Anne McLaughlin Portrait

Anne McLaughlin

Scottish National Party - Glasgow North East

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Immigration, Asylum and Border Control)

(since February 2021)

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Justice)

(since February 2021)
Committee on Standards
2nd Mar 2020 - 20th May 2021
Committee of Privileges
2nd Mar 2020 - 20th May 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Women)
7th Jan 2020 - 1st Feb 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Equalities)
7th Jan 2020 - 1st Feb 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Civil Liberties)
20th May 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 19th October 2021
09:25
Nationality and Borders Bill - Debate
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
19 Oct 2021, 9:25 a.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 19th October 2021
14:00
Nationality and Borders Bill - Debate
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
19 Oct 2021, 2 p.m. View calendar
Oral Question
Wednesday 20th October 2021
12:00
Cabinet Office
Oral Question No. 12
If he will list his official engagements for Wednesday 20 October.
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 21st October 2021
11:30
Nationality and Borders Bill - Debate
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
21 Oct 2021, 11:30 a.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 21st October 2021
14:00
Nationality and Borders Bill - Debate
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
21 Oct 2021, 2 p.m. View calendar
Division Votes
Monday 7th June 2021
Advanced Research and Invention Agency Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 42 Scottish National Party Aye votes vs 0 Scottish National Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 263 Noes - 364
Speeches
Thursday 23rd September 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill (Fourth sitting)

Q Thank you very much for your time today. I have one quick question on that: if a person is …

Written Answers
Friday 10th September 2021
Asylum: Accommodation Centres
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to commence specific sections within Part …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 8th September 2021
Emma Ritch
That this House recognises the remarkable achievements of internationally renowned feminist, the late Emma Ritch who was executive director of …
Bills
None available
Tweets
Monday 27th September 2021
21:24
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th April 2021
1. Employment and earnings
Payments from YouGov, 50 Featherstone Street, London EC1Y 8RT, for surveys:
EDM signed
Thursday 23rd September 2021
Town and Country Planning (Napier Barracks) Special Development Order 2021 (SI 2021, No. 962)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Town and Country Planning (Napier Barracks) Special Development …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Anne McLaughlin has voted in 208 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Anne McLaughlin Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Robert Buckland (Conservative)
(13 debate interactions)
Kevin Foster (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(9 debate interactions)
Kemi Badenoch (Conservative)
Minister for Equalities
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(52 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(18 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(13 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Anne McLaughlin's debates

Glasgow North East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Undocumented Migrants are suffering in silence, with no access to adequate Financial support, or any help. The Government should grant an urgent Amnesty of 5years to those with no criminal record so that they could live their lives as normal human beings and pay tax to help the UK economy.

Black Women in the U.K. are 5 times more likely to die during pregnancy and after childbirth compared to White Women (MBRRACE, 2019). We need more research done into why this is happening and recommendations to improve health care for Black Women as urgent action is needed to address this disparity.


Latest EDMs signed by Anne McLaughlin

23rd September 2021
Anne McLaughlin signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 23rd September 2021

Town and Country Planning (Napier Barracks) Special Development Order 2021 (SI 2021, No. 962)

Tabled by: Stuart C McDonald (Scottish National Party - Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the Town and Country Planning (Napier Barracks) Special Development Order 2021 (SI 2021, No. 962), dated 26th August 2021, a copy of which was laid before this House on 27th August 2021, be annulled
6 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Sep 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 6
21st September 2021
Anne McLaughlin signed this EDM on Tuesday 21st September 2021

60th anniversary of Kirklandneuk Primary School

Tabled by: Gavin Newlands (Scottish National Party - Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
That this House notes that Kirklandneuk Primary School in Renfrew celebrated its 60th anniversary on 28 August 2021; understands that the school has over the last three weeks had several events celebrating the occasion; believes that Kirklandneuk Primary School has made a substantial contribution to educating youngsters in the Renfrew …
46 signatures
(Most recent: 22 Sep 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 45
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Anne McLaughlin's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Anne McLaughlin, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Anne McLaughlin has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Anne McLaughlin has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Anne McLaughlin has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Anne McLaughlin has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


58 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what discussions she has had with representatives of (a) political parties and (b) civil society groups on the enactment of section 106 of the Equality Act 2010.

The Government keeps section 106 of the Equality Act 2010 under review but has no current plans for it to be commenced. We encourage political parties to lead the way in improving diverse electoral representation through their selection of candidates and we are happy to engage political parties and civil society groups on how best those responsibilities can be fulfilled.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what progress her Department has made on bringing section 106 of the Equality Act 2010 into force.

The Government keeps section 106 of the Equality Act 2010 under review but has no current plans for it to be commenced. We encourage political parties to lead the way in improving diverse electoral representation through their selection of candidates and we are happy to engage political parties and civil society groups on how best those responsibilities can be fulfilled.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total cost to the public purse is of expenditure by his Department on (a) Government Legal Department costs and (b) external legal advice on complaints related to the sale of Green Deal plans by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS).

Since 2017, the Department has incurred £309,992 on external legal advice in relation to Green Deal activity. This figure cannot easily be disaggregated to give a total for purely HELMS-related costs. The Department has also incurred £79,787 in fees from the Government Legal Department on First Tier Tribunal litigation related to the sale of Green Deal plans by HELMS. The Department gave external legal instructions for a small amount of work prior to 2017 but the details of costs are not readily available.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the number of appeals to the First Tier Tribunal as a result of sanction notices issued in response to complaints which do not concern mis-selling as their subject matter but which are related to the activities of Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS).

To date, no appeals have been made to the First Tier Tribunal in relation to complaints which are related to HELMS but do not concern mis-selling.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the UK leaving the EU on UK businesses that hire rather than sell goods.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement secured zero tariffs and zero quotas on trade in goods between the UK and EU.

The Agreement also guarantees that UK investors and service suppliers will be able to access the EU’s markets and will not be subject to discriminatory barriers to trade.

If someone hires goods to the EU, they will need to check the national regulations of the country they are doing business in to understand how best to operate.

If the supplier intends to travel for business, they should check whether they need to apply for a visa, work permit or other documentation before travelling to the EU.

The Department has undertaken no specific analysis in relation to leaving the EU and goods for hire.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many complaints in relation to Green Deal plans sold by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) his Department has refused to consider due to breaches of the Code of Practice having taken place more than six years ago.

At 15th February, a total of 244 appeals about the mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by the company Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) have been referred to my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State, of which 137 are yet to receive an intention notice and 153 are yet to receive a sanction notice.

The Department has issued 2 Intention Notices setting out ‘minded to’ decisions not to consider appeals on the basis that they were made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach of the Green Deal Regulations occurred. These decisions have been made in accordance with the Regulations. The Department does not hold data on any further appeals made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach occurred, as it is not possible to categorise appeals as such until case reviews are complete, at which point Intention Notices are issued.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many complaints his Department has received in relation to breaches of the Green Deal Code of Practice by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) which took place more than six years before the date of receipt of the complaint.

At 15th February, a total of 244 appeals about the mis-selling of Green Deal Plans by the company Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) have been referred to my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State, of which 137 are yet to receive an intention notice and 153 are yet to receive a sanction notice.

The Department has issued 2 Intention Notices setting out ‘minded to’ decisions not to consider appeals on the basis that they were made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach of the Green Deal Regulations occurred. These decisions have been made in accordance with the Regulations. The Department does not hold data on any further appeals made more than 6 years after the date on which the alleged breach occurred, as it is not possible to categorise appeals as such until case reviews are complete, at which point Intention Notices are issued.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many times (a) he and (b) his predecessors have used the power as outlined under Part 9 of the Green Deal Regulations to obtain information from (a) a Green Deal provider, (b) from the Green Deal Finance Company and (c) GDFC Assets Ltd to date.

The Department has requested information from various Green Deal Parties, including Green Deal Providers and the Green Deal Finance Company, on numerous occasions since the scheme was introduced in 2013. However, because there is no formal requirement to state that the Department is using its powers under Part 9 (reg 86) of the Green Deal Framework (Disclosure, Acknowledgment, Redress, etc) Regulations 2012, no record exists of how many times the Department has invoked the powers.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many green deal agreements were issued by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) for the purposes of installing external building insulation in each constituency in (a) England and (b) Wales.

The number of Green Deal plans provided by Home Energy & Lifestyle Management Ltd which included External Wall Insulation in England and Wales by parliamentary constituency are shown in the table below.

In order to manage the risk of revealing personal or commercial data, our approach is not to release non-zero counts of less than five for a small geographic area. Items marked * are small and have been supressed to achieve this disclosure control.

Parliamentary constituency

Green Deal Plans

Bristol North West

21

Chippenham

*

Coventry North West

*

Coventry South

*

Esher and Walton

*

Gloucester

*

North Herefordshire

*

North Swindon

41

Reading West

*

South Swindon

13

Worcester

*

England total

90

Newport East

7

Newport West

16

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total value is of all Green Deal loans taken out by consumers (a) without fees and interest and (b) including fees and interest.

The Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018. Their consideration is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the total value is of Green Deal loans sold by Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (a) excluding and (b) including fees and interest.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018, and as such the Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal Loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The Financial Ombudsman Service’s consideration of complaints is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, on what date he or his predecessor delegated the initial review of mis-selling allegations against HELMS to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018, and as such the Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal Loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The Financial Ombudsman Service’s consideration of complaints is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many recommendations the Financial Ombudsman Service has made to him in relation to HELMS complaints in its role delegated under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 to carry out the initial review of mis-selling allegations against a green deal provider.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018, and as such the Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal Loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The Financial Ombudsman Service’s consideration of complaints is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many recommendations of loan cancellation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made in relation to HELMS complaints in its role delegated under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 to carry out the initial review of mis-selling allegations against a green deal provider.

The then Secretary of State Greg Clark delegated initial reviews of complaints about mis-selling to the Financial Ombudsman Service under section 32 of the Energy Act 2011 on 24th October 2018, and as such the Department does not hold data on the total value of Green Deal Loans, whether taken out with Home Energy and Lifestyle Management Ltd (HELMS) or any other Green Deal Provider.

The Financial Ombudsman Service’s consideration of complaints is part of the wider review process. Responsibility for deciding whether a breach has occurred and, if so, whether a sanction should be imposed rests with the Secretary of State, in line with the requirements of the Framework Regulations.

Under this delegation the Financial Ombudsman Service has made recommendations regarding 143 complaints about HELMS. Recommendations may cover whether to cancel or reduce loans, or cover other matters, such as whether to conclude that there have been breaches of the Green Deal Framework regulations. For 69 of these complaints, the Financial Ombudsman Service recommended cancellation.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the average response time is from the Green Deal Ombudsman on a complaint about Green Deal mis-selling once an acknowledgement has been received.

Where mis-selling complaints have not been dealt with to the consumer’s satisfaction by the Green Deal Provider, they are routinely handled by the Financial Ombudsman Service. We do not hold data on response times for either the Green Deal Ombudsman or the Financial Ombudsman Service.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what time targets his Department has for acknowledging complaints from people about Green Deal mis-selling.

In line with departmental targets, we aim to respond to correspondence within 15 working days. This includes acknowledging complaints about Green Deal mis-selling.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to assist food and drink wholesalers who had their trade credit limits (a) reduced or (b) withdrawn by insurers in advance of the full re-opening of the hospitality sector.

The Government’s Trade Credit Reinsurance Scheme will see the majority of Trade Credit Insurance coverage maintained for businesses across the UK. The Scheme operates as a reinsurance arrangement which will see trade credit insurers continuing to write and maintain cover to business throughout the Covid-19 crisis.

We expect to finalise details of the scheme with both insurers and the European Commission soon. Contractual agreements with insurers will be signed shortly afterwards allowing cover that has previously been reduced or withdrawn to be reinstated. If a business feels that their coverage has been withdrawn unfairly they should contact either their previous insurer about reinstating cover, or look to arrange new cover under the same conditions as their previous coverage.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the hospitality sector of many of their suppliers going out of business; and what further support is available to prevent this.

We have been in regular contact with representatives from the hospitality sector, including suppliers, to ensure that we support them during and after the Covid-19 crisis. A number of measures are available to support suppliers to the hospitality industry, such as access to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and government backed loans. Suppliers to badly hit sectors such as hospitality may also be able to access the Discretionary Grant Fund which provides business support grants to businesses affected by the Covid-19 crisis at the discretion of Local Authorities.

The Government is providing additional measures to support the hospitality sector itself, including a VAT reduction to 5% and the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether easements in respect of universal credit introduced in response to the covid-19 outbreak will remain in place for the duration of that outbreak; and what discussions she has had with claimant groups on ensuring that the most vulnerable people are supported during that outbreak.

Last year, the Department for Work and Pensions introduced a number of easements for Universal Credit claimants, to ensure they could continue to be supported while there were restrictions on face-to-face interaction. Some of these easements are still in place, while others have reverted back to business-as-usual procedures.

Additionally, to provide financial support with essential living costs to vulnerable people and those hardest hit during the COVID 19 outbreak, the Government is delivering an unprecedented package of support, injecting billions into the welfare system. This includes the temporary uplifts to Universal Credit and Working Tax Credits, and boosting Local Housing Allowance by almost £1bn.

DWP provides a range of support to help vulnerable people, especially during the Covid period. Throughout the pandemic, Jobcentres have remained open for anyone who needs face-to-face support and cannot be helped in any other way, which includes all vulnerable claimants, and we have increased the number of work coaches to enable us to continue supporting vulnerable claimants and working with partners to ensure they get the help they need.

DWP regularly meet stakeholders in order to update them on a range of issues and will continue to do so.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will publish the risk assessments undertaken by her Department in respect of the return to face-to-face appointments in job centres for 18 to 24 year olds.

DWP takes the safety of colleagues and customers very seriously and all of our offices are COVID secure. We have a suite of Health & Safety risk assessments in place developed following extensive consultation with departmental trade union representatives. These are not specific to any customer group but relate to the safety of everyone who uses a jobcentre and are regularly reviewed, including when services are extended.

These risk assessments cover all of the measures in place to protect staff and publishing them could potentially identify the physical security measures on site, for example, CCTV coverage and therefore put our staff and customers at risk.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she has taken to ensure companies that have been contracted by her Department to fulfil outsourced work comply with covid-related health and safety regulations.

All contractors that deliver the Department contracts are required to deliver their contractual obligations in accordance with all applicable law regarding health and safety as a matter of course. We expect all our contractors to comply with current government guidelines to ensure Covid safe working practices as part of that commitment.

In many instances the Department has supported contractors moving to Covid safe working practices by delivering services to participants using digital platforms, where appropriate to do so and in many cases our contractor’s staff have moved to working from home during the height of the pandemic.

We have also collaborated closely with providers to establish procedures for the safe resumption of face to face services where these are necessary, including advice on social distancing requirements, sanitisation, PPE and face coverings

In specific cases the Department has actively worked in consultation with its suppliers to assess Covid related risk in the workplace and identify ways in which the services can be delivered in a safer manner. Specific examples include –

  • Review of reactive and planned maintenance services on the Department estate, (against criticality and risk) and identification of services which should be suspended or amended for periods of restricted movement
  • Provision of PPE equipment
  • Increased cleaning regimes and social distancing measures implemented across the estate to ensure working environment continues to be Covid secure.
  • Reduction in the numbers of Security Officers required to attend sites in line with reduced Operational requirements.
  • Provision of PPE equipment for those Security Officers required to attend sites

We have also supported providers in meeting and exceeding their obligations under Covid related procedures, for example where Security Officers test positive they are required to self-isolate for 14/10 days and not return to work but still receive their full pay whilst self-isolating.

Unfortunately, the Department cannot attend sites to verify that providers are adhering to Covid safe working practices, as this in itself would breach the same standards.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the 2013 Care Leaver Strategy, what progress has been made on introducing a care leaver marker in the universal credit system.

The Department takes seriously the need to support vulnerable claimants, and wants the application process for Universal Credit to be as quick and easy as possible, ensuring that claimants receive money at the earliest opportunity.

Through locally agreed protocols, Jobcentres and local authorities support care leavers transitioning to DWP paid benefits. This helps ensure care leavers are identified promptly and receive the support they need, for example through the advance claim preparation facility.

All Universal Credit claimants, including those who are care leavers, are assigned to a named Work Coach, with whom they can build a trusting relationship. With the permission of the claimant, a Work Coach is able to record, in a free text format, through the use of ‘pinned notes’ in the Universal Credit system, information which supports staff in identifying and managing relevant experiences and circumstances of individual claimants.

Additionally, the Department funds Citizens Advice and Citizens Advice Scotland to deliver ‘Help to Claim’ which provides tailored, practical support to people making a
Universal Credit claim and is available across Great Britain. Claimants can access this support through self-referral, or may be directed towards or referred to the service by DWP or other support agencies.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when she plans to reply to the letter of 26 October 2020 from the hon. Member for Glasgow North East.

The Department aims to respond to correspondence from hon. Members within 20 working-days of receipt. A response is currently being worked on and should be with the hon. Member shortly.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many pension credit claims there have been since the announcement on introducing means-testing for free TV licences for people aged over 75.

The total number of Pension Credit Claims made since introduction of means testing for free TV licences for people aged over 75 from 1st August 2020 is 29,919.

Extract taken from Weekly Pensions Performance Report on 28th September 2020

Source: Weekly Data from CAM (Customer Account Manager)

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps Department is taking to maximise uptake of pension credit.

While over 1.5 million pensioners currently receive Pension Credit, the Government wants to make sure that all pensioners eligible can claim the Pension Credit to which they are rightly entitled. That is why in February this year we launched a nationwide campaign to raise awareness of Pension Credit and help dispel some of the misconceptions that people might have about Pension Credit eligibility.

We are also continuing to work with our stakeholders all across the UK, to help spread the key messages from the campaign because we know that often the best ways to reach eligible pensioners is through trusted stakeholders working in the local community. Our online Pension Credit toolkit (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pension-credit-toolkit) has been updated with the recent awareness campaign materials to supplement the resources it already contains for those working with pensioners, such as guides to Pension Credit and information designed to help older people understand how they could get Pension Credit.

In May this year we also launched an online claim service for Pension Credit to supplement the existing telephone and postal claim services (https://www.gov.uk/pension-credit). The new online service enables pensioners to apply for Pension Credit at a time that suits them.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many pension credit claims there were in each of the last 12 months for which data is available; and what the outcome was of those pension credit claims over that period.

The number of Pension Credit claims received in the last 12 months is shown in table 1 below:

Table 1

Oct-19

Nov-19

Dec-19

Jan-20

Feb-20

Mar-20

10,645

8,318

6,615

8,540

9,574

12,557

Apr-20

May-20

Jun-20

Jul-20

Aug-20

Sep-20

9,567

8,613

9,004

17,087

14,865

15,054

Extract taken from Weekly Pensions Performance Report on 28th September 2020

Source: Weekly Data from CAM (Customer Account Manager)

The figure includes both successful and unsuccessful Pension Credit claims.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
8th Jun 2021
What steps he is taking to support the retention of health and care staff beyond the covid-19 outbreak.

The workforce are at the forefront of our plans for recovery and we are ensuring they get the support they need and have time to rest.

This includes access to wellbeing support and rapid referral to mental health hubs.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the UK global human rights sanctions regime in preventing of human rights abuses in Sri Lanka.

Sanctions are one response among a number of diplomatic tools we can deploy around the world as part of a broader political strategy in order to change or send a political signal regarding particular behaviours. The Global Human Rights Sanctions regime gives the UK a powerful tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. We will continue to consider targets globally, guided by the objectives of the human rights sanctions regime and the evidence. However, it is not appropriate to speculate on who may be designated in the future, as to do so could reduce their impact.

The UK Government, alongside our partners in the Core Group, has led international efforts over many years to promote accountability, reconciliation and human rights in Sri Lanka, including at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC). On 23 March the UNHRC adopted a new UK-led resolution, 46/1. This resolution provides a continued framework for international engagement on human rights in Sri Lanka, and highlights serious concerns about the situation, including those detailed in the report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). It calls on the government of Sri Lanka to make progress on accountability and human rights, and stresses the importance of a comprehensive accountability process for all violations and abuses committed in Sri Lanka. We continue to engage with the government of Sri Lanka on these important issues.

Nigel Adams
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, where and how information in respect of the decision to place a person on the UK Global Human Rights sanctions regime is (a) disseminated, (b) published and (c) reported.

As set out in the Global Human Rights Sanctions Regulations 2020, decisions to designate will be made by the Secretary of State and may only take place where the Secretary of State has "reasonable grounds to suspect" that an individual or entity "is or has been" involved in one of the serious human rights violations or abuses falling within the Regulations. The designation must also be considered "appropriate" having regard to the purpose of the regulations and the likely significant effects on the target. The regulations place an obligation on the UK Government to take such steps as are reasonably practicable to inform a person of their designation and to publicise this. As part of this, we will publish designations on the "UK Sanctions List" on GOV.UK.

Nigel Adams
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what (a) body or (b) person is responsible for determining who is designated under the UK Global Human Rights sanctions regime.

As set out in the Global Human Rights Sanctions Regulations 2020, decisions to designate will be made by the Secretary of State and may only take place where the Secretary of State has "reasonable grounds to suspect" that an individual or entity "is or has been" involved in one of the serious human rights violations or abuses falling within the Regulations. The designation must also be considered "appropriate" having regard to the purpose of the regulations and the likely significant effects on the target. The regulations place an obligation on the UK Government to take such steps as are reasonably practicable to inform a person of their designation and to publicise this. As part of this, we will publish designations on the "UK Sanctions List" on GOV.UK.

Nigel Adams
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
8th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many designations under the Global Human Rights sanctions regime her Department has issued on Sri Lankan officials accused of breaches of international and human rights law since the 18 May 2009.

The Global Human Rights Sanctions regime gives the UK a powerful tool to hold to account those involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. No Sri Lankan officials have been designated under the sanctions regime to date and it is not appropriate to speculate on who may be designated in the future, as to do so could reduce the impact of the designation.

Sanctions are one response among a number of diplomatic tools. The UK government, alongside our partners in the Core Group, has led international efforts over many years to promote accountability, reconciliation and human rights in Sri Lanka, including at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC). On 23 March the UNHRC adopted a new UK-led resolution, 46/1. This resolution provides a continued framework for international engagement on human rights in Sri Lanka, and highlights serious concerns about the situation, including those detailed in the report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). It calls on the government of Sri Lanka to make progress on accountability and human rights, and stresses the importance of a comprehensive accountability process for all violations and abuses committed in Sri Lanka. We continue to engage with the government of Sri Lanka on these important issues.

Nigel Adams
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2021 to Question 912435 on hire companies and trade with the EU, once the hire company has checked the national regulations of the country it is doing business in to understand how best to operate, what tax is payable when hire goods return through UK customs; what paperwork must be completed; and where hire companies can find the detail of the applicable UK regulations.

If taking goods temporarily out of the UK (including hiring), an ATA Carnet can help simplify customs formalities by allowing a single document to be used for clearing goods through customs in the countries that are part of the ATA Carnet system. Both the UK and all EU Member States accept ATA Carnets. In the UK, ATA Carnets are administered by the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI). Business wishing to use ATA Carnets are advised to contact the LCCI directly to discuss their business needs.

Temporary Admission offers an alternative means to import goods temporarily into the EU, provided the relevant conditions are met. The management of EU import and export procedures is the responsibility of the customs authorities of the EU Member States so businesses and individuals should confirm the processes at their port of arrival.

Businesses re-importing goods into the UK can claim relief from import VAT and any customs duty under Returned Goods Relief (RGR), provided specific conditions are met. RGR applies to goods exported from the UK and re-imported within three years in an unaltered state and can apply to goods which are imported into the UK following their export from the UK under Temporary Admission or with an ATA Carnet.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made for the implications of his policies of the data collected by the Federation of Wholesale Distributors on the risk to wholesale businesses of liquidation.

The Government fully recognises the extreme disruption to people’s lives, jobs and businesses caused by the necessary actions taken to tackle COVID-19. It is for this reason that the Government has announced unprecedented levels of support for workers and businesses. Food and drink wholesalers, which have played a critical role in supporting the food supply chain throughout the past months, are eligible for a number of these schemes, including:

• The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help keep millions of people in employment;
• £10,000 cash grants for all business properties in receipt of Small Business Rates Relief and Rural Rates Relief;
• The Bounce Back Loan Scheme for small businesses to borrow between £2,000 to £50,000, with no interest payments or fees for the first 12 months; and
• The Discretionary Grant Fund for small and micro businesses that are not eligible for other grant schemes.

Food and drink wholesalers will also benefit from the Chancellor’s recent announcement of the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme which will encourage people to safely return to eating out at restaurants for sit-down meals.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to commence specific sections within Part 2 of the Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002.

The New Plan for Immigration, published by the Home Office on 24 March 2021, included plans to set up Reception Centres to provide basic accommodation for asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute.

As part of these plans consideration is being given to commencing some of the measures set out in the Nationality Immigration and Asylum 2002 which relate to supporting asylum seekers in accommodation centres.

The locations for accommodation centres have not yet been determined. Any proposals to establish accommodation centres in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland would be discussed with the devolved governments.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to consult Ministers in the devolved Administrations before making any arrangements for the provision of accommodation centres in their respective nations (a) pursuant to s16 Nationality Immigration Act 2002 and (b) generally.

The New Plan for Immigration, published by the Home Office on 24 March 2021, included plans to set up Reception Centres to provide basic accommodation for asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute.

As part of these plans consideration is being given to commencing some of the measures set out in the Nationality Immigration and Asylum 2002 which relate to supporting asylum seekers in accommodation centres.

The locations for accommodation centres have not yet been determined. Any proposals to establish accommodation centres in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland would be discussed with the devolved governments.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to institute an expedited asylum decisions process for Afghan nationals who have applied for asylum in the UK whose claim is (a) still outstanding or (b) subject to further review; and if she will make a statement.

The UK has a proud history of providing protection to those who need it, in accordance with our international obligations.

All asylum claims are considered on a case by case basis and in line with published policy.

We are currently reviewing the country situation and will issue updated country policy and information notes shortly for Afghanistan, which reflect revised assessments of risk of persecution. We have therefore temporarily paused asylum decision making for Afghan nationals to ensure our decision makers are only considering claimants’ protection needs in the light of relevant and up-to-date country information.

All asylum appeals from Afghan nationals will be reviewed ahead of any hearing to look at the individual claim in light of the changed country situation, current guidance and any further information submitted by the claimant, to assess whether the decision to refuse is still appropriate.

No one who is found to be at risk of persecution or serious harm in Afghanistan will be expected to return there. Enforced returns of those who have been refused asylum and have exhausted all rights of appeal are currently paused.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, under what circumstances and asylum support provision persons issued with a Notice of Intent are being supported.

An asylum seeker who receives a “notice of intent” stating their asylum claim may be treated as inadmissible, is eligible to receive support under section 95 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 if they would otherwise be destitute.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to bring into force (a) sections 27-31 or (b) sections 36 of the Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 in respect of accommodation centres for persons in the UK who seek to or have registered asylum claims.

The New Plan for Immigration published by the Home Office included plans to set up Reception Centres to provide basic accommodation for asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute.

As part of these plans consideration is being given to commencing some of the measures set out in the Nationality Immigration and Asylum 2002 which relate to supporting asylum seekers in accommodation centres.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the 4,561 persons who received a Notice of Intent in the period 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2021 have been moved into the substantive asylum process and had their claim registered.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail inadmissibility decisions made and can be found online at:

How many people do we grant asylum or protection to? - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

A breakdown of these figures into nationality and gender is not currently available.

Quarterly statistics relating to the period between June and September 2021 are due to be published on 25 November. We are working to bring data in respect of the six month long-stop in line with current reporting and hope to publish this information in the same timeframe.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the 4,561 persons by (a) sex and (b) nationality received a Notice of Intent in the period 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2021.

The latest published Immigration Statistics detail inadmissibility decisions made and can be found online at:

How many people do we grant asylum or protection to? - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

A breakdown of these figures into nationality and gender is not currently available.

Quarterly statistics relating to the period between June and September 2021 are due to be published on 25 November. We are working to bring data in respect of the six month long-stop in line with current reporting and hope to publish this information in the same timeframe.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government’s immigration returns agreement with Afghanistan is no longer valid.

Enforced returns to Afghanistan have been paused

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether it is her policy that (a) no Afghan nationals in the UK asylum procedure shall be returned to Afghanistan and (b) no Afghans on asylum support will be subject to negative cessations decisions or evictions.

Enforced returns to Afghanistan have been paused.

Afghan nationals who have an asylum claim or appeal that has not yet been decided are eligible to receive support under section 95 of the 1999 Act if they would otherwise be destitute. Furthermore, failed asylum seekers may be supported under section 4(2) of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 (1999 Act) if they would otherwise be destitute and meet other conditions set out in the Immigration and Asylum (Provision of Accommodation to Failed Asylum-

Failed asylum seekers who consider that they would be at risk of harm on return to Afghanistan because of the recent changes in the country are able to lodge further asylum submissions and would therefore be eligible to receive support under Regulation 3(2)(e) of the 2005 Regulations, subject to meeting the destitution criteria.

There are no plans to change the policy so that Afghans may not be evicted from accommodation provided under section 95 or 4(2) in any circumstances. Like others supported under the provisions, their support may be discontinued in a number of circumstances, including where it appears they are no longer destitute, where they are no longer living in the accommodation provided to them and where they are granted refugee status and therefore become eligible to take up employment or apply for mainstream benefits.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people (a) in 2019, (b) in 2020 and (c) since 1 January 2021 to date have been issued with a Notice of Intent under the Government's guidance on inadmissibility: safe third country cases.

Figures on the number of asylum application decisions made in the first quarter of 2021 are due to be published on 27 May 2021. We are working to bring inadmissibility data in line with current reporting and hope to publish that information in the same timeframe.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she has taken to engage with devolved Administrations on the New Plan for Immigration; and whether the outcomes of that engagement will inform the public consultation which closed on 6 May 2021.

The NPI consultation was open to people and organisations across the UK to share their views

The Home Office will consider responses to the consultation carefully, including the method for reporting on its findings, in line with our duties as the policy develops in this area

In relation to the devolved Administrations, efforts were made to meet with officials to discuss the plan however the invitations were declined as the devolved authorities did not feel able to meet with the Home Office. Further attempts to engage the devolved Administrations will continue.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she consulted current asylum accommodation or asylum advice contractors prior to and in respect of the New Plan for Immigration being published on 24 March 2021.

The Government undertook a comprehensive consultation and engagement process on the New Plan for Immigration when the proposals were published, and providers of accommodation and advice services for asylum seekers have the opportunity to submit their views, in the same way as others. The consultation closed on the 6 May and we will carefully consider the outcome. Providers will be involved in the work to implement any changes.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to commence the remainder of Part 2 Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002, to give effect to the reception centres proposed in the UK government’s New Plan for Immigration, published on 24 March 2021.

The UK Government is considering options for how this proposal could be given effect.

One option for implementing the plans is to commence some or all of the provisions in the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 which relate to Accommodation Centres.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, under what powers people issued with a Notice of Intent pursuant to her Department's guidance on inadmissibility: safe third country cases are being (a) accommodated and (b) supported.

If an individual would otherwise be destitute, they would be eligible to be provided with accommodation and support to cover their essential living needs under sections 95 or 98 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding she has allocated to refugee resettlement for 2021-22.

The first 12 months of a refugee's resettlement costs are funded by central government using the Official Development Assistance budget which amounts to £8,520 per person. For years 2-5 local authorities receive £12,000 per person overall; tapering from £5,000 in year 2, to £3,700 in year 3, to £2,300 in year 4 and £1,000 in year 5. Funding is also made available for healthcare, education, and to help local authorities with exceptional costs such as social care and housing adaptations.

This tariff funding will be made available to all local authorities who resettle refugees during 2021-22. The number of refugees resettled next year will be dependent on local authority capacity as we recover from the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the five most common nationalities of new asylum applicants making claims to the UK in 2020 were; and how many asylum applications were received by the UK from nationals of each of those five countries.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of asylum applications lodged in the UK by the top 20 nationalities are published in table Asy_01c of the asylum and resettlement summary tables, which include a breakdown for year of application.

The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and resettlement

The latest data relate up to year ending December 2020.
Additionally, the Home Office publishes further data on asylum applications in Asy_D01 of the detailed asylum and resettlement datasets.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people applied for asylum from detention in the UK in 2020.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum claims made at ports of entry or “in country” and the latest figures can be found in table Asy_D01 within the Asylum and Resettlement datasets published on gov.uk. We do not publish further detail on the location of where an asylum claim is made as this is not held centrally on Home Office databases and could only be determined at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
1st Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fresh asylum applications were submitted in 2020 by individuals who had previously been refused asylum in the UK.

Home Office records indicate that a total of 7,341 Further Submissions in support of fresh asylum/protection claims were submitted in 2020 by individuals who had previously been refused asylum in the UK.

Where people who have previously been refused asylum in the UK wish to make representations in support of a fresh asylum application these are recorded as Further Submissions.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many complaints her Department has received on the time taken to produce biometrics residence permits in the last three years.

While a delay in receiving the Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) may make accessing public services more difficult for all customers, since 20 January 2021 the standard pre-delivery email to customers has included their BRP number and guidance on how to use the online right to work and right to rent services to prove their entitlements.

We are also investigating the possibility of including National Insurance Numbers in the same message to further assist customers.

Data relating to correspondence performance is published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customer-service-operations-data-november-2020

We are currently unable to break this down into complaints specifically related to BRP delays.

UVKI does not hold figures relating to the number of customers who have waited longer than 10 working days to receive their BRP after a positive decision between 2018 and 2020.

However, it does have service level agreements with its production provider the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) and its secure delivery provider FedEx which took over the contract in February 2020. Prior to this, DX held the contract.

The DVLA has a target of producing 90% of BRPs within 24 hours of receiving the production request and 100% within 48 hours. It achieved the following:

Financial Year

24 hour target

48 hour target

Outside of 48 hours

2018/19

96.8%

99.4%

0.6%

2019/20

93.9%

100.00

0

2020/21 (to 5/2/21)

72.4%

97.4%

2.6%

FedEx and DX both had a target to attempt first delivery for 99% of BRPs within 48 working hours of collection of the BRP from DVLA.

DX consistently met this target during the years it had responsibility for the contract. For financial year 2020 to end December 2020 FedEx were achieving 94.4%. UKVI is working closely with FedEx to improve this performance and an improvement plan is in place to achieve this.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UKVI applicants have waited longer than the estimated 10 days to receive their biometrics residence permit after a positive decision in (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) 2020.

While a delay in receiving the Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) may make accessing public services more difficult for all customers, since 20 January 2021 the standard pre-delivery email to customers has included their BRP number and guidance on how to use the online right to work and right to rent services to prove their entitlements.

We are also investigating the possibility of including National Insurance Numbers in the same message to further assist customers.

Data relating to correspondence performance is published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customer-service-operations-data-november-2020

We are currently unable to break this down into complaints specifically related to BRP delays.

UVKI does not hold figures relating to the number of customers who have waited longer than 10 working days to receive their BRP after a positive decision between 2018 and 2020.

However, it does have service level agreements with its production provider the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) and its secure delivery provider FedEx which took over the contract in February 2020. Prior to this, DX held the contract.

The DVLA has a target of producing 90% of BRPs within 24 hours of receiving the production request and 100% within 48 hours. It achieved the following:

Financial Year

24 hour target

48 hour target

Outside of 48 hours

2018/19

96.8%

99.4%

0.6%

2019/20

93.9%

100.00

0

2020/21 (to 5/2/21)

72.4%

97.4%

2.6%

FedEx and DX both had a target to attempt first delivery for 99% of BRPs within 48 working hours of collection of the BRP from DVLA.

DX consistently met this target during the years it had responsibility for the contract. For financial year 2020 to end December 2020 FedEx were achieving 94.4%. UKVI is working closely with FedEx to improve this performance and an improvement plan is in place to achieve this.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on refugees of delays in the delivery of a biometrics residence permit after gaining a positive decision.

While a delay in receiving the Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) may make accessing public services more difficult for all customers, since 20 January 2021 the standard pre-delivery email to customers has included their BRP number and guidance on how to use the online right to work and right to rent services to prove their entitlements.

We are also investigating the possibility of including National Insurance Numbers in the same message to further assist customers.

Data relating to correspondence performance is published here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customer-service-operations-data-november-2020

We are currently unable to break this down into complaints specifically related to BRP delays.

UVKI does not hold figures relating to the number of customers who have waited longer than 10 working days to receive their BRP after a positive decision between 2018 and 2020.

However, it does have service level agreements with its production provider the Driver and Vehicle Licencing Agency (DVLA) and its secure delivery provider FedEx which took over the contract in February 2020. Prior to this, DX held the contract.

The DVLA has a target of producing 90% of BRPs within 24 hours of receiving the production request and 100% within 48 hours. It achieved the following:

Financial Year

24 hour target

48 hour target

Outside of 48 hours

2018/19

96.8%

99.4%

0.6%

2019/20

93.9%

100.00

0

2020/21 (to 5/2/21)

72.4%

97.4%

2.6%

FedEx and DX both had a target to attempt first delivery for 99% of BRPs within 48 working hours of collection of the BRP from DVLA.

DX consistently met this target during the years it had responsibility for the contract. For financial year 2020 to end December 2020 FedEx were achieving 94.4%. UKVI is working closely with FedEx to improve this performance and an improvement plan is in place to achieve this.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many UKVI applications have had an official positive decision implemented at a different time from family members under the same application in (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) in 2020.

The Home Office are unable to state how many UKVI applications have had an official positive decision implemented at a different time from family members under the same application in 2018, 2019 and 2020 as this information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Asylum claims may include one or more family members who are accepted as dependant on the principal applicants claim. It is important to fully consider all the evidence available, including that provided by dependants or other family members who have made claims in their own right, and to recognise protection issues which may arise in the family context when considering such claims.

Dependants of an asylum applicant who have been included in the initial asylum claim will, if the principal applicant is granted Asylum, HP, Family or Private Life leave to remain (LTR) or Discretionary Leave, normally be granted leave of the same duration and status as the principal applicant

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)