Dehenna Davison Portrait

Dehenna Davison

Conservative - Bishop Auckland

Dehenna Davison has no previous appointments


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 11th May 2021
16:00
Home Affairs Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The work of the Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service
11 May 2021, 4 p.m.
At 4.10pm: Oral evidence
Dame Cressida Dick DBE QPM - Commissioner at Metropolitan Police Service
Louisa Rolfe OBE - Assistant Commissioner at Metropolitan Police Service
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Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 12th May 2021
09:30
Home Affairs Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Police conduct and complaints
12 May 2021, 9:30 a.m.
At 10.00am: Oral evidence
Kit Malthouse MP - Minister for Crime and Policing at Home Office
Michael Cordy - Head of Police Integrity Unit, Policing Policy Directorate at Home Office
Paul Regan - Head of Neighbourhood Crime Unit, Crime Reduction Directorate at Home Office
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Division Votes
Wednesday 28th April 2021
Immigration
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 357 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 270 Noes - 358
Speeches
Monday 15th March 2021
Policing and Prevention of Violence against Women

I join my right hon. Friend and voices from right across the House in paying my deepest condolences to Sarah …

Written Answers
Thursday 18th March 2021
Trains: Hydrogen
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to include hydrogen trains in the Transport decarbonisation …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
1. Employment and earnings
30 December 2019, received £208.19 from Lumo.Tax Ltd (tax advice firm), The Greenhouse, Greencroft Industrial Park, Annfield Plain, Stanley DH9 …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Dehenna Davison has voted in 286 divisions, and 3 times against the majority of their Party.

13 Oct 2020 - Public Health: Coronavirus Regulations - View Vote Context
Dehenna Davison voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Conservative No votes vs 298 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 82
2 Sep 2020 - Recall of MPs (Change of Party Affiliation) - View Vote Context
Dehenna Davison voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Conservative No votes vs 47 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 52
17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Dehenna Davison voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
View All Dehenna Davison Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(14 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
(12 debate interactions)
Michael Gove (Conservative)
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(31 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(17 debate contributions)
Home Office
(17 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(6 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Dehenna Davison's debates

Bishop Auckland Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Bishop Auckland signature proportion
Petitions with most Bishop Auckland signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

As the Coronavirus escalates, there are concerns that a trade deal between the UK Government and the US deal might not exempt our NHS, leaving it vulnerable to privatisation and in direct contradiction to promises this would not happen.


Latest EDMs signed by Dehenna Davison

Dehenna Davison has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Dehenna Davison, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Dehenna Davison has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Dehenna Davison has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Dehenna Davison has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Dehenna Davison has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


22 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Explanation of written questions
5 Other Department Questions
4th Mar 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, whether the Commission has made an assessment of the potential merits of using the restoration of the Speaker’s House as a pilot scheme for the Restoration and Renewal programme to allow parliamentarians to properly understand and anticipate the costs of the project and assess the likelihood of hidden costs.

The Commission has made no assessment of the potential merits of using a restoration of the Speaker’s House as a pilot scheme for the Restoration & Renewal programme.

A number of capital projects and programmes for necessary works to enable the continuing operation of the Palace of Westminster are currently ongoing, including the Cast Irons Roofs programme and the Mechanical, Electrical, Public Health and Fabric Safety programme. The Elizabeth Tower project, which began before the enactment of the legislation, is nearing its conclusion. The Commission plans for capital investment in the Palace to continue in the years running up to the start of the restoration and renewal works.

In line with best practice, the House Service will work with the Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body to ensure that any lessons learned from current and future works to the Palace are used to inform planning and preparation for the Restoration and Renewal programme.

4th Mar 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what methods the House of Commons Commission has in place to scrutinise the costs of the Restoration and Renewal Programme and ensure the Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority delivers value for money.

The Commissions of both Houses are responsible under the Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration & Renewal) Act 2019 for setting the Phase 1 Expenditure Limit for the parliamentary building works, covering the period up to the approval of the Restoration & Renewal (R&R) Outline Business Case. The House of Commons Commission has to date, also received advice from the Commons Finance Committee in setting the Phase 1 Limit.

Since the creation of the Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body, the Commission has also received quarterly progress reports on the R&R Programme. At its meeting on 22 February, the Commission noted the assurance and scrutiny arrangements that the Sponsor Body has established for the Programme and the opportunities to strengthen those arrangements to provide further assurance to both Houses, including on reporting progress to secure further savings against the Phase 1 Expenditure Limit. Work will take place, following publication of the Sponsor Body’s Strategic Review report, to confirm Commission and House engagement, decision points and ongoing scrutiny up to Outline Business Case approval.

4th Mar 2021
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, whether the Commission has considered ways in which hybrid or virtual proceedings in Parliament can (a) reduce the cost of the restoration and renewal of the Palace of Westminster and (b) minimise the need for decant during the restoration and renewal programme.

The Commission has not made a formal assessment of the potential ways in which hybrid or virtual proceedings in Parliament could reduce the cost of the restoration and renewal of the Palace of Westminster or the need for decant whilst the works are underway. Whilst the Commission is keen to ensure that the plans for restoration and renewal, and for decant, represent good value-for-money, it would ultimately be for the House to determine whether to adopt different ways of working during the works to the Palace.

The Procedure Committee is currently considering changes to the procedure and practice of the House since the start of the pandemic, and lessons for any continuing or future use of hybrid and/or virtual proceedings may emerge from that work.

4th Mar 2021
To ask the Right hon. Member for East Hampshire, representing the Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body, whether the Sponsor Body has made an assessment of the potential effect of the completion of ongoing fire safety works on the cost of the restoration and renewal of the Palace of Westminster.

The Sponsor Body is aware of ongoing fire safety works to the Palace of Westminster. The Outline Business Case will take account of completed works, including fire safety works, when proposing cost estimates for the parliamentary building works under the R&R Programme. This will be conditional on further design work and testing.

4th Mar 2021
To ask the Right hon. Member for East Hampshire, representing the Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body, what advice the Sponsor Body has sought from (a) the Infrastructure and Projects Authority, (b) HM Treasury and (c) the National Audit Office on the costs of the Restoration and Renewal Programme and ensuring value for money.

The Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body has good working relationships with the Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA), HM Treasury and the National Audit Office (NAO). As the Sponsor Body transitioned out of Parliament, where it existed in shadow form, to becoming a formal statutory body, advice was sought from the IPA on good practice and lessons learned in areas such as assurance and governance. The relationship with the IPA continues to be positive and the Sponsor Body has recently worked with the IPA to identify independent reviewers for a forthcoming Gateway Review.

Productive discussions continue with HM Treasury regarding the Sponsor Body's preparation of the Outline Business Case for the Restoration and Renewal Programme and, under the terms of the Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Act 2019, HM Treasury also has a role to provide advice to the Parliamentary Works Estimates Commission on the Sponsor Body's Estimate for each financial year prior to that Estimate being laid in the House of Commons.

Both the IPA and HM Treasury contributed to the recent Strategic Review via discussions as part of the Review's Challenge Panel.

The NAO published a review of the R&R Programme in April 2020, highlighting the vital and urgent need to restore the Houses of Parliament. That report contained a number of helpful recommendations which the Sponsor Body accepted in full. The Sponsor Body welcomes further reviews by the NAO on behalf of Parliament over the coming years to ensure value for money is delivered for the taxpayer. Both the Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority will also continue to work with the NAO to apply lessons learned from NAO reviews of other projects and programmes as well as in relation to the NAO's role as the external auditor for the Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the average length of delay in initiating the investigation of complaints submitted to the Information Commissioner under section 50(1) of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 is; and what steps he is taking to tackle that delay.

The Freedom of Information Act (FOI) is regulated and enforced independently of Government by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).

The ICO is dealing with rapidly growing numbers of complaints; currently it receives around 100 new complaints a week. The ICO responds to all FOI complaints with an email acknowledging receipt, which sets out current expected timescales for a response. All complaints are triaged: investigations into relatively simple cases usually commence within 30 days of receipt, while more complex cases may take up to 7 months to be allocated to an ICO officer for investigation.

The ICO is taking steps to increase its resources in this area so that these cases are dealt with as quickly as possible, whilst ensuring a high quality of response.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2020
What steps he is taking to help schools improve their buildings and facilities to provide high-quality education.

The government has committed to invest more than £23 billon in the school estate between 2016-17 and 2020-21. This includes a combination of formula and bid-based allocations to schools, local authorities and academy trusts as well as centrally delivered programmes.

As part of this, the Priority School Building Programme is rebuilding or refurbishing buildings in the worst condition at over 500 schools.

The government has provided £560 million in additional condition funding this year for repairs and upgrades in schools - on top of £1.4 billion already committed in 2020-21.

The Prime Minister announced plans in June for a transformative ten-year school rebuilding programme. This will replace poor condition school buildings with modern, energy efficient designs, transforming education for thousands of pupils.

We will start with 50 schools in the most need of repair, supported by over £1 billion in capital funding, with full details of these projects and further funding for the programme to be set out later in the autumn at the Spending Review.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to include hydrogen trains in the Transport decarbonisation plan; and what his timeframe is for ordering the first hydrogen train fleet.

The Government is developing an ambitious Transport Decarbonisation Plan to achieve net zero emissions across all modes of transport. The Network Rail-led Traction Decarbonisation Network Strategy (TDNS) makes recommendations about whether hydrogen or battery trains or electrification will likely be the best way to decarbonise each part of the network. TDNS will inform the Transport Decarbonisation Plan and the procurement of rolling stock.

The Department is supporting work to understand and develop hydrogen trains, so that they can be introduced smoothly onto lines where and when they are appropriate.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of trialling hydrogen trains on the Tees Valley line to help decarbonise the railway network.

The Government believes that there will be a role for hydrogen trains in decarbonising the railway. My Department is considering the case for running hydrogen trains in Teesside.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress his Department has made in introducing E10 fuel to UK forecourts as part of the Government’s Build Back Better and green recovery plans.

We plan to publish the Government response to our consultation on the introduction of E10 as soon as possible.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress he has made on ensuring the effective control of levels of pay in arm's-length bodies connected to his Department.

Transport bodies deliver complex, nationally important, infrastructure that is critical to building back better – however exceptional pay demands exceptional performance and remuneration must be proportionate. We are firmly focused on addressing the issue of high pay within the transport sector. The overall senior pay bill to taxpayers has reduced this year by over £1 million, and we intend to continue this trend.

Each year, the Cabinet Office publishes transparency data on senior salaries at public sector bodies. Analysis of this data since 2015 for Network Rail, Highways England and HS2 Ltd shows that an overall downward trend in pay awards to these high earners has begun, both in numbers of staff involved and total spend.

The Secretary of State has taken a personal interest in this issue and is bearing down on senior pay at the Department of Transport’s Arms-Length Bodies. This includes agreeing with some CEOs and Chairs voluntary, temporary, pay cuts in the light of current economic circumstances.

Taxpayers must be confident that their money is being spent wisely, with due regard to real-world performance and conditions.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to support self-employment.

The Department supports people to be self-employed when it is the right thing for them to do to be financially self-sufficient. Key to this is continuing to help claimants in, or considering, self-employment to progress to a level of sustained financial self-sufficiency that does not exclude the possibility of better paid work elsewhere. This ensures fairness to claimants, but also taxpayers who fund the welfare system.

Work coaches offer tailored support to our claimants who are in self-employment through to help them to increase their productivity and earnings. Work coaches can refer low-earning claimants to mentoring support from New Enterprise Allowance providers and sign-post claimants to the other extensive business support which is already funded by the Government.

We recognise that it takes time for new businesses to grow and that even established businesses can experience difficulties. From September 2020, all self-employed Universal Credit claimants will be given the same 12 months’ exemption period to provide them with time and support needed to grow their businesses.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what data her Department holds on the number of (a) serving and (b) retired police officers who have died by suicide in the last 10 years.

The Home Office does not centrally hold the information requested as the Office for National Statistics publish data on suicide by occupation, including police officers.

Information on suicides by occupation can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/adhocs/10807suicidebyoccupationenglandandwales2011to2018registrations

The statistics show that police officer (sergeant and below) suicide deaths in England remain relatively steady and small in number (e.g. 13 in 2011, reaching a high of 21 in 2012 and in the teens each year since, with 13 in 2019).

The death of any serving or retired police officer is a tragedy. The Government and police leaders take this matter seriously and are working to support the mental and physical wellbeing of all police officers and staff.

We have invested in programmes which offer help directly to officers and staff. This includes £7.5 to fund the development of the National Police Wellbeing Service, which was launched in 2019. The Service is helping forces to identify where there is most risk of impacts on mental health, and developing work around building resilience, as well as putting in place support for those who need it in response to traumatic events.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of trends in the suicide rate amongst (a) serving and (b) retired police officers.

The Home Office does not centrally hold the information requested as the Office for National Statistics publish data on suicide by occupation, including police officers.

Information on suicides by occupation can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/adhocs/10807suicidebyoccupationenglandandwales2011to2018registrations

The statistics show that police officer (sergeant and below) suicide deaths in England remain relatively steady and small in number (e.g. 13 in 2011, reaching a high of 21 in 2012 and in the teens each year since, with 13 in 2019).

The death of any serving or retired police officer is a tragedy. The Government and police leaders take this matter seriously and are working to support the mental and physical wellbeing of all police officers and staff.

We have invested in programmes which offer help directly to officers and staff. This includes £7.5 to fund the development of the National Police Wellbeing Service, which was launched in 2019. The Service is helping forces to identify where there is most risk of impacts on mental health, and developing work around building resilience, as well as putting in place support for those who need it in response to traumatic events.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support her Department is providing to police forces to prevent suicides amongst (a) serving and (b) retired police officers.

The death of any serving or retired police officer is a tragedy. The Government and police leaders take this matter seriously and are working to support the mental and physical wellbeing of all police officers and staff.

We have invested in programmes which offer help directly to officers and staff. This includes £7.5 million to fund the development of the National Police Wellbeing Service, which was launched in 2019. The Service is helping forces to identify where there is most risk of impacts on mental health, and developing work around building resilience, as well as putting in place support for those who need it in response to traumatic events.

The Government has also accelerated work to introduce a Police Covenant, which will ensure our police get the support and protection they need. We have been clear that the Covenant will also cover those who are retired from policing, to ensure that they are also supported effectively once they leave the service. The Covenant will be enshrined in law, with provisions being brought forward later this session, and the Home Secretary will have a duty to report annually on the work undertaken.

Our focus will be on health and wellbeing, physical protection and support for families. We are in no doubt that an area we must focus on is mental health support. We will continue to work closely with policing partners to ensure the Covenant has a lasting impact on both serving and retired officers and staff.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to support the mental wellbeing of retired police officers.

The Government takes the mental health and wellbeing of our police extremely seriously and we understand that the current crisis will have an impact on all of those working in policing, including those who have re-joined forces to support the response to Covid-19.

We have invested in programmes which offer help directly to police officers and staff. This includes £7.5 million to fund the development of the National Police Wellbeing Service (NPWS), which was launched in April 2019.

The NPWS has developed evidence-based guidance, advice, tools and resources which can be accessed by forces, as well as individual officers and staff. This helps Chief Constables in their duty to ensure the wellbeing of all officers and staff, by signposting to relevant services and additional support.

However, we want to go further, and have therefore accelerated work to introduce a Police Covenant, recognising the service and sacrifice of those who work, or have worked, in policing and to deliver the practical support they need. The key areas of focus will be physical protection, health and wellbeing and support for families.

Following an 8-week public consultation on the principle and scope of the Police Covenant, we are currently analysing the responses and intend to publish our response during the summer. Mental health and wellbeing support specifically for retired officers, including any additional needs as a result of the Covid-19 response, will be considered as part of this.

The Police Covenant will be put into law as part of the Police Protection and Powers Bill announced in the Queen’s Speech; we aim to introduce the Bill later this session.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the long-term effect on a person's mental health and wellbeing of serving in the police.

The Government takes the mental health and wellbeing of our police extremely seriously and we understand that the current crisis will have an impact on all of those working in policing, including those who have re-joined forces to support the response to Covid-19.

We have invested in programmes which offer help directly to police officers and staff. This includes £7.5 million to fund the development of the National Police Wellbeing Service (NPWS), which was launched in April 2019.

The NPWS has developed evidence-based guidance, advice, tools and resources which can be accessed by forces, as well as individual officers and staff. This helps Chief Constables in their duty to ensure the wellbeing of all officers and staff, by signposting to relevant services and additional support.

However, we want to go further, and have therefore accelerated work to introduce a Police Covenant, recognising the service and sacrifice of those who work, or have worked, in policing and to deliver the practical support they need. The key areas of focus will be physical protection, health and wellbeing and support for families.

Following an 8-week public consultation on the principle and scope of the Police Covenant, we are currently analysing the responses and intend to publish our response during the summer. Mental health and wellbeing support specifically for retired officers, including any additional needs as a result of the Covid-19 response, will be considered as part of this.

The Police Covenant will be put into law as part of the Police Protection and Powers Bill announced in the Queen’s Speech; we aim to introduce the Bill later this session.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the mental health and wellbeing of recently retired police officers who have re-joined forces during that outbreak.

The Government takes the mental health and wellbeing of our police extremely seriously and we understand that the current crisis will have an impact on all of those working in policing, including those who have re-joined forces to support the response to Covid-19.

We have invested in programmes which offer help directly to police officers and staff. This includes £7.5 million to fund the development of the National Police Wellbeing Service (NPWS), which was launched in April 2019.

The NPWS has developed evidence-based guidance, advice, tools and resources which can be accessed by forces, as well as individual officers and staff. This helps Chief Constables in their duty to ensure the wellbeing of all officers and staff, by signposting to relevant services and additional support.

However, we want to go further, and have therefore accelerated work to introduce a Police Covenant, recognising the service and sacrifice of those who work, or have worked, in policing and to deliver the practical support they need. The key areas of focus will be physical protection, health and wellbeing and support for families.

Following an 8-week public consultation on the principle and scope of the Police Covenant, we are currently analysing the responses and intend to publish our response during the summer. Mental health and wellbeing support specifically for retired officers, including any additional needs as a result of the Covid-19 response, will be considered as part of this.

The Police Covenant will be put into law as part of the Police Protection and Powers Bill announced in the Queen’s Speech; we aim to introduce the Bill later this session.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has to offer mental health and wellbeing support to police officers on retirement.

The Government takes the mental health and wellbeing of our police extremely seriously and we understand that the current crisis will have an impact on all of those working in policing, including those who have re-joined forces to support the response to Covid-19.

We have invested in programmes which offer help directly to police officers and staff. This includes £7.5 million to fund the development of the National Police Wellbeing Service (NPWS), which was launched in April 2019.

The NPWS has developed evidence-based guidance, advice, tools and resources which can be accessed by forces, as well as individual officers and staff. This helps Chief Constables in their duty to ensure the wellbeing of all officers and staff, by signposting to relevant services and additional support.

However, we want to go further, and have therefore accelerated work to introduce a Police Covenant, recognising the service and sacrifice of those who work, or have worked, in policing and to deliver the practical support they need. The key areas of focus will be physical protection, health and wellbeing and support for families.

Following an 8-week public consultation on the principle and scope of the Police Covenant, we are currently analysing the responses and intend to publish our response during the summer. Mental health and wellbeing support specifically for retired officers, including any additional needs as a result of the Covid-19 response, will be considered as part of this.

The Police Covenant will be put into law as part of the Police Protection and Powers Bill announced in the Queen’s Speech; we aim to introduce the Bill later this session.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the riot at HMP Deerbolt on 8 January 2020, what steps he is taking to (a) ensure the safety of prison staff and (b) recognise their work in difficult environments.

Our highly-skilled staff successfully resolved an incident involving 18 prisoners on one wing at HMYOI Deerbolt on 8 January. The 18 prisoners involved in the incident were transferred to other prisons or held in Deerbolt’s segregation unit. The perpetrators have been placed on report pending adjudication hearings as well as investigation by the police.

Prison officers do an outstanding job, and we do not underestimate the challenges faced by everyone working in prisons. We are committed to making prisons a safe place to work and are providing prison officers with the right support, training and tools to empower them to do their jobs. Any prisoner who commits an act of violence can expect to have action taken against them.

We are rolling out our key worker model to improve staff-prisoner relationships and reduce violence, by providing individual support to each prisoner from a dedicated officer. We are giving staff rigid bar handcuffs and have provided nearly 6,000 body worn video cameras to officers, which provide high-quality evidence to support prosecutions.

We are also introducing PAVA – a synthetic pepper spray – to protect staff and prisoners from incidents where there is serious violence, or an imminent or perceived risk of serious violence. Alongside the rollout of PAVA we are introducing a new personal safety package, SPEAR (Spontaneous Protection Enabling Accelerated Response), to ensure that PAVA is introduced as part of a wider package of skills for staff to resolve and deescalate incidents.

Finally, we are spending £2.75 billion to transform the prison estate, creating 10,000 additional modern prison places and bolstering security to allow staff to focus their efforts on rehabilitating offenders.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jan 2020
What steps his Department is taking to reduce levels of crime in prisons.

Our prisons face a range of security challenges including supply of drugs and psychoactive substances and use of illicit phones. This fuels crime both behind and beyond the prison walls.

We are investing £100 million across the estate on airport-style security, including X-ray scanners, to stop drugs and phones from getting in.

Our previous investment in staff means prisons are making greater use body, property, cell and area searches to find contraband that gets in, aided by dedicated search teams and drug detection dogs.

And we are working closely with law enforcement to detect, disrupt and pursue the organised crime groups who drive significant amount of this criminal activity.

Lucy Frazer
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)