareness training to help reduce HIV related stigma and discrimination in the police; and if she will provide funding for that matter.

Individual police forces are responsible for setting standards and improving police training within the national Competence and Values Framework set by the College of Policing.

It is critical that the police have access to the most accurate and up to date information on HIV transmission, so that they can accurately assess any risks posed to their own safety in the course of their work and respond appropriately. This will also enable them to help reduce stigma and discrimination in the communities in which they work.

On the 4th February 2021, the Government published a total police funding settlement of up to £15.8 billion in 2021/22, an increase of up to £636 million compared to 2020/21. Overall police funding available to PCCs will increase by up to £703 million (5.4% in cash terms) next year.

Decisions about the allocation of police resources are for Chief Constables and democratically accountable PCCs.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she plans to take to support police forces to ensure HIV status is not recorded on the Police National Computer so that the confidentiality of medical information is ensured.

The Home Office continues to work with the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) to ensure that the data on the Police National Computer (PNC) is necessary, proportionate and accurate, including medical status data. The Home Office has no plans for specific guidance or support to forces at present regarding HIV status beyond that already published in the PNC Manual.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to strengthen enforcement powers in respect of unauthorised Gypsy and Traveller sites.

I refer my Hon Friend to the answer I gave to UIN 62648 on 02 July 2020 to the Hon Member for Sevenoaks.

[On 5 November 2019, the Government launched a consultation seeking views on measures to strengthen police powers to tackle unauthorised encampments. The consultation closed on the 5 March. We will announce the outcome of this consultation in due course].

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
30th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many additional police officers (a) have joined the Metropolitan Police in the London Borough of Sutton in the last 12 months and (b) are planned to join the Metropolitan Police in that borough by 2024.

The Home Office does not hold the specific information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on police joiners, broken down by Police Force Area in the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin. However, data per London Borough are not available.

Data for the year ending March 2019 are available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/831666/police-workforce-mar19-tables.ods

Furthermore, the Home Office has also started to publish quarterly updates on ‘Police officer uplift’. The quarterly update contains information on the number of joiners since November 2019 (when these data were first collected). The latest release is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-officer-uplift-quarterly-update-to-march-2020

The next release of both publications is scheduled for 30 July 2020.

The Government has committed to increasing the number of police officers in England and Wales by 20,000 over the next three years. 6,000 additional officers have been allocated to forces across England and Wales by the end of March 2021 and over 3,000 have already been recruited as at March 2020. The Metropolitan Police Service accounted for 714 of the 3,005 officer uplift (24%), and 25% of all officers in England and Wales.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Mar 2020
What steps she is taking to tackle anti-social behaviour.

We are committed to protect communities from the menace of anti-social behaviour. That is why we have enhanced the powers available to tackle anti-social behaviour through the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

The powers are flexible, allowing local areas to tailor their response according to the circumstances. They are best-placed to understand their communities’ needs and the most appropriate response.

We keep anti-social behaviour under review through the ASB Strategic Board which brings together key partners.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the proportion of private landlords that are utilising (a) the Government’s current model tenancy agreement and (b) previous versions of the model tenancy agreement.

The Model Tenancy Agreement is the Government’s suggested contract for assured shorthold tenancies in the private rented sector. It is a publicly available template which landlords and tenants can choose to use to agree a tenancy, although they are not obligated to do so.

The Government does not collect data on the proportion of landlords using current or previous versions of the Model Tenancy Agreement.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to ensure that local authorities plan adequately for residential vehicle parking for new-build properties.

It is for local authorities to assess the level of parking required for new developments and to set local parking standards.

The Government has made clear in the National Planning Policy Framework the factors that authorities should take into account when setting local parking standards for residential and non-residential development.

These include considering the accessibility of the development; the type, mix and use of development; the availability of and opportunities for public transport; local car ownership levels; and the need to ensure an adequate provision for spaces for charging plug-in and other ultra-low emission vehicles.

2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to update Government Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Needs Assessments guidance; and if he will make a statement.

In February 2019 we announced a package of measures to help support site provision as part of the Government response to the Consultation on Unauthorised Encampments, including a commitment to finalise the 2016 draft guidance on assessing housing need including for those residing in caravans and houseboats.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to update Government guidance to local authorities on local parking strategies; and if he will make a statement.

The Government does not have current plans to update guidance on on-street parking.

The Government did support a private members bill to improve the situation for motorists in relation to private parking companies. The Parking (Code of Practice) Act received Royal Assent in 2019. This Act will lead to the creation of an independent code of practice for private parking companies and a “one-stop-shop” for parking appeals.

The Ministry of Housing Communities and Local Government laid an advisory Code of Practice for private parking companies in the House of Commons Library. On 3 November 2019, the government announced that the British Standards Institution (BSI) will write the Code in consultation with consumer and industry groups. The Government has committed to developing the final code this year, and will carry out a full public consultation, to give the parking industry, the public and other interested parties the opportunity to have a say.

18th May 2021
What steps his Department is taking to support victims of domestic abuse.

Domestic abuse is a top priority across Government, and we are determined to transform the response to this abhorrent crime.

We passed our landmark Domestic Abuse Bill on 29 April and our forthcoming Victims’ Bill will further transform victims’ experience of the criminal justice system and we have provided unprecedented funding for domestic abuse since the pandemic began, including £51m boost for specialist support services to support victims through the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of (a) prosecutions for animal cruelty and (b) the number of people found guilty of those offences in each year from 2005 to 2019; and if he will make a statement.

The Ministry of Justice holds data on prosecutions and outcomes for offences regarding animal cruelty, in England and Wales, up to the year ending December 2019, available in the ‘Outcomes by offence’ data tool, here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/938568/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2019.xlsx

This tool includes data from the last 10 years; figures for 2005 to 2019 can be found in the table attached.

The following are the offences that were considered:

  • 108a Animal Cruelty under sections 4-8 under Animal Welfare Act 2006
  • 108b Other Cruelty to animal offences.
Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the CPS's use of restorative justice to support victims of crime.

The Ministry of Justice has not conducted an assessment of the CPS’s use of restorative justice. This is because the CPS has a very limited role in restorative justice (reparative conditions are an option for conditional cautions) and it does not provide or fund restorative justice services.

Under the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime, all victims have the right to receive information about the availability of restorative justice services. The Code also stipulates the obligations on providers of restorative justice, including ensuring that victims are able to give informed consent to participation and that it is in the best interests of the victims.

The Ministry of Justice provides funding to Police and Crime Commissioners to commission a wide range of local support services for victims, including restorative justice services. From April 2018 to March 2019 the Ministry provided about £68m, with about £4.4m spent on restorative justice services. PCCs also spent another £1m from other sources on restorative justice services.

Alex Chalk
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice)