Angela Crawley Portrait

Angela Crawley

Scottish National Party - Lanark and Hamilton East

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Defence Procurement)

(since January 2020)

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Attorney General)

(since February 2021)
Women and Equalities Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 25th May 2021
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Pensions)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Youth affairs)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Children and Families)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Equalities)
1st Jul 2018 - 7th Jan 2020
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Disabilities)
20th Jun 2017 - 7th Jan 2020
Health and Social Care Committee
13th May 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Women and Equalities Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Family Support)
20th Jun 2017 - 1st Jul 2018
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Housing)
20th Jun 2017 - 1st Jul 2018
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Child Maintenance)
20th Jun 2017 - 1st Jul 2018
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Equalities, Women and Children)
20th May 2015 - 1st Jul 2018
Women and Equalities Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Department Event
Tuesday 5th July 2022
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
5 Jul 2022, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 5th July 2022
14:00
Justice Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The role of adult custodial remand in the criminal justice system
5 Jul 2022, 2 p.m.
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Peter Dawson - Director at Prison Reform Trust
Penelope Gibbs - Director at Transform Justice
Professor Anthea Hucklesby - Professor of Criminal Justice and Head of the School of Social Policy at University of Birmingham
At 3.30pm: Oral evidence
Professor Mark Elliott - Professor of Public Law and Chair of the Faculty of Law at University of Cambridge
Professor Gavin Phillipson - Professor of Law at University of Bristol
Professor Guglielmo Verdirame QC - Professor of International Law at King's College London, and Barrister at Twenty Essex Chambers
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Scheduled Event
Wednesday 6th July 2022
Ten Minute Rule Motion - Main Chamber
Miscarriage Leave: Ten Minute Rule Motion
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Department Event
Thursday 7th July 2022
10:10
Attorney General
Oral questions - Main Chamber
7 Jul 2022, 10:10 a.m.
Attorney General
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Monday 18th July 2022
14:30
Ministry of Defence
Oral questions - Main Chamber
18 Jul 2022, 2:30 p.m.
Defence (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 20th September 2022
11:30
Ministry of Justice
Oral questions - Main Chamber
20 Sep 2022, 11:30 a.m.
Justice (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Thursday 22nd September 2022
10:10
Attorney General
Oral questions - Main Chamber
22 Sep 2022, 10:10 a.m.
Attorney General
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 29th June 2022
Northern Ireland Troubles (Legacy and Reconciliation) Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 27 Scottish National Party Aye votes vs 0 Scottish National Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 191 Noes - 271
Speeches
Thursday 30th June 2022
50 Years of Pride in the UK
I beg to move,

That this House has considered 50 years of Pride in the UK.

It is a huge …
Written Answers
Tuesday 28th June 2022
Travel: Documents
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many permission to travel letters have been reissued by …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 22nd June 2022
Time Deli Hamilton
That this House congratulates Time Deli in Hamilton on their success in the 2022 Lanarkshire Retail Business Awards; recognises the …
Bills
Monday 21st June 2021
Miscarriage Leave Bill 2021-22
A Bill to make provision for paid leave for people who have experienced miscarriage.
MP Financial Interests
None available
EDM signed
Wednesday 8th June 2022
Gypsy, Roma, and Traveller History Month 2022
That this House notes that during the month of June 2022 it is Gypsy, Roma and Traveller History Month; further …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Angela Crawley has voted in 321 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

20 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Angela Crawley voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and against the House
One of 3 Scottish National Party No votes vs 2 Scottish National Party Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 307 Noes - 185
View All Angela Crawley Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Anne McLaughlin (Scottish National Party)
Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Immigration, Asylum and Border Control)
(13 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(10 debate interactions)
Robert Buckland (Conservative)
(6 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(16 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(15 debate contributions)
Ministry of Justice
(8 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Angela Crawley's debates

Lanark and Hamilton East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Lanark and Hamilton East signature proportion
Petitions with most Lanark and Hamilton East signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

We have the second most expensive childcare system in the world. A full time place costs, on average, £14,000 per year, making it completely unaffordable for many families. Parents are forced to leave their jobs or work fewer hours, which has a negative impact on the economy and on child poverty.


Latest EDMs signed by Angela Crawley

22nd June 2022
Angela Crawley signed this EDM as the primary signatory on Wednesday 22nd June 2022

Time Deli Hamilton

Tabled by: Angela Crawley (Scottish National Party - Lanark and Hamilton East)
That this House congratulates Time Deli in Hamilton on their success in the 2022 Lanarkshire Retail Business Awards; recognises the hard work of mother and daughter team Lisa and Linda, as well as their excellent team of staff, in developing a successful business since starting the venture in 2017; celebrates …
3 signatures
(Most recent: 23 Jun 2022)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 3
11th May 2022
Angela Crawley signed this EDM on Wednesday 8th June 2022

Killing of Shireen Abu Akleh

Tabled by: Grahame Morris (Labour - Easington)
That this House is shocked by the killing of Al-Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh by Israeli forces whilst reporting on raids in Jenin; extends its sincere condolences to her family and colleagues who are devastated? by her death; is appalled that this widely-respected, brave and committed journalist was hit by …
59 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Jun 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 29
Scottish National Party: 19
Independent: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All Angela Crawley's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Angela Crawley, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Angela Crawley has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Angela Crawley has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Angela Crawley


A Bill to make provision for paid leave for people who have experienced miscarriage.


Last Event - 2nd Reading (Commons)
Friday 6th May 2022

A Bill to make provision about workers’ rights; to amend the definition of worker; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Monday 21st June 2021

Angela Crawley has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


109 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent discussions he has had with Ofgem on (a) differing forms of power production, (b) their differing costs to produce power and (c) the influence of those on setting the market price of a MWHr.

The Renewables Obligation Order (RO) and Contracts for Difference (CfD) sustainability criteria require that electricity generation from biomass does not exceed a set greenhouse gas threshold and produces life-cycle emission savings:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/contracts-for-difference-cfd-allocation-round-4-standard-terms-and-conditions

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/renewables-obligation-sustainability-criteria.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with Ofgem on the (a) energy price cap rise and (b) its criteria of setting the price of a MWHr.

It is Ofgem’s role, as the independent regulator, to set a fair level for the price cap. Legislation sets out that Ofgem must review the level of the cap at least once every 6 months to ensure the cap appropriately reflects the underlying costs of energy, and the need to ensure that energy suppliers who operate efficiently are able to finance their activities.

Ofgem robustly developed and widely consulted on their methodology for determining the cap level, which was last published on 4 February 2022.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to mitigate the impact the energy price cap increase on customers.

The Government is committed to ensuring that support is provided to help consumers deal with the impact of high wholesale energy costs.

In response to the recent energy price cap increase, my Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer has announced a package of support to help households with rising energy bills, worth £9.1 billion in 2022-23. This includes a £200 rebate for households delivered via their energy bill this autumn, a £150 non-repayable reduction in Council Tax bills for all households in Bands A-D in England and £144 million of discretionary funding for Local Authorities to support households who need support but are not eligible for the Council Tax reduction. In Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, delivery of the council tax rebate will depend on how the Devolved Administrations choose to structure their support; they have flexibility to determine how they use their Barnett funding.

In addition to these measures, the Government will continue to provide support to vulnerable consumers through the Warm Home Discount Scheme, which this winter is providing over 2 million households a £140 rebate off their energy bill each winter. The Government has announced that the rebate will be increasing to £150 and will help an extra 780,000 households next winter. Further, Winter Fuel Payments and Cold Weather Payments help ensure the most vulnerable are better able to heat their homes over the colder months.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions his Department has had with Ofgem on the rise in the energy price cap.

Decisions on the level of the price cap are for Ofgem. The government is in regular contact with Ofgem and industry to discuss the impact of unprecedented global gas prices and will continue to monitor the situation closely to ensure consumers are protected.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what organisations and stakeholders he has met to discuss the potential merits of a four-day working week.

A four-day working week may work well for some workers and employers. However, the Government does not believe there can be a ‘one size fits all’ approach to work arrangements. That is why we put individual agency and choice at the heart of our consultation on “making flexible working the default”, which closed on 1st December 2021. We are currently reviewing the responses and will respond in due course.

BEIS Ministers attend the Flexible Working Taskforce, which is co-chaired by senior officials and the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development. This considers how to support flexible working in all its forms. The Taskforce’s membership comprises representatives from 16 external organisations including trade unions, voluntary sector organisations, and business groups.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to implement trials of a four-day working week in the UK public sector on similar basis to those underway in Scotland and Ireland.

The Government has no plans to implement trials of a four-day working week in the UK Civil Service.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to publish the Government's proposed Employment Bill.

The Employment Bill is a core part of Building Back Better, supporting the Government’s aim to build a high skilled, high productivity, high wage economy that delivers on our ambition to make the UK the best place in the world to work and grow a business. COVID-19 is having a profound impact on the labour market, so it is right that we introduce the Employment Bill when we are sure it will address the needs of businesses and workers in the post-Covid economy. We will bring forward the Employment Bill when the Parliamentary time allows it. In the meantime, we will continue to take necessary action to support businesses and protect jobs.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to counter the practice of intentionally shortening the lifespan of consumer products through planned obsolescence.

Subject to the outcome of two public consultations, later this year, the Government plans to introduce ecodesign measures that promote the repairability of consumer products, such as household fridges, washing machines and televisions, in order to increase their lifespan. These measures aim to improve the resource efficiency of energy related products and this will include ensuring that spare parts are available for a minimum of seven years after the placing of new products on the market. They will also ensure that parts can be replaced with the use of commonly available tools, tackling premature obsolescence. We are also seeking powers through the Environment Bill that will enable government to require products to carry information for example relating to product lifetimes, durability and reparability.

Our forthcoming world class energy-related products framework will push products to use even less energy and material resources, in order to reduce carbon emissions and consumer bills, and improve resource productivity.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support travel agents during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises the outbound travel sector has been particularly hard hit by covid-19, and we will continue to engage regularly with ABTA and its members about the sector’s recovery.

Businesses in the outbound travel sector have been able to access Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme, the loan schemes, VAT deferrals and cash grants of up to £25,000 for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses, as well as a broad range of other economic support.

Additionally, on 18 July the Government announced that ATOL-protected holidaymakers can book with confidence following confirmation that the Government will protect refund credit notes offered if packages are cancelled as a result of COVID-19.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Bounce Back Loan Scheme, whether the accreditation process for prospective new lenders can be prioritised so that support from that scheme is available to an increased number of small businesses.

Accrediting new lenders for the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) is a priority for the British Business Bank. The Bank is working at pace to accredit more lenders to further extend the Scheme’s reach and provide more choice for smaller businesses.

The Bank has put substantial additional resources in place to create a streamlined process within the Bank to help onboard new lenders seeking accreditation as quickly as possible. For example, existing lenders accredited under the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) may have an expedited accreditation process for the BBLS.

There are currently 16 accredited lenders for the BBLS.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether accredited lenders that assess applications to the Bounce Back Loan Scheme make their assessments (a) based on the applicant's individual merit and (b) not based on the applicant's status as a current business customer.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) has been introduced to help small and medium-sized businesses to borrow between £2,000 and £50,000. Businesses are not required to bank with a lender in order to apply for a Bounce Back Loan with them. A full list of accredited lenders can be found on the British Business Bank website.

To be eligible for the scheme, businesses must:

  • be based in the UK
  • have been negatively affected by coronavirus
  • not have been an ‘undertaking in difficulty’ on 31 December 2019
  • not already be claiming under:

o Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS)

o Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBILS)

o COVID-19 Corporate Financing Facility

To apply for the scheme businesses must complete a short, simple, online application form, meaning that applications can be submitted and processed rapidly. Businesses should then be able to access loans within a matter of days. The Government is providing lenders with a 100% guarantee on each loan to give them the confidence they need to support the smallest businesses in the country.

The Government continues to work with banks and other finance providers to help SMEs access the finance they need.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to safeguard supplies of (a) gas and (b) electricity during the covid-19 outbreak.

Great Britain has a reliable energy system and maintaining a safe and secure energy supply is a key priority for this Government.

Since the start of the Covid-19 outbreak, we have been in daily contact with gas and electricity operators, the National Grid Electricity System Operator (ESO), National Grid Gas (NGG), and Ofgem, to ensure our electricity and gas supplies are secure.

We have received assurance from all critical gas and electricity operators that they have contingency plans in place to mitigate the impacts of Covid-19; and we are closely monitoring staff absenteeism levels, as well as the supply of key commodities.

Currently, electricity and gas margins are adequate and there is sufficient supply to meet demand. The implementation of the Government policies to delay the spread of Covid-19 is resulting in a measurable reduction in the national demand for electricity and gas.

We are confident that electricity and gas supplies will keep flowing.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of introducing a freelance performers support scheme to support (a) the arts and (b) community attendance of covid-secure live cultural events.

The Government recognises the significant challenge the current pandemic poses to our world-beating cultural and creative industries and to the many individuals and freelancers working across the sector. We are working very hard to help freelancers in those sectors access support.

According to the latest statistics (published on the 25th November), over two thirds of all those who are self-employed in the country have been eligible for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme. Those statistics showed that 76,000 self employed people in the arts, entertainment and recreation sector got SEISS support in phase 1 earlier this year, and 72,000 in phase 2.

Of the £119m available through Arts Council England as part of their Covid emergency support, over £26m has been distributed to individuals, including freelance workers, and organisations via the Emergency Relief Fund and Project Grants Funding (as of 5 November 2020).

Within the £26m, £17m has been distributed to individuals via ACE’s Emergency Response Fund (now closed) and c.£9m has so far been distributed to both organisations and individuals via Project Grants (out of a total of c.£80m available until April 2021).

In addition to the two Funds above, the £119m also includes the following:

  • £6 million distributed by a series of Benevolent Funds focused on self employed individuals; and

  • £18 million available through their Developing Your Creative Practice Fund

The £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) is also benefiting freelancers. Around 40% of CRF awards have gone to non-building based companies (and building based companies are also likely to employ significant numbers of contracted employees), and it is estimated that around 12.5% of business costs by CRF recipients will go to freelancers, artists and casual events staff.

Under the new Tiers which came into force in England on 2 December live audiences are permitted in indoor covid secure venues in Tiers 1 and 2 in line with the capacity caps now in place and provided social distancing is maintained in line with the Performing Arts Guidance.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of a freelance performers support scheme during the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise the crucial role that individuals play in making our arts and creative industries world-leading. As a result of the £1.57 billion Culture Renewal Fund, organisations will be more able to resume cultural activity, albeit in a socially distanced way, which will increase employment opportunities for freelancers.

Each organisation that receives money will know what best they can do to support their workforce, including their freelance workforce.

To complement Government Funding, ACE have made over £115m of funding available for individuals, including freelancers, to apply to. That includes:

  • £17.1m through the Emergency Response Fund for individuals;

  • £18m through their Developing Your Creative Practice fund;

  • £75m through National Lottery Project Grants (available to both individuals and orgs); and

  • £6m distributed by a series of Benevolent Funds focused on the self employed.

4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 27 April 2020 to Question 38620 on access to superfast broadband, what measures to support connectivity for vulnerable customers he has agreed with telecommunication providers.

In response to Covid-19, my Department has agreed a package of measures with the UK’s major fixed and mobile providers to support and protect vulnerable consumers, and those who may become vulnerable, with their connectivity needs. This package came into effect on 29 March 2020.

Providers have committed to supporting their customers facing difficulties in paying their bills, removing data caps on all current fixed broadband packages, and giving customers new and generous offers on mobile and landline services (such as data boosts at low prices and free landline calls).

Additionally, providers have committed to giving those who are vulnerable, or have been asked to self-isolate, alternative methods of communication if their fixed broadband services cannot be repaired in the event of faults.

12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which organisations he has met that are (a) in favour and (b) opposed to the Government’s proposed ban on trophy hunting imports to the UK in the last five years.

Ministers and officials have engaged with a wide range of stakeholders with differing views on trophy hunting over the last 5 years. This has included NGOs, industry representatives, scientists, and foreign government representatives.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he will bring forward legislation to ban the import of hunting trophies into the UK.

We will be bringing forward ambitious legislation to ban the import of hunting trophies from thousands of species as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the value to the UK economy of the trade of trophy hunting imports in the last (a) 12 months, (b) five years and (c) 10 years.

The UK recorded 26 imports of hunting trophies under CITES in 2020, 327 imports in the five years from 2016 to 2020, and 731 imports in the ten years from 2011 to 2020.

As hunting trophies are considered personal effects, the commercial value of the items themselves is limited. Responses to the call for evidence, which ran from 2 November 2019 to 25 February 2020, suggested that the value to the UK economy of the trade of hunting trophy imports is likely to be low.

Further information will be published when legislation is brought forward in due course.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Feb 2021
What assessment she has made of the effect of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the (a) shellfish and (b) fishing industries.

The TCA is a good deal for British fishermen, it recognises UK sovereignty over our fishing waters, delivers an immediate uplift in quota for the UK fleet and ensures there are zero tariffs on trade in UK and EU goods. We continue to support the industry through the unique circumstances created by the COVID pandemic and adjusting to the new requirements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of including more language options for UK driving theory tests.

There are no plans to reintroduce voiceovers, or interpreters, on theory and practical tests.

A consultation exercise on the level of foreign language support during theory and practical tests showed that over 70% of respondents supported removing voiceovers and interpreters on tests. The research showed that people were worried and concerned that if tests were conducted in languages other than English, then road safety may be impacted, and fraud may occur.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with the PCS union on ensuring that DVLA staff have a covid-secure working environment.

Discussions between the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) and the Public and Commercial Services Union (PCS) about staff safety in relation to Covid-19 began before the initial lockdown was announced and have been ongoing throughout. The Department for Transport has also been involved in those discussions where appropriate.

Staff safety remains an absolute priority for the department and the DVLA and all appropriate measures have been put in place.

The PCS has made clear that our proposals are acceptable in terms of addressing their staff safety concerns.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the timescales are for implementing the recommendations of the Global Travel Taskforce, published on 24 November 2020.

From its inception the Global Travel Taskforce was a time-limited body, and it has now concluded its work.

However, the Government is working closely and at pace with industry and our international partners to implement the taskforce recommendations and ensure a safe and sustainable return to international travel as quickly as possible.

The taskforce recommendations addressed three priorities: implementing effective public health measures; encouraging safe growth in demand; and driving a co-ordinated response with global partners.

As a first step, on 15 December the Government introduced the ‘Test to Release for International Travel’ scheme in England, allowing arrivals to pay for a privately provided Covid-19 test and reduce their required period of self-isolation if the test is negative.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the Global Travel Taskforce next plans to convene to discuss the outstanding recommendations from its report, published on 24 November 2020.

From its inception the Global Travel Taskforce was a time-limited body, and it has now concluded its work.

However, the Government is working closely and at pace with industry and our international partners to implement the taskforce recommendations and ensure a safe and sustainable return to international travel as quickly as possible.

The taskforce recommendations addressed three priorities: implementing effective public health measures; encouraging safe growth in demand; and driving a co-ordinated response with global partners.

As a first step, on 15 December the Government introduced the ‘Test to Release for International Travel’ scheme in England, allowing arrivals to pay for a privately provided Covid-19 test and reduce their required period of self-isolation if the test is negative.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which commercial aviation routes are being prioritised as part of the Government's plans to support the restart of the aviation sector in response to the covid-19 pandemic.

The Government recognises the challenging times facing the aviation sector?as a result of?COVID-19 and is committed to tackling this virus while enabling a sustainable and responsible return to travel.

Commercial air transport routes are a matter for airlines, and therefore decisions on how soon to operate a route after a period of inactivity is a matter for those airlines.

Since 10 July under the Travel Corridor policy, passengers arriving from a number of countries and territories are no longer required to self-isolate on arrival unless they have visited or transited through a non-exempt country or territory. Ministerial decisions on Travel Corridors are informed by risk assessments provided by the Joint Biosecurity Centre, working closely with Public Health England, using a methodology endorsed by the 4 Chief Medical Officers of the UK.

As a further measure in support of international travel, the Test to Release scheme was launched on 15 December. This provides passengers arriving in England with the option to shorten the self-isolation period by up to half following a negative COVID-19 test.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with the aerospace sector since August 2020 on aerospace and aviation restart and recovery.

The Government is working closely with the UK’s aerospace industry, including at sector level through the Aerospace Growth Partnership, to help retain jobs and return the sector to growth as soon as possible.

The Global Travel Taskforce has also undertaken extensive engagement with the transport industry, international partners, the tourism sector, business leaders, and the private testing sector and invited submissions from all of these partners on its work. The Taskforce has received contributions from a wide range of partners, including the aerospace industry, and is due to report its recommendations to the Prime Minister in November.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to implement a covid-19 testing system (a) to enable international travel to and from the UK by the end of the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown (b) that would remove the need for a 14-day quarantine for travellers returning from international destinations.

The Government is actively working on the practicalities of using testing to release people from self-isolation earlier than 14 days. The Global Travel Taskforce is working at pace to consider how testing, technology and innovation can drive a recovery for international travel and tourism, without adding to infection risk or infringing on our overall NHS test capacity.

The taskforce will report to the Prime Minister no later than November, setting out recommendations for how the UK can support the recovery of international travel. I will update the House on its conclusions and outputs shortly.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how long the Global Travel Taskforce is planned to be in operation.

The Government is actively working on the practicalities of using testing to release people from self-isolation earlier than 14 days. The Global Travel Taskforce is working at pace to consider how testing, technology and innovation can drive a recovery for international travel and tourism, without adding to infection risk or infringing on our overall NHS test capacity.

The taskforce will report to the Prime Minister no later than November, setting out recommendations for how the UK can support the recovery of international travel. I will update the House on its conclusions and outputs shortly.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which commercial aviation routes are planned to be prioritised when a covid-19 testing infrastructure is introduced by the Government.

The Government is actively working on the practicalities of using testing to release people from self-isolation earlier than 14 days. The Global Travel Taskforce is working at pace to consider how testing, technology and innovation can drive a recovery for international travel and tourism, without adding to infection risk or infringing on our overall NHS test capacity.

The taskforce will report to the Prime Minister no later than November, setting out recommendations for how the UK can support the recovery of international travel. I will update the House on its conclusions and outputs shortly.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that adequate hygiene precautions are undertaken by all (a) drivers and (b) staff employed at distribution company depots during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department is working very closely with the logistics industry to keep supply chains moving, including to address this and other matters to keep workers safe. Public Health England updated their advice on 24 March and further work with Public Health England is ongoing.

My colleague Baroness Vere has reiterated in writing the need for guidance to be followed and truck drivers to be allowed access to facilities including toilets, which is consistent with the Public Health England advice.

11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether asylum seekers are able to access tailored job search support upon resettlement in the UK.

Most asylum seekers in the UK do not currently have the right to work and are therefore not eligible to access DWP employment services.


Employment support is however available to refugees and those entering the UK as part of a resettlement scheme which is delivered by the Home Office. Local Jobcentre Managers have considerable flexibility and expertise to provide tailored support to meet individual needs as required.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential impact of the removal of the £20 universal credit uplift on child poverty in (a) Lanark and Hamilton East constituency and (b) other areas of deprivation.

It is not possible to produce a robust estimate of the impact of removing the £20 uplift on child poverty. This is particularly the case at the moment given the uncertainty around the speed of the economic recovery, and how this will be distributed across the population.

The Chancellor announced a temporary six-month extension to the £20 per week uplift at the Budget on 3 March to support households affected by the economic shock of Covid-19. Universal Credit has provided a vital safety net for six million people during the pandemic, and the temporary uplift was part of a COVID support package worth a total of £407 billion in 2020-21 and 2021-22.

There have been significant positive developments in the public health situation since the uplift was first introduced. With the success of the vaccine rollout and record job vacancies, it is right that our focus is on helping people back into work. Helping parents to move into and remain in work offers the best opportunity for families to move out of poverty and to improve children’s long-term outcomes. A child living in a household where every adult is working is about 5 times less likely to be in absolute poverty (before housing costs) than a child in a household where nobody works.

Through our Plan for Jobs, we are targeting tailored support schemes of people of all ages to help them prepare for, get into and progress in work. These include: Kickstart, delivering tens of thousands of six-month work placements for Universal Credit claimants aged 16-24 at risk of unemployment; Restart, which provides 12 months’ intensive employment support to Universal Credit claimants who are unemployed for a year; and JETS, which provides light touch employment support for people who are claiming either Universal Credit or New Style Jobseekers Allowance, for up to 6 months, helping participants effectively re-engage with the labour market and focus their job search. We have also recruited an additional 13,500 work coaches to provide more intensive support to find a job. In total, our Plan for Jobs interventions will support more than two million people.

This Government is wholly committed to supporting those on low incomes, and continues to do so through many measures, including by increasing the living wage, and by spending over £111 billion on welfare support for people of working age in 2021/22.

This year, we are also investing up to £220m in the Holiday Activities and Food programme, which has been expanded to every Local Authority across England. Participating children will benefit from a range of support, including a healthy and nutritious meal as well as fun and engaging activities covering the Easter, summer and Christmas holidays in 2021. We also increased the value of Healthy Start Food Vouchers from £3.10 to £4.25 in April, which helps eligible low income households buy basic foods like milk, fruit and vitamins.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what financial support is available to people who have been diagnosed with long covid.

People who are under State Pension Age and have a disability or health condition that affects their ability to work can apply for New Style Employment and Support Allowance (NS ESA), subject to the wider eligibility criteria.

Where an individual is not furloughed, and they are sick or incapable of work, they may be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay from their employer subject to satisfying entitlement conditions.

In addition, where an individual’s income is reduced while off work sick and they require further financial support, they may be able to receive Universal Credit, depending on their personal circumstances. Those with long term health conditions may also be eligible for help with the additional costs that can arise from a long-term health condition or disability through Personal Independence Payment, Attendance Allowance or Disability Living Allowance, depending on their age.

6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people are in receipt of (a) employment support allowance and (b) personal independence payment as a result of a long covid diagnosis.

In relation to your question on Employment and Support Allowance (ESA), Information on lower level medical conditions is not currently available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

The available information on the number of Employment and Support Allowance claimants by high level medical conditions is published here:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

In respect of your question on Personal Independence Payment (PIP), the information you requested is not held by the Department. A specific diagnosis code for Long Covid does not exist in the PIP Computer System. Claimants who experience Long Covid symptoms will have a disability recorded that links with the claimant’s functional needs.

Statistics on the number PIP Claims with Entitlement broken down by disability for each month from April 2013 – October 2020 is published on Stat-Xplore:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she has taken to provide additional (a) financial and (b) other support for people on legacy benefits during the covid-19 outbreak.

We have introduced a balanced package of support for people who are affected by the effects of Covid 19. This includes over £6.5 billion of extra support through the welfare system as part of the unprecedented series of measures, announced by the Chancellor, to support businesses and their employees to mitigate the impact of COVID-19.

For Jobseeker’s Allowance we have ensured that any periods of sickness experienced by a person who, is infected or contaminated with coronavirus, in self-isolation or caring for a child or qualifying young person in their household who is infected, will not count towards the maximum permitted number of sickness periods applicable to a claimant, whilst in receipt of that benefit. This means entitlement can continue if this causes them to exceed the maximum of 13 weeks in a 12-month period.

We have also introduced a range of additional measures to support legacy claimants deal with the impacts of the Covid 19 pandemic. We made the decision to temporarily suspend the requirement for face-to-face Jobcentre Plus appointments from 19 March for all claimants on Universal Credit, new styles Employment and Support Allowance and Jobseeker’s Allowance, and legacy benefits. Claimants will continue to receive benefits as normal and they will not be sanctioned for not taking part in appointments with Jobcentres.

We also removed waiting days for ESA for claimants affected by Covid-19, so it will be payable from day one of the claim, subject to the claimant satisfying the normal conditions of entitlement.

We have increased the Local Housing Allowance rates for private renters claiming Housing Benefit to the 30th percentile of local rents. As a result, Housing Benefit claimants will gain on average an additional £600 this year in increased housing support. In addition, we have increased the additional earnings disregard in Housing Benefit from £17.10 to £37.10 per week to ensure that the increase of approximately £20 a week we have introduced to the basic element of Working Tax Credit is not clawed back.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of the proposal from Citizens Advice to establish a Crisis Minimum Income of £180 per week for people affected by the covid-19 outbreak.

There are no plans to introduce a crisis minimum income at this time.

The Government has been clear in its commitment to support those affected in these difficult times and we have made a number of changes to the welfare system to ensure people are receiving the support they need. These changes include:

  • making it easier to access benefits. Those applying for Contributory ESA will be able to claim from day 1 – as opposed to day 8 - and we have removed the need for face-to-face assessment. Both Universal Credit and Contributory ESA can now be claimed by phone or online;
  • increasing the standard rate of Universal Credit and working tax credit for this year by around £1000 per year;
  • temporarily relaxing the application of the Minimum Income Floor (MIF) for all self-employed claimants affected by the economic impact of COVID-19 to ensure that the self-employed can access UC at a more generous rate;
  • making Statutory Sick Pay available from day 1 – as opposed to day 4 - where an eligible individual is sick or self-isolating; and
  • increasing the Local Housing Allowance rates for Universal Credit and Housing Benefit claimants so that it covers at least 30% of the market rents in an area – which is on average £600 in people’s pockets.

Taken together, these measures represent an injection of over £6.5 billion into the welfare system and, along with other job and business support programmes announced by the Chancellor, represent one of the most comprehensive packages of support introduced by an advanced economy in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the feasibility of allowing personal independence payments to continue without assessment during the covid-19 outbreak.

As both the Prime Minister and Chancellor have made clear, the Government will do whatever it takes to support people affected by COVID 19 and we have been clear in our intention that everyone should be supported to do the right thing.

24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to his oral contribution of 27 January 2020, Official Report, column 525 and pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2020 to Question 7257, on Social Security Benefits: Medical Examinations, if he will make an assessment of the compatibility of his statement that 82 per cent of personal independence payment claimants were satisfied and the results in the table provided in that answer.

The 82% referenced in my oral contribution of 27 January 2020, referred to the overall satisfaction of PIP claimants in 2017/18 as published in the “Claimant Service and Experience Survey 2017/18”, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dwp-claimant-service-and-experience-survey-2017-to-2018

PIP Assessment Providers, Independent Assessment Services (IAS) and Capita, have a separate Claimant Satisfaction target, set at 90%. They have consistently exceeded this target since the measurement began in 2016.

12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will take steps to bring forward to date to extend the repayment period for universal credit advances to 16 months from October 2021.

The Department has announced that from October 2021, the repayment period for these advances will be extended further to 16 months. There are no plans to introduce this earlier.

Claimants can access up to 100% of their total expected Universal Credit monthly award, which they can pay back over a period of up to 12 months. Proposed repayments of the advance are explained in advance, and all claimants are advised to request a level of advance which is manageable when considering the repayments required. Work Coaches gauge claimants’ financial needs from their first interview. For those who need help with budgeting, we can signpost to additional support, for example through the Money and Pensions Service (MaPS), who can help with personal budgeting and money management through its free helpline, printed guides and digital guidance.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Written Ministerial Statement of 11 February 2020, HCWS104, on Personal Independence Payment, what recent estimate she has made of (a) number of claimants to still be reviewed, (b) the number of claimants entitled to a higher award, and (c) the associated estimated cost.

Management information at 5 January 2020 shows that so far we have cleared 720,000 cases under the MH decision and 820,000 cases under the RJ decision.

Continuous monitoring of the outcomes of the administrative exercise has shown which cases are most likely to benefit from the exercise. We remain on track to complete the exercise in 2020.

Claimants unlikely to benefit will be contacted in writing and provided with the information they need to decide whether they might be affected. If they feel they may be affected they will be offered the opportunity for their case to be reviewed.

We are currently re-estimating the number of claimants and associated costs as further data on the number of claimants with revised awards has become available as part of our continuous monitoring of the exercise.

9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what progress she has made on the introduction of a single digital platform for personal independence payments, employment and support allowance and universal credit assessment services.

We remain committed to delivering the new single, integrated assessment service for health assessments across PIP, ESA and UC. We are developing the new digital service and are already using it in a small number of assessment centres. To date the service has handled over 300 assessments. We are using feedback from DWP staff, service users, our assessment providers, and wider stakeholders to involve them in the design of our digital service, making sure we deliver a more user-friendly, streamlined process.

9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many complaints her Department has received in relation to (a) ATOS and (b) Maximus health assessments in the last 12 months.

Any complaint received by the department relating solely to the service provided by the Assessment Provider is passed to them to action. Providers have their own complaints process to deal with dissatisfaction about the service they provide.

Information on the total number of complaints received by Independent Assessment Service (IAS), formally ATOS and Centre for Health and Disability Assessments (CHDA), which is a MAXIMUS company, for the period January 2019 to December 2019 are shown in the table below.

Assessment Provider

Total number of complaints received

Complaints as a percentage of assessments

IAS (prev ATOS)

6,140

0.91%

CHDA

3,640

0.45%

* All data collated from provider MI, all numbers rounded to the nearest 10

9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment she has made of the effectiveness of universal credit.

Universal Credit has now rolled out in every Jobcentre with a caseload of 2.7 million, growing every month, now able to access the additional support and flexibilities it offers. The latest data shows the proportion of all Universal Credit claims that received their full payment on time was over 95 per cent.

The Universal Credit Full Service Claimant Survey (June 2018) shows that 9 months into a Universal Credit claim, 40 per cent of claimants are working for an employer in a paid role, as opposed to only 23 per cent at the start of their claim, and people on Universal Credit spend around 50% more time looking for a job than they did under Jobseeker’s Allowance. 86 per cent of people on Universal Credit were actively looking to increase their hours, compared to just 38 per cent of people on Jobseeker’s Allowance. This is because they can take on more hours without losing their benefit.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
26th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many UK manufactured covid-19 lateral flow tests are being reviewed by the UK Health Security Agency.

As at 28 January 2022, no lateral flow device (LFD) tests from either United Kingdom or overseas manufacturers have been approved under the Medical Devices (Coronavirus Test Device Approvals) (Amendment) Regulations 2021 since 1 September 2021. The UK Health Security Agency is currently reviewing sixteen applications for LFD tests to be approved from applicants with a UK address. Information on the location where the tests will be manufactured is not collected.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many UK manufactured covid-19 lateral flow tests have been approved by the UK Health Security Agency since 1 September 2021.

As at 28 January 2022, no lateral flow device (LFD) tests from either United Kingdom or overseas manufacturers have been approved under the Medical Devices (Coronavirus Test Device Approvals) (Amendment) Regulations 2021 since 1 September 2021. The UK Health Security Agency is currently reviewing sixteen applications for LFD tests to be approved from applicants with a UK address. Information on the location where the tests will be manufactured is not collected.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps he has taken to increase funding for mental health research.

The Department funds research through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). In 2020-21, the NIHR spent £109.5 million on mental health research. While it is not usual practice to ring-fence funds for particular topics or conditions, the NIHR’s funding is available through open competition for mental health and we encourage researchers to submit applications in this area. We are also funding the Mental Health Research Initiative to expand current activity and build the capacity and capability of mental health research in regions which are currently underrepresented.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the financial effect on dementia research charities of the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will increase funding for dementia research.

The Department is closely liaising with the Association of Medical Research Charities, as well as individual dementia charities, to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on this sector and identify how best the Government and charities can work together to ensure that patients continue benefiting from charity funded research.

The Government remains strongly committed to supporting research to combat dementia. The Government’s Challenge on Dementia 2020 contained the commitment to spend £300 million on dementia research over the five years to March 2020. This commitment was delivered a year early with £341 million spent on dementia research over the four years to 31 March 2019.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much the Government spent on developing its NHSX contact tracing app.

To date the cost of developing the National Health Service COVID-19 app is £10.8 million.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance she is issuing to public health officers to take into account a person’s wellbeing and personal requirements under schedule 20 of the Coronavirus Bill.

The guidance issued by the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care to public health officers will include guidance on wellbeing and personal circumstances. However, public health officers are trained in taking into account a person’s wellbeing. This will be no different for responding to someone suspected of having COVID-19.

The guidance to public health officers (PHOs) will set out that a PHO should give particular consideration to the needs of people with protected characteristics for example, the needs of children, the elderly, those with disabilities, those with existing medical conditions, those with mental health conditions, those who are pregnant, those who may not speak English, and any other groups on whom the impact of those requirements might be greater than would otherwise be the case. For example, individuals with mobility needs may need to be provided with appropriate accommodation and adjustments made if they are to be placed into supported isolation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what restrictions she plans to place on a person’s (a) movements or travel, (b) activities and (c) contact with others after assessment for covid-19.

On Monday 23 March, new COVID-19 measures came into effect in the United Kingdom. These measures have reduced day-to-day contact with other people in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The new measures include the following:

- Requiring people to stay at home, except for very limited purposes;

- Closing of certain businesses and venues; and

- Stopping of all gatherings of more than two people in public.

Individuals suspected of having COVID-19, who live alone, are required to stay at home for seven days from when the symptoms began. After the seven day period, if the individual no longer has a high temperature, they do not need to continue to self-isolate. Every citizen is instructed to comply with these all of new measures.

Further information can be found online at the following links:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/full-guidance-on-staying-at-home-and-away-from-others/full-guidance-on-staying-at-home-and-away-from-others

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance/stay-at-home-guidance-for-households-with-possible-coronavirus-covid-19-infection

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what methods of screening for covid-19 infection are to be used under schedule 20 of the Coronavirus Bill.

Screening may include requiring an individual to answer questions about their health or other relevant circumstances; produce supporting health documents; allow biological samples to be taken; and to provide suitable tracing information. Only those screening requirements which are deemed as necessary and proportionate will be used.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria will be used to determine the adequacy of assessment facility conditions for screening people for covid-19 infection under schedule 20 of the Coronavirus Bill.

Assessment facilities will be determined as adequate if there is availability of staff with the clinical expertise to take samples and/or medical history; staff have the relevant protective equipment; they are able to safely take biological samples; and the facility is cleaned appropriately.

A Public Health Officer will advise on what can be considered as a suitable facility including for those who are unable to self-isolate at home and will work with relevant authorities to ensure this.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria will be used to determine reasonable grounds for suspecting a person is potentially infected with covid-19 under the provisions on screening and assessment in schedule 20 of the Coronavirus Bill.

An individual will be deemed as being potentially infected with COVID-19 if they display symptoms associated with COVID-19; have travelled from a country which is considered high risk; or have come into close contact with anyone known or believed to have COVID-19.

In assessing whether there are reasonable grounds to suspect an individual may be infected, constables and immigration officers will have regard to public health guidance and, where practicable, consult public health officers to determine if it is necessary and proportionate to require that the individual undergo screening and assessment.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment she has made of Rwanda’s capacity to successfully integrate non-African refugees into society.

Rwanda has a strong history of welcoming refugees and protecting their rights. The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), commended Rwanda for their "excellent job integrating refugees" in December 2021. People relocated under the Migration and Economic Development Partnership will have all their needs looked after while their asylum claims are being considered in Rwanda. This includes safe and clean accommodation, food, healthcare and amenities. They will have full access to translators and will be able to access legal support to appeal decisions in Rwanda's courts. Rwanda's constitution includes a broad prohibition on discrimination. We have carried out a robust assessment of the country which demonstrates our commitment to fully evaluating whether Rwanda would be suitable for each potentially eligible person to be relocated.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment she has made of the capacity of the Rwandan Government to successfully integrate refugees into society.

Rwanda has a strong history of welcoming refugees and protecting their rights. The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), commended Rwanda for their "excellent job integrating refugees" in December 2021. People relocated under the Migration and Economic Development Partnership will have all their needs looked after while their asylum claims are being considered in Rwanda. This includes safe and clean accommodation, food, healthcare and amenities. They will have full access to translators and will be able to access legal support to appeal decisions in Rwanda's courts. Rwanda's constitution includes a broad prohibition on discrimination. We have carried out a robust assessment of the country which demonstrates our commitment to fully evaluating whether Rwanda would be suitable for each potentially eligible person to be relocated.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the levels of press freedom in Rwanda.

The UK Government firmly believes that a free media and vibrant civil society are vital for a healthy and well-functioning democracy. We discuss these issues regularly with the Government of Rwanda through our High Commission in Kigali and at Ministerial level, most recently on 18 May where I met Foreign Minister Biruta.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with the Hong Kong Government on border restrictions on people travelling from the UK.

We are in contact with the Hong Kong SAR Government to minimise the disruption to UK and Hong Kong families and businesses.

However it is the authorities in the country or territory a person wishes to travel to, who are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. The Hong Kong authorities have informed us that the decisions will be reviewed every two weeks.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking in preparation for the upcoming Financial Conduct Authority regulations for prepaid funeral plans to help ensure that people who have purchased plans from suppliers that do not apply for, or fail to receive, FCA approval will receive an equal plan from another provider or get a refund.

Safe Hands Funeral Plans has recently gone into administration. I am aware that the current situation will be distressing for customers of Safe Hands and can assure you that the Treasury continues to monitor the implementation of regulation in this sector closely.

I welcome the commitment from Dignity to provide funerals to Safe Hands’ customers for two weeks.

It is a regrettable fact that bringing a previously unregulated sector into regulation – whatever form that may take – creates a possibility that some providers are not able to meet the threshold for authorisation.

Where a provider is unable to obtain FCA authorisation because of underlying issues, it is important to understand that this is not an issue created by bringing the sector into regulation. Rather, bringing the sector into regulation exposes these unsustainable business models and prevents these problems from getting worse and impacting more consumers.

The FCA’s guidance is clear that providers who are not seeking or not able to obtain authorisation should either transfer their existing plans to a provider which is seeking authorisation, or wind down in an orderly way before regulation starts.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to safeguard the customers of (a) Safe Hands and (b) other prepaid funeral providers that may not abide by FCA regulations.

Safe Hands Funeral Plans has recently gone into administration. I am aware that the current situation will be distressing for customers of Safe Hands and can assure you that the Treasury continues to monitor the implementation of regulation in this sector closely.

I welcome the commitment from Dignity to provide funerals to Safe Hands’ customers for two weeks.

It is a regrettable fact that bringing a previously unregulated sector into regulation – whatever form that may take – creates a possibility that some providers are not able to meet the threshold for authorisation.

Where a provider is unable to obtain FCA authorisation because of underlying issues, it is important to understand that this is not an issue created by bringing the sector into regulation. Rather, bringing the sector into regulation exposes these unsustainable business models and prevents these problems from getting worse and impacting more consumers.

The FCA’s guidance is clear that providers who are not seeking or not able to obtain authorisation should either transfer their existing plans to a provider which is seeking authorisation, or wind down in an orderly way before regulation starts.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential impact of reducing VAT on energy bills on the consumer.

The Government already applies a reduced rate of VAT at 5 per cent on domestic fuel and power such as gas and electricity.

The Government is providing significant financial support of up to £350 to the majority of households, which will cover more than half of the forecast £700 rise in energy bills for the average household. This support is worth £9.1 billion in 2022-23. This is more generous than removing VAT on domestic fuel and power, which would not be targeted because it would also benefit high-income households that do not need support. There would also be no guarantee that suppliers would pass on the discounts to all customers.

While the Government keeps all taxes under review, there are no plans to remove VAT on domestic fuel and power.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of HMRC aligning their application processes to allow UK Companies to apply online for Certificates of Residence as is available to individuals and sole traders.

HMRC recognises the importance of digital working and intends to introduce the facility for companies to apply for Certificates of Residence wholly online by 1 April 2022. This facility will also allow for partnerships and public bodies to apply for Certificates online, rather than needing to print out and send a form to HMRC.
Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking with HMRC to improve processing times for applications from UK businesses for Certificates of Residence.

As announced at Tax Administration and Maintenance Day in November 2021, HMRC will embark on a project to improve processing times on Certificates of Residence for UK businesses. These improvements will come in the form of process changes and digital improvements.
Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Written Statement of 17 December 2020, HCWS678, how the Government compensation scheme for London Capital & Finance bondholders will be administered.

In my Written Ministerial Statement on 17 December 2020, I outlined the three main channels through which London Capital & Finance plc (LCF) bondholders can seek compensation. These are the administration process, the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), and the Financial Conduct Authority’s (FCA) Complaints Scheme.

My statement also announced that, taking into consideration the specific and complex set of circumstances surrounding the collapse of LCF, the Treasury will set up a compensation scheme which will assess whether there is justification for further one-off compensation payments in certain circumstances for some LCF bondholders . The Government will announce further details in due course.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Written Statement of 17 December 2020 HCWS678, whether the Government compensation scheme for London Capital and Finance plc bondholders will be available to all bondholders with no restrictions on the size or the timing of their investment.

In my Written Ministerial Statement on 17 December 2020, I outlined the three main channels through which London Capital & Finance plc (LCF) bondholders can seek compensation. These are the administration process, the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), and the Financial Conduct Authority’s (FCA) Complaints Scheme.

My statement also announced that, taking into consideration the specific and complex set of circumstances surrounding the collapse of LCF, the Treasury will set up a compensation scheme which will assess whether there is justification for further one-off compensation payments in certain circumstances for some LCF bondholders . The Government will announce further details in due course.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme to freelance performers and musicians under the measures announced in the Winter Economy Plan.

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) has provided and will continue to provide support to the self-employed, including freelance performers and musicians who meet the eligibility criteria. The third grant, combined with up to £14,070 worth of support for each individual from the first and second grants, makes the SEISS one of the most generous schemes for the self-employed in the world.

The third grant will be available to self-employed individuals who have been affected by reduced demand or have been unable to trade due to COVID-19, which they believe will lead to a significant reduction in their trading profits. This will ensure that support is targeted at those who most need it.

The SEISS continues to be just one element of a substantial package of support for the self-employed. Other elements of the package include Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, mortgage holidays, self-isolation support payments and other business support grants.

The Government has announced a £1.57bn Culture Recovery Fund to protect the cultural sectors through the COVID-19 pandemic, in order to help to ensure a vibrant future for the cultural and creative sectors on the other side of the COVID-19 crisis. To date, £560m in grant funding has been allocated to nearly 3,000 cultural organisations in England. Organisations supported include galleries, theatres, museums, orchestras, music venues, comedy clubs and festivals. This funding will help to enable performances to restart, protect jobs and create opportunities for freelancers. Further allocations will be announced in the coming weeks.

27th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of potential merits of introducing the Directors Income Support Scheme.

I refer the Honourable Member to the answer given on 24 November to UIN 115585.

12th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to support jobs in the aerospace sector supply chain by establishing a long-term supply chain investment fund to recapitalise suppliers who are unable to take on new debt.

I am aware of the challenging conditions facing the aerospace sector. That is why we are supporting the aerospace sector and its aviation customers with over £9 billion support through the Bank of England’s Covid Corporate Financing Facility, grants for research and development, loan guarantees and support for aerospace exports.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending eligibility to the extended Self-Employment Income Support Scheme to freelance performers and musicians.

The forthcoming Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) Grant Extension will help provide critical support to the self-employed, including freelance performers and musicians. The SEISS Grant Extension will support those who are currently eligible for the SEISS and are actively continuing to trade but are facing reduced demand due to COVID-19. The scheme will last for 6 months, from November 2020 to April 2021.

The extension will be in the form of two grants. The first grant will cover a three-month period from the start of November until the end of January. The second grant will then cover the subsequent three-month period from the start of February until the end of April.

Those who require further support may be able to benefit from other elements of the comprehensive package of support for individuals and businesses. This package includes Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, increased levels of Universal Credit, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants.

14th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme for self-employed people who rely on the hospitality sector for their income.

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) Grant Extension provides crucial support for the self-employed, including those in the hospitality sector. It is targeted at those who are currently actively trading but are facing reduced demand due to COVID-19, in order to help them continue trading in the forthcoming winter months.

The Government understands that some businesses and sectors will be affected by COVID-19 to a greater extent than others. The SEISS continues to be just one element of a comprehensive package of support for the self-employed. Those not eligible for the SEISS Grant Extension may still be eligible for other elements of the unprecedented financial support available.

The Government has temporarily increased the Universal Credit standard allowance for 2020-21 and relaxed the Minimum Income Floor for the duration of the pandemic so that where self-employed claimants' earnings have significantly fallen, their Universal Credit award will have increased to reflect their lower earnings. In addition to this, the self-employed have access to other elements of the package, including Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants.

21st Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to extend the availability of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to people with blood cancer who have been shielding and (a) cannot work from home and (b) have been advised to continue shielding from August 2020.

The Government recognises the challenges facing those with cancer, and the current level of unprecedented support for people’s incomes is available for those who are living with cancer. This includes the Self- Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

The Chancellor announced on 12 May that the CJRS scheme will be extended until October.

Before 30 June, any employee could be furloughed. From 1 July, an employee can only continue to be furloughed if they have previously been furloughed for at least 3 consecutive weeks taking place any time between 1 March 2020 and 30 June.

For those required to shield after 1 August, they will receive letters/notification advising them of this, and they will continue to be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay on the basis of their shielding status.

10th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of allowing furlough under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme for employees of companies which make a yearly RTI submission by using information from 2018-19.

For an employee to be eligible for the CJRS they must have been notified to HMRC on a real-time information (RTI) submission on or before 19 March. Those paid annually are eligible to claim, as long as they meet the relevant conditions including being notified to HMRC on an RTI submission on or before 19 March 2020, which relates to a payment of earnings in the 2019/2020 tax year. Anyone paid annually and notified on an RTI submission after that date will not be eligible for the scheme, which puts them in the same position as those who are paid more frequently and were not notified to HMRC on or before 19 March. The 19 March date allows as many people as possible to be included by going right up to the day before the announcement and mitigates the risk of fraud that existed as soon as the scheme became public.

18th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to extend the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme to people whose self-employed profits are less than 50 per cent of their income.

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) is only available to those whose trading profit makes up 50% or more of their total income, as the SEISS aims to provide financial support to those who rely on self-employment as their main source of income. Many individuals earn small amounts of income from self-employment in addition to income from employment and other sources. These individuals may benefit from other policies such as the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Individuals may have access to a range of grants and loans depending on their circumstances, and the SEISS supplements the significant support already announced for UK businesses, including the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the deferral of tax payments. More information about the full range of business support measures is available at www.businesssupport.gov.uk/coronavirus-business-support/.

13th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to extend the duration of the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

The UK has one of the most generous self-employed COVID-19 support schemes in the world. The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme opened on 13 May, ahead of schedule, and it provides support worth up to £7,500 each to millions of individuals. Recipients will have the grants in their bank accounts within six working days of making an application.

The Chancellor indicated that the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme would be temporary when he announced it at the end of March, and that it could be extended if necessary. The Government is keeping this under review.

As the economy re-opens, the Government will consider how to adjust support in a way that ensures people can get back to work, protecting both the UK economy and livelihoods.

11th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the letters of (a) 27 March, (b) 1 April and (c) 16 April 2020 from the hon. Member for Lanark and Hamilton East on the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme.

HM Treasury has received unprecedented amounts of correspondence since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, and apologises for the delay in responding to the Honourable Member. The Honourable Member’s correspondence is receiving attention and will be replied to as soon as possible.

1st May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to provide furlough payments under the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme for the hospitality sector until social distancing measures allow them to safely reopen, and if he will make a statement.

The Government has extended the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme until October 2020. Extending the scheme in its current form until July will provide workers, businesses and the economy with clarity on this vital support. After July, the Government will introduce more flexibility to the furlough scheme in a measured way that protects people’s incomes and helps support furloughed employees as they return to work. From August through to the end of October, employers currently using the scheme will have more flexibility to bring their furloughed employees back to work part-time while still receiving support from the scheme. Employers using the scheme will start contributing some of the costs of their workers’ salaries, substituting in part the contribution that the Government is currently making. The Government will outline more details of how this will work by the end of May.

It is the case that some firms will be affected by coronavirus for longer than others, and the Government will seek to support these firms appropriately. It would be challenging to target the CJRS to specific sectors in a fair and deliverable way, and it may not be the case that this is the most effective or sensible way to provide longer term support for those sectors most affected by coronavirus.

The Government will continue to monitor developments and engage with affected sectors, with the aim of ensuring that support provided is right for these sectors and for the economy as a whole.

1st May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will issue guidance on the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme for umbrella companies on whether they can claim 80 per cent of average take home pay for contract workers in furlough, and if he will make a statement.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) covers employees on any type of employment contract, including full-time, part-time, agency, flexible or zero-hour contracts. It covers agency workers (including those employed by umbrella companies), so long as the other eligibility conditions of the scheme are met.

Employers should follow HMRC’s comprehensive online guidance in order to calculate the correct reference pay. This guidance can be applied to all forms of employment contract.

Where an employee has been paid a variable amount, the reference pay is calculated by looking at the average pay over the financial year 2019/20, or in some instances by means of a one-year look-back test. Only payments that the employer was obliged to make should be included.

21st Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer,if he will introduce funding to enable people who cannot access superfast broadband to stay connected online during lockdown through mobile data packages.

The Government has announced unprecedented support for businesses and workers to protect them against the current economic emergency.

The Government has also worked with the UK’s major telecommunications providers to agree measures to support connectivity for vulnerable consumers and the NHS.

In addition, the government recently announced that vulnerable and disadvantaged children across England are to receive laptops, tablets and 4G routers to make remote education accessible. We are also working with the major telecommunications providers to make it easier for families to access selected educational resources by temporarily exempting these sites from data charges.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to ensure that February and March new starter workers who were not able to notify HMRC of their employment before 19 March 2020 are eligible for the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme.

Extending the cut-off date for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme beyond 20 March, when the scheme was announced, would enable criminals to exploit the scheme by providing fraudulent payroll data that HMRC could not easily verify. Processing claims beyond 20 March while managing the significant fraud risks would require much greater manual handling by HMRC which would substantially slow down the system and therefore delay the delivery of grants that many businesses desperately need.

Those not eligible for this grant may be able to access the other support the Government is providing, including a package of temporary welfare measures and up to three months’ mortgage payment holidays for those struggling with their mortgage payments.

23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the covid-19 outbreak, what guidance his Department has issued to finance companies on the provision of repayment holidays for people that have lost income or been made redundant.

Banks and building societies are ready and able to support consumers impacted by COVID-19. On the 17 March, the Chancellor announced on behalf of the sector that banks and building societies will offer a 3-month ‘mortgage holiday’ for borrowers that are financially struggling with their repayments. This forbearance measure will enable affected borrowers to defer their mortgage payments for up to 3 months while they get back on their feet.

The FCA have also published guidance on payment holidays and repossession action for firms that engage in mortgage lending activities. This means that second charge mortgages are also captured by the measures. You can view the guidance here:

https://www.fca.org.uk/consumers/mortgages-coronavirus-consumers

As a form of forbearance, the option of a mortgage repayment holiday is open to any customer regardless of whether they are in payment shortfall. Any customer who is concerned about their current financial situation should get in touch with their lender at the earliest possible opportunity to discuss the best option for their them.

The Government has introduced an unprecedented £350bn package of measures to support businesses access the finance they need during this difficult period, and announced significant measures to directly provide support for SMEs including grants, business rates relief and other tax measures.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his recent announcement on mortgage payment holidays during the covid-19 outbreak extends to those paying second mortgages.

Banks and building societies are ready and able to support consumers impacted by COVID-19. On the 17 March, the Chancellor announced on behalf of the sector that banks and building societies will offer a 3-month ‘mortgage holiday’ for borrowers that are financially struggling with their repayments. This forbearance measure will enable affected borrowers to defer their mortgage payments for up to 3 months while they get back on their feet.

The FCA have also published guidance on payment holidays and repossession action for firms that engage in mortgage lending activities. This means that second charge mortgages are also captured by the measures. You can view the guidance here:

https://www.fca.org.uk/consumers/mortgages-coronavirus-consumers

As a form of forbearance, the option of a mortgage repayment holiday is open to any customer regardless of whether they are in payment shortfall. Any customer who is concerned about their current financial situation should get in touch with their lender at the earliest possible opportunity to discuss the best option for their them.

The Government has introduced an unprecedented £350bn package of measures to support businesses access the finance they need during this difficult period, and announced significant measures to directly provide support for SMEs including grants, business rates relief and other tax measures.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many permission to travel letters have been reissued by her Department in each of the last three years; and what her Department's timeframe is for reissuing a permission to travel letter once requested.

Permission to Travel letters are only issued in relation to the recently launched Ukraine Schemes.

The information requested is not contained within published data and is not routinely captured. To capture numbers would require a manual trawl of data and to do so would incur disproportionate cost.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the report commissioned by her Department entitled, The Historical Roots of the Windrush Scandal; and if she will make a statement on that report.

The Historical Roots of the Windrush Scandal report was commissioned by the Home Office to form part of an internal learning resource to improve understanding of the historical development of immigration policy, in response to Recommendation 6 of the Windrush Lessons Learned Review by Wendy Williams.

The report was written by a historian who was independent from the Home Office and does not represent government policy. The views included in the report are those of the author.

We have already made good progress against Wendy Williams’ recommendations. She highlighted many achievements, including the work we have put into becoming a more compassionate and open organisation. Yet we know there is more to do. Many people suffered terrible injustices at the hands of successive Governments, so we will continue working hard to deliver a Home Office worthy of every community we serve.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure documentation for children's passport applications are linked to their parents' documents sent as part of the application.

Her Majesty’s Passport Office endeavours to associate documents to the relevant passport application as quickly as possible.

Where the same document is required to complete checks upon multiple applications, HM Passport Office is working to deliver further technical solutions to improve this process for both its customers and staff.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Homes for Ukraine visas were approved and awaiting a permission to travel letter to be sent from the dispatch team as of 1 June 2022.

Information on the number of visas granted under the Ukraine Family Scheme and the Homes for Ukraine Scheme can be found in our published data on the GOV.UK webpage: Ukraine Family Scheme and Ukraine Sponsorship Scheme (Homes for Ukraine) visa data - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Information requested which is not contained within this published data is not routinely captured. To capture this would require a manual trawl of data and to do so would incur disproportionate cost.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applicants have paid for fast-track passports in each month between May 2021 and May 2022.

Urgent services are only required where an applicant needs a passport sooner than ten weeks. Since April 2021, people have been advised to allow up to ten weeks when applying for their British passport.

Between March and May 2022 approximately 98.5% of applications processed were completed within ten weeks. If an application from the UK has been with Her Majesty’s Passport Office for more than the published timeframe and the applicant is travelling in the next two weeks, then it will be prioritised at no additional cost.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what risk assessment her Department plans to undertake of asylum seekers' vulnerabilities including (a) disabilities, (b) sexual orientation, (c) gender reassignment status, (d) mental trauma, (e) mental health and (f) physical health when determining eligibility for relocation to Rwanda.

The Home Office will continue to ensure that the welfare and dignity of all claimants forms a central platform of our decision-making processes.

An individualised assessment of each eligible person’s circumstances will be undertaken prior to any decision to relocate them to Rwanda. We would not relocate someone where it would be unsafe or inappropriate to do so.

Any vulnerabilities will be taken into consideration and every individual who is eligible for removal under this policy will be able to make representations where they are concerned the country in question would not be safe for them.

Tom Pursglove
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 18 May 2022 to Question 847, on Asylum: Employment, how many asylum seekers have (a) applied for and (b) been accepted for permission to work or volunteer in (i) 2020, (ii) 2021 and (iii) 2022; and what steps her Department is taking to promote vacancies on the shortage occupations list to asylum seekers.

The Home Office are unable to report how many asylum seekers have applied for and been accepted for permission to work in 2020, 2021 and 2022 as this information is not held in a reportable format or forms part of published data.

The Home Office do not track how many asylum seekers have applied to volunteer as they are able give their time for free to charitable or public sector organisations without any contractual obligation or entitlement. They are not employees or workers as defined by various statutory provisions. Further information can be found at: Permission to work and volunteering for asylum seekers (accessible version) - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Information on the shortage occupation list (SOL) is readily available in the public domain as part of the immigration rules: Immigration Rules - Guidance - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many shortage occupation list vacancies have been filled by (a) refugees and (b) people entering the UK as part of a resettlement scheme in (i) 2020, (ii) 2021 and (iii) 2022.

The Government does not collect the information required to calculate the number of people with refugee status employed in the UK. Those granted refugee status in the UK have full, unrestricted, labour market access and are free to take employment without notifying the Home Office.

To capture numbers would require a manual trawl of data and to do so would incur a disproportionate cost.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 18 May 2022 to Question 847, on Asylum: Employment, what steps her Department is taking to promote employment support to (a) refugees and b) people entering the UK as part of a resettlement scheme.

Those granted refugee status or humanitarian protection, as well as those arriving under one of the UK’s resettlement schemes, have immediate access to the labour market and welfare benefits. If in receipt of Universal Credit, they can receive employment support from the Department for Work and Pensions.

For those arriving through one of the UK’s resettlement schemes, the Home Office funds local and regional authorities to provide a package of support. As part of this, authorities are responsible for ensuring that arrivals are provided with a dedicated source of advice and support to assist with registering for mainstream benefits and services, including assistance with access to employment.

For those who were asylum seekers, we provide a further 28 days' support after the grant of refugee status to help with the transition to the mainstream benefits system. This Move-On service includes advice and assistance in relation to applying for Universal Credit and employment support.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support his Department is providing for asylum seekers who are experiencing trauma and mental health issues (a) upon their arrival to the UK and (b) in temporary accommodation.

Asylum seekers have access to NHS health service.

All Home Office staff and contractors engaging with asylum seekers are trained to adopt a risk-based approach towards potential indications of vulnerability and to refer relevant cases onto the Safeguarding Hub, a dedicated resource assigned to identifying and safeguarding vulnerable asylum seekers.

The Safeguarding Hub works closely with the statutory agencies to signpost vulnerable customers for support with their health and social care needs.

We are investing an additional £2.3 billion a year into mental health services by 2023/24, the largest increase in mental health funding in NHS history.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
11th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to ensure that asylum seekers housed in bridging hotels have access to all items outlined in Section 4 of the Home Office Guide to Living in Asylum Accommodation.

The Guide to Living in Asylum Accommodation sets out what is available for people being accommodated in asylum accommodation and who are eligible for asylum support. Those accommodated in bridging hotels have been evactuated from Afghanistan and are refugees with leave to remain in the country, they are not asylum seekers and therefore are not eligible for asylum support and so the guide does not apply to them.

In 2021 The UK Government undertook the biggest and fastest emergency evacuation in recent history, helping over 15,000 people to safety from Afghanistan. Due to the scale and pace of the evacuation we were not able to source appropriate accommodation in the normal way, we therefore had to use bridging hotels as a temporary measure. In these hotels we provide 3 meals a day for residents. All arrivals received an Aspen Card with funds equivalent to those on Universal Credit (UC). The families/individuals will then apply for UC and Aspen Cards will be terminated.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Jul 2021
What plans she has to bring forward proposals to review the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.

This Government currently has no plans to review the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. We keep drug controls under review, in consultation with the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs.

Drugs Legislation forms part of our wider approach to preventing drug misuse alongside prevention and education, supporting treatment and recovery, and tackling the supply of illicit drugs.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department has spent on (a) outdoor advertising, (b) social media, (c) radio media, (d) television media and (e) print media to advertise the 30 June 2021 deadline of the EU Settlement Scheme.

Since its launch in 2019, the EU Settlement Scheme advertising campaign has encouraged EU citizens and their family members to apply to the scheme and has helped to drive over 5.6 million applications.

In May the Home Office launched the latest £1.8 million wave of UK advertising to ensure EU citizens and their family members apply to the scheme ahead of the 30 June 2021 deadline. This builds on the successful £6.8 million campaign already delivered since launch.

Below is a breakdown of the campaign spend since launch in March 2019 for each requested channel:

  • Outdoor advertising £1,313,000
  • Social media £1,024,000
  • Radio media (including community radio) £1,605,000
  • Television media (including video on demand) £2,608,000
  • Print media £194,500

The remainder of the total cost has been spent on other paid media channels such as digital advertising and paid search.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applicants to the EU Settlement Scheme have updated their birth name to their married name using the Update My Details service since March 2019.

The Home Office issues settled status documentation in the primary name which is used in the official documentation produced as part of an individual’s application.

The Home Office does not capture data on the number of customers who have updated their birth name to their married name since being issued status. To capture numbers would require a manual trawl of data and to do so would incur disproportionate cost.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Feb 2021
What assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the immigration system since the end of the transition period.

The Government has successfully delivered one of the key promises made to the British people at the last election.

Freedom of movement has ended and a new points-based system is in place. This means we can attract those people with the skills this country needs to support our economic recovery and build back better.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many EU nationals living in the UK have been issued Settled Status documentation in their birth name rather than their married name.

The information requested is not held centrally.

The Home Office issues settled status documentation in the name which is used in the official documentation produced as part of an individual’s application.

We do not require married applicants to provide evidence of their birth name.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to reduce the number of people who are (a) held in immigration detention and (b) unlawfully detained.

We are making good progress with an ambitious and systematic programme of immigration detention reform, at the heart of which is a Government commitment, over time, to secure a material reduction in the number of people detained and the length of time they spend in detention, coupled with improved welfare for detainees and a culture that maintains the highest standards of professionalism.

As part of this reform, we are maximising the use of existing alternatives to detention and exploring new approaches including a current pilot to support vulnerable women in the community who would otherwise be detained at Yarl’s Wood.

We are progressing these priorities all while continuing to tackle abuse of the immigration system. The immigration estate is safer, more secure, and almost 40 per cent smaller than in 2015, with only four per cent of individuals detained for more than four months, and only two per cent of individuals detained for more than six months in year ending December 2019. Detention only exceeds these timescales in the most complex cases, almost always where serious and/or persistent criminality is involved.

Reducing instances of when the Courts find that we have unlawfully detained an individual is a priority. Often, an initial decision to detain will be appropriate, before a change in the individual’s circumstances undermines this decision. As part of our response to the Home Affairs Committee immigration detention report, the Home Office has begun a programme of work focused on litigation outcomes to ensure that best practice is shared, that lessons are learned, and that we reduce instances of unlawful detention.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish the Windrush Lessons Learned report.

The Home Secretary published this report on 19th March 2020

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress he has made on proposals for the reinstatement of war widows pensions for those who remarried; and when those proposals will be published.

The Government continues to examine alternative methods to see whether we can mitigate the impact to those survivors who had remarried or cohabited before the introduction of the 'Pensions for Life' changes in 2015. Much progress has been made and the issue remains a priority for the Ministry of Defence, though it remains very complex.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many of his Department's staff were based in Scotland in each year from 2016 to 2020.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) publishes annual location statistics for UK Regular Service and MOD Civilian staff. Table 2.1a of the 2020 publication includes the number of MOD personnel based in Scotland as at April each year since April 2012 and can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/location-of-all-uk-regular-service-and-civilian-personnel-annual-statistics-index

16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what alternative methods his Department is examining to mitigate the effect of the loss of the war widows' pension for people who remarried between 1973 and 2015.

The Government recognises the unique commitment that Service families make to our country and remains sympathetic to the circumstances of those widows who remarried and cohabited before 1 April 2015. However, the Government currently has no plans to reinstate War Widows’ Pensions for war widows who remarried or cohabited before the 2015 changes took effect.

As the Secretary of State for Defence said to the House on 3 February 2020, we are examining alternative methods to see whether we can mitigate the impact. However, this is a complex policy area and it is taking time to carefully consider the potential options within both financial and legal constraints. This work is ongoing, and any recommendations will have to first be agreed with other Government Departments.

11th Jan 2021
What recent discussions he has had with (a) devolved Administrations and (b) Cabinet colleagues on the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

The Government has been clear we intend to continue to work in partnership with the devolved administrations and local communities. We have demonstrated this commitment by confirming that devolved administrations will have a place within the governance structures for the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF).

Ministers regularly speak to Cabinet colleagues on the UKSPF and my officials routinely engage with their devolved administration counterparts on their priorities. To date, we have conducted 25 engagement events across the UK, many of which were attended by the devolved administrations. We will continue this engagement as we develop the UKSPF investment framework and in advance of its publication.

18th May 2021
What steps he has taken to help ensure that the UK upholds its obligations under international treaties on human rights.

The UK has strong human rights protections within a comprehensive and well-established constitutional and legal system, and a longstanding tradition of ensuring rights and liberties are protected domestically and of fulfilling our international human rights obligations.

The UK has put in place a combination of policies and legislation to give effect to the international human rights treaties that it has ratified. The UK has a strong record before the various UN treaty monitoring bodies and fully participates in relevant reporting processes.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Dec 2020
What recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on upholding the rule of law.

Naturally, the Government does not disclose the details of private conversations that are had amongst Cabinet colleagues, but there should be no doubt that the Government will continue to be very active in supporting the rule of law.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)