Jim Fitzpatrick Portrait

Jim Fitzpatrick

Labour - Former Member for Poplar and Limehouse

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
4th Nov 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Transport Committee
4th Nov 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Minister (Transport)
8th Oct 2010 - 29th Aug 2013
Shadow Minister (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) (Farming and the Environment)
9th Jun 2009 - 6th May 2010
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2007 - 5th Jun 2009
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Employment Relations & Postal Services)
5th May 2006 - 28th Jun 2007
Minister (Office of the Deputy Prime Minister) (London)
10th May 2005 - 5th May 2006
Vice-Chamberlain (HM Household)
13th Jun 2003 - 10th May 2005
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
29th May 2002 - 13th Jun 2003
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
14th Jun 2001 - 28th May 2002


Division Voting information

Jim Fitzpatrick has voted in 2497 divisions, and 52 times against the majority of their Party.

22 Oct 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 19 Labour Aye votes vs 217 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 329 Noes - 299
22 Oct 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour Aye votes vs 233 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 308 Noes - 322
19 Oct 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Acts - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 231 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 306
4 Sep 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 6) Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour Aye votes vs 224 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 495
12 Jun 2019 - Leaving the EU: Business of the House - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 8 Labour No votes vs 222 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 309
29 Mar 2019 - United Kingdom’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour Aye votes vs 234 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 286 Noes - 344
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 42 Labour No votes vs 143 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 188 Noes - 283
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 27 Labour No votes vs 198 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 268 Noes - 295
19 Mar 2019 - Foreign Affairs Committee - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Labour No votes vs 168 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 199 Noes - 134
27 Feb 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the EU - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 7 Labour No votes vs 225 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 288 Noes - 324
14 Feb 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the EU - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour Aye votes vs 244 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 258 Noes - 303
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Labour No votes vs 241 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 296 Noes - 327
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Labour No votes vs 232 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Labour No votes vs 226 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 321
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 13 Labour No votes vs 224 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 322
29 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 7 Labour Aye votes vs 239 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 317 Noes - 301
13 Jun 2018 - European Union (Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 15 Labour Aye votes vs 74 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 327 Noes - 126
27 Apr 2018 - Prayers - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour Aye votes vs 29 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 2 Noes - 69
16 Mar 2018 - Prayers - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour Aye votes vs 44 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 1 Noes - 114
19 Apr 2017 - Early Parliamentary General Election - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Labour No votes vs 174 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 522 Noes - 13
23 Mar 2016 - High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Labour No votes vs 153 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 399 Noes - 42
16 Dec 2015 - Petroleum - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Labour Aye votes vs 191 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 261
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 56 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 390
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 65 Labour Aye votes vs 153 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 397 Noes - 223
11 Sep 2015 - Assisted Dying (No. 2) Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 73 Labour Aye votes vs 91 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 118 Noes - 330
18 Jun 2015 - European Union Referendum Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour Aye votes vs 195 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 71 Noes - 514
27 Oct 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Labour Aye votes vs 162 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 166 Noes - 340
23 Oct 2014 - Repeal of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Labour Aye votes vs 61 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 21 Noes - 68
13 May 2014 - Prohibition of Unpaid Internships - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Labour No votes vs 150 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 181 Noes - 19
25 Mar 2014 - 47. Air passenger duty (rates of duty from 1 April 2014) - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Labour Aye votes vs 1 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 301 Noes - 15
31 Oct 2013 - High Speed Rail (Preparation) Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Labour No votes vs 74 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 350 Noes - 34
29 Aug 2013 - Syria and the Use of Chemical Weapons - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 205 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 220 Noes - 332
28 Jan 2013 - Succession to the Crown Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 17 Labour Aye votes vs 154 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 38 Noes - 371
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 46 Labour No votes vs 126 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 205 Noes - 228
24 Apr 2012 - Food Labelling (Halal and Kosher Meat) - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Labour Aye votes vs 49 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 73
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Labour No votes vs 41 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 105 Noes - 186
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 48 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 101 Noes - 166
4 Mar 2010 - Chair (Terminology) - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 27 Labour Aye votes vs 124 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 106 Noes - 221
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 93 Labour No votes vs 155 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 235 Noes - 176
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Labour No votes vs 157 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 158
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Labour No votes vs 156 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 153
12 Nov 2008 - MODERNISATION OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS (STANDING ORDERS) - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 33 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 87
3 Jul 2008 - Members’ Expenses - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 50 Labour No votes vs 144 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 172 Noes - 144
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 56 Labour Aye votes vs 231 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 233 Noes - 304
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Labour Aye votes vs 233 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 149 Noes - 318
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 51 Labour Aye votes vs 225 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 163 Noes - 342
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 51 Labour Aye votes vs 216 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 200 Noes - 293
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 126 Labour Aye votes vs 184 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 155 Noes - 418
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 132 Labour Aye votes vs 177 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 178 Noes - 392
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 156 Labour Aye votes vs 157 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 267
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 96 Labour No votes vs 207 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 337 Noes - 224
2 Mar 2007 - Off-Road Vehicles (Registration) Bill - View Vote Context
Jim Fitzpatrick voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 19 Labour No votes vs 98 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 19
View All Jim Fitzpatrick Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

View all Jim Fitzpatrick's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Jim Fitzpatrick

16th October 2019
Jim Fitzpatrick signed this EDM on Tuesday 29th October 2019

ASDA contract 6

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House notes with concern the decision by ASDA to proceed with proposals to put all hourly paid employees on flexible contracts (Contract 6) despite considerable concern about the proposed changes to employee terms and conditions; further notes that the flexibility clause in Contract 6 will force employees to …
48 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Dec 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 32
Scottish National Party: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Independent: 2
Conservative: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
24th October 2019
Jim Fitzpatrick signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 24th October 2019

Timetable for the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill

Tabled by: Lord Field of Birkenhead (Crossbench - Birkenhead)
That this House calls on the Government, if it is granted a flexible extension to Article 50 by the European Union, to work to a 14-day timetable for passing the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill, and to bring to an immediate end the flexible extension as soon as the Bill …
14 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 7
Independent: 3
Conservative: 3
Crossbench: 1
View All Jim Fitzpatrick's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Jim Fitzpatrick, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


2 Urgent Questions tabled by Jim Fitzpatrick

Monday 17th June 2019
Tuesday 26th October 2010

Jim Fitzpatrick has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Jim Fitzpatrick


A Bill to prohibit the use of wild animals in circuses; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 3rd September 2014

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to provide for a fixed penalty charge for those caught smuggling dogs into the United Kingdom; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 26th March 2014

519 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
25 Other Department Questions
23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what recent assessment the Government has made of the auditing sector's contribution to economic productivity.

No such assessment has been made.

1st Mar 2016
To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, whether the Electoral Commission has given any early indication to Ministers of the likely outcomes of its investigations into electoral fraud in Tower Hamlets; and when the Commission expects that investigation to be complete.

The Electoral Commission is not currently carrying out any investigations into electoral fraud in Tower Hamlets. Any allegations of electoral fraud offences under the Representation of the People Act 1983 can only be investigated by the police, on behalf of the Director of Public Prosecutions. The Metropolitan Police Service is responsible for investigating any allegations relating to elections in Tower Hamlets, and the Commission will monitor the outcome of any investigations relating to electoral fraud offences.

In advance of the elections this May, the Commission is working closely with the police and electoral administrators in each of the 18 areas it has identified as being at higher risk of allegations of electoral fraud, including Tower Hamlets, to ensure that robust plans are in place to detect and prevent fraud.

25th Feb 2016
To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what recent assessment the Commission has made of the level of electoral fraud in Tower Hamlets.

The Electoral Commission works with the National Police Chiefs’ Council to collate data from police forces about cases of alleged electoral fraud reported each year. This data is published on the Commission’s website.

The data show that 49 cases of alleged electoral fraud offences were reported in Tower Hamlets in 2014. Of these cases, no further action was taken following investigation by the police in 39 cases. This was either because the activity involved was not in fact an offence; there was no evidence that an offence had been committed; or there was insufficient evidence to identify a perpetrator. It also included cases which, following investigation, were found not to have involved electoral fraud offences.

Five cases were locally resolved with advice from the police or the Returning Officer, and one case resulted in a caution being given. Of the remaining four cases, one resulted in court proceedings being initiated, one awaits prosecution advice and two remain under investigation.

A total of 28 cases of alleged electoral fraud offences were reported in Tower Hamlets in 2015. No further action was taken following investigation by the police in 23 cases, and one case was locally resolved. One case awaits prosecution advice and three remain under investigation. The Commission will monitor the outcome of any investigations relating to electoral fraud offences.

In advance of the May 2016 elections, the Commission is working closely with the police and electoral administrators in each of the 18 areas it has identified as being at higher risk of allegations of electoral fraud, including Tower Hamlets, to ensure that robust plans are in place to detect and prevent fraud.

The Commission also encourages anyone who has evidence that an electoral offence may have been committed to report this to the police, either directly or anonymously through Crimestoppers.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of mechanisms by which a disabled student can challenge a failure to make reasonable adjustment under the Equality Act 2010 by a higher education institution.

Higher Education Institutions have a legal duty under the Equality Act 2010 to provide reasonable adjustments for disabled students and to monitor their compliance with their Equality Act duties. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) Regulations 2011 require institutions to publish information as to their compliance with the general public sector equality duty.

In those cases where a student is dissatisfied with the response from their higher education institution and have completed the institution’s formal complaints procedures, they can take their complaint to the Office of the Independent Adjudicator (OIA) for Higher Education. The OIA is independent of Government and publishes an annual report setting out its performance in handling unresolved student complaints. In providing remedies, the OIA aims to return students to the position they were in before their complaint. In appropriate circumstances this can include financial payments.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how his Department plans to monitor whether higher education institutions comply with their duties under the Equality Act 2010 towards disabled students; and what remedies are available to such students in the event that an institution does not comply with those duties.

Higher Education Institutions have a legal duty under the Equality Act 2010 to provide reasonable adjustments for disabled students and to monitor their compliance with their Equality Act duties. The Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties) Regulations 2011 require institutions to publish information as to their compliance with the general public sector equality duty.

In those cases where a student is dissatisfied with the response from their higher education institution and have completed the institution’s formal complaints procedures, they can take their complaint to the Office of the Independent Adjudicator (OIA) for Higher Education. The OIA is independent of Government and publishes an annual report setting out its performance in handling unresolved student complaints. In providing remedies, the OIA aims to return students to the position they were in before their complaint. In appropriate circumstances this can include financial payments.

13th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what assessment he has made of the effect on students living or studying in areas where household income is below the national average of the announcement by the Chancellor of the Exchequer on 8 July 2015 that maintenance grants will be discontinued from 2016-17.

From 2016/17 all new eligible students living or studying in areas where household income is below the national average and who would otherwise have received a grant will qualify for an increased loan for living costs. The total living costs support available under the new student support arrangements for eligible students on the lowest incomes is increasing by 10.3% in 2016/17.

2nd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, when her Department plans to publish the results of the 14th onshore oil and gas licensing round.

Applications made for onshore licences under the 14th Onshore Licensing Round are currently under consideration. The next step will be the publication of a consultation on the Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA) under the Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 and the Oil and Gas Authority aims to announce awards later in the year.

10th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what recent assessment he has made of trends in illegal money lending; and if he will make a statement.

The Department does not hold information relating to changes in the number of people using illegal lending sources as a result of new regulations and the annual levy on payday loan companies. However, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) works closely with the national Trading Standards Illegal Money Lending Teams (IMLTs) across the UK to monitor trends and police the market, and both have the powers to take action where necessary, including the ability to prosecute those who are found guilty to be lending illegally.

I am well aware of the misery inflicted on often vulnerable consumers by loan sharks. That is why this financial year (2014/15) the Department has provided £15 million in funding to the National Trading Standards Board (NTSB) and Trading Standards Scotland (TSS). The NTSB the TSS utilise specialist expertise to tackle the worst rogue traders, including the illegal money lenders. In addition to apprehending loan sharks, the NTSB and TSS engage in valuable educational work, equipping vulnerable groups of consumers to avoid the clutches of illegal money lenders.

Both NTSB and TSS regularly report emerging developments to the Department, along with their successes. Since April 2012 £1.5 million in cash has been seized from illegal money lenders, and 47 individuals have received custodial sentences.

10th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps he is taking to assess changes in the number of people using illegal lending sources as a result of new regulations and the annual levy on payday loan companies.

The Department does not hold information relating to changes in the number of people using illegal lending sources as a result of new regulations and the annual levy on payday loan companies. However, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) works closely with the national Trading Standards Illegal Money Lending Teams (IMLTs) across the UK to monitor trends and police the market, and both have the powers to take action where necessary, including the ability to prosecute those who are found guilty to be lending illegally.

I am well aware of the misery inflicted on often vulnerable consumers by loan sharks. That is why this financial year (2014/15) the Department has provided £15 million in funding to the National Trading Standards Board (NTSB) and Trading Standards Scotland (TSS). The NTSB the TSS utilise specialist expertise to tackle the worst rogue traders, including the illegal money lenders. In addition to apprehending loan sharks, the NTSB and TSS engage in valuable educational work, equipping vulnerable groups of consumers to avoid the clutches of illegal money lenders.

Both NTSB and TSS regularly report emerging developments to the Department, along with their successes. Since April 2012 £1.5 million in cash has been seized from illegal money lenders, and 47 individuals have received custodial sentences.

27th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what information his Department holds on how many families with children in Poplar and Limehouse constituency are in debt to their energy companies.

The Department does not hold information on how many families are in debt with their energy companies.

Ofgem closely monitors domestic energy suppliers’ performance and publishes information in relation to debt owed by domestic electricity and gas accounts holders in Great Britain, but they do not publish data relating to families with children or constituency areas. At the end of 2013, latest data available, 1.5 million domestic electricity account holders and 1.4 million domestic gas account holders were in debt to their energy supplier Ofgem’s Domestic Suppliers’ Social Obligations: 2013 Annual Report:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/ofgem-publications/92186/annualreport2013finalforpublication.pdf.

8th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the results were of the impact assessment carried out on the effect on the small marine business sector of his Department's decision to withdraw enhanced funding from the British Marine Federation.

Earlier this year, the indicative amounts of funding for value added services (‘enhanced activity’) to be delivered by the British Marine Federation (BMF) for UK businesses at the Dusseldorf Boat Show and the Miami Boat Show were withdrawn. Tradeshow Access Programme (TAP) grants for small business customers at these events were unaffected. Subsequent to this, UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) has offered an additional five TAP grants to assist new-to-event exhibitors at Dusseldorf. Since UKTI and the BMF had not progressed beyond the basic planning stage on the enhanced activity to be delivered alongside grants at these two shows when the funding was withdrawn, it is not possible to estimate accurately the impact of this withdrawal on small businesses in the sector.

4th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, when he expects to bring forward delegated legislation to set the level of fine available to the Groceries Code Adjudicator.

As required by section 9 of the Groceries Code Adjudicator Act 2013, the Adjudicator has consulted on a proposed maximum penalty, and has made a recommendation to the Secretary of State. This is currently the subject of cross-Government Ministerial consideration.

24th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, if his Department will estimate the potential change in annual household energy bills arising from government subsidies to Drax for biomass power generation over the next 13 years.

We currently support two units of Drax under the Renewables Obligation (RO), one as a full conversion, the other as an enhanced co-firing unit. One further unit has been awarded a contract under Final Investment Decision Enabling for Renewables (FIDeR). Government spending on levy funded support for low carbon electricity, including renewables, is capped by the Levy Control Framework (LCF), thereby helping to minimise the impact on consumer bills.

An estimate of the cost of support for renewable electricity generation by Drax cannot be provided as such information would allow the determination of operational factors which are commercially confidential.

22nd Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, when the deadline was for submitting evidence for the equality analysis of proposed changes to disabled student's allowance; and how awareness of that deadline was disseminated.

The Government invited interested parties to submit evidence as part of its programme of consultation during the summer.

22nd Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what representations he has received calling for a public consultation on proposed changes to disabled students' allowance.

Over the summer Ministers and officials undertook extensive discussions with a wide range of stakeholders regarding changes to DSA.

22nd Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will take steps to ensure that disabled pupils have information in advance of an application to a higher education institution on what reasonable adjustments that institution will make to meet their needs.

A variety of information is already available to students, both through the Unistats website - http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/ - and from individual Institutions. Institutions are considering what additional information may be necessary in light of the announcement on changes to the Disabled Students’ Allowance.

22nd Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will bring forward proposals to give disabled pupils a right of appeal against higher education institutions at a special educational needs and disability tribunal where an institution fails to make reasonable adjustments under the Equality Act 2010.

There are already a number of rights of appeal available to students.

The Government is working with interested parties to consider if further changes are needed.

22nd Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, which biomass power stations are totally dependent on clean wood rather than waste wood.

In 2009 the Renewables Obligation Order introduced the requirements for generating stations using biomass fuels to report against sustainability criteria. The dataset for the fourth reporting year (2012-2013) against these criteria has been published, and details the types of biomass used:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/biomass-sustainability-dataset-2012-13.

22nd Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what information his Department holds on the proportion of biomass used for power generation in the last three years for which data is available that comprises (a) roundwood, (b) diseased trees, broken branches and unused sawdust that would otherwise go to waste and (c) other wood in (i) Drax and (ii) other biomass power stations.

In 2009 the Renewables Obligation Order introduced the requirements for generating stations using biomass fuels to report against sustainability criteria. Datasets for four reporting years have been published. These detail the types of biomass used. The dataset for 2012-13 is at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/biomass-sustainability-dataset-2012-13.

The dataset for 2011-12 is at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/annual-sustainability-report-2011-2012.

The dataset for 2010-11 is at:

https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/annual-sustainability-report-2010-11.

The dataset does not provide a comparable breakdown by roundwood, diseased trees, broken branches, unused sawdust that would otherwise go to waste and other wood used by Drax and other biomass power stations except where generators have provided further descriptions of the material used, in addition to the reporting requirements.

The reporting requirements include the following: fuel name, biomass type and biomass form.

Our intention is for the sustainability criteria to become mandatory from April 2015 for stations of 1MW and above wishing to claim support under the Renewables Obligation, Renewable Heat Incentive, Investment Contracts and future Contracts for Difference.

22nd Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what information his Department holds on the proportion of biomass combusted for power generation in the UK that is attributable to (a) high-risk and (b) low-risk pathways as assessed by his Department.

The Bioenergy Strategy 2012 defined a set of low-risk energy deployment pathway, opposed to high risk pathways, for biomass combusted for power generation. These included:

· Using wastes for energy where it maximises carbon and cost effectiveness and where it is consistent with the waste hierarchy

· Using sustainable biomass as a transitional fuel to reduce carbon emissions from current coal power generation

· The promotion of combined heat and power generation to make more efficient use of biomass resources

The Department has acted to support biomass deployment in line with these pathways. Information on the capacity of and generation from these sources is publically available and published as part of the Digest of UK Energy Statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/digest-of-uk-energy-statistics-dukes.

10th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, when his Department will publish an assessment of the effect on disabled people of the proposed changes to disabled students' allowances.

The analysis is currently being updated in light of information and evidence provided by stakeholders and will be published alongside the regulations in the autumn.

10th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, whether his Department will carry out a public consultation on proposed changes to disabled students' allowances.

Ministers and officials have been engaged in extensive discussions with stakeholders, students and their representatives and disability organisations since April this year. The views and evidence provided have informed proposals and the on-going Equality Analysis.

29th Aug 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what recent discussions he has had on (a) improving access to the EU sugar market for cane sugar suppliers and (b) removal of the CXL sugar import duty.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills has had no recent discussions directly concerning the removal of the CXL sugar import duty, or on improving access to the EU sugar market for cane sugar suppliers. The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills is involved in ongoing trade negotiations between the EU and various trading partners which aim to increase trade of goods, and this includes sugar cane imports.

5th Jun 2014
To ask the Deputy Prime Minister, what assessment he has made of the Electoral Commission's efforts to improve the conduct of elections in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets.

The integrity of our elections is central to our democracy.

I am aware that the Electoral Commission is investigating allegations of electoral misconduct in Tower Hamlets at the recent local elections and the Metropolitan Police are conducting a number of criminal investigations. I have written to the chair of the Electoral Commission, stressing the importance of ensuring public confidence in the electoral process.

Given the gravity of the allegations it is important that the Electoral Commission provides a robust assessment of what went on in Tower Hamlets and includes firm recommendations of how to ensure the integrity of future elections.

25th Feb 2016
To ask the Attorney General, what the deadline is for criminal prosecutions to be brought by the Metropolitan Police against people implicated in electoral fraud in Tower Hamlets as a result of the Election Court rulings against former mayor Lutfur Rahman.

The time limit for bringing proceedings for a criminal offence depends on the court in which the case can be heard. Proceedings for those offences which can only be tried in the magistrates court must usually be brought within 6 months of the alleged offence being committed. There is not usually a time limit for those offences which can only be prosecuted in the Crown Court or which can be prosecuted in either the magistrates or Crown Court. There are exceptions in relation to individual offences.

2nd Apr 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 27 March 2019 to Question 234661 on the draft Public Services Ombudsman Bill, what criteria the Government plans to use to determine whether the Housing Ombudsman Service will be brought within the scope of the Public Service Ombudsman.

The Government has not yet established the criteria that would be used to make such a
determination. Any decision to introduce the necessary secondary legislation would need to take into
account feedback received during pre-legislative scrutiny and the passage of the Bill. In addition the
Government published its response to Strengthening Consumer Redress in the Housing Market
consultation on 24 January 2019 which set out proposals to establish a new Housing Complaints
Resolution Service to provide a single point of access to redress across all housing tenures.

20th Mar 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress the Government has made on its plans to introduce a Public Service Ombudsman; and whether the Independent Housing Ombudsman will be included within it.

The government published the draft Public Service Ombudsman Bill in December 2016, setting out in detail its plans to introduce a new Public Service Ombudsman. The draft Bill will be progressed as and when a legislative opportunity arises.

The Housing Ombudsman Service is not included in the draft Bill, but the Bill as drafted would give Ministers the power to include that organisation at a later date, through secondary legislation. No decisions have been taken on the potential future inclusion of the Housing Ombudsman Service.

13th Apr 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of people (a) with hearing loss and (b) who list their primary medical condition as difficulty in hearing in employment who were in employment as (i) an employee, (ii) self-employed, (iii) unpaid family workers and (iv) part of a Government supported training and employment programme in the last 12 months.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Apr 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of people (a) with hearing loss and (b) who list their primary medical condition as difficulty in hearing who were recorded as being economically inactive for the reason of (i) being a student, (ii) looking after family or home, (iii) being temporarily sick, (iv) being long-term sick, (v) being a discouraged worker, (vi) being retired and (vii) other reasons in the last 12 months.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Apr 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of people (a) with hearing loss and (b) who list their primary medical condition as difficulty in hearing who were (i) in employment, (ii) economically inactive and (iii) unemployed in the last 12 months.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Dec 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the timetable is for his Department's publication of a response to the pre-legislative scrutiny of the draft Public Service Ombudsman Bill.

The Government published a draft Public Service Ombudsman Bill in December 2016 to allow the Bill to be opened up to pre-legislative scrutiny.

The Communities and Local Government Select Committee held a pre-legislative scrutiny session in March 2017. This can be accessed on their Parliamentary website:

www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/communities-and-local-government-committee/inquiries/parliament-2015/inquiry8/

Responses will be taken account of in the final Bill, which will be introduced as and when a legislative opportunity arises.

14th Dec 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will place copies of the written responses to the draft Public Service Ombudsman Bill in the Library.

The Government published a draft Public Service Ombudsman Bill in December 2016 to allow the Bill to be opened up to pre-legislative scrutiny.

The Communities and Local Government Select Committee held a pre-legislative scrutiny session in March 2017. This can be accessed on their Parliamentary website:

www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/communities-and-local-government-committee/inquiries/parliament-2015/inquiry8/

Responses will be taken account of in the final Bill, which will be introduced as and when a legislative opportunity arises.

11th Sep 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Government (a) department and (b) Minister is responsible for the promotion and recognition of British Sign Language.

Under the Equality Act 2010 and Public Sector Equality Duty, all Government
departments have a responsibility to create inclusive communications. This does not
mean promoting BSL as an activity in itself but it does mean identifying and meeting
the communication needs of the audiences we are targeting (for example, where
formats could include Braille, BSL, easy read etc).

5th Dec 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many safer vehicles have been procured by each government department since the adoption of the Road Safety Statement.

The high-level vehicle data that is held centrally does not include the safety specific standard equipment or the optional safety related extras that may have been added. Consequently, we are unable to provide the information required.

The Crown Commercial Service is committed to supporting the British Road Safety Statement and has recently put in place a Vehicle Telematics Framework to support public sector fleets in addressing driver behaviour and adopting safer driving policies.

6th Jul 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that deaf young people who are reliant on communication support such as sign language interpreters are able to access the National Citizens Service.

The Government is committed to ensuring that there is a place on National Citizen Service (NCS) for every young person who wants one. The Cabinet Office is working closely with NCS Trust, the independent organisation which delivers NCS, to ensure that NCS is accessible, including to those with physical and sensory disabilities.

Many NCS providers already reach out and offer support to those with disabilities, including deaf young people. The largest provider, The Challenge, has worked with the National Deaf Children's Society, and adapted the programme for deaf young people, including providing dedicated support workers.

The NCS Trust is currently developing a detailed inclusion strategy to ensure that over the longer term there is consistent and high quality provision for young people with disabilities to take part in the programme.

21st Mar 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of deaths in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland resulted from (i) traffic offences and (ii) other offences in the last year for which figures are available.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

11th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the (a) Electricity, Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations 2002 and (b) Distribution Connection and Use of Service Agreement whereby only Distribution Network Operators, Energy Suppliers and meter operators can remove cut-out fuses in domestic properties.

No recent assessments have been made of the effectiveness of the Electricity, Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations. Regulation 24 requires the cut-out to be locked or sealed to prevent supply interference by unauthorised persons.

The Distribution Connection and Use of System Agreement is a multi-party contract between licensed electricity distributors, suppliers and generators in Great Britain concerned with the use of the electricity distribution system. My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is not a party to this agreement. The industry regulator, Ofgem, is responsible for approving changes to this agreement.

Government and Ofgem have launched a review into the rules that govern our energy system to develop options for improving the codes and their governance. The Distribution Connection and Use of System Agreement is in the scope of this review.

11th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has plans to introduce changes to the regulations under the Electricity, Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations (ESQCR) and the Distribution Connection and Use of Service Agreement (DCUSA) to enable registered electricians to remove cut out fuses.

There are no plans to change the Electricity, Safety, Quality and Continuity Regulations. Regulation 24 requires the cut-out to be locked or sealed to prevent supply interference by unauthorised persons.

The Distribution Connection and Use of System Agreement is a multi-party contract between licensed electricity distributors, suppliers and generators in Great Britain concerned with the use of the electricity distribution system. The Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy is not a party to this agreement. The industry regulator, Ofgem, is responsible for approving changes to this agreement.

Government and Ofgem have launched a review into the rules that govern our energy system to develop options for improving the codes and their governance. The Distribution Connection and Use of System Agreement is in the scope of this review.

31st Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals after the UK has left the EU on graphic warnings on firework packaging on the health dangers from the misuse of pyrotechnics.

The Government promotes the safe and responsible use of fireworks by consumers and there is strict legislation in place which regulates their supply and use. The Government is currently working with a range of stakeholders to raise consumer awareness on firework safety.

Under current UK legislation, there are clear requirements on manufacturers to categorise and label fireworks according to their explosive content, safety distances, noise level, or similar. The label must include instructions on safety distances and means of ignition and safety messages.

28th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that recalled electrical goods are not offered for sale; and if he will make a statement.

Electrical products intended for use by consumers, are regulated under the Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations. The Government is clear that when a safety issue is identified in a product already on the market, corrective action should be taken swiftly and with sufficient resource to ensure it is effective.

Retailers, including retailers of second-hand goods, also have a duty to ensure that any products they sell meet the legal safety requirements and are not subject to relevant corrective action.

28th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the effectiveness of the Consumer Affairs Act 2015 on the regulation of private sales online between private individuals.

The Consumer Rights Act provides protection for consumers when buying from traders and does not cover private sales online between private individuals.

The Consumer Green Paper “modernising consumer markets” published on 11 April 2018 consulted on whether the legal framework for consumer-to-consumer transactions remains appropriate to promote consumer confidence. A copy of the Green Paper can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/consumer-green-paper-modernising-consumer-markets.

26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what guidance his Department has issued to consumers on the identification of sales of (a) second hand and (b) recalled electrical goods.

The Government recalls website keeps consumers informed on recalls of all electrical goods and other products. The Government advises consumers to register their electrical appliances, whether new or second-hand, with the manufacturer so they can be informed directly by them should a recall or other corrective action subsequently be required. There is also helpful guidance for consumers on buying second hand electrical goods produced by the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents and Electrical Safety First.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of whether cancellation charges incurred by subcontractors and SMEs after 15 January 2018 working on public contracts secured by Carillion will be paid.

Goods and services supplied with the Official Receiver’s agreement following the making of the winding up orders against Carillion Plc and its subsidiaries will be paid in full. Any amounts due by the Carillion companies to contractors and suppliers prior to the date of the winding-up orders will be claims in the liquidation and included in the general body of unsecured creditors. Those claims in the liquidation could include incidental costs incurred by subcontractors and others which are a direct consequence of the liquidations.

5th Feb 2018
To ask Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to support SMEs affected by the collapse of Carillion.

My rt. hon. friend, the Secretary of State and I are working to ensure information is provided to SMEs in the Carillion supply chain in a timely manner.

The Secretary of State has established the Carillion Taskforce to advise on the impact on small businesses and employees affected by Carillion insolvency. The Taskforce’s attendees included representatives from leading business bodies, the construction trade sector, unions, banks and government. This has already led to useful collaborations, in particular in relation to ensuring firms and employees have access to support from Government and the banks.

I have also met several times with leading business and construction trade bodies, representing Carillion’s sub-contractors, to understand the impact of Carillion’s insolvency on the supply chain, and agree actions that could be taken to mitigate this. It is our intention to continue to meet regularly with this group on an ongoing basis.

Following the Secretary of State and my meeting with the banks on Wednesday 17th January, they made public commitments to provide support to SMEs affected and are contacting customers and, where appropriate, are putting in place emergency measures, including overdraft extensions, payment holidays and fee waivers to ensure those facing short term issues can be helped to stay on track. Details of these can be found at https://www.ukfinance.org.uk/banks-offer-support-to-business-customers-impacted-by-carillion/

On the 3rd February, the Government announced that through the British Business Bank, it will make available support of up to £100m to small businesses, through their delivery partners, using the Enterprise Finance Guarantee (EFG); enabling lenders to extend credit to SMEs which, while viable, may have insufficient security to secure other credit lines to support their businesses at this time. Through this collaboration the UK government and the banks can continue to support small businesses with the appropriate finance.

The Secretary of State has written to all accredited EFG lenders to draw their attention to this additional support, and expects them to ensure that they are actively engaging with SME businesses so they can give them the support they need. Accredited EFG lenders are listed on the British Business Bank website at https://british-business-bank.co.uk/ourpartners/supporting-business-loans-enterprise-finance-guarantee/efg-accredited-lenders/

The Department is providing a range of advice and support services for firms, delivered both nationally and locally available to SMEs affected by the insolvency of Carillion. These include a network of 38 Local Growth Hubs, run in conjunction with the Local Enterprise Partnership, to help businesses of all sizes and in all sectors to access support.

Information is published online by the Insolvency Service for employees, creditors and suppliers affected and seeking advice. In addition to providing current information, they provide a dedicated hotline for enquiries and contact numbers to other relevant organisations such as the Pensions Advisory Service, and the website PwC have been established to provide information. These can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/carillion-declares-insolvency-information-for-employees-creditors-and-suppliers

5th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department plans to take into account the Regulation 28: Report to prevent future deaths by David Lewis, Assistant Coroner for the area of North Wales (East and Central) on the Llanrwst fire inquest when it responds to the report from the Working Group on Product Recalls and Safety.

The Department has been closely monitoring this tragic case and we will be considering whether there are any wider implications for product safety in light of the Coroner’s Report and Whirlpool’s formal response to the Coroner, which is due by 26th December.

The Government’s response to the Working Group on Product Recalls and Safety will consider the recommendations made in their Report in July. Our response will consider any factors that are relevant to improving the system of product safety and recalls so that consumers can have confidence in the safety of electrical products.

13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to improve electrical safety in the private rented sector.

Electrical products intended for use by consumers, are regulated under the Electrical Equipment (Safety) Regulations. These require all electrical products to be safe when placed on the market. They also require manufacturers, where appropriate, to monitor their products on the market and to take immediate corrective action or if necessary recall a product if they become aware it is unsafe.

13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what progress his Department has made in implementing the recommendations of the Electrical Safety Working Group.

The Working Group on Product Recalls and Safety published its recommendations in July. We plan to respond to the report before the end of the year. Actions already underway include a new draft Code of Practice on recalls commissioned from the British Standards Institution (BSI), which has recently been subject to consultation, and an upgraded Government website to make it easier to find information on recalls and to register appliances. We are also actively considering the proposal made by the Working Group on Product Recalls and Safety for a new central body to support consumers on product safety.

11th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to incentivise businesses to invest in rooftop solar.

Solar PV is a UK success story. In 2013, we estimated that solar capacity would reach 10-12GW by 2020. We now expect Government support to bring forward around 13 GW by 2020. The Feed-in Tariff remains open to solar PV which provides an incentive for businesses to invest in rooftop solar.

5th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on the safety implications of cladding and external wall insulation systems.

My Right Hon Friend the Secretary of State has regular discussions with ministerial colleagues on a number of issues. This includes issues related to the safety of buildings where BEIS can support the Government response to the tragic fire in Grenfell Tower.

30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations his Department is planning to seek from consumer groups on the working group on product recalls and safety; and what representation consumer groups will have on the membership of that group.

The Working Group on Product Recalls and Safety includes representatives from a wide range of experts including the Chief Fire Officers Association, the Association of Chief Trading Standards Officers, Electrical Safety First, the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), many of whom represent the interests of individuals and consumers.

I have met with Which? to talk to them about the Working Group and they have been invited to join the Group.

2nd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if his Department will introduce a ban on the import of carbon monoxide alarms which do not comply with the BS EN 50291 safety standard after the UK leaves the EU.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy currently has no plans to introduce a ban on the import of carbon monoxide alarms that do not comply with the BS EN 50291 safety standard when the UK leaves the EU. However, we continue to consider what measures are likely to be most effective in ensuring protection against carbon monoxide poisoning.

13th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of society lotteries on the hospice sector; and whether he plans to make it easier for society lotteries to raise funds for hospices and other good causes through deregulation.

I greatly appreciate the impact society lotteries have as a fundraising tool for charities and other non-commercial organisations, raising hundreds of millions of pounds every year for many good causes including the hospice sector.

We are looking at the role of society lotteries, with advice from the Gambling Commission, and will make an announcement in due course.

24th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress her Department has made with the food, drink and advertising industries on discouraging the promotion of high caffeine and sugar energy drinks at sporting events.

Sporting Future: A New Strategy for an Active Nation published in 2015 committed government to continue to discuss with sports the scope for voluntary agreements on high fat sugar and salt (HFSS) food sponsorship. Working with Department of Health, Public Health England, the Sport and Recreation Alliance and sports organisations we developed a set of principles for sports bodies to consider when entering into relationships that relate to HFSS products. These principles were set out in Sport England's wider guidance to sports bodies on commercial sponsorship in May this year. This included ensuring monies received are reinvested into developing and promoting sport and providing information to consumers on the content of food and drink available at sporting events.

In addition, Public Health England (PHE) are leading a programme to reduce the levels of sugar in key foods that contribute most to children’s sugar intakes by 20% by 2020.

5th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the voluntary levy on the betting industry to support greyhound welfare, what progress the Government has made on encouraging bookmakers to join the scheme and secure contributions for revenue generated in (a) the UK and (b) offshore; and what further steps the Government plans to take to encourage more bookmakers to join that scheme.

With regard to those based in Great Britain, the Association of British Bookmakers has estimated that over 90% of all Licenced Betting Offices in Britain contribute to the voluntary levy.

Earlier this year I wrote to trade bodies representing the betting industry to ask that they take part in discussions to improve the current funding position in the greyhound industry, to be chaired by Lord Lipsey.

Lord Lipsey’s work is ongoing and Ladbrokes Coral have followed Bet 365 and recently announced that they will begin making voluntary contributions to the greyhound racing industry based on their offshore business from the start of 2018. This is a welcome boost to the sport which will strengthen the industry's ability to meet and exceed their commitments in relation to welfare and integrity and I would urge all betting operators who do not currently contribute to the voluntary levy to reconsider their position.

To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of society lotteries on the hospice sector; and whether he plans to make it easier for society lotteries to raise funds for hospices and other good causes through deregulation.

I greatly appreciate the impact society lotteries have as a fundraising tool for charities and other non-commercial organisations, raising hundreds of millions of pounds every year for many good causes including the hospice sector.

We are looking at the role of society lotteries, with advice from the Gambling Commission, and will make an announcement in due course.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, where a local authority has failed, following a revisit by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission, to make sufficient progress in improving its provision for children with special educational needs and disabilities, what steps his Department will take to involve local parents in decision-making on next steps.

If a local area has failed to make sufficient progress following a special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) revisit by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission, local area leaders must, as a minimum, submit an updated action plan to the Department for Education, NHS England and the Department for Health and Social Care. The action plan must be co-produced with partners and state how the local area will report on progress and impact, as well as how partners, including families, will be kept fully aware and informed of progress. The action plan will be published and a formal progress review meeting will take place within six months of the revisit report being published. The key partners involved, including the Parent Carer Forum, will be invited to attend this meeting.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, makes a case-by-case assessment regarding which actions to take following a local area SEND inspection. The outcomes of inspection reports – and particularly where local areas have not made sufficient progress following their revisit by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission - are key criteria in the Secretary of State’s consideration of the use of intervention powers.

The Secretary of State has asked Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission to design a programme of further local area SEND inspections to follow the current 5-year round. Discussions around the design and delivery of a possible second cycle are underway but no final decisions have yet been made.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether local area inspections of provision by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission for children with special educational needs and disabilities will continue beyond 2021.

If a local area has failed to make sufficient progress following a special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) revisit by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission, local area leaders must, as a minimum, submit an updated action plan to the Department for Education, NHS England and the Department for Health and Social Care. The action plan must be co-produced with partners and state how the local area will report on progress and impact, as well as how partners, including families, will be kept fully aware and informed of progress. The action plan will be published and a formal progress review meeting will take place within six months of the revisit report being published. The key partners involved, including the Parent Carer Forum, will be invited to attend this meeting.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, makes a case-by-case assessment regarding which actions to take following a local area SEND inspection. The outcomes of inspection reports – and particularly where local areas have not made sufficient progress following their revisit by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission - are key criteria in the Secretary of State’s consideration of the use of intervention powers.

The Secretary of State has asked Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission to design a programme of further local area SEND inspections to follow the current 5-year round. Discussions around the design and delivery of a possible second cycle are underway but no final decisions have yet been made.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what criteria he will use in deciding whether to use his powers of intervention where a local authority has failed to make sufficient progress in improving its provision for children with special educational needs and disabilities.

If a local area has failed to make sufficient progress following a special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) revisit by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission, local area leaders must, as a minimum, submit an updated action plan to the Department for Education, NHS England and the Department for Health and Social Care. The action plan must be co-produced with partners and state how the local area will report on progress and impact, as well as how partners, including families, will be kept fully aware and informed of progress. The action plan will be published and a formal progress review meeting will take place within six months of the revisit report being published. The key partners involved, including the Parent Carer Forum, will be invited to attend this meeting.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, makes a case-by-case assessment regarding which actions to take following a local area SEND inspection. The outcomes of inspection reports – and particularly where local areas have not made sufficient progress following their revisit by Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission - are key criteria in the Secretary of State’s consideration of the use of intervention powers.

The Secretary of State has asked Ofsted and the Care Quality Commission to design a programme of further local area SEND inspections to follow the current 5-year round. Discussions around the design and delivery of a possible second cycle are underway but no final decisions have yet been made.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what data his Department collects on outcomes achieved by disabled children, including those who have not been formally identified as having a special educational need.

The department collects data, via the school census, on pupils identified with a special educational need. This will include some pupils who have a disability, but the department does not collect data on pupils who have a disability but have not been identified with a special educational need.

The department collects and publishes a range of data on outcomes achieved by children, and the published data is generally broken down by a range of characteristics, including pupils identified with special educational needs. A summary of the data published by special educational needs is available in the following publication:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sen-analysis-and-summary-of-data-sources.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has plans to update the SEND Code of Practice to in relation to the duties of schools supporting children with SEND to include Ofsted's terminology in a definition of off-rolling.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

6th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he has taken to ensure that there are adequate numbers of teachers of the deaf to support deaf children, their families, and their education settings.

I am determined that all children and young people, including those who are deaf or have a hearing impairment, receive the support they need to achieve the success they deserve.

Local authorities are best placed to judge local priorities and to make local funding decisions. It is therefore for local authorities, in consultation with local people and having regard to the range of statutory responsibilities placed on them, to determine the exact nature of provision in their areas, including services for supporting children and young people with hearing impairment.

The Whole School Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) Consortium is being funded by the department to embed SEND into school improvement in order to equip the workforce to deliver high quality teaching across all types of SEND, including children and young people with hearing impairment.

I have met with the National Deaf Children’s Society and asked my officials to consider their proposal for a central bursary scheme for teachers of the deaf. They will report to me once they have collected all the relevant information.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
1st Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with his counterparts in the (a) Scottish and (b) Welsh Governments on the adequacy of school fire safety standards.

The Department will engage with the devolved administrations, as appropriate, when developing policy areas. Officials have been in contact with the relevant school specialists in the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish Governments to alert them to the review of Building Bulletin 100 (fire safety in schools).

29th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the loss of school facilities used by the wider community as a result of fire.

The Department does not assess the impact of the loss of school facilities on the wider community. The majority of fires in schools are restricted to the room of origin, with very few leading to the loss of facilities.

29th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to prevent school fires breaking out as a result of hot works.

The Department has produced guidance to assist schools in the safe management of maintenance activity that creates a significant risk of fire (hot works). These activities include plumbing activities using blow torches, and roof repair activities that use liquefied petroleum gas and bitumen burners.

This guidance can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/fire-risk-from-school-maintenance-or-building-works.

29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, under what circumstances the Office of the Schools Adjudicator (OSA) will be the statutory decision maker for proposals to establish a new voluntary-aided schools, and whether the OSA has the ability to override a decision made by a local authority.

In line with the existing legislation, there are two situations in which the Schools Adjudicator would decide whether to approve a voluntary-aided school proposal.

The first situation is if the local authority has rejected a proposal. In this situation, the proposer can appeal to the Schools Adjudicator. The Schools Adjudicator will then make a fresh decision which will override the decision made by the local authority.

The second situation is if a local authority has failed to make a decision within two months of the end of the representation period, which is a stage in the statutory process. In this situation, the local authority must refer the proposal to the Schools Adjudicator to be decided.

6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of expanding the definition of school which Ofsted can inspect to include unregistered schools.

Ofsted already has the power to carry out inspections, where it has reasonable cause to believe that an unregistered school is being operated on the premises.

Since January 2016, we have operated and funded a joint team with Ofsted to investigate unregistered schools, which has had significant success. In the last two years this team have conducted 192 inspections and issued 50 warning notices to suspected illegal schools, 38 of which have ceased to operate or have closed.

The offence of operating an unregistered independent educational establishment is created by section 96 of the Education and Skills Act 2008. Since 5 January 2015, two cases were referred to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) for early advice following which investigations were discontinued. Two further cases were referred to the CPS for a charging decision. Neither of these cases met the evidential test under the Code for Crown Prosecutors. A further case is currently with the CPS for advice.

6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of making compulsory the registration of the place of education of children of compulsory school age.

The department keeps under review the need for extension of registration requirements.

6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken against the proprietors of unregistered schools in each of the last five years; and how many such cases have been referred to the CPS in that same period.

Ofsted already has the power to carry out inspections, where it has reasonable cause to believe that an unregistered school is being operated on the premises.

Since January 2016, we have operated and funded a joint team with Ofsted to investigate unregistered schools, which has had significant success. In the last two years this team have conducted 192 inspections and issued 50 warning notices to suspected illegal schools, 38 of which have ceased to operate or have closed.

The offence of operating an unregistered independent educational establishment is created by section 96 of the Education and Skills Act 2008. Since 5 January 2015, two cases were referred to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) for early advice following which investigations were discontinued. Two further cases were referred to the CPS for a charging decision. Neither of these cases met the evidential test under the Code for Crown Prosecutors. A further case is currently with the CPS for advice.

5th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of increasing the scope of evidence that Ofsted is able to collect during its inspections of unregistered educational establishments.

Where Ofsted has reasonable cause to believe that the offence of operating an unregistered school is being committed on any premises, they have the power to enter and inspect the premises, and inspect and take copies of any records or other documents, which they believe may be required for the purposes of proceedings in relation to such an offence. Obstructing Ofsted in the exercise of these functions is a criminal offence. The department operates and funds a joint team with Ofsted on unregistered schools. We work together closely with Ofsted on all of these issues, including on the extent of their powers, which we keep continually under review.

5th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to publish its response to the consultation on out-of-school education settings.

We will be publishing our response to the call for evidence shortly. As well as carefully considering the wide range of responses received, we have been working with a range of partners across the sector to strengthen our understanding of these settings. Our continued work with communities will ensure any future system is effective and carefully takes into account the differences of this broad and diverse sector, which varies considerably in their characteristics and the types of education and activities that they offer.

5th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of allocating funding from the apprenticeship levy to support apprenticeships in SMEs.

The apprenticeship levy is paid by employers with a payroll of over £3 million a year. These employers are able to spend funds they have paid into the levy through their apprenticeship service account. All other employers use funds that have been allocated to providers, who offer apprenticeship training.

We have recently awarded hundreds of providers across the country with initial awards totalling around £485 million to deliver apprenticeship training for non-levy paying employers. Non-levy paying employers benefit from government co-investment of 90 per cent of apprenticeship training and assessment costs. 100 per cent of the cost of training is paid for small employers, with fewer than 50 employees, who take on apprentices who are 16 to 18 years old, 19 to 24 year old care leavers or 19 to 24 year olds with an Education and Health Care Plan.

From April 2018, we will allow eligible levy-paying employers to transfer up to 10 per cent of the annual value of funds entering their digital accounts to other employers, including smaller businesses.

By 2019/20 annual investment in apprenticeships in England will be £2.45 billion, double what was spent in 2010-11, ensuring that all employers can access high quality apprenticeships training.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress has been made on collating and publishing examples of good practice such as The Daily Mile in increasing children’s physical activity levels in schools.

We are aware of a number of active mile programmes working with schools. Active miles are an excellent opportunity for schools to support their pupils to be physically active throughout the school day.

Officials have met with representatives from active mile providers and will continue to discuss good practice. This will ensure that active mile programmes can best meet the needs of schools and enable pupils to be physically active throughout the school day.

The government has worked with physical education (PE) and school sport partners to identify good practice examples for the PE and Sport Premium. They have been published on the Teaching blog at:

https://teaching.blog.gov.uk/category/pe-and-sport-premium/.

The government has doubled the primary PE and Sport Premium to £320 million a year from September 2017. Updated guidance was published in October 2017 and case studies were published via the Teaching blog site on GOV.UK.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether an assessment has been made of the sufficiency of funding for the primary school swimming programme in all parts of the UK; what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of training of the staff on that programme and whether teachers have professional expertise regularly updated; and if he will ensure that the swimming programme is offered by all primary schools to all children.

Swimming and water safety are compulsory elements of the physical education (PE) curriculum at key stages 1 and 2. The department is responsible for the PE curriculum and the PE and Sport Premium in England. Responsibility for the curriculums of Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales lie with each devolved administration.

The government’s sports strategy, ‘Sporting Future’, published in December 2015, included a commitment to establish a working group “to advise on how to ensure no child leaves school unable to meet a minimum standard of capability and confidence in swimming”. In response, the Swim Group has published an independent report, which reviewed current practice and provision and set out a number of recommendations.

The government has formed an implementation group to review the recommendations. The group will work to increase the opportunities for all children to swim and achieve the national curriculum requirements.

The government has doubled the primary PE and Sport Premium to £320 million a year from September 2017. Updated guidance was published in October 2017 stating that the premium can be used to “provide additional swimming provision targeted to pupils not able to meet the swimming requirements of the national curriculum”. The guidance also indicates the premium can be used to provide staff with professional development, mentoring, training and resources to help them teach PE and sport more effectively.

For the 2017 to 2018 academic year, schools must publish how many pupils within their year 6 cohort are meeting the national curriculum requirement to swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres, use a range of strokes effectively and perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations. This is a new condition placed upon use of the premium.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans to implement recommendation 8 of the Maynard Taskforce.

We are making good progress in implementing the recommendations made by Paul Maynard’s taskforce to ensure that having a learning difficulty and/or disability is not a barrier to becoming an apprentice.

In accordance with Recommendation 8, we considered joining up funding streams to reduce potential hurdles. On reviewing departments’ policies, we found that sources of funding support for those with learning disabilities in work are already streamlined. The Department for Work and Pension’s Access to Work scheme is a highly personalised funding stream, which is already able to consider pre-existing assessments of need agreed by other agencies in emplacing support in the workplace, including Additional Learning Support assessments.

We are also evaluating how the new apprenticeship funding system is working to encourage the successful take up and likely achievement of apprentices with a disability. We have developed guidance materials, which make clearer the support available to disabled apprentices and how to access that, including a toolkit for employers to help them develop a more inclusive and accessible apprenticeship offer, and equality and diversity training materials.

10th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the amount of student (a) fees not paid and (b) loans not repaid by foreign students from (a) EU and (b) non-EU countries was in each of the last five years.

Statistics covering English student loans are published annually by the Student Loans Company (SLC) in the Statistical First Release (SFR) ‘Student Loans in England’.

http://www.slc.co.uk/official-statistics/full-catalogue-of-official-statistics/student-loans-debt-and-repayment.aspx

Eligibility for student finance is based on residency prior to studying; students resident in non-EU countries prior to studying are typically not eligible for English student support.

Information on student loans held at the end of each financial year by borrowers domiciled in England and the EU prior to studying can be found in Table 1 of the SFR. The latest statistics show that at the end of the financial year 2016-17, around £89.3 billion was outstanding in higher education loans, of which £1.7 billion (1.9%) was held by EU domiciled borrowers.

27th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if her Department will replace its July 2016 guidance on schools being fitted with fire sprinklers which includes the words therefore BB100 no longer includes an expectation that new school buildings will be fitted with them with guidance which makes clear that there is an expectation that all new schools will have sprinklers fitted.

There have been no changes to the fire safety laws for schools or our determination to protect children’s safety. It has always been the case, and remains the case, that where the risk assessment required for any new building recommends sprinklers are installed to keep children safe, they must be fitted.

The draft revised fire safety design for schools guidance, issued as part of a technical consultation with experts from the fire sector, has not been adopted. The Department’s 2007 guidance continues to be extant. Alongside the rest of Government, the department will take forward any findings from the public inquiry into the tragic Grenfell Tower fire.

6th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions she has had with (a) the Minister in the Home Office responsible for the Fire Service, (b) the Minister in the Department for Communities and Local Government responsible for building regulations and (c) the Government's Chief Fire and Rescue advisor before the publication of the Government's revised guidance on fire sprinklers in schools.

The Department’s guidance on fire safety in schools is Building Bulletin (BB) 100. This was published in 2007 and is currently being updated. BB 100 includes advice on the use of fire sprinklers in schools as a property protection measure, but not as separate guidance.

Officials are working to update BB100, and have involved officials from the Home Office, the Chief Fire and Rescue Adviser’s Unit and the Department for Communities and Local Government as part of this work. The Government will publish its response to the consultation alongside revised guidance in due course.

1st Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils were displaced from school buildings as a result of fire in each of the last 10 years; and for how long on average those pupils were placed in temporary classrooms.

The Department for Education does not hold data on the number of pupils displaced from school buildings as a result of fire. If a school building is rendered unusable by fire, or any other event, active steps are taken to ensure pupils have the proper access to education.

24th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans her Department has to offer British sign language as an option at GCSE.

There are no plans to introduce additional GCSE subjects.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children for whom hearing impairment is a primary need and who attended a grammar school achieved five GCSEs including English and mathematics at grades A* to C in 2015-16.

The number of pupils for who have a hearing impairment as a primary need, attended a selective school and achieved 5A*-C grades including English and mathematics in 2014/15 was 43.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children for whom hearing impairment is a primary special educational need attended a grammar school in each of the last five years.

The table below shows the number of children with hearing impairments who have attended a grammar school in each of the last five years:

Pupils with Hearing Impairment as their Primary SEN Type in Grammar Schools by Year

January 2012 - 2016

England

.

Grammar Schools

Year

Total Pupils

Total pupils with Hearing Impairment as their Primary SEN Type

Number

% (1)

2012

161,012

177

0.1

2013

161,482

186

0.1

2014

162,629

202

0.1

2015

164,149

297

0.2

2016

166,517

327

0.2

Source: School Census

(1) Percentages are rounded to the nearest 0.1.

7th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment has been made of the effect on the productivity of the economy of the decision to close the UK Commission for Employment and Skills and the associated Skills Sector Councils.

The remit and priorities of the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) were to:

  • lead the debate with industry to drive better outcomes for skills, jobs and growth;
  • work with industrial partnerships and wider networks to push forward employer ownership of skills;
  • test out employer-led innovation to address persistent skills challenges; and
  • help businesses realise the potential of their people through Investors in People (IIP).

While these activities helped to raise awareness of the importance of skills development, which is a driver of productivity, no specific assessment has been made of any effect on UK productivity as a result of the decision to close the UKCES and the associated Sector Skills Councils.

As a result of these decisions, Whitehall departments have been working with the UK Commission to agree a way forward.

National Occupational Standards (NOS) will be managed by the Devolved Administrations and transferred to another public sector organisation. Decisions on the detail of how NOS will be managed are the responsibility of the Devolved Administrations. The contents of the NOS database will remain publicly available and employers throughout the UK can continue to use NOS if they so choose although they are not a mandatory requirement in England for either qualifications or apprenticeships.

The management of the Employer Skills Survey, the Employer Perspectives Survey and the Labour Market Information for All Portal is being moved into the Department for Education. The Investors in People function will continue and the Government is looking to secure its future.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many school fires have been reported in each year since 2005; and what the cost has been of replacing or repairing the buildings affected by such fires in each such year.

The numbers of reported school fires in Great Britain are as follows:

2005/06: 1,400

2006/07: 1,200

2007/08: 1,000

2008/09: 1,000

2009/10: -----

2010/11: 800

2011/12: 700

2012/13: 600

2013/14: 600

These are National Statistics’ figures published on GOV.UK and are rounded[1].

There are no statistics for 2009/10 as none were published for that year due to an incomplete data set. Since 2014/15 fire statistics are published as England only, with data on ‘educational premises’ including other institutions such as colleges and universities, alongside schools, which is not consistent with the data above. These England only statistics are available on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/fire-statistics

The Government does not hold data centrally on the annual cost of replacing or repairing school buildings following damage by fire. However, the Department is currently collecting data on both the capital costs resulting from fire damage and the costs of providing alternative accommodation.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fire-statistics-great-britain-2013-to-2014

6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the effect on safety of buildings on pupils of removing the expectation from guidance that most new schools should have automatic fire sprinkler systems fitted.

The Department has recently consulted stakeholders on proposed revisions to fire safety guidance, which seek to clarify when sprinklers will be fitted in schools. We are not changing the rules on fire safety. It has never been compulsory for sprinklers to be fitted in schools. All new schools must comply with building and fire safety regulations. Where it is concluded that sprinklers must be fitted to protect property or keep children safe, they will be. We are actively considering responses to the consultation and will respond in due course.

1st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many deaf children attended mainstream schools in England in each of the last 10 years; and how many such children were taught British Sign Language in each of those years.

The number of children with special educational needs (SEN) who have ‘hearing impairment’ listed as their primary need can be found in the annual statistical first release ‘Special Educational Needs in England’ on GOV.UK. Table 1, below, provides collated figures for the last ten years, for pupils attending state-funded primary and secondary schools. These figures include children in resourced provision or SEN units but not children in special schools. There will be children whose primary need is not ‘hearing impairment’ but who, nevertheless, have a hearing impairment. These children are not covered by this information.

From September 2014 the ’SEN support’ category replaced the ’school action’ and ‘school action plus’ categories. Those recoded, in 2015, as having ‘SEN support’ but who were formerly included in the ‘school action’ category will not previously have had a primary type of need recorded. This is likely to have contributed to the large increase – between 2014 and 2015 – in the numbers of children recorded as having a hearing impairment.

The Department does not collect statistics on the number of deaf children in mainstream schools who are being taught British Sign Language.

Table 1:

Year

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

State funded primary schools

6,390

6,570

6,650

6,860

7,230

7,370

7,510

7,610

7,915

9,275

State funded secondary schools

5,510

5,670

5,980

6,350

6,730

7,080

7,125

7,225

7,125

8,705

Total

11,900

12,240

12,630

13,210

13,960

14,450

14,635

14,835

15,040

17,980

The links to published data can be found here:

2015

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2015

2014

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2014

2013

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2013

2012

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2012

2011

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2011

2010

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2010

2009

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130401151655/http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00196058/special-educational-needs

2008

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130401151655/http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00195802/pupils-with-special-educational-needs

2007

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130401151655/http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00195520/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2007

2006

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130401151655/http://www.education.gov.uk/researchandstatistics/statistics/allstatistics/a00195201/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2006

13th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will implement the recommendations of the All-Party Group on a Fit and Healthy Childhood on encouraging play in childhood development and learning in school.

We want all children to lead healthy active lifestyles. Physical activity and play are important throughout childhood and can contribute enormously to the healthy development of children. The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) Statutory Framework emphasises this and makes clear that in their early years children learn through play. When inspecting childcare providers, including schools, Ofsted look at how staff are enabling children to play in ways that help them develop and learn. Ofsted’s recent report on Teaching and Play is available to view at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/teaching-and-play-in-the-early-years-a-balancing-act


The EYFS framework can be found here at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/early-years-foundation-stage-framework--2

21st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will provide guidance to head teachers and governors of primary schools on the appropriateness of head covering for girl pupils in order to help tackle rickets.

The Department for Education does not intend to provide specific guidance to headteachers and governors of primary schools on the appropriateness of head covering for girls in order to help tackle rickets.

The department provides advice to schools on health and safety. Schools must take reasonable steps to ensure that staff and pupils are not exposed to risks to their health or safety by conducting a risk assessment and, if necessary, putting measures in place to minimise any known risk.

It is for individual schools to decide whether or not to provide guidance on the appropriateness of head covering. It is for the governing body of each school to set their own policies on school uniform and other matters of appearance. Our guidance to schools on school uniform is clear that, in doing so, they must have full regard to their obligations under equalities law.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what regulations cover the provision of school nurses in (a) local authority schools, (b) private schools and (c) free schools.

The delivery of nursing services within publicly-funded schools is for local determination, and commissioning is led by local authorities. In some areas schools have co-commissioned additional services based on the health needs of the population within their school or locality. Guidance on commissioning school nursing services for local authorities, published by the Department of Health, is available online at:

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/303769/Service_specifications.pdf

School nursing services are monitored by the Care Quality Commission in terms of the quality of provision in an area, but the commission does not monitor individual settings or the extent to which individual schools engage with the service.

In terms of nursing provision in independent schools, there is no specific requirement for such schools to have nurses or for staff to have particular qualifications. If nursing is provided, regulatory requirements relating to the health and welfare of pupils – and also boarding welfare if the school has boarding provision – are relevant.

No assessment of the quality of nursing services in independent schools has been made.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance her Department issued to primary school head teachers on working with pupils who wanted to fast during Ramadan.

The Department for Education has not issued guidance to primary schools on fasting during Ramadan as it is a matter for individual schools to decide how to accommodate pupils who wish to fast during this time. We would expect schools to consider carefully the views of pupils and parents, as well as pupil wellbeing, when applying policies involving religion or individuals’ beliefs. All schools must ensure that any measures they take comply with their legal obligations under the Equality Act 2010.

The Equality and Human Rights Commission has published detailed practical guidance for schools, available online at:

www.equalityhumanrights.com/private-and-public-sector-guidance/education-providers/education-providers-schools-guidance

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment has been made of the quality of the provision, coverage and monitoring of school nurses in private and free schools.

The delivery of nursing services within publicly-funded schools is for local determination, and commissioning is led by local authorities. In some areas schools have co-commissioned additional services based on the health needs of the population within their school or locality. Guidance on commissioning school nursing services for local authorities, published by the Department of Health, is available online at:

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/303769/Service_specifications.pdf

School nursing services are monitored by the Care Quality Commission in terms of the quality of provision in an area, but the commission does not monitor individual settings or the extent to which individual schools engage with the service.

In terms of nursing provision in independent schools, there is no specific requirement for such schools to have nurses or for staff to have particular qualifications. If nursing is provided, regulatory requirements relating to the health and welfare of pupils – and also boarding welfare if the school has boarding provision – are relevant.

No assessment of the quality of nursing services in independent schools has been made.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress her Department is making on improving public accountability of services for children with special educational needs through published performance data.

The Department for Education publishes a range of performance and attainment data from:

  1. Local authorities
  2. Early years settings
  3. Schools and colleges on children and young people with special educational needs and disability
  4. Local and national levels

Local authorities and their partners across education, health and social care are implementing the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) reforms which came into force on 1 September this year. The Department is working closely with local authorities and local Parent Carer Forums to understand how local implementation of the Children and Families Act is progressing. Summary findings of an autumn implementation survey will be published before the end of the year. The Department will also publish local authority data on an annual basis, starting in summer 2015. This will include, for example, the number of conversions from statements to Education, Health and Care (EHC) Plans and the number and percentage of new EHC Plans delivered within twenty weeks.

From September 2015, we expect local authorities will have made significant progress in embedding the reforms, and our focus will increasingly be on whether the new systems are leading to improved outcomes for children and young people.

We have asked Ofsted to consider what more needs to be done to ensure good quality delivery of the new system. Ofsted’s recommendations will be published shortly.

10th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when Ofsted will make recommendations on the role of inspections in monitoring specialist education support services for children with special educational needs.

The Department for Education asked Ofsted to carry out a study to identify best practice amongst local authorities to prepare for the special educational needs reforms in order to understand whether there is a need for an inspection framework to drive improvements. The findings from the study and the recommendations are a matter for Ofsted. We understand that Ofsted will publish its findings and recommendations from the study by the end of this year.

17th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what information his Department holds on the number of greyhounds exported from the UK to Ireland in (a) 2018 and (b) 2019.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) does not record information on the specific breed of any dog exported from the UK. However, the total numbers of dogs exported using Export Health Certificates to the Republic of Ireland for the years 2018 and 2019 is as follows:

2018 - 5

2019 - 15

Please note that APHA does not record information relating to the number of pets travelling from Great Britain with a passport under the Pet Travel Scheme.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of reports that UK-born and trained greyhounds are being kept in poor conditions for breeding in China; whether his Department has plans to prevent the future export of greyhounds from the UK to China; and if he will make a statement.

The Government takes the welfare of all racing animals very seriously, including once their racing careers have ended.

The Animal Plant and Health Agency (APHA), which grants certification for the commercial exports of dogs and records information regarding the commercial movement of animals, has confirmed that they do not have any records of greyhounds being exported to China for commercial purposes during 2017 or 2018.

The Greyhound Board of Great Britain have made clear that they do not support the export of greyhounds to countries where welfare standards cannot be verified. They keep records of all dogs running and once a dog is retired the owner or trainer is required to state where the dog will be relocated to.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if the Government will bring forward legislative proposals to amend the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 to allow rehoming organisations to rehome banned section 1 dogs.

The evidence I provided the House of Commons Select Committee on Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (EFRA), as part of its review into controlling dangerous dogs, sets out what can be done with respect to the transfer of ownership of prohibited dogs. Defra has also had discussions with animal welfare organisations on the issue.

Evidence is available via the following link:

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201719/cmselect/cmenvfru/1892/1892.pdf

In relation to dog attacks, the Metropolitan Police provided evidence to last year’s review on controlling dangerous dogs by the EFRA Committee which showed that pit bull terriers were disproportionately involved in dog attacks (section 3 Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 offences, completed cases).

The Metropolitan Police figures indicated that in 2015-16 pit bulls were responsible for 19.3% (92) of all reported dog attacks in Greater London out of a total of 468 cases. Pit bull terriers are considered to represent much less than 19.3% of the dog population and it is concerning that one type of dog, which does not have high levels of ownership, is disproportionately responsible for that many dog attacks in London. In addition, information collected by Defra shows the pit bull terrier to be disproportionately involved in fatal dog attacks, with seven fatalities out of 34 since 2005 caused by pit bull terriers.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the scientific evidence is for determining that the four breeds of dog banned under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 pose more of a risk to the public then other dog breeds.

The evidence I provided the House of Commons Select Committee on Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (EFRA), as part of its review into controlling dangerous dogs, sets out what can be done with respect to the transfer of ownership of prohibited dogs. Defra has also had discussions with animal welfare organisations on the issue.

Evidence is available via the following link:

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201719/cmselect/cmenvfru/1892/1892.pdf

In relation to dog attacks, the Metropolitan Police provided evidence to last year’s review on controlling dangerous dogs by the EFRA Committee which showed that pit bull terriers were disproportionately involved in dog attacks (section 3 Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 offences, completed cases).

The Metropolitan Police figures indicated that in 2015-16 pit bulls were responsible for 19.3% (92) of all reported dog attacks in Greater London out of a total of 468 cases. Pit bull terriers are considered to represent much less than 19.3% of the dog population and it is concerning that one type of dog, which does not have high levels of ownership, is disproportionately responsible for that many dog attacks in London. In addition, information collected by Defra shows the pit bull terrier to be disproportionately involved in fatal dog attacks, with seven fatalities out of 34 since 2005 caused by pit bull terriers.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with animal welfare organisations on the rehoming of dogs banned under section 1 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991.

The evidence I provided the House of Commons Select Committee on Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (EFRA), as part of its review into controlling dangerous dogs, sets out what can be done with respect to the transfer of ownership of prohibited dogs. Defra has also had discussions with animal welfare organisations on the issue.

Evidence is available via the following link:

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201719/cmselect/cmenvfru/1892/1892.pdf

In relation to dog attacks, the Metropolitan Police provided evidence to last year’s review on controlling dangerous dogs by the EFRA Committee which showed that pit bull terriers were disproportionately involved in dog attacks (section 3 Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 offences, completed cases).

The Metropolitan Police figures indicated that in 2015-16 pit bulls were responsible for 19.3% (92) of all reported dog attacks in Greater London out of a total of 468 cases. Pit bull terriers are considered to represent much less than 19.3% of the dog population and it is concerning that one type of dog, which does not have high levels of ownership, is disproportionately responsible for that many dog attacks in London. In addition, information collected by Defra shows the pit bull terrier to be disproportionately involved in fatal dog attacks, with seven fatalities out of 34 since 2005 caused by pit bull terriers.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what funding his Department has allocated to projects to reduce children’s exposure to air pollution.

Defra provides funds to Local Authorities via the air quality grant fund for projects in local communities to tackle air pollution and reduce emissions affecting schools, businesses and residents. For example, in 2016/17, the London Borough of Islington were awarded £50,000 to run a local school focussed awareness and engagement campaign through the air quality grant, and in 2017/18, Spelthorne Borough Council were given £145,188 to run an awareness campaign in schools across Surrey.

Local Authorities have a duty to monitor and assess air quality and to take action to reduce pollution where these breach statutory limits, and are best placed to determine local priorities. Their local knowledge and interaction with the communities that they serve mean that they know the issues on the ground in detail and the solutions that are best suited to local circumstances.

Defra awarded a total of £2.4 million to local authorities from the 2017/18 air quality grant fund; £3.7 million was awarded to local authorities in 2016/17, and £0.5 million in 2015/6. £3 million has been allocated for 2018/19.

The Government has also put in place a £3.5 billion plan to improve air quality and reduce harmful emissions, which includes £255 million for councils to improve air quality and a dedicated Clean Air Fund of £220 million for those local areas with the biggest air quality challenges. We have consulted on our new world leading Clean Air Strategy, which includes new and ambitious goals, legislation, investment and policies which will help us to clean up our air faster and more effectively.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
5th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government's proposals for a clean air strategy will include (a) a commitment not to exceed World Health Organisation recommended limits on particulate matter and (b) a target to reduce premature deaths caused by air pollution.

The evidence of health impacts from particulate matter (PM) is particularly strong and the Government is already taking action to reduce emissions of harmful PM. The UK has signed up to ambitious new targets to reduce emissions of PM2.5 as well as four other damaging pollutants (ammonia, nitrogen oxides, non-methane volatile organic compounds and sulphur dioxide) by 2020 and 2030. The Government is aiming to cut early deaths from air pollution by half. The Statutory Instrument committing these targets to law was laid on 1 February.

We will publish a Clean Air Strategy, which will set out plans to meet these targets, for consultation in 2018. We are currently calling for evidence on domestic solid fuel use, one of the largest emissions sources of PM. Householders and businesses are being asked for their views on proposals to cut harmful emissions caused by domestic fuel burning.

Defra works closely with the Department for Health and Social Care and Public Health England to develop a strong evidence base on the health impacts of air pollution and to provide health advice during episodes of elevated air pollution. We are carefully considering public health measures.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
21st Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what information he holds on the number of (a) consignments of dogs exported to Pakistan and (b) dogs within those consignments in each of the last three years.

In 2015 there were 15 consignments of dogs to Pakistan, with 15 animals exported. In 2016 there were 18 consignments of dogs, with 23 animals exported. In 2017, there were 23 consignments with 26 animals.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, by what criteria requests for access to anonymised track injury and euthanasia data for research purposes will be assessed.

As set out during Defra’s Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010, the Government expects the Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) to begin publishing from early next year annual aggregate injury and euthanasia statistics from GBGB tracks, and annual summary statistics for the number of GBGB registered greyhounds that leave the sport. The figures will cover the preceding calendar year and, for dogs that leave the sport each year, the details will include by what method. The GBGB will begin publishing both sets of figures by the end of March 2018. Access to anonymized track injury and euthanasia data will be considered by GBGB’s Welfare Standing Committee and Defra for bona fide research purposes.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (a) by what date he expects the Greyhound Board of Great Britain to begin publishing summary statistics for the number of dogs that leave the industry each year and (b) what details those statistics will include.

As set out during Defra’s Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010, the Government expects the Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) to begin publishing from early next year annual aggregate injury and euthanasia statistics from GBGB tracks, and annual summary statistics for the number of GBGB registered greyhounds that leave the sport. The figures will cover the preceding calendar year and, for dogs that leave the sport each year, the details will include by what method. The GBGB will begin publishing both sets of figures by the end of March 2018. Access to anonymized track injury and euthanasia data will be considered by GBGB’s Welfare Standing Committee and Defra for bona fide research purposes.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, (a) by what date he expects the Greyhound Board of Great Britain to begin publishing aggregate injury and euthanasia figures and (b) what period that data will cover.

As set out during Defra’s Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010, the Government expects the Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) to begin publishing from early next year annual aggregate injury and euthanasia statistics from GBGB tracks, and annual summary statistics for the number of GBGB registered greyhounds that leave the sport. The figures will cover the preceding calendar year and, for dogs that leave the sport each year, the details will include by what method. The GBGB will begin publishing both sets of figures by the end of March 2018. Access to anonymized track injury and euthanasia data will be considered by GBGB’s Welfare Standing Committee and Defra for bona fide research purposes.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he expects the Greyhound Board of Great Britain to fulfil its agreement to develop a Publicly Available Specification for trainers’ kennels and to extend its UK Accreditation Service to include the enforcement of those new standards.

A Publicly Available Specification (PAS) for greyhound trainers’ residential kennels was published by the British Standards Institution on 12 December 2017. The PAS has been sponsored by the Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) and has been drafted with input from animal welfare groups, veterinarians, the industry and Defra. GBGB are currently beginning the process of extending their current UK Accreditation Service accreditation to include enforcement of the standards contained in the PAS. This process can take between 12 to 18 months.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress his Department has made on a non-regulatory agreement with independent greyhound racing tracks to allow anonymised, aggregate injury and euthanasia statistics from those tracks to be published.

Prior to seeking any agreements with independent greyhound racing tracks, Defra has undertaken research and is currently assisting with further research sponsored by the Dogs Trust and the RSPCA into the profile and practices of independent greyhound tracks and the trainers that use them. There are currently three independent tracks operating in England.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the timetable is for the drafting of the legislative proposals on increasing the maximum sentence for animal cruelty to five years imprisonment; and whether the Government plans to consult with animal welfare organisations on those proposals.

As announced on 30 September, draft legislation to increase the maximum penalty for animal cruelty to five years will be published for consultation around the turn of the year. We will welcome comments from animal welfare charities who have campaigned for this change.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
10th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many consignments of dogs were exported from the UK to (a) EU and (b) non-EU countries in 2016.

  1. 80 consignments of dogs were exported from Great Britain to the EU during 2016 with individual health certificates, under the Balai Directive. This figure does not include those which moved under the pet travel scheme.

  2. 3886 consignments of dogs were exported from Great Britain to non-EU countries during 2016.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 15 July 2016 to Question 42492, on Trade in Animals and Related Products Regulations 2011, when her Department will begin the five-year review of those regulations.

Defra began its review of the Trade in Animals and Related Products (TARP) Regulations 2011 with formal and informal consultation with customers in October 2015. We now anticipate completion in Spring 2017.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
20th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 14 March 2017 to Question 67006 on bovine tuberculosis: dogs, whether her Department has carried out any research on diseases in packs of hunting dogs.

Bovine TB is a notifiable disease in all farmed and pet mammal species, including dogs. The disease has only very rarely been diagnosed in dogs, in this country and elsewhere, and investigations into bovine TB breakdowns in cattle herds have never identified the source of a breakdown as an infected dog.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
8th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the extent to which bovine TB is spread by dogs.

Evidence indicates that dogs play an insignificant role in the persistence and spread of bovine TB in Great Britain, including transmission of the disease to cattle herds.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
28th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 7 February 2017 to Question 62238, on Pets: Imports, for what reasons the number of dogs reported as entering the UK non-commercially under the Pet Travel Scheme increased between 2015 and 2016.

There has been a marked increase in popularity of the Pet Travel Scheme in GB. In 2014 APHA issued 80,274 new pet passports to their official veterinarians, 119,704 in 2015 and 95,449 in 2016.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
28th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons her Department decided not to require Animal and Plant Health Advisory officers to deter illegal imports of puppies into the UK control zone in Coquelles, Calais.


The Government takes the illegal importation of puppies seriously and does put in place deterrents to the illegal import of puppies into the United Kingdom Control Zone at Coquelles. The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) is responsible for ensuring there are effective controls to prevent illegal movements into the Control Zone. APHA require approved carriers, in the case of Coquelles, Eurotunnel, to check 100% of animals travelling under the Pet Travel Scheme for compliance before they are permitted to enter the Control Zone. There is a formal agreement in place which details how Eurotunnel must carry out this function.


APHA has always carried out periodic inspections in the Control Zone to ensure that the carrier company’s checks are effective. Our approach to these pet animal checks and compliance monitoring has not changed. In addition APHA has also worked with carriers on specific intelligence led operations to identify and seize illegally imported puppies. APHA works with all carriers approved to transport pet animals and is currently in discussion on proposals to strengthen the effectiveness of the checks they are required to carry out.


George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
27th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate her Department has made of the return to the UK taxpayer of each £1 invested in UK Farming.

UK taxpayers support the agricultural sector in variety of ways: through the EU Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), spending on agricultural research and development, including the Agri-tech Strategy, and indirectly through wider programmes such as on skills development. The benefit of each pound spent on the Agri-tech Strategy was estimated to be £9 (BIS Evaluation Plan 2016)[1]. The estimated benefit, on average, for funds spent in England under Pillar 2 of the CAP is over £3 per pound spent according to the Rural Development Plan for England Impact Assessment 2015[2], but less than £1 per pound spent for Pillar 1 according to a report on implementation of CAP in England in 2013[3]. As a result of the UK’s decision to leave the European Union there is a real opportunity to improve returns to taxpayer support for agriculture.

[1] BIS Evaluation Plan 2016

[2] The Rural Development Programme for England, 2014 to 2020: Final Impact Assessment (2015)

[3] Implementation of CAP reform in England 2013

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) dogs, (b) cats and (c) ferrets were imported (i) non-commercially under the Pets Travel Scheme and (ii) commercially under the Trade in Animals and Related Products Regulations 2011 into the UK in 2016.

The commercial data was extracted from the Trade Control and Expert System (TRACES) and the pet data was taken from APHA’s system for recording pets entering the UK, based on information provided by pet checkers.

In some cases imports are recorded on TRACES as “Canis familiaris / Felis catus”, so APHA are unable to distinguish between cat or dog imports. These are included on the table in row “Mixed cats/dogs”.

Pets

Commercial

Dogs

275,876

34,017

Cats

24,145

2,572

Ferrets

129

0

Mixed cats/dogs

N/A

327

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when she plans to publish the details of the public consultation on the 25 Year Natural Environment Plan.

In line with its manifesto commitment, the Government is committed to improving the environment within a generation. We are developing a 25 Year Environment Plan to deliver this.

The first step towards developing the plan will be to publish soon a consultative document open to all to contribute either online or by mail. We will use the feedback from this to help develop the full plan itself next year.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
8th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government plans to conduct further research on the value of trees to farm productivity.

Defra has conducted a review into the evidence base for agroforestry and how the agroforestry measure could operate within the Rural Development Programme. The review is being finalised and will be published shortly.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
8th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much has been grated to farmers in respect of animal welfare commitments made under Article 33 of Regulation (EU) No. 1305/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council on support for rural development and previously under Article 40 of Council Regulation (EU) No. 1698/2005 in each of the last four years; what the value was of each grant made under those regulations; and what the animal welfare commitment was in respect of which each such grant was so made.

For the 2014-20 Rural Development Programme for England the Government decided to support animal health and welfare aims under measures other than the specific animal welfare provision in the EU Rural Development Regulation to which the question refers. Therefore no funding has been granted to farmers in respect of these specific animal welfare measures.

However, a number of projects under the two programmes have supported animal welfare. These include the North West Livestock Programme and the South West TB advisory service under the 2007-13 programme and grants for supporting lameness detection, rumination monitoring & oestrus detectors under the 2014-20 programme.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
8th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government plans to conduct further research on the utility of trees in flood prevention.

The Government continues to fund and support research into the utility of trees in flood prevention through the Defra/Environment Agency ‘Working with Natural Processes’ research programme, and the Forestry Commission’s Science and Innovation Strategy.

Forest Research, the Forestry Commission’s Research Agency, is conducting a number of medium and long-term projects on this topic, often in partnership with water regulators, universities and end users. These cover process, modelling, economic and mapping studies designed to quantify and demonstrate how woodland can contribute to flood risk management. Operational synthesis of existing research is currently being used as the basis for designing and targeting forestry’s contribution to help protect ‘communities at risk’ under the Cumbria Floods Action Plan.

One flagship project led by Forest Research is the ‘Slowing the Flow’ at Pickering study. This is evaluating how the integrated application of a range of land use and management measures can alleviate flooding, including woodland creation and the use of large woody structures.

Other studies are underway in the catchments of the River Parrett in Somerset, River Irthing in Northumberland and River Usk in Wales, to provide evidence of how woodland and woodland management can affect flood risk.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans her Department has to bring forward legislation to amend the Welfare of Racing Greyhound Regulations 2010 related to the recommendations in the post-implementation review of those regulations.

As set out in Defra’s Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010, we are currently considering a number of areas where the Regulations may need amending. Any such amendments can be introduced via secondary legislation made under the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of greyhound trainers' kennel standards before legislation is to be brought forward to amend the Welfare of Racing Greyhound Regulations 2010.

Defra’s Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010 contained an assessment of standards at trainers’ kennels and found that more was needed to be done to safeguard welfare. As a result, the Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) has agreed to work through the British Standards Institution and with other stakeholders, to develop a consensus standard for trainers’ kennels. The GBGB has also agreed to seek to extend its current United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) accreditation to cover the enforcement of these new standards at the kennels of GBGB licensed trainers. During the Review process no evidence was submitted to Defra on the numbers of greyhound trainers operating solely at the four remaining independent tracks in England and the conditions at any such kennels. Therefore Defra are giving further consideration as to how best to gather this evidence, this includes a possible joint research project with the Dogs Trust. Any Defra research will be published on the Gov.UK website and any useful information found will be used in an Impact Assessment that would accompany any regulations for trainers’ kennels.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the recommendations of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee's report of 25 February 2016, what assessment her Department has made of introducing a two-year probationary period for continued self-regulation of greyhound industry.

Defra’s Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010 made an assessment of the Greyhound Board of Great Britain’s (GBGB) enforcement of the standards contained in the 2010 Regulations at GBGB affiliated tracks. The Review found that the standards at GBGB affiliated tracks were being maintained in an effective manner by the GBGB. However, the GBGB’s ability to self-regulate track standards is dependent on them maintaining their United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) accreditation as a certification body for those standards. Should GBGB lose its UKAS accreditation then, under the 2010 Regulations, it would immediately lose the right to self-regulate standards at GBGB affiliated tracks. Therefore, for regulating conditions at tracks, the Government would not support extending to two years such a probationary period. For other areas of GBGB’s self-regulatory work, prior to EFRA’s Greyhound Welfare report, the GBGB had already agreed with Defra a period of two years, up to 2018, to: develop a consensus standard for trainers’ kennels and to extend its current UKAS accreditation to cover the enforcement of these new standards; and begin publishing annually aggregate figures for dogs injured or euthanized at GBGB affiliated tracks, as well as dogs leaving GBGB racing.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the post-implementation review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010, when her Department plans to (a) gather evidence on the number of trainers operating at independent tracks and the conditions at those kennels and (b) publish its report.

Defra’s Post Implementation Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010 contained an assessment of standards at trainers’ kennels and found that more was needed to be done to safeguard welfare. As a result, the Greyhound Board of Great Britain (GBGB) has agreed to work through the British Standards Institution and with other stakeholders, to develop a consensus standard for trainers’ kennels. The GBGB has also agreed to seek to extend its current United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) accreditation to cover the enforcement of these new standards at the kennels of GBGB licensed trainers. During the Review process no evidence was submitted to Defra on the numbers of greyhound trainers operating solely at the four remaining independent tracks in England and the conditions at any such kennels. Therefore Defra are giving further consideration as to how best to gather this evidence, this includes a possible joint research project with the Dogs Trust. Any Defra research will be published on the Gov.UK website and any useful information found will be used in an Impact Assessment that would accompany any regulations for trainers’ kennels.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
12th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when her Department plans to begin the five-year review of the Trade in Animals and Related Products Regulations 2011 required by those regulations.

Defra began its review of the Trade in Animals and Related Products (TARP) Regulations 2011 with formal and informal consultation with customers in October 2015.

The intention is to complete the review by the end of 2016.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
26th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the Government's policy will be on supporting further protection through an uplisting of (a) elephants, (b) rhinos and (c) lions at the forthcoming CITES Conference of the Parties in September 2016.

Proposals on the listing protection of 60 species have been submitted to the 17th Conference of Parties (CoP17) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). Uplisting proposals for elephants and lions will be discussed but there is no proposal on rhinoceroses, which are already generally subject to the highest level of protection.

All these proposals will be assessed against the scientific criteria for listings set out in the Convention and, where justified, the UK will advocate further protection to support the survival of endangered species. This includes in negotiations with the other Member States of the EU to ensure our positions on proposals are taken into account before the final negotiating position for the EU and its Member States is agreed.

25th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what ministerial representation there will be at the CITES Conference of the Parties in September 2016.

We understand that the South African Government is intending to host a ministerial-level segment to open the 17th Meeting of the Conference of Parties (CoP17) to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species taking place in Johannesburg, South Africa from 24 September to 5 October 2016.

We are still considering UK Ministerial attendance so I am not able to confirm this at the current time. I am however keen for the UK delegation to play an active role at CoP17 in securing positive outcomes for endangered species at risk of over-exploitation as a result of international trade.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to educate consumers about the welfare risks of certain breed characteristics in cats so that consumers can make informed decisions when considering a purchase.

The Government would be happy to work with key stakeholders to discuss health problems associated with pedigree cats

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what cross-departmental working groups or structures are in place in respect of (a) litter policy and (b) marine litter at (i) official and (ii) ministerial level.

Defra and the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) are working in partnership to develop a National Litter Strategy. To help us, we have set up a Litter Strategy Advisory Group which includes representatives from local government, campaign groups and independent experts, as well as the packaging and fast-food industries. Other relevant Departments, such as Department for Transport, Department of Health, Home Office or Ministry of Justice will attend the Advisory Group as appropriate. Ministers from both Defra and DCLG attended an initial meeting of key stakeholders with an interest in this issue and are taking an active interest in the work of the Group. Officials from Defra and DCLG are of course in close contact on litter policy.

The National Litter Strategy will complement existing work including actions to address litter in the marine environment. It will promote concerted, co-ordinated and effective actions to reduce litter and littering on land, which in turn should lead to a reduction in the amount of litter reaching the marine environment.

The UK’s Marine Strategy sets out the actions we are taking to improve the marine environment, including what we are doing to tackle marine litter. The Strategy is approved by the Government and the Devolved Administrations. At an official level, development of the Strategy is overseen by a steering group made up of relevant officials from Defra, Defra Group partners and other relevant Government Departments. This is supported by our Clean and Safe Seas Evidence Group that includes a specific sub-group on marine litter. In addition, given the trans-boundary nature of marine litter, we work closely with other countries sharing our seas through an EU-level Technical Group on Marine Litter and an Oslo and Paris Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North East Atlantic (OSPAR) group on marine litter.

10th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people have been identified as illegally importing puppies under the Pet Travel Scheme during the Dogs Trust's pilot quarantine initiative.

Local Authorities are responsible for the prosecution of individuals illegally importing puppies into Great Britain. In addition Port of Dover Police can issue formal warnings for illegal landing of puppies including where animals have been concealed. It is for the local authority concerned to decide if it wishes to undertake a prosecution in any of the cases of illegal importation identified during the pilot.

The Dogs Trust pilot quarantine initiative began on 2 December 2015 and is expected to continue until the end of May 2016. As explained in my reply to the honourable Member for North Durham, Kevan Jones, on 11 March 2016, PQ UIN 30363, the Animal and Plant Health Agency will carry out an assessment of the effectiveness of the initiative following its conclusion. This assessment will be made publicly available and will be based on information provided by all parties involved in the pilot. This will include a summary of all enforcement action that has been taken. The report may not, however, be able to comment on investigations that may be underway.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
10th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many prosecutions have occurred or proceedings been commenced as the result of the seizure of illegally imported puppies taken into the Dogs Trust's care via its pilot quarantine initiative since the start of that pilot.

Local Authorities are responsible for the prosecution of individuals illegally importing puppies into Great Britain. In addition Port of Dover Police can issue formal warnings for illegal landing of puppies including where animals have been concealed. It is for the local authority concerned to decide if it wishes to undertake a prosecution in any of the cases of illegal importation identified during the pilot.

The Dogs Trust pilot quarantine initiative began on 2 December 2015 and is expected to continue until the end of May 2016. As explained in my reply to the honourable Member for North Durham, Kevan Jones, on 11 March 2016, PQ UIN 30363, the Animal and Plant Health Agency will carry out an assessment of the effectiveness of the initiative following its conclusion. This assessment will be made publicly available and will be based on information provided by all parties involved in the pilot. This will include a summary of all enforcement action that has been taken. The report may not, however, be able to comment on investigations that may be underway.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
10th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the recommendations of the Pitt Review on the 2007 floods, whether her Department plans to (a) change building regulations to make homes more resilient in flood risk areas and (b) increase the adoption of sustainable drainage systems in order to better manage urban flood risk in the long term.

Building regulations were updated in 2013 and enable the incorporation of flood resilience measures into building work. In addition, the British Standards Institution published BS8550 in November 2015. This is a technical standard addressing resilience and resistance issues. We continue to promote better resilience and support innovations in this field.

On 6 April 2015, planning policy was strengthened to ensure that sustainable drainage systems are provided in new major developments where appropriate, and that clear arrangements are in place for ongoing maintenance over the lifetime of the development.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many licenses issued under the Welfare of Wild Animals in Travelling Circuses (England) Regulations 2012 are currently in force; and how many applications for such licenses for what reasons have been (a) granted, (b) refused, (c) suspended and (d) revoked in the last 12 months.

Under the Welfare of Wild Animals in Travelling Circuses (England) Regulations 2012 there are currently two licences in force. One of these licences was suspended for twenty days in December 2015. Applications for renewals of both of these licences have been received and are currently being considered.

In May 2015, Defra also received an application for a licence from a further circus. As that circus subsequently decided not to tour in England in 2015 their application was discontinued without Defra making a decision whether to grant or refuse the application. In the last 12 months, no other applications for a licence have been received by Defra and no others have been refused, suspended or revoked.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
13th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the number and countries of origin were of dogs imported into the UK for (a) non-commercial reasons under PETS and (b) commercial reasons.

For imports under the Pet Travel Scheme, a record is made of the country that prepared the relevant documentation. This will not always be the country of origin.

The majority of pets entering Great Britain have UK pet passports, suggesting that they are returning with their owners from a holiday or visit abroad.


Data is collated by a range of third parties, typically transport companies approved to carry pet animals and it is not possible for the Government to guarantee the accuracy of the statistics.


I have attached the available information on commercial and non-commercial imports of dogs for the years 2013, 2014 and 2015.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
10th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress her Department has made on implementing those aspects of the Floods and Water Management Act 2010 applicable to smaller reservoirs.

In February 2015, Defra announced it had decided not to make further changes to the inspection regime for smaller reservoirs because, at that time, the evidence base would not support such changes.


However, we are exploring potential further research which could provide additional evidence on the level of risk posed by smaller reservoirs.

10th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans she has to take further steps to implement those aspects of the Floods and Water Management Act 2010 applicable to smaller reservoirs.

In February 2015, Defra announced it had decided not to make further changes to the inspection regime for smaller reservoirs because, at that time, the evidence base would not support such changes.


However, we are exploring potential further research which could provide additional evidence on the level of risk posed by smaller reservoirs.

22nd Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how frequently cattle in each region are tested for bovine TB.

All herds in the designated High Risk and Edge Areas of England are subject to annual surveillance testing for bovine TB, except for herds in the part of Cheshire falling within the Edge Area, which is currently subject to six-monthly testing. In the designated Low Risk Area all herds are subject to four yearly surveillance testing for bovine TB, except for certain higher risk herds which are subject to annual testing. Herds in all risk areas may also be subject to additional TB testing as a result of TB breakdowns

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
21st Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what proportion of cattle have been tested for bovine TB in each of the last three years.

Bovine TB is a devolved matter. The figures presented below are for England only.


Year

Number of cattle tested during year (millions)

Cattle population at June 1 (millions)

2012

3.4

5.4

2013

3.7

5.4

2014

4.0

5.3


Figures for the number of cattle tested for bovine TB represent all cattle tested during a calendar year. Cattle population estimates are as at a single point in time (1 June 2015). It is not, therefore, possible to determine the proportion of the cattle population which was tested in each of these years. All herds in the designated High Risk and Edge Areas of England are subject to annual surveillance testing for bovine TB, except for herds in the part of Cheshire falling within the Edge Area, which is currently subject to six-monthly testing. In the designated Low Risk Area all herds are subject to four yearly surveillance testing for bovine TB, except for certain higher risk herds which are subject to annual testing. Herds in all risk areas may also be subject to additional TB testing as a result of TB breakdowns.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when she plans to issue the public consultation on the 2010 Greyhound Regulations.

Defra plans to consult on the initial findings of the Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010 this autumn. The Greyhound Forum and members of the Forum have contributed to the initial findings exercise and, as part of the initial stages of the Review.

Defra officials have also had discussions with UKAS.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Greyhound Forum has been consulted over the forthcoming review of the 2010 Greyhound Regulations.

Defra plans to consult on the initial findings of the Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010 this autumn. The Greyhound Forum and members of the Forum have contributed to the initial findings exercise and, as part of the initial stages of the Review.

Defra officials have also had discussions with UKAS.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions she has had with UKAS on extending the current regulations on greyhounds to cover trainers' kennels.

Defra plans to consult on the initial findings of the Review of the Welfare of Racing Greyhounds Regulations 2010 this autumn. The Greyhound Forum and members of the Forum have contributed to the initial findings exercise and, as part of the initial stages of the Review.

Defra officials have also had discussions with UKAS.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent estimate she has made of the number of abandoned or neglected horses.

No recent estimate has been made, however estimates published by horse welfare charities in 2014 suggested there might be up to 3,500 horses a year in England. The Animals Act 1971 was amended earlier this year to make it easier to deal with abandoned or fly-grazing horses in England.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate she has made of the number of horses not properly registered under passport and micro-chipping regulations in the UK.

Defra has not made an estimate of the number of horses not properly registered and identified under passport and micro-chipping regulations in the UK. Local Authorities are responsible for enforcing the regulations and prosecuting owners of unidentified horses, and records of these are not held centrally.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many prosecutions there have been for abandoning or neglecting horses in each of the last five years.

Prosecutions under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 for abandonment or neglect are not broken down by type of animal.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department plans to produce an action plan on wildlife crime in the UK modelled on the plan recently announced at EU level.

The Coalition Government published The UK Commitment to Action on the Illegal Wildlife Trade in February 2014 and reported on progress against these commitments in March 2015. In March, the UK also reported on its progress against the London Declaration on Illegal Wildlife Trade and agreed new urgent measures to tackle the trade at the Kasane Conference in Botswana. This Government remains committed to working with our international partners to tackle wildlife crime, both at home and overseas, and will work closely with the Commission as it develops its action plan on illegal wildlife trade.

In the UK, the National Wildlife Crime Unit (NWCU) helps in tackling wildlife crime by analysing and disseminating intelligence and assisting law enforcement agencies directly in carrying out wildlife crime investigations. The Government is part-funding the NWCU until March 2016.

Where wildlife crime is sufficiently serious, the specialist capabilities of the National Crime Agency can be accessed. Border Force also plays a leading role, delivering risk-based anti-smuggling controls at the border.

The Government also helps tackle wildlife crime through the Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime (PAW), a multi-agency body comprising representatives of the Government and voluntary bodies with an interest in combating wildlife crime.

18th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs entered the UK from each country for (a) non-commercial purposes under the Pet Travel Scheme and (b) commercial purposes under the Balai Directive 92/45/EEC in 2014.

The information requested is attached.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many (a) licensed dog breeders and (b) pet shops licensed to sell puppies there are in the UK.

Numbers of licensed dog breeders and pet shops are not recorded centrally but are held separately by each local authority. According to a 2014 survey submitted to Defra by an animal welfare organisation, there are between 50-70 pet shops selling cats and dogs.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under section 2 of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1871 in England in 2014.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under Section 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and Section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871, in England in 2014, can be viewed in the below table.

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of selected offences related to dogs legislation, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Legislation

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Section 3(1) Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

1,163

878

Section 2 Dogs Act 1871

59

10

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people were (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under section 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in England in 2014.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under Section 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 and Section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871, in England in 2014, can be viewed in the below table.

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts of selected offences related to dogs legislation, England, 2014 (1)(2)

Legislation

Proceeded against

Found guilty

Section 3(1) Dangerous Dogs Act 1991

1,163

878

Section 2 Dogs Act 1871

59

10

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions her Department has held with other EU member states in which bovine TB occurs on establishing joint research on a TB vaccine for cattle.

To date, no other EU member States have expressed interest in developing a TB vaccine for cattle. But we are working with officials and businesses in both New Zealand and the USA in our quest to identify, through research, an effective DIVA test (a TB test to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals), which is a critical element of any programme which would involve BCG vaccination of cattle.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will publish the most recent update of the tentative timeline for possible use of a vaccine against bovine TB in the EU as set out by the EU Commissioners in January 2013.

In the comprehensive TB Strategy we commit to pursuing options to license a cattle vaccine by 2023, or sooner if possible, but the hurdles remain very high. The 10 years indicative timeline set out by the Commission was an indication of the timescale for allowing free movement of vaccinated cattle in the EU. It may be possible for vaccination to be used in the UK before then but we are still some way from that, given the need to develop an effective DIVA test (a TB test to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) and, if we are successful in that, what would then inevitably be lengthy, wide-scale and expensive field trials.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress her Department has made on commencing field trials for a cattle vaccine for bovine TB.

Before a decision can be made to make an investment in field trials, we need to be confident that we have an effective DIVA test (a TB test to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals). The work we have already done shows that the blood test DIVA is unlikely to be good enough, in that it will yield too many false positive results leading to slaughter of too many uninfected cattle. So we are now investing in the development of a more promising skin test DIVA.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
9th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons her Department has not yet introduced a Bill based on the draft Wild Animals in Circuses Bill.

We remain committed to banning the use of wild animals in circuses. Despite publishing a draft Bill and supporting the Honourable Member’s determined attempt to introduce that Bill, we have run out of time this Parliament. We have always said that introducing primary legislation can take time. That is why we introduced a strict licensing scheme to protect the welfare of wild animals still used in circuses in the interim.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people have been (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of offences under section 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in England in each year from 1997 to 2014.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871 and Section 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in England from 1997 to 2013 is in the table attached and has also been sent to the House Library.

Criminal court proceedings data for 2014 are planned for publication in May 2015.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many section 1 dogs have been exempted under section 4A or 4B of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in England in each year from 1997 to 2014.

The attached table shows the numbers of dogs added to the Index of Exempted Dogs under section 4A and 4B of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 from 1997 to 2014.

Year

Number of Dogs

1997

11

1998

35

1999

25

2000

15

2001

4

2002

7

2003

None recorded

2004

6

2005

1

2006

6

2007

185

2008

330

2009

395

2010

729

2011

683

2012

678

2013

720

2014

674

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many people have been (a) proceeded against and (b) convicted of an offence under section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871 in England in each year from 1997 to 2014.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates’ courts and found guilty at all courts of offences under section 2 of the Dogs Act 1871 and Section 3(1) of the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 in England from 1997 to 2013 is in the table attached and has also been sent to the House Library.

Criminal court proceedings data for 2014 are planned for publication in May 2015.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to page 11 of her Department's publication, Red Tape Challenge - Environment Theme Implementation Plan, what the reasons are for the review of Regulations on Control of Trade in Endangered Species being delayed from April 2014 until 2015.

The Review has not progressed as swiftly as originally intended due in part to the volume and complexity of the work needed fully to assess the anticipated impacts of the proposals for changes to the Regulations, and in part to the focus required on other urgent priorities, including the preparations for the London Conference on the Illegal Wildlife Trade and its follow up.

In addition to the Red Tape Challenge commitment to rationalise the number of CITES-related pieces of domestic legislation currently in place, the review has looked at, amongst others, proposals relating to new requirements brought about by amended EU regulations, the designation of ports of entry and exit to be used when importing and exporting CITES specimens and the updating of enforcement requirements to reflect the evolution of the illegal wildlife trade and enforcement trends.

The work on the Regulations is now nearing completion and it remains our intention to issue as soon as possible a public consultation on proposals to update and improve the Control of Trade in Endangered Species (Enforcement) Regulations, together with the Control of Trade in Endangered Species (Ports of Entry) Regulations.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what additional provision she plans to make to ensure the level of monitoring of wildlife cybercrime does not fall following the expiration of funding for a cybercrime investigations post within the National Wildlife Crime Unit.

We recognise the important work carried out by the National Wildlife Crime Unit (NWCU). Defra and the Home Office have committed £544,000 to help support the NWCU until March 2016.

In addition, Defra has provided funding to the NWCU this year to carry out a specific project on wildlife crime on the internet. We will continue to liaise with the NWCU on its work on this important topic, including considering the findings of its report.

The National Crime Agency (NCA) and its law enforcement partners focus on disrupting those serious and organised criminals who present the highest risk to the UK and its communities, including in areas such as child sexual exploitation and modern slavery. Where high-risk organised criminals are engaged in the illegal wildlife trade, the NCA will lead, support or coordinate an appropriate level of response. That response could include the NCA’s niche capabilities such as the National Cyber Crime Unit or its global network of liaison officers.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many prosecutions there have been in England and Wales in the last five years for failure to comply with the collar and tag requirements in the Control of Dogs Order 1992.

Defendants proceeded against at magistrates' court for offences under the Control of Dogs Order 1992 in England and Wales from 2009 to 2013 (latest available) can be viewed in the attached table.

Data has been taken from the Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings Database.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
2nd Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what information her Department holds on the level of biomass power generation in the UK located in (a) urban areas and (b) areas of above average atmospheric pollution; and if her Department will publish that information.

Defra only holds information for biomass generation in England. Power-generating stations that burn only biomass are located in: Brigg, Lincolnshire; Ely, Cambridgeshire; Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire; Selby, North Yorkshire; Sleaford, Lincolnshire; Snetterton, Norfolk; and Telford, Shropshire. There are power generating stations that co-fire biomass with other fuels such as gas or coal, but the proportion of biomass burning in these is very low.

Defra assesses air quality through a combination of fixed monitoring and modelling, and data is freely available on our website. While it is not straightforward to define “above average air pollution”, pollution levels can be found at: uk-air.defra.gov.uk/interactive-map by locating the nearest monitoring station and looking at the latest and historical data for that site. Modelled data is presented on a GIS map at: uk-air.defra.gov.uk/data/gis-mapping. Locations can be searched and overlays are displayed for different pollutants.

1st Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many times each circus licensed under the Welfare of Wild Animals in Travelling Circuses (England) Regulations 2012 was inspected in (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014; and how many animals of each species each circus is currently licensed to hold.

The Welfare of Wild Animals in Travelling Circuses (England) Regulations 2012 came into force in January 2013. Only two circuses have been licensed under the Regulations: Circus Mondao and Jolly's Circus. During 2013 there were three inspections by a Defra appointed inspector of Circus Mondao and four inspections by a Defra appointed inspector of Jolly's Circus. So far during 2014 there has been one such inspection of Circus Mondao and two such inspections of Jolly's Circus. Further such inspections are planned during 2014. Currently, Circus Mondao is licensed to use: 2 camels, 2 reindeer and a zebra. Jolly's Circus is licensed to use: an ankoli, a camel, a fox, 2 lions, a racoon, 4 reindeer, 3 snakes, 3 tigers and 2 zebra.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
10th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of public trust in the authenticity of food purchased at food outlets in each (a) region and (b) local authority area since January 2013.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) conducts a Biannual Public Attitudes Tracker survey on a nationwide basis. Whilst this does not ask specific questions on the authenticity of food, authenticity related issues are raised by some consumers in spontaneous responses and when prompted (http://multimedia.food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/science-research/biannual-attitudes-tracker-nov-2013.pdf). In July 2013 consumers reported mislabelling as a concern leading them to have a lack of trust in the supply chain[1]. Similar evidence has been reported by other consumer attitude research by non-Government organisations such as Which?[2], IGD[3], Mintel[4] and the Ipsos Mori survey for The Grocer[5].

Consumers have a right to expect that the food they buy is what it says it is. Government has taken significant steps to ensure the continued authenticity of our food including increasing support to Local Authorities for delivery of the national coordinated sampling programme from £1.6m to £2.2m in 2013/14. Continued investment in the Government's food authenticity research programme ensures that the UK is at the cutting edge of science in developing novel technologies to detect ever more sophisticated food fraud and protect UK consumers.

In June 2013 the Secretaries of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and for Health asked Professor Elliot to conduct a review into the Integrity and Assurance of Food Supply Networks. The interim report was published on 12 December 2013 and the Professor's final report will be published shortly.


[1]http://food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/horsemeat-attitudesb.pdf

[2]http://www.which.co.uk/news/2013/03/horsemeat-scandal-dents-trust-in-food-industry-313016/

[3]http://shoppervista.igd.com/Hub.aspx?id=4&tid=4

[4]http://store.mintel.com/consumer-trust-in-food-uk-june-2013?cookie_test=true#

[5]http://www.thegrocer.co.uk/topics/food-safety/horse-meat/horsegate-scandal-hasnt-changed-shopping-habits-of-majority/353432.article

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
25th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment he has made of the effect on identification of tuberculosis cases of the (a) WHO Global Tuberculosis Report published on 17 October 2019 and (b) Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria's Strategy 2017-2022.

Millions of tuberculosis cases continue to go undiagnosed and untreated each year – identifying these is essential to ending the tuberculosis epidemic, which killed 1.5 million people globally in 2018. We are pleased to note the improvement in the number of cases of tuberculosis identified as confirmed by the World Health Organisation Global Tuberculosis Report published on 17 October. 7 million people with tuberculosis were identified globally in 2018, including 600,000 more people than in 2017.

The Global Fund has played an important part in this improvement. A joint initiative between the Global Fund, the Stop TB Partnership and the World Health Organisation aims to accelerate progress in finding people with tuberculosis in 13 countries with the highest disease burden. In these countries, by the end of 2018, already more than 800,000 additional patients were found and treated, compared with the baseline of 2015.

The UK remains fully committed to achieving the targets set out in the World Health Organisation End Tuberculosis Strategy, recently pledging £1.4 billion to the Sixth Replenishment of the Global Fund.

1st Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much his Department has allocated to deafness programmes in each country for which aid was provided in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

However, people with disabilities, including deaf people, benefit from many DFID programmes. For example, through the Girls Education Challenge, DFID supported over 40,000 girls with disabilities, including girls who are deaf, to access an education in countries including Kenya and Uganda.

Through the Disability Catalyst Programme, the UK supports Disabled Persons Organisations to advocate for the rights of deaf people in developing countries including Haiti and Rwanda, including projects preventing violence and advocating for access to education and employment.

1st Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much funding her Department has allocated to deafness programmes in each of the last five years.

The information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

However, people with disabilities, including deaf people, benefit from many DFID programmes. For example, through the Girls Education Challenge, DFID supported over 40,000 girls with disabilities, including girls who are deaf, to access an education in countries including Kenya and Uganda.

Through the Disability Catalyst Programme, the UK supports Disabled Persons Organisations to advocate for the rights of deaf people in developing countries including Haiti and Rwanda, including projects preventing violence and advocating for access to education and employment.

16th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to include tackling global health threats such as malaria as part of its ongoing dialogue with other Commonwealth countries.

Discussions with Commonwealth members and other countries on global health threats, including malaria, take place through a number of international bodies such as the World Health Organization, the UN General Assembly, and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

12th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to replenish out-of-date bed nets in malaria-endemic countries.

DFID is the second largest international funder to the global malaria response. We fund the provision of bednets for new users and to replace older bednets, through bilateral country programmes, and through the significant UK investment in the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. With UK funding the Global Fund will provide 79 million insecticide treated long lasting bednets from 2014 to 2019.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what progress has been made in implementing the commitments set out in the EU/Bangladesh Sustainability Compact.

Good progress has been made since the signing of the Sustainability Compact in Bangladesh in all three areas of commitment. On Labour rights, the adoption of the Bangladesh Labour Act 2013 and finalisation of the implementation rules of the Labour Law in October 2015 are important milestones. On health and safety, the Government of Bangladesh has adopted a robust National Health and Safety policy and inspection of 3,500+ factories for fire, electrical and building safety represents important progress. Private sector initiatives such as ‘The Accord’ and ‘The Alliance’ are making a big contribution to the safety of factory workers.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether it is Government policy to link an extension of the Generalised System of Trade Preferences for Bangladesh to further improvements in that country's garment sector on factory safety and labour rights.

Duty-free, quota-free access to European Union (EU) markets is granted to Bangladesh on the basis of need in line with agreed EU regulations. These trade preferences have no expiry date, so an extension is not required, and there is no provision for the use of additional conditionality. Any reduction in Bangladesh's market access would result in immediate and long-term harm to the livelihoods of poor Bangladeshi workers.

The UK Government supports the approach reflected in the ‘Bangladesh Sustainability Compact’ between the Government of Bangladesh, the EU, the USA, Canada and the International Labour Organization, which commits Bangladesh to improvements in occupational health and safety and respect for labour rights. UK officials are working closely with counterparts in Bangladesh to co-ordinate action to improve safety and labour rights in the country’s garment sector and DFID is supporting a number of programmes in this area.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if her Department will support a change to legislation to require UK registered companies to publish a full list of their suppliers internationally, to enhance transparency and accountability and to ensure adherence to international labour standards in company supply chains.

We are aware of similar legislation being proposed in other countries. At present we promote voluntary reporting on supply chain activity, and are trying to increase the tools available to companies to trace their supply chains. We will monitor the effectiveness of similar legislation as it progresses.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether her Department has made representations to the government of Bangladesh on trade union recognition and adherence to ILO core labour standards in that country's export processing zones.

These issues are regularly discussed through a forum known as the 3 + 5, as part of efforts to ensure the full implementation of the sustainability compact with the objective of improving labour standards in Bangladesh. The 3 + 5 group has representatives from three Ministries of the Government of Bangladesh and 5 donor partners, including the UK.

In addition, through the Private Sector Development Programme with the World Bank, DFID has supported the Bangladesh Export Processing Zones Authority to develop a cadre of 60 labour counsellors who support improvements in labour standards in the zones.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Transport on implementing UN General Authority motion A/70 L.44 which reaffirms SDG targets 3.6 and 11.2.

DFID officials meet regularly with both Department of Health (DoH) and Department for Transport (DfT) officials and work in a co-ordinated manner on international road safety, including UN General Authority motion A/70 L.44.

3rd Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether her Department plans to take account of the conclusions of the United Nations/World Health Organisation Second Global High-Level Conference on Road Safety when preparing the UK's response to the next set of Sustainable Development Goals.

Road traffic injuries cost developing countries an estimated 1-2% of their gross national product, equivalent to over US$100 billion annually, with a widening of the disparity between advanced and developing countries. Road accidents kill an estimated 1.3 million people and injure up to 78 million people each year.


We are pleased that the burden of road crashes has been recognised in the Sustainable Development Goals and we are committed to supporting the international community to achieve the target of halving the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents by 2020.


DFID recently increased its funding to the Global Road Safety Facility (GRSF) hosted at the World Bank and will contribute £4.5 million between 2013 and 2017. The GRSF provides funding, knowledge, and technical assistance that lever road safety investments into transport sector programmes.


We also focus on road safety through our research and evidence portfolio. For example our programme on High Volume Transport and the programme “Research for Community Access Partnership” (ReCAP) both have strong road safety research components. DFID also supports a programme in Nepal working to improve road infrastructure for road safety on a critical section of Nepal’s national network.


14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what progress her Department has made in implementing the recommendations of the Independent Commission for Aid Impact report.

DFID publishes Annual Updates on actions it has taken to address Independent Commission for Aid Impact (ICAI) recommendations on the Government website. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/autumn-2013-progress-updates-on-implementing-icai-recommendations.

ICAI itself follows up on DFID progress against its recommendations and publishes details in its Annual Reports http://icai.independent.gov.uk/2014/06/13/icai-annual-report-2013-14/. A further update on progress against ICAI’s recent recommendations will be published in December 2014 in preparation for additional follow up work by ICAI.

17th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with local authorities on (a) improving the availability of electric car charging points and (b) funding for those charging points.

In 2018 Office for Low Emission Vehicle Ministers wrote to Local Authority leaders encouraging them to support the uptake of electric vehicles and apply to the On-street Residential Chargepoint Scheme. This scheme provides grant funding to Local Authorities to install chargepoints at on-street locations for residents that lack off-street parking. Ministers also announced a further £4.5m for the scheme (£2m for 18/19 and £2.5m for 19/20). In addition, OLEV and the Energy Savings Trust have hosted a series of on-street charging workshops providing over 200 Local Authorities with more information on the scheme. The Office for Low Emission Vehicles have regular discussion with Local Authorities on recharging infrastructure.

We have also provided £40m to eight Go Ultra Low Cities, around £20 million for dedicated taxi infrastructure and recently announced over £12.5 million for bus recharging infrastructure under the ultra low emission bus scheme.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
13th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of (a) fatal crashes caused by uninsured drivers and (b) speed cameras activated by uninsured drivers in each of the last three years.

The Government does not hold data on either the insurance status of drivers involved in accidents or from speed cameras in relation to uninsured drivers.

13th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the cost to the economy of road crashes resulting in (a) deaths and (b) serious injuries in the last three years.

The latest figures available for the total cost elements of reported accidents are:

Deaths

Serious injuries

2017

£3,571M (at 2017 prices)

£5,490M (at 2017 prices)

A full breakdown on accident and casualty costs by year has been published on www.gov.uk (see https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/ras60-average-value-of-preventing-road-accidents - Table RAS60003 has the total value of prevention for accidents of all severity, by cost element.)

13th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the cost to the economy of road crashes resulting in (a) deaths and (b) serious injuries caused by uninsured drivers in the last three years.

The Department does not hold data on the specific costs of accidents caused by uninsured drivers.

6th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment he has made of the merits of increasing his Department's funding to Bikeability.

The Bikeability programme is an important part of the Government’s Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, because it provides the next generation of cyclists with the skills and confidence to make cycling a natural choice for shorter journeys.

The Strategy included a commitment that the Department would invest £50 million to support Bikeability over the period to 2020, and the programme is currently delivering more than 300,000 training places per year to children in England outside London. The Government also announced in August that it would provide an additional £1m of funding for Bikeability as part of a suite of new measures aimed at halving childhood obesity by 2030.

A further £1 million has been raised through a commercial partnership between Halfords and The Bikeability Trust. Additional funding has also been allocated to a new pilot scheme to develop a cycle training package for driving instructors aimed at improving empathy and understanding between road users. Funding and delivery of Bikeability in London is devolved to Transport for London and the London boroughs.

Future funding for Bikeability will be considered during the next Spending Review. The Department for Transport is currently evaluating the benefits of the programme with more than 200 schools nationwide, and expects to be in a position to publish the findings in summer 2019.

26th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, further to oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport of 24 April 2018, Official Report, column 356WH, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on road safety of the decision to eliminate safety targets; and what the killed or seriously injured figures were in each year from 2007 to 2017.

There is no robust academic evidence to indicate the lack of targets in the UK has contributed to the lack of progress in road casualty reduction since 2010. There has been a stalling of progress in road casualty reductions across many economically advanced countries, affecting countries with targets (e.g. Sweden and the Netherlands) as well as the UK where there is no target.

The KSI statistics for road accident casualties between 2007 and 2016 can be found in the table below along with a comparison to the 2010 – 2014 average. The KSI figures for 2017 will be published later this year.

Year

Killed

Seriously injured

Killed or Seriously injured

Slightly injured

All casualties

2007

2,946

27,774

30,720

217,060

247,780

2008

2,538

26,034

28,572

202,333

230,905

2009

2,222

24,690

26,912

195,234

222,146

2010

1,850

22,660

24,510

184,138

208,648

2011

1,901

23,122

25,023

178,927

203,950

2012

1,754

23,039

24,793

170,930

195,723

2013

1,713

21,657

23,370

160,300

183,670

2014

1,775

22,807

24,582

169,895

194,477

2015

1,730

22,144

23,874

162,315

186,189

2016

1,792

24,101

25,893

155,491

181,384

2010 -2014 average

1,799

22,657

24,456

172,838

197,294

25th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what guidance his Department has issued to (a) local authorities and (b) police authorities on setting their own road safety targets since the removal of Government road safety targets in 2010; and what information his Department holds on the number of such bodies which have set such targets.

The British Road Safety statement sets out the Department for Transport’s overall principles and priorities in relation to British road safety. Local authorities, the police and other bodies are free to set their own road safety targets if they wish.

The Department does not issue guidance to local authorities or the police on setting their own road safety targets, nor does it hold records on bodies which may have done so. What matters is that local road safety practitioners, the police or local authorities should be apply and adapt their knowledge and skills to local circumstances.

27th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to publish the next annual update of the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, and if he will make a statement.

The Government will report regularly to Parliament on the progress it is making in delivering the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, as required by section 21 of the Infrastructure Act 2015. A decision on the timing of the first such progress report will be made in due course.

27th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the health effects of achieving the aims of the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy; and if he will make a statement.

The Department has not made a detailed assessment of this matter. The health benefits of cycling and walking are considerable and the Department is working closely with the Department for Health and Social Care and Public Health England on the delivery of the £1.2 billion Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy.

23rd Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of minimum (a) kerb heights and (b) levels of provision of crossings required for shared space schemes.

The Department’s guidance on shared space, Local Transport Note 1/11 (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/shared-space), includes advice on the use of kerbs and provision of crossings.

The Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation recently published its review of shared space schemes, which makes recommendations to Government for further work (www.ciht.org.uk/en/knowledge/streets-and-transport-in-the-urban-environment/index.cfm) including in relation to kerb heights and crossings. The Department is considering these recommendations.

Local authorities are responsible for the design of their streets. It is for them to ensure any public realm scheme, including a shared space, is inclusive and meets the requirements of the Equality Act 2010.

7th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government has plans to introduce a diesel vehicle scrappage scheme for people on low incomes.

On 22 November 2017 the Government launched a consultation on additional measures to support individuals and businesses affected by local NO2 plans. Options considered include retrofitting vehicles, support for car clubs, vehicle scrappage and improved public transport offers. The consultation closed on 5 January 2018 and the Government will publish a response in due course.

11th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress has been made on bringing forward a new southern rail access link to Heathrow Airport.

On 25 October 2016, this Government announced that a Northwest Runaway at Heathrow Airport, combined with a package of supporting measures, was its preferred scheme to deliver additional airport capacity in the South East of England. The supporting measures would include improved rail access to the airport and we are actively looking at what we could do to accelerate these.

The next step for the proposed Southern Rail Access is a GRIP 1-2 study to permit informed option appraisal. This is being considered alongside the detailed development of Western Rail Access plans for the airport, in order to ensure that we provide maximum benefit for airport and non-airport passengers and exploit the new journey opportunities this may provide.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his oral statement of 5 July 2017, Official Report, column 153WH, when his Department plans to publish the (a) terms of reference and (b) names of the chair and members of the working party on working conditions in the private hire industry.

The working group on taxi and private hire vehicle licensing, as announced on 5 July 2017, will have its first meeting on 26 September 2017. The group’s membership and terms of reference will be formally confirmed at that meeting, and copies of those documents will subsequently be deposited in the library of the House.

13th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the number of electric vehicle charging points that will be required to meet the predicted demand for (a) commercial and (b) consumer electric vehicles in London.

The Government is supporting an increase in provision of electric vehicle chargepoints as part of its programme for ultra low emission vehicles (ULEVs). At Autumn Statement 2016, the Chancellor announced additional funding of £80m for charging infrastructure (including rapid charge points) for the period 2017 to 2020 and Government is considering how best to allocate this funding to meet the needs of drivers and deliver value for money.

Alongside this, Highways England has £15m to expand the existing rapid chargepoint network to ensure that across 95 per cent of the strategic road network there will be a chargepoint at least every 20 miles. As part of this, Government will be working with Highways England to understand current and future demand on England’s strategic road network.

Transport for London’s July 2015 ULEV Delivery Plan committed to deliver 300 rapid charge points by 2020, with 150 by 2018, to meet the expected demand from taxis and commercial fleets. The government is supporting this ambition with a total of £12.6m of funding. Many chargepoints will be introduced by Local Authorities and the private market in England or London in the coming years.

In order to help meet demand from commercial vehicles, fleets and employee cars, the Government’s Workplace Charging Scheme (£7.5m) provides funding towards the purchase and installation costs of electric vehicle chargepoints for eligible UK companies. This support is in addition to the Government’s UK-wide Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme, to provide funding towards the installation of a dedicated domestic chargepoint, for electric vehicle drivers with access to off-street parking. The Government’s On-Street Residential Charging Scheme (£2.5m), is also available to Local Authorities in the UK to provide up to 75% of the funding towards the installation of on-street chargepoint in residential areas without off-street.

13th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what (a) funding is available and (b) steps have been taken to support the introduction of a rapid charging network infrastructure for electric vehicles capable of supporting commercial demand for electric vehicles.

The Government is supporting an increase in provision of electric vehicle chargepoints as part of its programme for ultra low emission vehicles (ULEVs). At Autumn Statement 2016, the Chancellor announced additional funding of £80m for charging infrastructure (including rapid charge points) for the period 2017 to 2020 and Government is considering how best to allocate this funding to meet the needs of drivers and deliver value for money.

Alongside this, Highways England has £15m to expand the existing rapid chargepoint network to ensure that across 95 per cent of the strategic road network there will be a chargepoint at least every 20 miles. As part of this, Government will be working with Highways England to understand current and future demand on England’s strategic road network.

Transport for London’s July 2015 ULEV Delivery Plan committed to deliver 300 rapid charge points by 2020, with 150 by 2018, to meet the expected demand from taxis and commercial fleets. The government is supporting this ambition with a total of £12.6m of funding. Many chargepoints will be introduced by Local Authorities and the private market in England or London in the coming years.

In order to help meet demand from commercial vehicles, fleets and employee cars, the Government’s Workplace Charging Scheme (£7.5m) provides funding towards the purchase and installation costs of electric vehicle chargepoints for eligible UK companies. This support is in addition to the Government’s UK-wide Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme, to provide funding towards the installation of a dedicated domestic chargepoint, for electric vehicle drivers with access to off-street parking. The Government’s On-Street Residential Charging Scheme (£2.5m), is also available to Local Authorities in the UK to provide up to 75% of the funding towards the installation of on-street chargepoint in residential areas without off-street.

13th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many electric vehicle rapid charging points will be introduced in (a) England and (b) London in (i) 2017, (ii) 2018, (iii) 2019 and (iv) 2020; and what methodology was used to determine those figures.

The Government is supporting an increase in provision of electric vehicle chargepoints as part of its programme for ultra low emission vehicles (ULEVs). At Autumn Statement 2016, the Chancellor announced additional funding of £80m for charging infrastructure (including rapid charge points) for the period 2017 to 2020 and Government is considering how best to allocate this funding to meet the needs of drivers and deliver value for money.

Alongside this, Highways England has £15m to expand the existing rapid chargepoint network to ensure that across 95 per cent of the strategic road network there will be a chargepoint at least every 20 miles. As part of this, Government will be working with Highways England to understand current and future demand on England’s strategic road network.

Transport for London’s July 2015 ULEV Delivery Plan committed to deliver 300 rapid charge points by 2020, with 150 by 2018, to meet the expected demand from taxis and commercial fleets. The government is supporting this ambition with a total of £12.6m of funding. Many chargepoints will be introduced by Local Authorities and the private market in England or London in the coming years.

In order to help meet demand from commercial vehicles, fleets and employee cars, the Government’s Workplace Charging Scheme (£7.5m) provides funding towards the purchase and installation costs of electric vehicle chargepoints for eligible UK companies. This support is in addition to the Government’s UK-wide Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme, to provide funding towards the installation of a dedicated domestic chargepoint, for electric vehicle drivers with access to off-street parking. The Government’s On-Street Residential Charging Scheme (£2.5m), is also available to Local Authorities in the UK to provide up to 75% of the funding towards the installation of on-street chargepoint in residential areas without off-street.

5th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the British Road Safety Statement, published in December 2015, what progress has been made on the revision of government buying guidelines to promote the uptake of procuring safer vehicles.

The Department for Transport (DfT) is working with the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) - who own the Government Buying Standards (GBS) for vehicle procurement - on an update that will promote the purchase of safer and cleaner vehicles where appropriate. New standards are expected by 2017.

22nd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress has been made on implementing the conclusions of Working Together to Build a Safer Road System, published December 2015; if he will make it his policy to issue an annual statement; and if he will make a statement.

The Government, and its road safety partners, are making excellent progress in delivering the Road Safety Statement. Highlights include: laying legislation to implement much tougher penalties for drivers using a hand held mobile phone; a £1m drug-driving enforcement grant to police forces in England and Wales; £50m of Bikeability funding; piloting a new practical driving test and developing the hazard perception test. We intend to publish a progress report towards the end of 2017.

17th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the Government's policy is on whether the provisions of EU Directive 261/2004, on compensation for denied boarding, cancellation or long delays for air passengers, should continue to apply in the UK (a) until and (b) after the UK leaves the EU.

The Government is considering the impacts of the decision to leave the European Union, including future arrangements for existing legislation. Until the UK leaves, EU law continues to apply, so we continue to comply with the existing directives and regulations, such as the common rules on compensation and assistance under Regulation (EC) 261/2004.

18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent research his Department has conducted on (a) the merits of static speed cameras and (b) the effect of conspicuously marking such cameras on their effectiveness.

The Department published “The national safety camera programme: Four-year evaluation report” in December 2005. The Road Safety Observatory, of which the Department is a member, published “Effectiveness Of Speed Cameras In Preventing Road Traffic Collisions And Related Casualties: Systematic Review” in March 2013. No research has been carried out of the effect of conspicuously marking cameras.

13th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Prime Minister's Oral Answer Prime Minister of 8 June 2016, Official Report, column 1189, on airport expansion, whether the term summer includes the September sitting of the House.

The government remains fully committed to delivering the important infrastructure projects it has set out.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department plans to update its 2013 aviation demand forecasts before publishing an updated version of the 2013 Aviation Policy Framework.

The Government is planning to review the existing Aviation Policy Framework over the remainder of this year with a view to publishing a revised framework thereafter, having sought stakeholder views of what work is required and what a strategy should cover. This work is at an early stage, and no decisions have yet been taken on what additional analysis may be required to support that work or when a strategy will be published, though clearly updated forecasts are within the potential scope of this work.

2nd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether a Minister of his Department will be representing the UK at the UN's second Global Summit on Road Safety to discuss the inclusion of targets to reduce crash deaths worldwide as a new sustainable development goal.

The UN’s Second Global High Level Conference on Road Safety has already taken place.

2nd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions Ministers of his Department had with Ministers of the Department for International Development to discuss the new UN sustainable development goal on reducing worldwide crash deaths.

The government has a manifesto commitment to reduce the number of cyclists and other road users killed or injured on our roads every year. Ministers from across government, including ministers from the Department for International Development, support the Road Safety Statement which was published on the 21st December 2015. The Statement sets out the government’s vision, values and priorities for improving the safety of Britain’s roads which will contribute to the sustainable development goal to halve the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic collisions.

Officials from the Department for Transport and from the Department for International Development continue to discuss the UN sustainable development goal relating to road safety.

2nd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress he has made on preparations for the UN General Assembly debate scheduled for April 2016 on Road Safety as a result of the Second Global Conference in Brasilia in 2015.

The Department for Transport has been working with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to arrange for a UK representative to attend the UN General Assembly debate scheduled for April 2016 on Road Safety as a result of the Second Global Conference in Brasilia in 2015. I expect that the UK representative will be Lord Robertson of Port Ellen and I intend to meet with him shortly.

2nd Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with the (a) Foreign and Commonwealth Office and (b) UK Permanent Representative to the UN in preparing for debate in April 2016 at the UN General Assembly on Road Safety.

The Department for Transport has been working with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office to arrange for a UK representative to attend the UN General Assembly debate scheduled for April 2016 on Road Safety as a result of the Second Global Conference in Brasilia in 2015. I expect that the UK representative will be Lord Robertson of Port Ellen and I intend to meet with him shortly.

11th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect of increased waiting times for driving tests for young drivers on (a) failure rates and (b) increased travel time and cost to examination centres.

Any comparison between waiting times and failure rates would be highly subjective as the Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) has no way of excluding other factors. DVSA also cannot identify the motivation of candidates choosing test centres for their practical test; therefore, DVSA is unable to assess what the costs would be.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect of changes in the numbers of driving examiners in England on waiting times for tests; and what steps he is taking to encourage more examiners to qualify.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) undertake quarterly test forecast reviews to identify the likely demand of driving tests, from which it calculates the numbers of examiners required in order to service those demands. Those numbers are reviewed against the current examiners numbers and where increases are identified, these are factored into DVSA’s recruitment campaigns. DVSA usually run two recruitment campaigns per year, with additional campaigns where necessary i.e. where there has been insufficient take-up/success in geographical areas.

This process has, over the years, generally worked well, but the unforeseen and exceptionally high increase in demand for driving tests in 2015. Across the whole of DVSA it has recruited 167 new driving examiners during 2015/16 with a further 60 either attending or booked on to new entrant courses. DVSA has also offered posts to a further 40 potential examiners.

DVSA has also been re-prioritising the activities of examiners and offering them additional overtime in order to increase testing capacity.


Over 2015 DVSA introduced a number of changes to the marketing of its recruitment campaign in order to try and encourage interest from wider and more diverse groups, additionally DVSA undertook two targeted campaigns for motorcycle examiners and LGV examiners.

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average wait for driving tests is in each English region.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency records its data in four regions, which are; Scotland and North England, Central England and North Wales, South Wales and South West England and London and the South East. The average waiting times in January 2016 for these areas are listed below.

Scotland & North England

Waiting time in weeks

Jan-16

Average Car Waiting time

8.4

Average M/C Mod 1 Waiting time

1.3

Average M/C Mod 2 Waiting time

2.1

Average Voc Waiting time

7.9

Average ADI 2 Waiting time

7.2

Average ADI 3 Waiting time

7.1

Average Taxi Waiting time

8.0

Central England & North Wales

Waiting time in weeks

Jan-16

Average Car Waiting time

8.4

Average M/C Mod 1 Waiting time

1.3

Average M/C Mod 2 Waiting time

2.1

Average Voc Waiting time

7.9

Average ADI 2 Waiting time

7.2

Average ADI 3 Waiting time

7.1

Average Taxi Waiting time

8.0

South Wales & South West England

Waiting time in weeks

Jan-16

Average Car Waiting time

8.7

Average M/C Mod 1 Waiting time

3.6

Average M/C Mod 2 Waiting time

2.1

Average Voc Waiting time

5.7

Average ADI 2 Waiting time

5.7

Average ADI 3 Waiting time

7.8

Average Taxi Waiting time

7.6

London & South East

Waiting time in weeks

Jan-16

Average Car Waiting time

7.5

Average M/C Mod 1 Waiting time

1.5

Average M/C Mod 2 Waiting time

1.5

Average Voc Waiting time

3.3

Average ADI 2 Waiting time

3.8

Average ADI 3 Waiting time

3.3

Average Taxi Waiting time

3.4

National

Waiting time in weeks

Jan-16

Average Car Waiting time

8.4

Average M/C Mod 1 Waiting time

2.7

Average M/C Mod 2 Waiting time

2.4

Average Voc Waiting time

5.3

Average ADI 2 Waiting time

5.5

Average ADI 3 Waiting time

5.9

Average Taxi Waiting time

6.7

10th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the pass rates in driving tests were in each region and constituent part of the UK in each of the last five years.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency does not record pass rates for each constituent part of the UK. Pass rates by test centre are published on GOV.UK.

3rd Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to increase UK Ship Register fees in the next financial year.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency is discussing potential increases in its fees, including the UK Ship Register fees, with other government departments ahead of a consultation exercise with the shipping industry and other stakeholders.

1st Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect on his Department's policies of the recommendations of the Second Global Conference on Road Safety organised by the UN/WHO in Brasilia between 17 and 19 November 2015.

The themes of the recommendations from the Second Global Conference on Road Safety in Brasilia are broadly in line with our approach to road safety, with an emphasis on education, enforcement and infrastructure with particular regard to vulnerable road users.


The Government has a Manifesto commitment to reduce road deaths and injuries amongst cyclists and other road users every year. We are working with road safety groups and other stakeholders to determine what more can be done to meet this commitment.

13th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to reduce the number of private hire vehicles illegally plying for hire.

The Government is responsible for the legislative structure within which local licensing authorities deliver the licensing regime for taxis and private hire vehicles. Enforcement of the licensing regime, including ensuring that private hire vehicles do not illegally ply for hire, is therefore a matter for local licensing authorities and the police.

13th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with his ministerial colleagues on introducing a statutory definition of plying for hire in the taxi and private hire vehicle industry.

As part of the process of considering all the recommendations in the Law Commission’s report on reforming taxi and private hire vehicle legislation, my Department is continuing to discuss the proposals with colleagues in other Government departments.


The Government will formally respond to the Law Commission and announce its intentions in due course.


13th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 8 July 2015 to Question 5604, when he expects to provide a full response to the Law Commission's report on a statutory definition of plying for hire for the taxi and private hire industry.

In its comprehensive review of taxi and private hire legislation, the Law Commission considered creating a statutory definition of plying for hire. However, after careful consideration the Law Commission recommended an alternative approach that would make it unlawful for anyone other than a local taxi driver to accept a hiring ‘there and then’.


The Government is currently considering all the recommendations in the Law Commission’s report. The Government will formally respond to the Law Commission and announce its intentions once this scrutiny is completed.


9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what penalties there are for London airports which breach the noise quota count designated in the Civil Aviation Act 1982.

There have been no breaches of the night noise quotas in the last 10 years. For the night period (23.30 to 06.00), there is a limit on the number of movements (an aircraft landing or taking off) and noise quotas (each aircraft is given a noise quota according to the noise produced) at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted for the summer and winter seasons.


There are, and have been, no penalties for breaching the movement and noise quota limits. Details on these limits are set out in the London Heathrow, London Gatwick and London Stansted Airports Noise Restrictions Notices.


9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many times noise quotas at each London airport have been breached in each of the last 10 years.

There have been no breaches of the night noise quotas in the last 10 years. For the night period (23.30 to 06.00), there is a limit on the number of movements (an aircraft landing or taking off) and noise quotas (each aircraft is given a noise quota according to the noise produced) at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted for the summer and winter seasons.


There are, and have been, no penalties for breaching the movement and noise quota limits. Details on these limits are set out in the London Heathrow, London Gatwick and London Stansted Airports Noise Restrictions Notices.


9th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how often have the noise quotas for London airports been reviewed or updated since their designation in the Civil Aviation Act 1982.

Night flight restrictions of some form have been in place at Heathrow since 1962, Gatwick since 1971 and Stansted since 1978. Since 1993, the night noise regime has limited the number of flights and amount of noise energy that can be emitted at each airport. These limits are reviewed approximately every 5 years and there has been three consultations since 1993. The current regime ends in October 2017 and the Government will be consulting next year on a regime to replace it.

21st Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what regulatory arrangements require airlines to use the quietest aircraft for early morning and late night flights into London's airports; and by what means are those arrangements enforced.

The Government sets night flight restrictions at the three busiest London airports; Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted, which are designated for noise control purposes under the Civil Aviation Act 1982. As well as limiting the number of movements allowed within an airline season, these restrictions place requirements on the aircraft that can operate during the night period, and place seasonal limits on the amount of noise energy that can be emitted at each airport.


All aircraft are given a Quota Count (QC) number based on their noise during take-off and landing, with the noisier aircraft given a higher QC rating. QC/4 aircraft are not allowed to be scheduled during the night quota period (2330 to 0600), and the highest rated QC/8 and QC/16 aircraft are prevented from operating at all during the entire night period (2300 to 0700).


Each airport is given a seasonal noise quota, with aircraft with higher QC ratings using more of this quota per movement. The noise quota limit is designed to encourage the use of quieter aircraft by allowing airports to maximise the number of movements during any season through the use of aircraft with a lower quota count.


The Government regularly monitors the movement and noise quota usage at all three airports, including restrictions on the noisiest aircraft, to ensure compliance. It should be noted that these restrictions do not preclude noisier aircraft from using these airports in the case of emergencies or severe disruption, or with prior Government approval, such as for disaster relief flights.


The Government does not set night restrictions at any of London’s other international airports, but these operate their own restrictions, which are usually agreed as planning conditions:

  • London Luton has a similar night noise regime to that in place at the designated airports. This limits the number of flights that can take place between and 2330 and 0600 and prohibits aircraft with a QC rating of greater than 2 from operating between 2300 and 0700.
  • London City Airport does not operate flights between 2200 and 0630 from Sunday to Saturday morning, nor any flights between 1230 Saturday and 1230 Sunday.
  • London Southend sets a limit of 120 night movements per month in the period 2300 to 0630 and, in addition, prohibits any scheduled movements by aircraft with a QC rating of greater than 1 or by helicopters.

Enforcement at these airports is a matter between airlines and the airport, or the local planning authority if relevant.


It should also be noted that airports are able to incentivise airlines to use their quietest aircraft during the night and early morning by charging higher landing fees for noisier planes at these times.

21st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will provide guidance to local authorities considering planning applications for cruise terminals on the comparative merits of berthed cruise ships receiving energy supplies from onshore sources and generating their own energy from diesel fuel.

The National Policy Statement (NPS) for Ports (www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-policy-statement-for-ports), designated in 2012, includes guidance about onshore electricity supply at paragraphs 5.7.12ff. Although the NPS primarily addresses nationally significant infrastructure projects as defined under the Planning Act 2008, for which it has legal force, it also stands as potentially relevant guidance for the Marine Management Organisation and for local authorities when dealing with smaller ports projects.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how his Department monitors and enforces International Maritime Organisation regulation on air quality in cities.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency is responsible for enforcing the UK legislation regulating pollutant emissions from ships, which implements Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (commonly known as the MARPOL Convention) that has been adopted by the International Maritime Organization. The Agency is not however, responsible for monitoring or enforcing air quality standards in our cities.

Ship emissions are estimated as part of the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI).  The inventory provides estimates of annual emissions from shipping from a range of sources, including domestic coastal shipping, inland waterways, UK fishing (both in UK waters and waters outside the UK), naval shipping, journeys between the UK and overseas territories.

A detailed description of the methodology used to produce estimates of UK shipping emissions can be found in the UK Informative Inventory Report (1990 to 2013), p.138 (http://uk-air.defra.gov.uk/assets/documents/reports/cat07/1508131403_GB_IIR_2015_Final_v20.1_resubmission.pdf).

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment has been made of the implications for his Department's policies of the increase in the number of privately owned drones and its effects on safety for civil aviation.

The Government recognises that this emerging technology has great opportunities for the UK. However the Government is aware that there have been a few incidents that have caused some concerns to other commercial air traffic.

The Civil Aviation Authority has recently launched a publicity campaign called "You have control. Be safe! Be legal!’’ which is aimed at raising awareness of the general public, at the point of purchase, about their responsibilities as the unmanned aircraft operator.

In addition to this a cross-government working group is currently engaged in a piece of work that is looking at the risks posed by drones to commercial civil aviation. The results of this work will inform our understanding of the scale of the problem and what steps need to be taken to mitigate these risks.

22nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the reason is for the time taken to allocate funding under the Regional Air Connectivity Fund; and when an announcement of the launch of the new air links under the Fund will be made.

The Government announced last year financial support for two public service obligation routes, Dundee – London City and Newquay Cornwall – London Gatwick from the Regional Air Connectivity Fund.

In addition to this the Government undertook earlier this year an initial application stage for airlines to bid for start-up aid funding. The Government will announce after the July Budget how we will take this forward.

11th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the contribution to (a) jobs and (b) GDP of sustainable fuels in the period up to 2030.

The Department employed Ecofys UK Ltd. to produce an overview of the UK biofuel sector. The report was published in April 2014 at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/renewable-transport-fuel-obligation-a-draft-post-implementation-review

The analysis suggests that the UK’s total biofuel production capacity is over 1,500 million litres per year and that around 562 people are directly employed at the main UK biofuel plants. Additionally jobs in, for example, farming, transport and distribution will be supported by the UK’s sustainable biofuel industry. The report also estimates that several thousand in addition are supported by the Used Cooking Oil (UCO) collection industry.

In March the Transport Energy Task Force reported on how the EU 2020 greenhouse gas emissions reduction and renewable transport fuel targets should be reflected in UK policy, and how sustainable low carbon fuels can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions from UK transport in the period to 2030 and beyond. This report was published at:

http://www.lowcvp.org.uk/projects/transport-energy-task-force.htm

The Department is now considering the task force report carefully and will consult on any changes necessary to UK legislation. As part of that exercise we will also seek views on the wider potential economic benefits of biofuel production in the UK and the economic analysis underpinning our proposals.

11th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the proportional contribution of transport to air pollution in London in each of the last five years.

The National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (published at http://naei.defra.gov.uk/data/data-selector ), funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Department of Energy and Climate Change, estimates national emissions of greenhouse gases and air quality pollutants across all sources, including transport. These emissions estimates are updated annually.

Local authorities are responsible for reviewing and assessing air quality under the Local Air Quality Management system. As part of this assessment London Borough Councils undertake additional monitoring. Information can be found on their individual websites.

The Greater London Authority maintain the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory. The latest version was produced in 2010; estimates of pollutants are included for the base year 2010 and projected forward to 2012, 2015, and 2020. This can be found here: http://data.london.gov.uk/dataset/london-atmospheric-emissions-inventory-2010.

11th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to provide economic support for the development and the roll-out of sustainable fuel production for the aviation sector.

The Department for Transport and the Low Carbon Vehicle Partnership established a Transport Energy Task Force in September 2014 to examine options to meet our renewable energy and greenhouse gas reduction targets, including through the wider deployment of sustainable biofuel. The Transport Energy Task Force’s report and recommendations were published earlier in March 2015.

http://www.lowcvp.org.uk/projects/transport-energy-task-force.htm

We are currently considering the recommendations from the task force and our options to deliver greenhouse gas emissions reductions, including possible policy mechanisms to support sustainable low carbon fuels in aviation. We will consult further on changes as necessary, and as part of that formal public consultation process we will set out the proposed timing and next steps for any future changes.

9th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion contribution does (a) road traffic, (b) aviation and (c) shipping make to air pollutant emissions levels in London.

Air quality emission levels by mode are only compiled at National level by the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory published at http://naei.defra.gov.uk/data/data-selector, funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Department of Energy and Climate Change. This estimates national emissions of Greenhouse Gases and air quality pollutants across all sources, including road traffic, aviation and shipping.

Local authorities are responsible for reviewing and assessing air quality under the Local Air Quality Management system. As part of this assessment London councils undertake additional monitoring. Information can be found on their individual websites. Greater London Authority hold the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory, which can be found here: http://data.london.gov.uk/dataset/london-atmospheric-emissions-inventory-2010 .

9th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the level of air pollutant emissions from (a) road traffic, (b) aviation and (c) shipping on the air quality of London.

Air quality emission levels by mode are only compiled at National level by the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory published at http://naei.defra.gov.uk/data/data-selector, funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Department of Energy and Climate Change. This estimates national emissions of Greenhouse Gases and air quality pollutants across all sources, including road traffic, aviation and shipping.

Local authorities are responsible for reviewing and assessing air quality under the Local Air Quality Management system. As part of this assessment London councils undertake additional monitoring. Information can be found on their individual websites. Greater London Authority hold the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory, which can be found here: http://data.london.gov.uk/dataset/london-atmospheric-emissions-inventory-2010 .

9th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment has been made of the effect of level of use of the River Thames for transport on air pollution in London.

Air quality emission levels by mode are only compiled at National level by the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory published at http://naei.defra.gov.uk/data/data-selector, funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Department of Energy and Climate Change. This estimates national emissions of Greenhouse Gases and air quality pollutants across all sources, including road traffic, aviation and shipping.

Local authorities are responsible for reviewing and assessing air quality under the Local Air Quality Management system. As part of this assessment London councils undertake additional monitoring. Information can be found on their individual websites. Greater London Authority hold the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory, which can be found here: http://data.london.gov.uk/dataset/london-atmospheric-emissions-inventory-2010 .

22nd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to update the Government's Aviation Policy Framework following the publication of the Airports Commission Final Report; and if he will make a statement.

The Airports Commission is set to publish its final recommendations in the summer of 2015. It will be for the Government of the day to decide how to respond to those recommendations and whether to update the Aviation Policy Framework.

15th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding was allocated to projects related to increasing the number of journeys on foot (a) between 2005 and 2010 and (b) between 2010 and 2014.

The Department supported the following walking initiatives during financial years 2005/06 and 2009/2010: £2.5m for the Active School Travel programme between 2009/10 and 2010/11, £5m from Department of Health for cycling and walking as part of an obesity initiative in 2009/10, and £700k for the Schools ‘Finding New Solutions’ programme in 2010/11.

Between 2010 and 2014, the primary source of funding for walking initiatives has been the Local Sustainable Transport Fund. The Fund is a £600m grant programme for local authorities that currently supports a range of sustainable transport projects across England. While this funding can be used for a range of transport interventions, many projects support walking either directly or as a secondary benefit (such as cycleways that can also be used by pedestrians).

Due to the varied nature of the individual projects and the range of transport modes benefitting, it is not possible to place a precise figure on the amount of Local Sustainable Transport Fund grant being spent directly on walking. However, the latest annual report for this programme suggests that around 20% of the funding in 2012/13 was spent on projects that directly benefitted walkers. We can therefore assume that between financial years 2010/11 and 2014/15, approximately £120m will be spent on schemes that directly benefit walkers. This is a conservative estimate that does not consider projects where pedestrians are the secondary beneficiaries of a scheme, or projects that are 100% focussed on walking (such as Durham County Council’s ‘Walk to Schools outreach’ programme, which is receiving £4.8m in funding).

In addition to this, all cities in receipt of the Department’s Cycling Ambition grant programme needed to demonstrate how their proposed designs would benefit walkers as well as cyclists. To support this, the Department worked with the Department of Health to make £1.2m in funding available to ensure walking is considered alongside the wider Cycling Ambition Grant programme. This funding has been shared between Birmingham, Cambridge, Leeds, Manchester and Norwich.

Local authorities are also welcome to participate in the Department’s School Award Scheme, operated by Modeshift. This scheme promotes walking and cycling to schools and is benefitting from £840,000 between 2014 and 2016.

15th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the recommendations in the report by Sustainable Aviation on Sustainable Fuels UK Roadmap, published in December 2014; and if he will make a statement.

The Government agrees that sustainable biofuels have a valuable role to play in reducing carbon emissions from transport, and particularly in sectors where there are limited alternatives such as aviation.

We also recognise that we have world class research capabilities in the UK, and share the ambition in the Sustainable Aviation’s report for the UK to become a global leader in the advanced sustainable fuels market.

To that end we launched a competition on 10 December which will provide £25 million of capital funding for the construction of demonstration-scale advanced biofuel plants in the UK.

We do not currently intend to revise the current policy framework (for example to make Renewable Transport Fuel Certificates available to aviation fuel suppliers) while discussions are continuing on accounting for indirect land use change under European targets. Meanwhile, we have established a Transport Energy Taskforce of experts from the aviation industry, NGOs and the fuels and automotive industry to examine options to meet our renewable energy and greenhouse gas reduction targets, and provide greater certainty to industry. The report by Sustainable Aviation provides valuable input to this work.

12th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will publish reported road casualty figures by severity for each (a) local authority area and (b) parliamentary constituency for each year from 2003 to 2013.

The attached tables contain reported road casualty figures by severity for each (a) local authority area and (b) parliamentary constituency for each year from 2003 to 2013.

Equivalent tables covering the years 2010 to 2013 are available for the public at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/ras30-reported-casualties-in-road-accidents. These tables are updated each year.

28th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of planned spending on (a) cycling, (b) walking, (c) public transport and (d) roads contained in local growth plans in each local enterprise partnership area in each of the next six years.

The estimated spending figures are as per the attached table. Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) have varying degrees of freedom to vary spend between projects and between years. The published Growth Deals did not allocate funding to specific years other than 2015/16. The figures provided are therefore for all years 2015/16 to 2020/21 inclusive.

Spend has been designated according to the primary mode of the schemes individually named in growth deals. Many of those designated as ‘road’ and ‘public transport’ also include some cycling and walking infrastructure. Spend designated as ‘mixed’ includes individual schemes and packages where there is no single dominant mode, but within which sustainable modes, including cycling and walking are significantly represented. This includes the West Yorkshire Transport Fund where the individual schemes were not announced in the Growth Deal. An estimated breakdown of modal spend within these schemes and packages could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

The figures in this table relate to the new projects announced in growth deals in July 2014. The Local Growth Fund also includes £1.6bn of transport spending over the same six year period that had previously been allocated to individual major schemes and local transport bodies. The Department has also committed significant expenditure outside the Local Growth Fund, for example, an additional £114m to further the work of the Cycling Ambition programme.

10th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the report published by Living Streets and Transport Research Laboratory entitled, A Review of Pedestrian Walking Times and Time Needed to Cross the Road, if his Department will conduct an assessment of the road safety benefits to pedestrians of adjusting the time to cross at signalised crossings.

The Department notes the recommendation that the relevant guidance on this subject should be updated.

The Department expects to bring the successor to the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions, which will include all pedestrian crossing types, into force in 2015.

Pedestrian walking speeds and crossing timings are matters for guidance rather than legislation. The Department intends to produce a new chapter of the Traffic Signs Manual on traffic lights and pedestrian crossings, bringing together and updating existing advice. A timetable for publication has not yet been set.

4th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to promote telematics in cars (a) for young drivers and (b) generally.

The Department is conducting focus groups with young people, parents and employers to gain a better understanding of their perspective on the safety of young drivers, including the use of telematics.

During a meeting with the insurance industry, the Department agreed to commission new research into how telematics can change the behaviour and attitudes of learner drivers. We are currently working with insurance companies to encourage participation before tendering the research.

We will publish the findings of both the focus groups and research in due course.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what meetings he has had with (a) the Mayor of London and (b) officials from Transport for London within the last 24 months regarding the tolling of proposed river crossings east of Tower Bridge that are included within the Mayoral Transport Strategy; and how that will impact on traffic levels at the Dartford Crossing.

The Secretary of State for Transport has regular meetings with the Mayor of London at which a range of London transport measures are discussed. Other Ministers also discuss various London transport issues and projects with senior officials from Transport for London.

The Mayor of London wrote to the then Secretary of State for Transport on 1 June 2012 to request the designation of the proposed Silvertown tunnel as a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project. The Secretary of State responded on 26 June 2012 outlining her agreement to grant the request.

On 16 July 2013, the Mayor of London wrote to me to respond to the Department's consultation on the Lower Thames Crossing proposals.

The Department's review of options for a new Lower Thames Crossing included a sensitivity test to assess whether the proposed Silvertown Crossing scheme would be likely to impact on the forecast flows for the existing Dartford crossing, and any potential new crossing. The conclusion of that test was that the effect was likely to be negligible. The review findings were published in May 2013 as part of consultation on the options.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what meetings he has had with (a) the Mayor of London and (b) officials from Transport for London within the last 24 months regarding proposed river crossings east of Tower Bridge that are included within the Mayoral Transport Strategy; and how they impact on the options for the proposed Lower Thames Crossing.

The Secretary of State for Transport has regular meetings with the Mayor of London at which a range of London transport measures are discussed. Other Ministers also discuss various London transport issues and projects with senior officials from Transport for London.

The Mayor of London wrote to the then Secretary of State for Transport on 1 June 2012 to request the designation of the proposed Silvertown tunnel as a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project. The Secretary of State responded on 26 June 2012 outlining her agreement to grant the request.

On 16 July 2013, the Mayor of London wrote to me to respond to the Department's consultation on the Lower Thames Crossing proposals.

The Department's review of options for a new Lower Thames Crossing included a sensitivity test to assess whether the proposed Silvertown Crossing scheme would be likely to impact on the forecast flows for the existing Dartford crossing, and any potential new crossing. The conclusion of that test was that the effect was likely to be negligible. The review findings were published in May 2013 as part of consultation on the options.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what written correspondence he has had with (a) the Mayor of London and (b) officials from Transport for London within the last 24 months regarding the tolling of proposed river crossings east of Tower Bridge that are included within the Mayoral Transport Strategy; and how that will impact on traffic levels at the Dartford Crossing.

The Secretary of State for Transport has regular meetings with the Mayor of London at which a range of London transport measures are discussed. Other Ministers also discuss various London transport issues and projects with senior officials from Transport for London.

The Mayor of London wrote to the then Secretary of State for Transport on 1 June 2012 to request the designation of the proposed Silvertown tunnel as a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project. The Secretary of State responded on 26 June 2012 outlining her agreement to grant the request.

On 16 July 2013, the Mayor of London wrote to me to respond to the Department's consultation on the Lower Thames Crossing proposals.

The Department's review of options for a new Lower Thames Crossing included a sensitivity test to assess whether the proposed Silvertown Crossing scheme would be likely to impact on the forecast flows for the existing Dartford crossing, and any potential new crossing. The conclusion of that test was that the effect was likely to be negligible. The review findings were published in May 2013 as part of consultation on the options.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what written correspondence he has had with (a) the Mayor of London and (b) officials from Transport for London within the last 24 months regarding proposed river crossings east of Tower Bridge that are included within the Mayoral Transport Strategy; and how they impact on the options for the proposed Lower Thames Crossing.

The Secretary of State for Transport has regular meetings with the Mayor of London at which a range of London transport measures are discussed. Other Ministers also discuss various London transport issues and projects with senior officials from Transport for London.

The Mayor of London wrote to the then Secretary of State for Transport on 1 June 2012 to request the designation of the proposed Silvertown tunnel as a Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project. The Secretary of State responded on 26 June 2012 outlining her agreement to grant the request.

On 16 July 2013, the Mayor of London wrote to me to respond to the Department's consultation on the Lower Thames Crossing proposals.

The Department's review of options for a new Lower Thames Crossing included a sensitivity test to assess whether the proposed Silvertown Crossing scheme would be likely to impact on the forecast flows for the existing Dartford crossing, and any potential new crossing. The conclusion of that test was that the effect was likely to be negligible. The review findings were published in May 2013 as part of consultation on the options.

23rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 15 May 2019 to Question 224493, how much has been deducted from universal credit claimants' standard allowance in (a) the London Borough of Tower Hamlets and (b) Poplar and Limehouse constituency in each month since April 2017.

The attached table shows the amount deducted from Universal Credit claims in (a) the London Borough of Tower Hamlets and (b) the Poplar and Limehouse parliamentary constituency in each month since April 2017 to May 2019, which is the latest month that data is available for.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the report from the London Borough of Tower Hamlets' Housing Scrutiny Sub-Committee, published 26 February 2019, which found that in 2018-19 the local authority had referred 539 universal credit cases back to her Department due to accuracy queries, of which 197 were still outstanding.

The vast majority of Universal Credit (UC) claimants’ claims are administered in real time and accurately. Every UC award is calculated based on the circumstances of individuals during each assessment period, taking into account savings, assets and income.

All claimants have a responsibility to notify the Department about changes in their circumstances, as this could alter the monthly award and/or the responsibilities associated with receiving UC.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, by how much the cap on Access to Work grants will be uprated for the 2019-20 financial year.

This year, the annual limit on individual Access to Work grants will be increased to £59,200. This new limit will be applied to new customers with effect from 1 April. Existing customers will be subject to the new limit when their application is reviewed.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people affected by the lower benefit cap in May 2018 were also affected by the cap in February 2017.

The Lower Benefit Cap was introduced on 7th November, 2016. There were 27,000 households who had their Housing Benefit capped in both February 2017 and May 2018. 1,000 households had their Universal Credit capped in both February 2017 and May 2018.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people no longer affected by the lower benefit cap became exempt because they became in receipt of (a) employment and support allowance (support group), (b) personal independent payments and (c) another exempting benefit.

The breakdown of information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

The total number of households that no longer had their Housing Benefit capped at May 2018 because they became exempt as they were in receipt of an exempt benefit is published here: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk.

Guidance for users is available at: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html.

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many personal independence payment appeals have been made to the Social Security Tribunals by deaf claimants; and how many of those appeals have been successful.

The following table gives volumes of appeals lodged and overturned by year for claimants with a hearing disorder. Appeals lodged are given by the year the appeal was registered. Appeals cleared are appeals where a decision has been made and are given by the year the appeal was cleared. Appeals overturned are appeals where the DWP decision has been changed and are given by the year the appeal was cleared.

Appeals Lodged

Appeals Cleared

Appeals Overturned

2013/14

#

#

#

2014/15

300

100

#

2015/16

700

600

300

2016/17

1,100

900

500

2017/18 (data until April'17)

#

100

100

*Figures have been rounded to the nearest 100.

**‘#‘used for instances where there are less than 50 cases.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what training health professionals carrying out personal independence payment assessments receive on deafness.

Both Assessment Providers are required to ensure that the Health Professionals (HPs) carrying out assessments have knowledge of the clinical aspects and likely functional effects of a wide range of health conditions and impairments including deafness.

All HPs receive comprehensive training in disability analysis. This includes specific case studies and guidance which covers how a person who is deaf, or has a hearing impairment, is likely to be affected in their day-to-day activities. All HPs are required to complete this training before they can be approved to carry out assessments on our behalf.

The Department and our Providers work with a wide range of organisations, including those who represent people who are deaf or have a hearing impairment in order to continuously improve the service provided, including strengthening deaf awareness training material for HPs.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what interim support is available for deaf people between the start of a new job and when an Access to Work workplace assessment is carried out.

Access to Work (AtW) aims to supply help as quickly as possible, but where there are unavoidable delays, interim solutions may be considered. These will vary according to individual customers’ needs and situations. In such cases, AtW Advisers will inform customers and employers of likely delays and discuss interim support options.

We are continuously engaging with stakeholders to explore how the customer journey can be improved. For example, in June 2017 the new contract for AtW workplace assessments came into effect, changing the workplace assessments target. The new contract requires 90% of assessments to be carried out in 8 days, rather than the 10 days that was previously the case. This is intended to expedite the provision of support to AtW customers.

We will publish our response to “Improving Lives: The Work, Health, and Disability Green Paper“ this autumn, in which we will explore options for improving the service offered through AtW.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
17th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2017 to Question 3064 how many fire experts are employed by the Health and Safety Executive; and if he will list their specialisms.

HSE's regulatory responsibility covers process fire precautions - the management of fire and explosion risks arising from work processes such as chemical manufacturing, or the storage of dangerous substances at work.

HSE employs staff with the expertise required to carry out the necessary inspections, investigations and assessments on the sites for which it has regulatory responsibility. With regards to the regulation of fire and explosion risks, HSE employs a total of 70 specialists with expertise in a range of industrial fire-related areas:

  • 20 specialist process safety inspectors with technical knowledge of the hazards and risks of fires and explosions arising from onshore industrial activities. Their work focuses on ensuring businesses have suitable equipment and procedures to prevent fires and explosions arising from the processes they undertake, and measures to mitigate in the event of an incident.

  • 9 explosives inspectors who undertake similar functions on licensed explosives sites as well as providing technical knowledge regarding explosives across HSE.

  • 11 offshore process engineering and fire and explosion specialists.

  • 27 specialists in frequency and consequence modelling of industrial process fires such as fireballs and jet fires resulting from gas escapes.

  • 3 experts with experience in relevant applied research and additional knowledge of fire & explosions in factories, chemical sites, warehouses, and unusual environments such as buildings under construction and, tunnels.
Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
5th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many notifications the Health and Safety Executive has received on health and safety matters related to multi-storey buildings in each region of the UK and in each year since 2005; and what the principal reason was for each of those notifications.

The ‘Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013’ (RIDDOR) puts duties on employers, some self-employed and people in control of work premises (the Responsible Person) to report certain serious workplace accidents, occupational diseases and specified dangerous occurrences (near misses). Generally, such notifications are made in relation to workplace incidents and do not provide for the reporting of general health and safety concerns in relation to buildings.

There are two specific exceptions to this, firstly in Regulation 11 of RIDDOR which covers the reporting of gas related incidents in buildings, not just workplaces and secondly, in Schedule 2 of RIDDOR, which concerns itself with ‘Dangerous Occurrences’ in relation to structural collapse.

Where required under Regulation 11, reports are made to Health and Safety Executive (HSE) via an online form which asks for details of the incident and in what type of building it occurred (i.e. house, flat up to 4 stories, flat over 4 stories, bungalow, maisonette, other). HSE reviews all reports received against its own regulatory model to assess where further enforcement action is appropriate.

The information is not held in a readily accessible format and to extract and collate it would incur disproportionate costs.

Dangerous Occurrence reports (Schedule 2 of RIDDOR) require that the responsible person reports the unintentional collapse or partial collapse of any structure, which involves a fall of more than 5 tonnes of material; or any floor or wall of any place of work, arising from, or in connection with, ongoing construction work (including demolition, refurbishment and maintenance). The RIDDOR notification system does not provide for the reporting of building type in this case.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
5th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) chartered structural engineers and (b) fire engineers with expertise in cladding and external wall systems are employed by each Health and Safety Executive office.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has a national team of construction engineering specialist inspectors providing a broad range of structural and civil engineering expertise in support of HSE’s operations to ensure workplace risks are being properly managed and controlled. The team comprises one chartered structural engineer based in HSE’s Bedford office, the remainder are civil engineers.

HSE does not employ fire engineers with expertise in cladding and external wall systems.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
5th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the role of the Health and Safety Executive is in relation to ensuring the safe installation of cladding and external wall insulation systems.

The Health and Safety Executive is the national regulator for workplace health and safety. HSE’s role in relation to the installation of cladding and external wall insulation systems is to ensure that health and safety risks during the construction work are properly managed and controlled.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of people (a) with hearing loss and (b) who list their primary medical condition as difficulty in hearing who were (i) in employment, (ii) economically inactive and (iii) unemployed in the last five years for which figures are available.

Table 1 provides an estimate of the proportion of working age people who are in employment, who are unemployed and who are economically inactive who:

a) Report they have a difficulty in hearing (either as their main long term health condition or alongside a different main long term health condition)

b) Report that their difficulty in hearing is their main long term health condition.

Data has been provided for calendar years of 2012 and from 2014 to 2016 in the table below. A change in how the Annual Population Survey captures information on long term health conditions was made in April-June 2013. This change led to a break in the series and therefore data is not available for the entirety of the 2013 calendar year and has therefore not been provided. Data for 2012 is not comparable with data from 2014 onwards.

Please also note the full list of caveats below the table for further methodological information on how this data was calculated and how these figures should be interpreted appropriately.

Table 1 – The proportion of working age people in employment, who are unemployed and who are economically inactive for people who have a difficulty in hearing

People with a difficulty in hearing as either their main long term health condition or alongside a different main long term health condition

People whose main long term health condition is a difficulty in hearing

Employed (%)

Unemployed (%)

Economically Inactive (%)

Employed (%)

Unemployed (%)

Economically Inactive (%)

2012

47.1

6.5

46.4

66.2

9.4

24.3

2013

Data not available due to a change in how the Annual Population Survey captures information on health conditions. Data for 2014 onwards should not be compared with data before 2013.

2014

46.6

4.7

48.6

67.3

5.6

27.1

2015

47.9

4.6

47.5

69.4

6.3

24.3

2016

47.1

4.0

49.0

70.0

4.8

25.2

Source: Annual Population Survey, January to December, 2012, and 2014 to 2016

Notes:

  1. Figures are for the working age population, comprised of people aged 16 to 64.
  2. For 2014 to 2016 the table contains estimates of people with a difficulty in hearing who self-reported they have a physical or mental health condition or illness lasting or expected to last for at least 12 months. For 2012 the table contains estimates of people with a difficulty in hearing who self-report that they have health problems or disabilities that they expect will last for more than a year.
  3. The break in the series occurred in 2013 as a result of the Office for National Statistics’ Annual Population Survey (APS) adopting a new standardised question on individuals with health problems. The question was changed from: "Do you have any health problems or disabilities that you expect will last for more than a year?" to the standardised version: "Do you have any physical or mental health conditions or illnesses lasting or expecting to last 12 months or more?".
  4. The Annual Population Survey asks people if they experience any health conditions from a list and respondents are able to select multiple health conditions. If an individual responds with ‘difficulty in hearing’ they will be included in the people with a difficulty in hearing (either as their main long term health condition or alongside a different main long term health condition). Respondents are also asked: “Which of these is your main health problem/disability?” If an individual answers a ‘difficulty in hearing’ then only these individuals are included in the people whose main long term health condition is a difficulty in hearing group.
  5. Difficulty in hearing is considered without the use of a hearing aid.
  6. Data is subject to sampling variation.
  7. Estimates are based on small sample sizes and are therefore subject to a margin of uncertainty. Due to these small sample sizes, some of the differences between years may not be statistically significant. Therefore, these estimates and differences between them should be treated with caution.
Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
16th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he plans to take to reduce the (a) number of appeals against decisions on personal independence payments and (b) success rate of such appeals.

7%, of all Personal Independence Payment (PIP) decisions have been appealed and 3% have been overturned.

As part of on-going review and improvement of PIP, we are continuing to make efforts to ensure that all decisions, whether made initially or at Mandatory Reconsideration (MR), are the best informed decisions. For example, the department is running a series of trials which looks at the end to end PIP decision making process with a particular focus on MR and explores the different ways we can improve the quality of our decision making.

However, it is important that claimants can appeal their award decision if they are unhappy with it. Moreover, a request for an appeal does not mean that the decisions taken initially and as part of Mandatory Reconsideration were not right. Claimants often provide new, relevant evidence at the tribunal stage.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Urgent Question on 15 March 2017, Official Report, column 402, on personal independence payment assessments, how many people have scored points under descriptor f for psychiatric disorders alone for (a) new claims and (b) disability living allowance reassessments.

We have interpreted your question to be requesting the number of people who have scored points under descriptor f for Mobility Activity 1 (Planning and Following Journeys).

The number of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessments where the claimant had a Psychiatric Disorder and scored descriptor F for Mobility Activity 1 was:

New Claims: 12,160

Reassessments: 68,220

Figures include all PIP decisions between April 2013 and 28th February 2017.

Data is based on primary disabling condition as recorded on the PIP computer system. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions upon which the decision is based but only the primary condition is shown in these statistics.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans his Department has to extend the Access to Work programme to incorporate work experience and internships.

The Access to Work scheme has already been extended to support self-arranged work experience and Supported Internships in line with guidance set out in paragraphs 123 – 140 which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/541858/access-to-work-staff-guide.pdf

This was announced by the then Minister for Disabled People, Esther McVey on 16 July 2013.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to extend the Access to Work programme so that disabled people have support plans in place before an employment offer.

The Department has published an Access to Work pre-employment eligibility letter for individuals, their employers or potential employers in order to provide an indication of the help that people may be able to receive from the Access to Work scheme. This letter has been updated to include reference to both mental health support and coverage of apprentices, and can be found here. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/access-to-work-eligibility-letter-for-employees-and-employers

We are also promoting Access to Work and producing case studies to illustrate how the scheme can support people in a range of settings and how it makes a positive difference to disabled people’s working lives.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit claimants currently have a managed payment to landlord in each London borough.

This information is not currently available.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for what reason the universal credit regulations require that a claimant with a managed payment to landlord (MPtL) is unable to apply for a discretionary housing payment from their local authority while a MPtL is in place.

DWP does not see any reason why Discretionary Housing Payments cannot be paid to Universal Credit claimants who have Managed Payments to their Landlord in place.

However, if a Local Authority decides not to accept an application for DHP on the grounds that a managed payment to the landlord is in place, guidance is clear that DWP can, in agreement with the claimant, remove that arrangement to allow the application to be made.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants are in receipt of universal credit in Tower Hamlets.

As of December 2016, the number of people claiming Universal Credit in Tower Hamlets, including both those in and not in receipt of a payment, was 2,000

This information is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/universal-credit-statistics.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
20th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans he has for the number of full-time equivalent staff to be in the benefit cap processing team when the lower benefit cap is implemented; and what estimate he has made of the cost of those staff to the public purse.

The implementation funding for additional benefit cap processing is circa £1.4m to provide an additional 44 FTE staff in steady state for Universal Credit and current benefit claimants.

20th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 6 September 2016 to Question 45327, what proportion of claimants affected by the lower benefit cap in (a) Tower Hamlets and (b) London are in receipt of (i) jobseeker's allowance, (ii) employment support allowance and (iii) income support.

The information is provided in the table below.

Estimated breakdown of households affected by the lower cap levels by benefit receipt, 2016/17, GB

Benefit Received

Proportion of Capped Households

London Borough of Tower Hamlets

London

Employment and Support Allowance

25%

22%

Income Support

36%

39%

Jobseeker's Allowance

27%

25%

Other

12%

14%

Total

100%

100%

Notes:

  1. Figures may not sum due to rounding.
  2. London is defined as the 32 boroughs of London and the City of London.
  3. Estimates assume no behavioural responses - any behavioural responses to the lower cap, such as claimants moving into employment, would cause the number of households affected to reduce and may change the proportional split.
  4. The methodology used to estimate the households affected by the cap is consistent with that described in the latest impact assessment published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/welfare-reform-and-work-act-impact-assessment-for-the-benefit-cap
7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 2 June 2016 to Question 38327, when his Department plans to publish its Work and Health Green Paper.

We will publish a Green Paper later this year.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Answer of 27 June 2016 to Question HL691, if the Government will publish the information it holds on the proportion of claimants affected by the lower benefit cap who are in receipt of (a) jobseeker's allowance, (b) employment and support allowance and (c) income support.

The information is provided in the table below.

Estimated number of households affected by the lower cap levels by benefit receipt, 2016/17, GB

Benefit Type

Estimated number of Households affected (000’s)

Proportion of affected households

Employment and Support Allowance

19

21%

Income Support

43

49%

Jobseeker's Allowance

19

21%

Other

8

9%

Total

88

100%

Notes:

  1. Figures may not sum due to rounding.
  2. Estimates assume no behavioural responses - any behavioural responses to the lower cap, such as claimants moving into employment, would cause the number of households affected to reduce.
  3. The methodology used to estimate the households affected by the cap is consistent with that described in the latest impact assessment published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/welfare-reform-and-work-act-impact-assessment-for-the-benefit-cap

The benefit cap will be lowered from 7th November from £26,000 to £20,000, except in London where it will be lowered to £23,000. To help ensure Local Authorities are able to protect the most vulnerable Housing Benefit claimants and to support households adjusting to our welfare reforms, the Government will provide £870m funding for Discretionary Housing Payments over the next 5 years. Information about this and other measures to ease the transition for families affected by this policy change is included in the latest impact assessment at the link above.

6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what response he plans to make to the serious concerns raised by the recent UN Committee on the Rights of the Child in its concluding observations to its Fifth Period Report.

In section V. paragraph B92 of the UN concluding observations, the UN Committee has invited the UK to submit its combined sixth and seventh periodic reports (including a response to the observations from this year’s examination) by 14 January 2022; it would therefore not be appropriate for me to pre-empt this report by anticipating what we might say in 2022. In any event, the Government regularly assesses the impacts of its policies and will continue to do so.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of how many new (a) private rented and (b) social tenancies households will be affected by the proposed benefit cap; and what the average reduction in household income will be for both such households.

The Government set out its assessment of the impacts of the policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20 July. A link to the impact assessment is included.

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/impact-assessments/IA15-006.pdf

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the number of households in Tower Hamlets which will be affected by the proposed single person benefit cap; and what the average reduction in household income will be as a result of this cap.

The Government set out its assessment of the impacts of the policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20 July. A link to the impact assessment is included.

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/impact-assessments/IA15-006.pdf

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate he has made of the potential annual reduction in benefits for residents in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets due to the cap on household benefits.

The Government set out its assessment of the impacts of the policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20 July. A link to the impact assessment is included.

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/impact-assessments/IA15-006.pdf

4th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what provision for Discretionary Housing Payments he plans to make for the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in (a) 2015-16 and (b) each of the next three financial years.

The allocation for Discretionary Housing Payments (DHP) in 2015/2016 for Tower Hamlets is £1,565,107.

No decisions have been made on allocations to local authorities for the next three financial years, however as announced in the Budget, overall DHP funding will be increased to £800 million over the next five years. The Department considers the allocation of Discretionary Housing Payments each year, based on each local authority’s Housing Benefit expenditure and the local impact of reforms.

2nd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what regulations apply to asbestos in buildings; when such regulations are laid; and for what duration those regulations are in force.

Use of any asbestos in new buildings was prohibited in Great Britain by 1999 following earlier national prohibitions of the highest risk types in 1985 and 1992. The current prohibitions are now via the European Union’s Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Regulation 2006.

In respect of legacy asbestos present in older buildings the Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 2002 regulation 4 came into force on 21 May 2004. This regulation was then superseded by the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 (CAR) laid on 5 March 2012.

CAR Regulation 4 requires the owner, or person responsible for maintenance (the ‘duty holder’) of a non-domestic building to record the location and condition of any asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) and to put into place a plan to manage the risk they present. The record of the location and condition of any ACMs, and management plan, must be available for as long as ACMs are present in the building.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what regulations apply to the recording and maintenance of information on asbestos in buildings; and for what period such records should be maintained by building owners.

The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 (CAR) requires the owner, or person responsible for maintenance (the ‘duty holder’) of a non-domestic building to record the location and condition of any asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) and to put into place a plan to manage the risk they present. The duty holder is only responsible for managing the risk at the time they hold the duty; they are not responsible for prior exposure to earlier building occupants. The record of the location and condition of any ACMs, and management plan, must be available for as long as ACMs are present in the building.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what health and safety regulations apply to the demolition of buildings containing asbestos and prior exposure of staff who previously worked in such buildings.

Demolition is construction work as defined by the Construction Design and Management Regulations 2015 (CDM). Asbestos is a hazard which may give rise to risk and so information on its presence in a building should form part of the pre-construction information which the client must make available to the contractors involved.

In addition, all work with asbestos (including demolition) is subject to the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012 (CAR) which requires exposure to asbestos to be prevented or reduced to as low a level as reasonably practicable. In cases of final demolition the employer’s plan of work must, so far as is reasonably practicable, specify that asbestos must be removed before any demolition starts, unless removal would cause a greater risk to employees than leaving it in place.

CAR also requires the owner, or person responsible for maintenance (the ‘duty holder’) of a non-domestic building to record the location and condition of any asbestos-containing materials (ACMs) and to put into place a plan to manage the risk they present. The duty holder is responsible for managing the risk at the time they hold the duty; they are not responsible for prior exposure to earlier building occupants. The record of the location and condition of any ACMs, and management plan, must be available for as long as ACMs are present in the building.

9th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of legislation covering electrical safety in care homes.

All health and safety legislation was subject to independent review by Professor Ragnar Löfstedt in 2011. As part of the review, Professor Löfstedt was also asked to review comments received through the Government’s Red Tape Challenge on health and safety regulation. There was no specific comment on the adequacy of legislation covering electrical safety in care homes received from either review.

1st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with (a) representatives of clinical commissioning groups and (b) families on increasing the uptake of childhood immunisation.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has assessed the potential effect on public health of allowing children who have not received the MMR vaccine to start primary school in September 2019.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to prevent children who have not received the MMR vaccine from attending school.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of invoices received by the NHS are paid within 30 days; and how many incur 29 per cent interest for late payment of more than 30 days.

The Department does not centrally collect or hold performance payment data for the National Health Service. NHS trusts and NHS foundation trusts are required to follow the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 (PCR 2015) which states contracting authorities must pay valid and undisputed invoices within 30 days.

NHS Improvement monitors Better Payments Practice Code performance data on a monthly basis. Page 47 of the Departmental annual report shows an improvement in the percentage of invoices paid within target from 77% (2017-18) to 79% (2018-19). The report is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/832765/dhsc-annual-report-and-accounts-2018-to-2019.pdf

The Department does not hold information on how many invoices incur the 29% late payment interest.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have been supplied with NHS-funded hearing aids in each clinical commissioning group area in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

The information requested on the number of people supplied with National Health Services-funded hearing aids is not collated centrally.

The requested information for spend on audiology services by each clinical commissioning group (CCG) is not collected centrally.

Data on national spend is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available is shown in the following table.

Total spend on audiology services in £ million

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

Admitted Patient Care

25.8

124.5

161.8

163.5

152.5

Outpatient Attendances

21.2

30.8

24.2

32.0

36.5

Community Health Services

208.5

172.9

193.5

201.0

196.2

Total

255.5

328.2

379.5

396.5

385.2

Source: https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/reference-costs/

The information requested on projected spend on audiology services is not collected centrally.

CCGs are responsible for commissioning audiology services. The Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss framework will help CCGs to deliver on their responsibility to commission high quality, responsive hearing services by establishing what good commissioning looks like.

11th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the projected spend on audiology services is (a) this year and (b) next year, broken down (i) nationally and (ii) by clinical commissioning group.

The information requested on the number of people supplied with National Health Services-funded hearing aids is not collated centrally.

The requested information for spend on audiology services by each clinical commissioning group (CCG) is not collected centrally.

Data on national spend is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available is shown in the following table.

Total spend on audiology services in £ million

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

Admitted Patient Care

25.8

124.5

161.8

163.5

152.5

Outpatient Attendances

21.2

30.8

24.2

32.0

36.5

Community Health Services

208.5

172.9

193.5

201.0

196.2

Total

255.5

328.2

379.5

396.5

385.2

Source: https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/reference-costs/

The information requested on projected spend on audiology services is not collected centrally.

CCGs are responsible for commissioning audiology services. The Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss framework will help CCGs to deliver on their responsibility to commission high quality, responsive hearing services by establishing what good commissioning looks like.

18th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has received representations from the hospice movement on the effect of the proposed increases in NHS pay on that sector; and if he will make a statement.

My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State has received 10 written representations from the hospice sector; raising concerns about the potential increase in their costs if they choose to increase pay in line with the proposed Agenda for Change pay rates.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
18th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the proposed NHS pay increase on voluntary sector hospices.

The proposed Agenda for Change pay framework, which includes contract reform and pay awards over three years, is currently out to consultation with the National Health Service trades unions and the outcome will be known in June.

The Chancellor was explicit that additional funding was tied to extensive reforms to the terms and conditions of staff employed on the Agenda for Change contract.

We are considering the impact of the agreement on non-NHS organisations such as hospices that may be affected by the proposed deal however no decisions have been made.

Staff in hospices do a fantastic job in delivering world-class care. The Department remains fully committed to improving palliative and end of life care.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
6th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has had with the Government on steps to ensure that information concerning levels of air pollution reaches children, parents and schools; and if he will make a statement.

The Department of Health and Social Care, including Public Health England (PHE), is fully engaged in discussions with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on the development of the Government’s Clean Air Strategy at ministerial and official level. Communication of the best information and advice on air pollution to protect vulnerable groups, including children, will be an important part of the implementation of the Government’s Clean Air Strategy.

The Department, NHS England and PHE’s Health and Wellbeing Alliance are undertaking a feasibility study on behavioural insights, which aims to improve understanding of how people, particularly vulnerable populations, best receive communications during localised events of elevated air pollution. This includes children, parents and schools. Results are expected later this year. Currently, PHE disseminates Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs United Kingdom Air Information Resource’s tweets issued during significant high air pollution episodes through PHE’s social media account.

5th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department is planning to fund a public health campaign to let people know how to protect themselves against the effects of air pollution.

The Department of Health and Social Care works closely with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs to make sure the best evidence and information is available to the public. Public Health England (PHE) has developed a work programme to support national and local actions to reduce the health burden in England attributable to air pollution. The programme includes raising awareness of the health effects of air pollution and supporting related work of national and local Government.

In addition, the Department, NHS England and PHE’s Health and Wellbeing Alliance are undertaking a feasibility study on behavioural insights, which aims to improve understanding of how people, particularly vulnerable populations, best receive communications during localised events of elevated air pollution. Results are expected later this year. Currently, PHE disseminates Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs United Kingdom Air Information Resource’s tweets issued during significant high air pollution episodes through PHE’s social media account.

29th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress has been made on encouraging clinical commissioning groups to require providers to complete the Improving Quality in Physiological Services (IQIPS) self-assessment tool and apply for accreditation with UKAS and achieve accreditation within the duration of their contract.

NHS England does not collect information about the progress made on encouraging clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to require providers to complete the Improving Quality in Physiological Services (IQIPS) self-assessment tool and apply for accreditation with United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) and achieve accreditation within the duration of their contract.

However, Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss – a Framework for CCGs, published in July 2016, strongly encourages CCGs to expect providers to have completed the IQIPS self-assessment tool and applied for accreditation with UKAS, and achieve accreditation within the duration of their contract. This is reflected in the model service specification for adults.

27th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to debate of 24 March 2017, HC Deb Volume 623, col 1111, on cochlear implantation, what progress his Department has made on finalising new proposals from NICE on cochlear implants.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recently received a significant amount of information regarding its published technology appraisal guidance on cochlear implants and as a result it needs to conduct a more in-depth consideration which has resulted in a delay. NICE is in the process of analysing the evidence and aims to go out to consultation on a Review Proposal in early 2018. The Review decision will be published after the consultation.

24th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps the Government is taking to assist local authorities, voluntary organisations and business to promote a broad range of physical activity opportunities for health benefits.

We welcome the All-Party Parliamentary Group on a fit and healthy childhood’s report on “Physical activity in early childhood” which provides a valuable contribution to the debate as we continue to deliver our world-leading Childhood Obesity Plan.

Physical activity is a key part of our plan and has an important role in maintaining and improving the health and wellbeing of children and young people. We continue to invest in school sport through programmes such as the primary PE and sport premium, School Games, and Change4Life Sports Clubs, to encourage children to be active.

Local authorities are being given over £16 billion to spend on public health over the five years of the 2015 Spending Review. We know that many are prioritising action to tackle obesity and increase physical activity according to their local need.

Public Health England has developed “Everybody Active Every Day”, a national implementation framework for physical activity. This will support increased physical activity in local communities by: focussing across the whole life-course; consolidating evidence and providing a structured approach; and enabling local and national organisations to work together.

24th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policy on childhood obesity of the recommendations on the report of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on a fit and healthy childhood, Physical activity in early childhood, published in October 2017 on the role of baby swimming in boosting physical health and its effect on later academic performance.

We welcome the All-Party Parliamentary Group on a fit and healthy childhood’s report on “Physical activity in early childhood” which provides a valuable contribution to the debate as we continue to deliver our world-leading Childhood Obesity Plan.

Physical activity is a key part of our plan and has an important role in maintaining and improving the health and wellbeing of children and young people. We continue to invest in school sport through programmes such as the primary PE and sport premium, School Games, and Change4Life Sports Clubs, to encourage children to be active.

Local authorities are being given over £16 billion to spend on public health over the five years of the 2015 Spending Review. We know that many are prioritising action to tackle obesity and increase physical activity according to their local need.

Public Health England has developed “Everybody Active Every Day”, a national implementation framework for physical activity. This will support increased physical activity in local communities by: focussing across the whole life-course; consolidating evidence and providing a structured approach; and enabling local and national organisations to work together.

23rd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether the Government has plans to create a national all-encompassing campaign to promote the importance and value of physical activity in combating the child obesity to children across all areas.

We welcome the All-Party Parliamentary Group on a fit and healthy childhood’s report on “Physical activity in early childhood” which provides a valuable contribution to the debate as we continue to deliver our world-leading Childhood Obesity Plan.

Physical activity is a key part of our plan and has an important role in maintaining and improving the health and wellbeing of children and young people. We continue to invest in school sport through programmes such as the primary PE and sport premium, School Games, and Change4Life Sports Clubs, to encourage children to be active.

Local authorities are being given over £16 billion to spend on public health over the five years of the 2015 Spending Review. We know that many are prioritising action to tackle obesity and increase physical activity according to their local need.

Public Health England has developed “Everybody Active Every Day”, a national implementation framework for physical activity. This will support increased physical activity in local communities by: focussing across the whole life-course; consolidating evidence and providing a structured approach; and enabling local and national organisations to work together.

22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if his Department will ensure that physical activity programmes will be funded at a commensurate level to that made available for nutritional schemes in phase two of the Child Obesity Strategy.

Physical activity and sport are a key part of our Childhood Obesity Plan and have an important role in maintaining and improving the health and wellbeing of children and young people. Through the plan we have committed to invest revenue from the soft drinks industry levy in child health and physical activity, including doubling the primary PE and sport premium to £320 million a year from the 2017-18 academic year and £100 million in 2018-19 for the healthy pupils capital fund.

We will consider future funding as we continue to deliver our world-leading plan.

14th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of whether the conditions it attaches to National Institute for Health Research and National Health Service research grants safeguard affordable access for NHS patients to drugs and treatments that result from that research.

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) provides support for the development of new drugs and treatments, primarily through its investment in early translational research infrastructure in the National Health Service and through a range of research funding programmes.

NIHR-supported research generates high quality evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of medicines for the NHS and public health services, including informing the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance. There is no explicit link between the terms of NIHR research grants and the price the NHS pays for medicines.

NICE assesses important new medicines through a robust evaluation process, which ensures they are priced in a manner that is cost-effective for the value they provide to patients and to the NHS. The costs and source of financial support in developing medicines is not a relevant part of this assessment, and there are no plans to include this.

31st Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many patients were admitted via A&E with a primary diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in each of the financial years from 2010-11 to 2016-17.

The data is not available in the format requested.

This is because the format of the available data shows accident and emergency (A&E) admissions where a diagnosis of a respiratory condition can be made. There are no other groupings available. We are therefore unable to break A&E attendances down to those with a primary diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

31st Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many patients were admitted to hospital via A&E with a primary diagnosis of pneumonia in each of the financial years from 2010-11 to 2016-17.

The information is not collected in the format requested.

3rd Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to ensure that (a) patients and (b) the public are consulted on the creation of Accountable Care Systems.

Next Steps on the Five Year Forward View described Accountable Care Systems (ACS) as an ‘evolved’ version of a Sustainability and Transformation Partnership (STP), working as a locally integrated health system. Simon Stevens announced at the NHS Confederation Conference that nine areas, covering eight STPs, would become ACSs in the first wave.

STPs have previously engaged with patients and the public on their plans for the local area, and local engagement continues to play a key part in the development of the footprint. As ACSs are established, we expect that local engagement will continue to play a fundamental part in the development process.

No significant changes to the services people currently receive will be made without local engagement and, where required, consultation. There are longstanding assurance processes in place to make sure this happens.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to the publication of Next Steps on the NHS Five Year Forward View, published on 6 April 2017, what plans his Department has to align the work of the (a) sustainability and transformation plans, (b) sustainability and transformation partnerships, (c) cancer alliances and (d) forthcoming accountable care systems in the strategy on and delivery of cancer services.

Sustainability and Transformation Plans, Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships, and the forthcoming Accountable Care Systems are not separate entities. They are part of the same process, each evolving into the next, and are therefore aligned on that basis.

In October 2014, NHS England published the ‘Five Year Forward View’, which set out how the National Health Service would adapt to improve cancer care by 2020/21. This led to the creation of Cancer Alliances, which provide a focus for improvement and leadership on cancer care locally. This focus is then incorporated into the wider context of the sustainability and transformation partnerships and plans (STP) for each area, with the intention of developing partnerships and integrating services to improve patient outcomes across their geographical footprint.

The recently published ‘Next Steps on the Five Year Forward View’ stipulated that STPs will now begin the process of evolving into accountable care systems, providing better aligned and coordinated care that meets the needs of the local population.

The NHS currently has the highest cancer survival rates ever. There are an estimated 7,000 more people surviving cancer annually after successful NHS cancer treatment, compared to when the Five Year Forward View was published. Each of the 44 STP areas, and the organisations that make up each STP, including Cancer Alliances, have contributed to this achievement, and the forthcoming Accountable Care Systems will build on this.

24th Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to page 5 of the Report of the Independent Cancer Taskforce, Achieving world-class cancer outcomes: a strategy for England 2015-20, published in July 2015, when his Department plans to publish its strategic review of the cancer workforce.

Health Education England (HEE) is continuing to develop its workforce plan to be published for consultation from March 2017. HEE produced an initial workforce baseline review in 2016 and shared it with partners, the National Cancer Advisory Group, and Cancer Research UK and Macmillan, amongst others, as a starting point for conversations around workforce. This review, and an initial skills mix review, will be wrapped up in the cancer workforce strategy.

19th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions Ministers of his Department have had with Health Education England on the strategic review of the cancer workforce in the last 12 months.

Ministers regularly meet with Health Education England (HEE) to discuss workforce matters, including the progress it has made on its commitment to deliver a workforce with the right skills and competences to deliver high-quality modern cancer services.

Departmental officials also regularly meet with HEE as a member of the National Cancer Transformation Board, the group which has been tasked with overseeing the implementation of the 2015 Cancer Strategy for England.

19th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what Health Education England is required to deliver in March 2017 to satisfy the mandate for a strategic review of the cancer workforce.

In the 2016-17 Mandate to Health Education England (HEE), the Government tasked HEE with taking forward the relevant recommendations set out in the Independent Cancer Task Force’s report ‘Achieving World Class Cancer Outcomes: a strategy for England 2015-2020’, including to work with partners to develop a vision for the future shape and skills mix of the workforce required to deliver a modern, holistic patient-centred cancer service.

The strategic review includes a baseline of the current cancer related workforce; a review of the current skills mix; and a strategy for working with Cancer Alliances and Local Workforce Action Boards to find solutions for workforce challenges as new models of service delivery emerge.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which NHS Trusts that provide both adult and paediatric audiology services have received accreditation for their adult service alone.

NHS England does not hold information on which NHS trusts provide both adult and paediatric audiology services.

As of 1 November 2016, NHS trusts with Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation of adult audiology services are:

- Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

- Bolton NHS Foundation Trust

- Royal Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust

- University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust

- The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust

- Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust

- North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust

- Barnsley Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

- Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

As of 1 November 2016, the following NHS trusts have gained accreditation for paediatric audiology services:

- Berkshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

- Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust

- University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

- University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust

- Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

- Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust

- South Devon Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

- University Hospitals South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust

- Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust

- Southend University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

- Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- The Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- Portsmouth Hospital NHS Trust

- Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust

- Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust

- Hearing Services - Sheffield Children's NHS Foundation Trust

- Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust

In addition Chime Social Enterprise Community Interest Company, as a significant NHS provider, has gained accreditation for paediatric audiology services.

15th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which NHS Trusts have gained accreditation for paediatric audiology services.

NHS England does not hold information on which NHS trusts provide both adult and paediatric audiology services.

As of 1 November 2016, NHS trusts with Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation of adult audiology services are:

- Aintree University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

- Bolton NHS Foundation Trust

- Royal Shrewsbury and Telford Hospitals NHS Trust

- University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust

- The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust

- Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust

- North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust

- Barnsley Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

- Western Sussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

As of 1 November 2016, the following NHS trusts have gained accreditation for paediatric audiology services:

- Berkshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

- Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust

- University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust

- University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust

- Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

- Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust

- South Devon Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust

- University Hospitals South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust

- Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust

- Southend University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust

- Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- The Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- Portsmouth Hospital NHS Trust

- Northern Devon Healthcare NHS Trust

- Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

- Hounslow and Richmond Community Healthcare NHS Trust

- Hearing Services - Sheffield Children's NHS Foundation Trust

- Royal Cornwall Hospitals NHS Trust

In addition Chime Social Enterprise Community Interest Company, as a significant NHS provider, has gained accreditation for paediatric audiology services.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to introduce financial incentives for physiological services to engage with and achieve IQIPS accreditation.

Comprehensive data on the number of audiology services in England is not collected.

NHS England has no current plans to introduce financial incentives for the achievement of Improving Quality in Physiological Services (IQIPS) accreditation.

As of 1 September, there are 39 organisations with IQIPS accreditation for audiology, covering 28 adult and 21 paediatric audiology services. If an organisation is accredited for both adult and paediatric audiology, United Kingdom Accreditation Service considers that one accreditation.

In Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss: A framework for clinical commissioning groups, published in July, NHS England strongly encourages clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to expect providers to have completed the IQIPS self-assessment tool and applied for accreditation with UKAS, and achieve accreditation within the duration of their contract. This is reflected in the model service specification for adults.

In the contract for Genomics Medicines Centres, Annex M requires National Health Service trusts nominated as Lead Organisations and Local Delivery Partners to be working towards diagnostic accreditation across all available schemes, including IQIPS.

NHS England is also working with the Care Quality Commission to agree the use of scientific and diagnostic schemes as an information source for inspection purposes, as set out in their latest strategy.

We currently have no plans to introduce mandatory accreditation of audiology services in England.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the progress of audiology services achieving IQIPS accreditation; and what plans he has to ensure that audiology services in NHS trusts and communities give priority to registering with IQIPS.

Comprehensive data on the number of audiology services in England is not collected.

NHS England has no current plans to introduce financial incentives for the achievement of Improving Quality in Physiological Services (IQIPS) accreditation.

As of 1 September, there are 39 organisations with IQIPS accreditation for audiology, covering 28 adult and 21 paediatric audiology services. If an organisation is accredited for both adult and paediatric audiology, United Kingdom Accreditation Service considers that one accreditation.

In Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss: A framework for clinical commissioning groups, published in July, NHS England strongly encourages clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to expect providers to have completed the IQIPS self-assessment tool and applied for accreditation with UKAS, and achieve accreditation within the duration of their contract. This is reflected in the model service specification for adults.

In the contract for Genomics Medicines Centres, Annex M requires National Health Service trusts nominated as Lead Organisations and Local Delivery Partners to be working towards diagnostic accreditation across all available schemes, including IQIPS.

NHS England is also working with the Care Quality Commission to agree the use of scientific and diagnostic schemes as an information source for inspection purposes, as set out in their latest strategy.

We currently have no plans to introduce mandatory accreditation of audiology services in England.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether he plans to introduce mandatory accreditation of audiology services in England.

Comprehensive data on the number of audiology services in England is not collected.

NHS England has no current plans to introduce financial incentives for the achievement of Improving Quality in Physiological Services (IQIPS) accreditation.

As of 1 September, there are 39 organisations with IQIPS accreditation for audiology, covering 28 adult and 21 paediatric audiology services. If an organisation is accredited for both adult and paediatric audiology, United Kingdom Accreditation Service considers that one accreditation.

In Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss: A framework for clinical commissioning groups, published in July, NHS England strongly encourages clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to expect providers to have completed the IQIPS self-assessment tool and applied for accreditation with UKAS, and achieve accreditation within the duration of their contract. This is reflected in the model service specification for adults.

In the contract for Genomics Medicines Centres, Annex M requires National Health Service trusts nominated as Lead Organisations and Local Delivery Partners to be working towards diagnostic accreditation across all available schemes, including IQIPS.

NHS England is also working with the Care Quality Commission to agree the use of scientific and diagnostic schemes as an information source for inspection purposes, as set out in their latest strategy.

We currently have no plans to introduce mandatory accreditation of audiology services in England.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many audiology services there are in England.

Comprehensive data on the number of audiology services in England is not collected.

NHS England has no current plans to introduce financial incentives for the achievement of Improving Quality in Physiological Services (IQIPS) accreditation.

As of 1 September, there are 39 organisations with IQIPS accreditation for audiology, covering 28 adult and 21 paediatric audiology services. If an organisation is accredited for both adult and paediatric audiology, United Kingdom Accreditation Service considers that one accreditation.

In Commissioning Services for People with Hearing Loss: A framework for clinical commissioning groups, published in July, NHS England strongly encourages clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to expect providers to have completed the IQIPS self-assessment tool and applied for accreditation with UKAS, and achieve accreditation within the duration of their contract. This is reflected in the model service specification for adults.

In the contract for Genomics Medicines Centres, Annex M requires National Health Service trusts nominated as Lead Organisations and Local Delivery Partners to be working towards diagnostic accreditation across all available schemes, including IQIPS.

NHS England is also working with the Care Quality Commission to agree the use of scientific and diagnostic schemes as an information source for inspection purposes, as set out in their latest strategy.

We currently have no plans to introduce mandatory accreditation of audiology services in England.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to engage with the Daily Mile to help implement the physical activity objectives of the childhood obesity strategy.

I have been in correspondence with Elaine Wyllie about the Daily Mile and I am planning to meet her in due course to discuss in more detail.

14th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what type of support his Department plans to provide for initiatives mentioned as best practice in the Childhood Obesity Plan in its roll-out in England.

We will measure progress annually through the National Child Measurement Programme and Health Survey for England. We are confident that the measures we have announced will make a real difference and estimate could reduce childhood obesity rates by about a fifth (330,000) over the next 10 years and the assessment of reformulation progress by food manufacturers will be undertaken independently by Public Health England. Moreover, if we do not see the desired progress then the Government does not rule out taking further measures.

We will continue to work with the National Health Service, local authorities and other partners to deliver the proposals in our plan. For example, we are doubling the Primary PE and Sport Premium to £320 million from September 2017 and we will continue to fund a number of areas to support the plan’s ambitions including healthy start vouchers which gives healthy food support to the families that need it most. Alongside this, local authorities will receive over £16 billion to spend on public health over the next five years. We are confident they will want to prioritise action to tackle obesity according to local need.

14th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how his Department plans to monitor and assess the progress of the roll-out of his Department's Childhood Obesity Plan for Action in England.

We will measure progress annually through the National Child Measurement Programme and Health Survey for England. We are confident that the measures we have announced will make a real difference and estimate could reduce childhood obesity rates by about a fifth (330,000) over the next 10 years and the assessment of reformulation progress by food manufacturers will be undertaken independently by Public Health England. Moreover, if we do not see the desired progress then the Government does not rule out taking further measures.

We will continue to work with the National Health Service, local authorities and other partners to deliver the proposals in our plan. For example, we are doubling the Primary PE and Sport Premium to £320 million from September 2017 and we will continue to fund a number of areas to support the plan’s ambitions including healthy start vouchers which gives healthy food support to the families that need it most. Alongside this, local authorities will receive over £16 billion to spend on public health over the next five years. We are confident they will want to prioritise action to tackle obesity according to local need.

14th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how his Department plans to raise awareness among schools and head teachers of solutions they can choose to help children enjoy physical activity every day.

The County Sport Partnerships (CSPs) will continue to work with schools to raise awareness of local sport and physical activity opportunities. As announced in the recently published Childhood Obesity: A Plan for Action, CSPs will now also be working with the National Governing Bodies of sport and other national and local providers, to ensure that every school in England has access to high quality sport and physical activity programmes.

25th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, when his Department plans to implement the National Screening Committee's recommendations on introducing (a) the Faecal Immunochemical Test into the bowel screening programme and (b) HPV as the primary test in the cervical screening programme.

Ministers have accepted the UK National Screening Committee’s (UK NSC) recommendation on replacing the guaiac Faecal Occult Blood test with the Faecal Immunochemical Test (FIT) in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme. Following the change to FIT we expect that around 200,000 more people per year will take up the opportunity to be screened as part of the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme in England. This has the potential to save hundreds more lives by detecting bowel cancer earlier. Public Health England is responsible for the leadership of the NHS Screening Programmes and will oversee the change to the programme in partnership with NHS England.

Ministers are currently considering the UK NSC’s recommendation that human papillomavirus testing should replace the currently used cytology test as primary screening for cervical disease.

25th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the National Screening Committee's recommendations for the bowel and cervical screening programmes; and whether he plans to support those recommendations

Ministers have accepted the UK National Screening Committee’s (UK NSC) recommendation on replacing the guaiac Faecal Occult Blood test with the Faecal Immunochemical Test (FIT) in the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme. Following the change to FIT we expect that around 200,000 more people per year will take up the opportunity to be screened as part of the NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme in England. This has the potential to save hundreds more lives by detecting bowel cancer earlier. Public Health England is responsible for the leadership of the NHS Screening Programmes and will oversee the change to the programme in partnership with NHS England.

Ministers are currently considering the UK NSC’s recommendation that human papillomavirus testing should replace the currently used cytology test as primary screening for cervical disease.

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which audiology services have applied for accreditation under the Improving Quality in Physiological Diagnostic Services programme.

Specific data on which audiology services have applied for accreditation under the Improving Quality in Physiological Diagnostic Services (IQIPS) programme, which is managed by the Royal College of Physicians, are not available. According to the latest IQIPS report, published in October 2015, there are currently 183 audiology services registered with the programme. Further information is available at the following link:

www.iqips.org.uk

28th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to improve the information available on the quality of paediatric audiology services.

The Improving Quality in Physiological Services accreditation scheme has been established with the aim of improving service quality, care and safety for patients undergoing physiological diagnostics and treatment by promoting and recognising good quality practice in physiological services.

Information about those services which have achieved accreditation is publicly available on the United Kingdom Accreditation Service website and to date audiology services are making good progress towards accreditation.

Commissioning of accredited services is considered good practice and should be encouraged.

In March 2015, the Department and NHS England published the Action Plan on Hearing Loss.

A key action in the plan is the drafting of a Commissioning Framework. To ensure that issues concerning paediatric audiology are not neglected, the Commissioning Framework will include suggested care pathways and capture quality requirements which can be incorporated into the commissioning process. The framework will also include recommended Key Performance Indicators that can support commissioners to incorporate appropriate quality management in their contracts.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department plans to take in response to recommendation 15 of the Independent Cancer Taskforce report, Achieving world-class cancer outcomes; a strategy for England 2015-2020, published in July 2015, on the use of awareness campaigns to improve uptake of screening programmes for cervical and other cancers.

Ministers welcome and support cervical cancer prevention week. We are fully supportive of the work Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust does to raise awareness of cervical cancer and the importance of cervical screening for eligible women. The Department and Public Health England will be promoting cervical cancer prevention week on social media.


Information on cervical screening is available on the NHS Choices website:


http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Cervical-screening-test/Pages/Introduction.aspx


There are no plans for a Be Clear on Cancer campaign on cervical cancer.

A number of factors are taken into account when deciding which campaigns to develop and run, with one of the main criteria being the scope to save lives through earlier diagnosis and whether the cancer has a clear early sign or symptom that the general public can act upon should it arise.


Cancer screening programmes in England write to every eligible women giving information about the screening programme and the condition it aims to detect early. Additionally information is produced for the national and regional media and general practitioners raising awareness.


NHS England closely monitors the coverage rates for cervical screening in all age groups and is committed to increasing uptake and reducing variation across England. Local NHS England commissioners analyse coverage rates within their area and work with general practices to improve uptake by sharing best practice. For example, commissioners in London have developed a screening uptake and coverage strategy and delivery plan, including:

- increased public awareness and engagement with screening programmes across all communities; and

- increased engagement with primary care and improved reliability of data.


In addition to this:

- a primary care cancer screening best practice guide has been developed jointly with the transforming cancer services team, clinical commissioning groups and local authority public health representatives; and

- Imperial College is conducting a randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of texting non-responders on improving coverage and uptake.


To increase rates of cervical screening in young women, the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme has commissioned a £1 million study to determine which interventions are effective at increasing screening uptake amongst women who are receiving their first invitation from the NHS Cervical Screening Programme. The study began in November 2011 and reports can be expected in spring 2016.


In addition, the Department’s Behavioural Insight team is developing a trial to investigate the use of behavioural insights to optimise the content of the invitation letter for cervical screening.



21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to address falling cervical cancer screening rates among women in age groups (a) 25 to 29 and (b) 60 to 64.

Ministers welcome and support cervical cancer prevention week. We are fully supportive of the work Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust does to raise awareness of cervical cancer and the importance of cervical screening for eligible women. The Department and Public Health England will be promoting cervical cancer prevention week on social media.


Information on cervical screening is available on the NHS Choices website:


http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Cervical-screening-test/Pages/Introduction.aspx


There are no plans for a Be Clear on Cancer campaign on cervical cancer.

A number of factors are taken into account when deciding which campaigns to develop and run, with one of the main criteria being the scope to save lives through earlier diagnosis and whether the cancer has a clear early sign or symptom that the general public can act upon should it arise.


Cancer screening programmes in England write to every eligible women giving information about the screening programme and the condition it aims to detect early. Additionally information is produced for the national and regional media and general practitioners raising awareness.


NHS England closely monitors the coverage rates for cervical screening in all age groups and is committed to increasing uptake and reducing variation across England. Local NHS England commissioners analyse coverage rates within their area and work with general practices to improve uptake by sharing best practice. For example, commissioners in London have developed a screening uptake and coverage strategy and delivery plan, including:

- increased public awareness and engagement with screening programmes across all communities; and

- increased engagement with primary care and improved reliability of data.


In addition to this:

- a primary care cancer screening best practice guide has been developed jointly with the transforming cancer services team, clinical commissioning groups and local authority public health representatives; and

- Imperial College is conducting a randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of texting non-responders on improving coverage and uptake.


To increase rates of cervical screening in young women, the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme has commissioned a £1 million study to determine which interventions are effective at increasing screening uptake amongst women who are receiving their first invitation from the NHS Cervical Screening Programme. The study began in November 2011 and reports can be expected in spring 2016.


In addition, the Department’s Behavioural Insight team is developing a trial to investigate the use of behavioural insights to optimise the content of the invitation letter for cervical screening.



21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans his Department has to support Cervical Cancer Awareness Week on 24 to 30 January 2016.

Ministers welcome and support cervical cancer prevention week. We are fully supportive of the work Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust does to raise awareness of cervical cancer and the importance of cervical screening for eligible women. The Department and Public Health England will be promoting cervical cancer prevention week on social media.


Information on cervical screening is available on the NHS Choices website:


http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Cervical-screening-test/Pages/Introduction.aspx


There are no plans for a Be Clear on Cancer campaign on cervical cancer.

A number of factors are taken into account when deciding which campaigns to develop and run, with one of the main criteria being the scope to save lives through earlier diagnosis and whether the cancer has a clear early sign or symptom that the general public can act upon should it arise.


Cancer screening programmes in England write to every eligible women giving information about the screening programme and the condition it aims to detect early. Additionally information is produced for the national and regional media and general practitioners raising awareness.


NHS England closely monitors the coverage rates for cervical screening in all age groups and is committed to increasing uptake and reducing variation across England. Local NHS England commissioners analyse coverage rates within their area and work with general practices to improve uptake by sharing best practice. For example, commissioners in London have developed a screening uptake and coverage strategy and delivery plan, including:

- increased public awareness and engagement with screening programmes across all communities; and

- increased engagement with primary care and improved reliability of data.


In addition to this:

- a primary care cancer screening best practice guide has been developed jointly with the transforming cancer services team, clinical commissioning groups and local authority public health representatives; and

- Imperial College is conducting a randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of texting non-responders on improving coverage and uptake.


To increase rates of cervical screening in young women, the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme has commissioned a £1 million study to determine which interventions are effective at increasing screening uptake amongst women who are receiving their first invitation from the NHS Cervical Screening Programme. The study began in November 2011 and reports can be expected in spring 2016.


In addition, the Department’s Behavioural Insight team is developing a trial to investigate the use of behavioural insights to optimise the content of the invitation letter for cervical screening.



18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much Public Health England (PHE) plans to spend on HIV prevention in 2016-17; and which HIV-prevention projects PHE plans to support financially in that year.

In 2016/17 Public Health England (PHE) will support local, regional and national HIV prevention activities by providing stakeholders, commissioners and policy makers with specialist public health services. PHE is working through its detailed budget setting process having regard for the outcome of the Spending Review. PHE is not yet in a position therefore to confirm funding figures for 2016/17.

4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many lipid clinics there are in (a) England and (b) each clinical commissioning group.

This information is not collected centrally.

4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many lipidologists work within NHS England in (a) England and (b) each clinical commissioning group.

NHS England does not directly employ lipidologists. The number of lipidologists who work at clinical commissioning group level is not held centrally.


20th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the recommendations contained in the report from the Ear Foundation entitled Bending the Spend, published in October 2015; and if he will make a statement.

The Department in conjunction with NHS England jointly published the Action Plan on Hearing Loss in March 2015. The Action Plan sets out the case for action to tackle the rising prevalence and personal, social and economic costs of uncorrected hearing loss and the variation in access and quality of service.

The areas highlighted within the Bending the Spend report concur with and further strengthen those in the Action Plan. This includes the need to assess strategies for the earlier identification and management of hearing loss and the development of commissioning guidance to underpin the Action Plan, which NHS England will co-produce with stakeholders such as the Ear Foundation.


A Cross System Oversight Group had its first meeting on 14 October 2015. This will not only review and monitor progress of the implementation of the Action Plan, but will also provide a forum for government departments, arm’s length bodies and stakeholders within the hearing loss community to engage with each other to ensure connections are made and maintained across the system.


Membership of this group includes the Hearing Loss and Deafness Alliance of which the Ear Foundation is a member.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the number of hospital beds in England which are occupied by people with dementia.

An estimated 25% of hospital beds are occupied by people with dementia.[1]


[1] Prime Ministers Challenge 2020

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what targets his Department has set for reducing unnecessary hospital admissions for people with dementia.

There is greater awareness now about the importance of support after diagnosis of dementia, both for improving the individual’s quality of life and for the potential to reduce more costly crisis care, for example by avoiding unplanned or emergency admissions to hospitals.

On 21 February 2015 The Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia 2020 was published, building on the achievements of the Prime Minister’s challenge on dementia 2012-2015. The Government is clear that dementia remains a priority and will implement the 2020 Challenge in full to make sure that dementia care, support, awareness and research are transformed by 2020.

By 2020 we would wish to see the following improvements to care and support to reduce unnecessary hospital admissions for people with dementia:

- General practitioners (GPs) playing a leading role in ensuring coordination and continuity of care for people with dementia, as part of the existing commitment that from 1 April 2015 everyone will have access to a named GP with overall responsibility and oversight for their care.

- Every person diagnosed with dementia having meaningful care following their diagnosis, which supports them and those around them, with meaningful care being in accordance with published National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Quality Standards.

- Receiving information on what post-diagnosis services are available locally and how these can be accessed, through for example an annual ‘information prescription’.

- Access to relevant advice and support to help and advise on what happens after a diagnosis and the support available through the journey.

20th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate he has made of the average length of stay in hospital for people with dementia in each of the last three years.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre has provided the average length of stay[1] (LOS) in days, with a primary diagnosis[2] of dementia for 2011-12 to 2013-14.

Note that this is not a count of people as the same person may have had more than one admission episode within the same time period.

Mean

Median

2011-12

45.1

20

2012-13

49.9

21

2013-14

43.0

19

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), Health and Social Care Information Centre


[1] The difference in days between the admission date and the episode end date (duration of episode) or discharge date (duration of spell), where both dates are given. LOS is based on hospital stays and only applies to ordinary admissions not day cases (unless otherwise stated). Information relating to LOS, including discharge method/destination, diagnoses and any operative procedures, is based only on the final episode of the spell.

[2] The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and 7 prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the HES data set

2nd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps are being taken as part of the Government's dementia strategy to (a) improve the safety of people with dementia while at home and (b) raise awareness of safety around household electrical appliances for people with dementia.

As part of the Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia 2020, we want to see greater information and support for people with dementia to access housing options which meet their care and lifestyle needs, including appropriate support to remain in the home of their choice.

The 2020 challenge wants to see increased numbers of people with dementia being able to live longer and safely in their own homes when it is in their interests to do so, with a greater focus on independent living.

The Dementia Friendly Communities Champion Group is currently working with a wide range of organisations to consider how to improve the safety of people with dementia who are living in their own homes. The Department will continue to work with the Champion Group to consider issues such as fire and electrical safety for people with dementia, rather than meeting separately with individual organisations.

The Government signed up to a memorandum of understanding with the housing sector, social care and housing services to improve joint action to improve health through the home, which is very relevant for people living with dementia.

Public Health England is working with the fire service to raise awareness of house safety as part of all house visits for all older adults, including those with dementia.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will request Public Health England to extend its planned symptoms campaigns, as part of the Public Health England Marketing Strategy for 2014-17, to include cervical cancer symptoms.

Earlier diagnosis is essential to improving cancer survival and Be Clear on Cancer (BCOC) campaigns, which aim to raise awareness of the symptoms of specific cancers, and to encourage people with symptoms to see their doctor promptly, form an integral part of the Public Health England Marketing Plan for 2014-17 which was published in July 2014.

The decision on which cancers should be the focus of BCOC campaigns is informed by a steering group chaired by NHS England’s National Clinical Director for Cancer. Membership of the group includes primary care clinicians and representatives from the Department; Public Health England (PHE - Marketing team and the National Cancer Intelligence Network); NHS England; NHS Improving Quality; Cancer Research UK; Macmillan Cancer Support; and other stakeholders. A number of factors are taken into account when deciding which campaigns to develop and run, with one of the main criteria being the number of deaths that could be avoided through earlier diagnosis. The focus for national campaigns so far has therefore been on bowel, breast (in women over 70), bladder/kidney, lung, oesophageal and stomach (oesophago-gastric) cancers.

PHE has announced that a repeat of the national breast cancer campaign for women aged 70 and over will run in the summer from 13 July to 6 September 2015. Decisions on further BCOC campaign activity in 2015/16 will be made in due course based on evidence from previous campaigns.

PHE working with the Department, NHS England and other partners will continue to keep these campaigns under review and work with relevant experts to see what might be done to tackle other types of cancer.

10th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions Ministers in his Department have had with Public Health England on the types of cancers that it will include in potential local pilot tests within the Be Clear on Cancer programme; and whether it is proposed that cervical cancer will be included in that programme.

Earlier diagnosis is essential to improving cancer survival and Be Clear on Cancer (BCOC) campaigns, which aim to raise awareness of the symptoms of specific cancers, and to encourage people with symptoms to see their doctor promptly, form an integral part of the Public Health England Marketing Plan for 2014-17 which was published in July 2014.

The decision on which cancers should be the focus of BCOC campaigns is informed by a steering group chaired by NHS England’s National Clinical Director for Cancer. Membership of the group includes primary care clinicians and representatives from the Department; Public Health England (PHE - Marketing team and the National Cancer Intelligence Network); NHS England; NHS Improving Quality; Cancer Research UK; Macmillan Cancer Support; and other stakeholders. A number of factors are taken into account when deciding which campaigns to develop and run, with one of the main criteria being the number of deaths that could be avoided through earlier diagnosis. The focus for national campaigns so far has therefore been on bowel, breast (in women over 70), bladder/kidney, lung, oesophageal and stomach (oesophago-gastric) cancers.

PHE has announced that a repeat of the national breast cancer campaign for women aged 70 and over will run in the summer from 13 July to 6 September 2015. Decisions on further BCOC campaign activity in 2015/16 will be made in due course based on evidence from previous campaigns.

PHE working with the Department, NHS England and other partners will continue to keep these campaigns under review and work with relevant experts to see what might be done to tackle other types of cancer.

3rd Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many complaints were made to the NHS about the care of people with dementia in hospitals in 2013-14.

These data are not collected centrally. National data in respect of written complaints to the NHS are collected by the Health and Social Care Information Centre and may be found on their website.

3rd Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many hospital staff in each hospital trust have undergone specific dementia awareness training.

The Government’s 2014-15 Mandate to Health Education England, published on 1 May 2014, states that a further 250,000 National Health Service staff will receive Tier 1 dementia awareness training by March 2015, in addition to the 100,000 NHS staff who had received Tier 1 training by March 2014. At 30 September 2014, 377,886 NHS staff had undertaken the Tier 1 training.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many GP practices with 10-year contracts with NHS England have had those contracts (a) terminated and (b) renegotiated after five years of operation.

This information is not held or collected centrally.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment NHS England has made of the effect on the 8am to 8pm seven-day-a-week service operated by the Barkantine Health Centre of the decision by NHS England to separate the walk-in centre at that location from the general services.

We are informed by NHS England that the 8am-8pm walk in service is to be disaggregated from the service for registered patients at the Barkantine Health Centre. This is because the commissioning of the walk in service became the responsibility of the clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in April 2013.

We are assured that there will be an extensive engagement process undertaken with patients and key stakeholders. Tower Hamlets CCG will be responsible for the process and future decisions concerning the location and design of walk-in services.

The expectation is that the disaggregation of the contract should take place at the first available opportunity i.e. at the point a contract has a break clause.

10th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much funding has been allocated by NHS England to piloting seven-day GP services in the North of England.

NHS England has advised that £12,055,000 has been allocated for 2014-15 across seven pilots in the North of England as part of the Prime Minister’s Challenge Fund to look at ways of improving access to GP services, including longer opening hours on weekdays and weekends.

10th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many GP practices are currently operating services for patients from 8am to 8pm, seven days a week.

NHS England has advised that data on the number of GP practices operating services for patients from 8am to 8pm, seven days a week is not collected centrally.

2nd Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what information his Department holds on the quantum of premature death in the UK caused by the emission of wood smoke; and whether he plans to publish that information.

Figures for premature death in the United Kingdom caused by the emission of wood smoke are not calculated and the Department has no plans to do so.

The Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP) has considered the wider issue of the potency of particulate matter from different sources in causing adverse effects on health. This work included consideration of evidence on biomass combustion. COMEAP’s current view (as published in reports in 2009 and 2010) is that particulate matter measured as PM2.5 is the most appropriate measure of air pollution for estimating the impact on mortality of long-term exposure to air pollution in the UK. COMEAP believes that the available evidence does not make it possible to distinguish with confidence between the effects of the different components of the ambient air pollution mixture, nor of different sources.

COMEAP’s reports are available at:

www.comeap.org.uk/documents/reports

Wood smoke is a small contributor to the overall level of PM2.5, which is mainly related to traffic and industry emissions.

17th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to implement a national screening plan for HIV.

Recommendations for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening and testing are made by a number of bodies including Public Health England, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the UK Chief Medical Officer’s Expert Advisory Group on AIDS, the UK National Screening Committee (UKNSC), and professional organisations such as the British HIV Association and the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV.

At present there is a national antenatal screening programme which offers screening to all pregnant women. NICE guidelines for groups at increased risk of HIV include a recommendation on HIV testing in primary and secondary care in areas of higher prevalence. In addition, HIV testing is offered to all attendees of genitourinary medicine clinics.

The UKNSC is commissioning a review of the evidence for a universal screening programme in adults. The Committee hopes to be in a position to consult on the review in early 2015. In addition, NICE is in the process of reviewing its guidance relating to testing in men who have sex with men and black African communities.

14th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, with reference to the Written Statement of 22 November 2014, Official Report, column 65WS, on the Medical Innovation (No. 2) Bill, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to remove barriers to medical innovation, along the lines set out in that statement.

My noble Friend Lord Saatchi has reintroduced the Medical Innovation Bill in the current Parliamentary session as a private peer’s Bill, which had its second reading on 27 June. The Government is supportive of the principles of this Bill, but believes it is necessary to amend the Bill to ensure it does not:

- put patients at risk;

- deter good and responsible innovation;

- place an undue bureaucratic burden on the National Health Service; or

- expose doctors to a risk of additional liabilities.

The Bill will proceed through Parliament in the usual way.

10th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the merits of strengthening penalties for breaches of food law in reducing food fraud.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) is the competent authority for the Food Hygiene Regulations. The FSA Board has, on a number of occasions, highlighted its concern that the level of sanction imposed by the courts for food hygiene offences has not been sufficient to deter offending. The sentences imposed are often small when set against the potential profits to be accrued from non–compliance with the Regulations. The FSA would welcome the strengthening of penalties for breaches of the Food Hygiene Regulations.

The FSA is also keen to ensure that there is consistency in sentencing for food hygiene offences. They have approached the Office of the Sentencing Council and requested that they consider producing sentencing guidelines for food hygiene offences. They are currently working with officials from the Council, who are hoping to produce draft guidelines that can be put before the full Sentencing Council.

10th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent discussions he has had with the Food Standards Agency on joined-up action at both national and local level to tackle food fraud.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) continues to develop its capability in relation to food fraud, working closely with other Government Departments including the Department of Health, local authorities and industry to detect and deter food fraud.

The FSA is building an enhanced intelligence gathering network to increase the opportunity to capture and act on intelligence which may be indicative of future risks relating to food fraud, as well as producing strategic and tactical assessments to share with relevant enforcement agencies. Through this, the FSA has strengthened its links with other enforcement agencies, including the National Trading Standards Board, National Crime Agency, the Intellectual Property Office and the Gangmasters Licencing Agency. The FSA is a member of the Government Agencies Intelligence Network and is sharing and receiving intelligence through this network to support cross-government investigations.

At a European level, the FSA is fully engaged with the European Commission Food Fraud Team and its network which is now sharing intelligence to support cross-Europe investigations.

The FSA also provide support to local authorities in their food fraud related investigations through the provision of financial support, expert advice and training.

10th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of current tools available to enforcement officers to take swift action in tackling food fraud.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) works with local authority enforcement officers to ensure that food law is applied across the entire food chain. Direction and guidance on the approach that local authority food law regulatory services should take is given in the statutory Food Law Code of Practice (the Code). The FSA regularly assesses the effectiveness of tools available to these enforcement officers through undertaking audit of local authorities' enforcement services, reviewing the Code and ensuring lessons are learnt from major incidents.

The Code sets out instructions and criteria to which the authorities must have regard and is periodically reviewed to ensure that it reflects current enforcement practices and supports local authorities' delivery of their official control obligations and that enforcement is consistent, effective and proportionate.

The FSA provides specific tools to support local authorities with investigations relating to potential food fraud. The FSA operates the Food Fraud Database, which utilises specialist intelligence management software to record intelligence reports and identify links, and uses this to assist local investigations. The FSA also provides local authorities with financial support through its Fighting Fund, expert advice through its Food Fraud Advisory Unit and holds dedicated training courses for enforcement officers.

In addition, the FSA is building an enhanced intelligence gathering network to increase the opportunity to capture and act on intelligence which may be indicative of future risks relating to food fraud, as well as producing strategic and tactical assessments to share with relevant enforcement agencies.

10th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he has taken to strengthen food surveillance and the analytical capability of local authorities to pre-empt potential food fraud in the last 12 months.

The main role for the Food Standards Agency (FSA) in combatting food fraud is to provide assistance and resources to United Kingdom local authorities (LAs) food fraud related investigations through the provision of financial support, expert advice and training. The FSA continues to develop its capability in relation to food fraud, working closely with other Government Departments, LAs and industry to detect and deter food fraud.

The FSA provides additional funding on an annual basis to UK Enforcement Authorities for sampling and surveillance of food to help ensure risk-based targeted checks at ports and inland. Food authenticity and food adulteration issues have been prioritised in consultation with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and the Department of Health.

In 2013-14, the FSA made available £1.6 million to LAs and ports plus an additional £700,000 specifically for authenticity issues including: meat speciation and fish speciation by DNA testing; added water in chicken; authenticity of durum wheat; and authenticity of basmati rice.

Over the last 12 months, FSA and DEFRA have worked with the Authenticity Steering Group to address and prioritise analytical method development for the Food Authenticity Research Programme. Current activities include knowledge transfer sessions, which have been joint-funded by FSA and DEFRA, to enhance the range of analytical methods available to support LA enforcement activity. For example, a knowledge transfer event took place for Public Analysts on DNA extraction processes in early 2014 with a further two planned for later this year.

10th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many local authorities have not conducted any sampling to check food composition over the last 12 months.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) collects food law enforcement monitoring returns from local authorities annually. Data for the period 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014 is currently being collected. Following collation and analysis, the FSA plans to publish this data in November 2014.

The FSA advises that the following local authorities did not report any food composition sampling in 2012-13 via the Local Authority Enforcement Monitoring System (LAEMS):

Armagh

Birmingham

Blackburn

Bolton

Darlington

Isle of Wight

Leicester City

Plymouth City

Redcar and Cleveland

Rochdale

Rutland

South Lanarkshire

Swindon

Tameside

All of these authorities reported taking other labelling or microbiological samples in 2012-13.

A table has been placed in the Library which shows how many food standards samples (composition and labelling) each local authority reported via LAEMS in 2012-13, together with a comparison against the number reported in 2011-12 and how many food standards samples each local authority reported through a FSA-funded project.

All of the reported food standards samples were official samples and would have been submitted to the local authority's appointed Public Analyst for analysis. Out of 22,055 food standards samples in 2012-13, 4,387 were funded by the FSA, all other food standards samples would have been paid for by the local authority. By comparison, in 2011-12, the FSA funded 5,072 out of 21,970 food standards samples.

For some local authorities, the FSA funded sampling figure is larger than the number included in the LAEMS report. The difference will be due to the LAEMS reports only including samples for which the analytical result was received from the Public Analyst before 31 March 2013.

6th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, at the end of the process what assessment he has made of how many practices in (a) Tower Hamlets and (b) England will (i) lose and (ii) gain financially from the seven year reduction of the minimum practice income guarantees.

The Minimum Practice Income Guarantee payment is unfair because practices serving very similar populations are paid very different amounts per patient. The payments are being phased out over a seven-year period to allow practices time to adjust.

The money released by doing this will be reinvested in the basic payments made to all General Medical Services practices, which are based on numbers of patients and key determinants of practice workload, such as the age and health needs of patients.

NHS England has undertaken an analysis to identify the small number of practices that will lose the largest amount of funding per patient as a result of the phasing out of the Minimum Practice Income Guarantee, and will work with those practices to ensure that high quality services for their local populations are maintained.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the average annual change in income to GP practices in (a) England, (b) London and (c) Tower Hamlets arising from changes to points available for payment-related indicators under the Quality and Outcomes Framework.

The overall effect of the average annual changes in income for general practitioner (GP) practices as a result of the withdrawal of the Minimum Practice Income Guarantee is as follows:

(a) England – no change;

(b) London – a decrease of £948,000 spread across 721 General Medical Services (GMS) practices; and

(c) Tower Hamlets – a decrease of £184,000 spread across 21 GMS practices.

The overall effect of the average annual changes in income for GP practices as a result of the changes to Quality and Outcomes Framework payments is as follows:

(a) England – no change;

(b) London – an increase of £1,680,000 spread across 721 GMS practices; and

(c) Tower Hamlets – an increase of £138,000 spread across 21 GMS practices.

NHS England modelled these figures based on current practice populations.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what meetings have taken place between officials in his Department and officers of (a) the Tower Hamlets Clinical Commissioning Group and (b) the Regional or Sub Regional NHS to discuss the effects on GP services in Tower Hamlets of changes to the Quality and Outcomes Framework and Minimum Practice Income Guarantee.

The head of primary care for NHS England for North Central and East London met with the Chief Officers of all London clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) on 14 February 2014 at their London-wide forum and discussed the planned changes to the Minimum Practice Income Guarantee. This included offering to meet with practices alongside the CCG if requested.

The NHS England primary care team in London has had communication on a number of occasions by telephone and email with the Chief Officer of Tower Hamlets CCG regarding the potential impact on practices of changes to the Minimum Practice Income Guarantee and Quality and Outcomes Framework.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the average annual change in income for GP practices in (a) England, (b) London and (c) Tower Hamlets arising from the withdrawal of the Minimum Practice Income Guarantee.

The overall effect of the average annual changes in income for general practitioner (GP) practices as a result of the withdrawal of the Minimum Practice Income Guarantee is as follows:

(a) England – no change;

(b) London – a decrease of £948,000 spread across 721 General Medical Services (GMS) practices; and

(c) Tower Hamlets – a decrease of £184,000 spread across 21 GMS practices.

The overall effect of the average annual changes in income for GP practices as a result of the changes to Quality and Outcomes Framework payments is as follows:

(a) England – no change;

(b) London – an increase of £1,680,000 spread across 721 GMS practices; and

(c) Tower Hamlets – an increase of £138,000 spread across 21 GMS practices.

NHS England modelled these figures based on current practice populations.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect on the (a) numbers of GP practices and (b) services offered by GP practices of removing performance indicators from the Quality Outcomes Framework.

We have reduced the number of indicators in the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) by more than a third. This is intended to free up time for general practitioners (GPs) to provide more personalised care which includes the new responsibility of providing a named GP for all of their patients aged 75 and over. The money released from the QOF will be reinvested in general practice.

We understand that NHS England is currently developing the specifications and reporting protocols that will be required to capture the information provided by the retired QOF indicators.

This will enable NHS England's commissioning teams, clinical commissioning groups and the Care Quality Commission to take this information into account in reaching rounded judgements about the quality of care provided by general practice. It will also be used to evaluate the impact of the indicators that were retired on 1 April 2014, and will inform future decisions about the development of QOF.

NHS England has recently undertaken an analysis to identify ‘outlier' practices – those that will lose the largest amount of funding per patient as a result of the phasing out of the Minimum Practice Income Guarantee. Details of these practices have been sent to NHS England area teams.

In a small number of cases where there are exceptional underlying factors that necessitate additional funding – for example because a practice is serving an atypical population - it is anticipated that area teams will meet with the practices to discuss and agree arrangements to ensure that appropriate services for patients continue to be available.

To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment has been made of the effects of the removal of the Minimum Practice Income Guarantee on (a) GP services and (b) the income of GPs; and if he will commission research on the range and extent on GP income in Tower Hamlets.

As part of the general practitioner (GP) contract settlement in 2013, the Department decided to phase out Minimum Practice Income Guarantee (MPIG) top up payments over a seven year period, starting in the coming financial year 2014-15. This means that MPIG payments to practices will be reduced by one-seventh every year from 1 April 2014.

The money released by doing this will be reinvested in the basic payments made to all General Medical Services practices, which are based on numbers of patients and key determinants of practice workload, such as patient age, health needs and the unavoidable costs of providing services in rural areas. The decision to implement the changes over a period of seven years is designed to allow those practices that will lose funding to adjust gradually.

GPs are independent contractors and are responsible for deciding their own levels of income. The decision on how to address specific local issues will be taken by NHS England's area teams after a full assessment of local circumstances. We understand that NHS England's primary care team in London is in regular contact with the Chief Officer of Tower Hamlets clinical commissioning group about this issue.

8th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has held with his counterparts in the EU on tensuring the security and retention of frozen Libyan assets.

As a member of the United Nations Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1970 (2011) concerning Libya, we regularly discuss the implementation of the UN Libya sanctions regime, including with EU members of the Committee. We have regular discussions on the EU autonomous regime with EU member states in the relevant working groups and the listings are reviewed on a regular basis. We have also done so in routine working group meetings with EU partners concerning the implementation of the EU Regulations and restrictive measures on Libya. By its Resolution 2362 of 29 June 2017, the UN Security Council reaffirmed its intention to ensure that assets frozen by the UN in 2011 shall at a later stage be made available to and for the benefit of the Libyan people.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions took place between (a) his Department and the British Council and (b) the UK High Commission in Dhaka and the British Council in Bangladesh before the decision was taken to close that Council's centres in that country; and what timetable is in place for reopening those centres.

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office and UK High Commission in Dhaka have maintained close contact with the British Council before and since the closure, following the 1 July terrorist attack at Holey Bakery. The Council has completed its security review and is taking the necessary steps to ensure the safety and security of its staff and buildings before reopening.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
2nd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will take steps to ensure that UK citizens travelling to India, Thailand and other elephant-range states are made aware of the illegal practice of capturing and breaking the spirit of baby elephants for use in the tourist industry.

The United Kingdom is committed to conserving Asian elephants and recognises the growing threats to their populations, particularly from poaching and cross-border, illegal trade in live animals to feed the demand by the tourist and entertainment industries. We have been working internationally through the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in discussion with elephant range states, such as India and Thailand, to increase protection for Asian elephants. In 2014, we secured agreement in 2014 for elephant range states to put in place measures to prevent illegal trade in live elephants.

Although it is not for the Government to make British citizens aware of this practice, we will continue to work together with the Indian authorities, as well as non-governmental organisations, on protecting elephants.

2nd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to his Indian counterpart on the illegal use of bull-hooks on Asian elephants in the tourism and logging industries.

I refer the honourable Member to the answer I gave on 29 October 2015 (PQs 12817, 13418, 13419) which can be located at:

www.parliament.uk/writtenanswers/

15th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the political situation in Bangladesh.

The Government is deeply concerned about the escalating violence and disruption in Bangladesh, which affects the daily lives of its citizens. All political parties must urge restraint, an end to violence and respect for the rule of law. We have called on Bangladesh’s political parties to work together through dialogue to find a long-term solution that breaks the cycle of violence and disruption.

The British High Commissioner to Bangladesh, along with other EU Ambassadors, met Bangladesh Foreign Minister Mahmood Ali on 14 January to express collective concerns at the ongoing violence in Bangladesh, in particular the shooting of former Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Reaz Rahman and an attack on a bus in Rangpur which killed four people, including a child. They asked that the Bangladesh government investigate these crimes promptly and in accordance with the law. Our High Commissioner echoed these concerns in his statement on 14 January. I also raised these issues with the Bangladesh Minster for Law, Justice and Parliamentary Affairs in our meeting on Tuesday 20 January.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make it his policy for the Cabinet Office to publish annual reports and accounts for spending in the Conflict Pool.

The Conflict Pool will cease to operate in its current form in March 2015. The Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) will begin operating in April 2015, bringing together a number of new and current Government resources, including the former Conflict Pool. The Government will ensure full reporting to Parliament on the CSSF. Details of this will be confirmed in due course.

14th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, when his Department plans to publish the latest review of the Conflict Pool.

I refer the Member for Poplar and Limehouse to the reply which my Rt Hon Friend, the Member for New Forest West (Desmond Swayne MP), Minister of State, Department for International Development, gave the Member for Wirral South on 16 October (UIN 210197).

To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect on the UK's relationship with Bangladesh of the activities in the UK of Tareque Rahman, Vice Chairman of the Bangladesh Nationalist Party.

The UK enjoys a broad and wide ranging relationship with Bangladesh which is built on engagement with the government of Bangladesh and Bangladesh political parties, business and cultural exchanges between our people. We work on a range of bilateral and global issues that include Bangladesh's recent endorsement of the Declaration of Commitment to End Sexual Violence in Conflict. We are not aware of any activities by Mr Rahman that have had an impact on our bilateral relationship.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department plans to undertake a review of the charging of VAT on mooring fees for residents of houseboats.

Mooring fees on houseboats designed or adapted for use solely as a place of permanent habitation, which do not have the means of, and are not be capable of being readily adapted for self-propulsion, are VAT exempt.

Under the current EU VAT rules, there is no scope to extend the remit of these VAT reliefs for houseboats. Whilst the UK remains a member of the EU, it must comply with the rights and obligations that membership entails. This includes the application of EU VAT rules.

26th Mar 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the policy of the Inland Revenue on street and other similar markets not attracting VAT has changed; and whether the Government has plans for such changes.

HM Revenue and Customs has not changed its policy on VAT in relation to street or similar markets. If there is a passive supply of an interest in land then the supply will normally be exempt from VAT. However if the main supply is something other than just a supply of land, then the VAT treatment will be determined by the VAT rules relating to the main supply.

26th Mar 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the Upper Tax Tribunal decision that VAT (a) is due on the hire of pitches at organised events and (b) liability goes back up to four years; and if he will make a statement.

The decision of the Upper Tribunal in relation to VAT on the hire of pitches at organised events supported HM Revenue and Customs’ policy that such supplies were not exempt supplies of land. The main supply was that of access to a market place. Depending on the facts of each case, HMRC are normally only able to assess for any under declared tax going back 4 years.

8th Feb 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to decision of the UN to freeze Libyan Assets, agreed by EU Directive and adopted by the UK, whether he has made an estimate of the value of assets frozen (a) at the time the assets were frozen and (b) the current value of those assets.

In 2011, the approximate aggregate value at the time the funds were frozen in the UK was £7.5 billion.

The current value of frozen assets held are in the process of being finalised as part of the “2017 Annual Frozen Fund Review”. However, at the close of business on 30 September 2016 they were approximately £11.7 billion. The figure is provided on an aggregate basis so as not to indirectly disclose the value of funds held by particular individuals or entities.

The frozen funds continue to belong to the individuals and entities listed under the Regulation and are not seized or otherwise held by HM Government.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
13th Dec 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what progress has been made in securing the £200 million private sector investment for charging infrastructure announced in the Autumn Budget 2017; and if he will make a statement.

Following the announcement of the Fund at Autumn Budget, the Government is engaging with the private sector to ensure that it is set up in the most effective way. Further details will be announced in due course.

1st Mar 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of freezing rates of child benefit and child tax credit on families in Poplar and Limehouse constituency.

The Government has considered the impact on all benefits and tax credits rates that are included in the four year uprating freeze. The Government has published an impact assessment at:

http://www.parliament.uk/documents/impact-assessments/IA15-006C.pdf

28th Jan 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions his Department has had with the European Commission since the publication of the EU Aviation Strategy in December 2015; what assessment he has made of the effect of taxes and levies applied by member states on connectivity and competitiveness; what his Department's response to that strategy's conclusion on the effects of such taxes and levies conclusion is; and if he will make a statement.

HM Treasury takes note of the European Commission’s 2015 Aviation Strategy.

The UK has the third largest aviation network in the world and a strongly performing aviation sector – passenger numbers grew 4% in 2014 compared to 2013 and are expected to show similar growth for 2015.

In the absence of any taxation of international aviation fuel and no VAT on international or domestic flights, the Government levies air passenger duty (APD) on the carriage of passengers from UK airports. APD ensures that the aviation sector contributes its fair share in taxation towards reducing the deficit.

However, like all taxes, APD is kept under review with any changes announced at fiscal events.

26th Jan 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the cost to the Exchequer of reducing (a) Band A and (b) Band B air passenger duty by 50 per cent, excluding Scotland, from 1 April 2015; and if he will make a statement.

Air Passenger Duty (APD) is kept under review as part of the normal policy management process.

I draw the Hon. Member’s attention to the disaggregated APD receipts by country which are published by HMRC at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/disaggregation-of-hmrc-tax-receipts and the data on forecast APD receipts and the cost to exempt children published in tables 2.1 and B.3 of Autumn Statement 2014 at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/autumn-statement-documents.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions his Department has had with the Department for Transport on the regulation of the use of electronic scooters.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued for motoring offences in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, which can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales. However, information on the type of vehicle issued with a FPN is not collected. Data for the 2018/19 financial year is due to be published in October 2019.

Enforcement of road traffic law is an operational matter for the police to determine in line with local priorities. There have been no discussions with the Mayor of London, the Metropolitan Police or Transport for London on the enforcement of the regulations governing the use of electric scooters.

The Future of Mobility: Urban Strategy, published on 19 March 2019 by the Department for Transport, includes a Regulatory Review to address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulations are fit for the future. One strand of this will look at options for enabling micromobility devices, and a consultation will be issued in due course. The Home Office will work with Dft as proposals are developed.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions he has had with (a) the Mayor of London, (b) the Metropolitan Police and (c) Transport for London on the enforcement of the regulations governing the use of electric scooters on roads, pavements and cycle highways.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued for motoring offences in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, which can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales. However, information on the type of vehicle issued with a FPN is not collected. Data for the 2018/19 financial year is due to be published in October 2019.

Enforcement of road traffic law is an operational matter for the police to determine in line with local priorities. There have been no discussions with the Mayor of London, the Metropolitan Police or Transport for London on the enforcement of the regulations governing the use of electric scooters.

The Future of Mobility: Urban Strategy, published on 19 March 2019 by the Department for Transport, includes a Regulatory Review to address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulations are fit for the future. One strand of this will look at options for enabling micromobility devices, and a consultation will be issued in due course. The Home Office will work with Dft as proposals are developed.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fixed penalty fines have been issued to electric scooter riders by police in each of the last two years.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) issued for motoring offences in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, which can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales. However, information on the type of vehicle issued with a FPN is not collected. Data for the 2018/19 financial year is due to be published in October 2019.

Enforcement of road traffic law is an operational matter for the police to determine in line with local priorities. There have been no discussions with the Mayor of London, the Metropolitan Police or Transport for London on the enforcement of the regulations governing the use of electric scooters.

The Future of Mobility: Urban Strategy, published on 19 March 2019 by the Department for Transport, includes a Regulatory Review to address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulations are fit for the future. One strand of this will look at options for enabling micromobility devices, and a consultation will be issued in due course. The Home Office will work with Dft as proposals are developed.

13th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he has made an assessment of the potential effect of the 89 per cent conversion rate of uninsured drivers to insured under operation Tutelage in conjunction with the Motor Insurers' Bureau on police time spent processing individual PNC checks after manually downloading and cross-checking MIDAS hits from ANPR.

The Home Office has not assessed Operation Tutelage. How police enforce uninsured driving and deploy resources, including any particular campaigns, is an operational matter for individual Chief Officers of police in conjunction with local policing plans.

1st Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will publish all non-personal data fields from the Incident Reporting System.

The Home Office is committed to making as much data as possible available from the Incident Recording System (IRS) whilst mindful of the personal and sensitive data within it. It has done this through publishing 13 incident level datasets that are available here


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fire-statistics-incident-level-datasets

21st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fire inspections have been carried out by fire and rescue services in the UK in each of the last five years.

Fire is a devolved matter so the Home Office only holds data for England. Data on the number of fire safety audits undertaken by fire and rescue services (FRSs) in England are published in fire statistics data table FIRE1202 which accompanied the “Fire prevention and protections statistics, England, April 2017 to March 2018” release, available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fire-prevention-and-protection-statistics-england-april-2017-to-march-2018

13th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to the letter of 26 September 2017 from the hon. Member for Poplar and Limehouse on the case of Mrs Justina Ugisomi Saliu, the wife of Mr John Pattison.

A response was sent to the hon. Member on 16 April.

26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the Incident Reporting System for fires caused by electrical goods in domestic homes includes fires caused by (a) mobile phone chargers and (b) e-cigarettes.

The Home Office regularly considers how best to review both the IRS functionality and data collection, to ensure they continue to meet the needs of FRSs and other data users, particularly in light of the Fire Reform Agenda.

Fires related to mobile phone chargers are currently captured under the category ‘Battery Charger’ and although there is not a specific category for e-cigarettes, FRSs record fires related to these under the ‘other’ category.

Home Office officials have regular discussions with fire and rescue services about the data collected through the Incident Recording System and collect feedback about the IRS to feed into future reviews.

26th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the Incident Reporting System on fires caused by electricity.

The Home Office regularly considers how best to review both the IRS functionality and data collection, to ensure they continue to meet the needs of FRSs and other data users, particularly in light of the Fire Reform Agenda.

Fires related to mobile phone chargers are currently captured under the category ‘Battery Charger’ and although there is not a specific category for e-cigarettes, FRSs record fires related to these under the ‘other’ category.

Home Office officials have regular discussions with fire and rescue services about the data collected through the Incident Recording System and collect feedback about the IRS to feed into future reviews.

3rd Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress has been made on discussions with the US Administration on allowing the pre-clearance in the UK of passengers for immigration purposes.

Discussions with the US Administration on their proposals for the pre-clearance in the UK of passengers travelling to the US for immigration purposes are ongoing. No decision has yet been made.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reasons the UK National Resilience contract with the Fire Service College was terminated by her Department; what account was taken in that decision of the key objective of the Department for Communities and Local Government in selling that college to secure continuing access to National Resilience strategic assets; and if she will make a statement.

The 2-year National Resilience training contract will end on 26 April 2017. As part of Goverment’s policy to devolve further responsibilities to the Fire sector, centralised training has now been passed to a lead authority, Merseyside Fire and Rescue Authority. This offers increased value for money and allows in-year savings made to be used for the benefit of the national resilience capabilities. National Resilience assets are largely owned by the Fire and Rescue Authorities, and suitable training grounds remain available.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the role of the Fire Service College in (a) providing essential and unique training services to the UK fire and rescue services and (b) assisting the new professional standards body in building a framework of standards for the service.

The Government does not assess the College’s role in the provision of its services.

It is the responsibility for individual fire and rescue services to decide where training is procured and assure themselves of the quality of that training.

The sector based project team led by the National Fire Chiefs Council are currently undertaking work to explore options for a new professional standards body, and they will engage with the Fire Service College as a valued stakeholder during this process.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
1st Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many school fires have been reported in each of the last 10 years; how many of those fires were caused by arson; and what the total cost was of replacing school buildings affected by (a) those fires and (b) those fires caused by arson.

The latest published figures on fires in schools can be found in “Fire Statistics Great Britain: 2013/14” - https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fire-statistics-great-britain-2013-to-2014 and show that there were 593 fires in schools in 2013/14 in Great Britain of which 134 were deliberate fires (it should be noted that not all deliberate fires are arson). Subsequent publications have included schools under a broader category of “Education premises”.

We have not estimated the costs of fires in schools.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government's chief fire and rescue advisor was consulted on changes to policy on fire safety policy for new school buildings.

The Department for Education’s consultation on Fire Safety Design for Schools – Building Bulletin (BB) 100 Revised closed on 15 August and the Department for Education is considering responses.

The Home Office, including the Chief Fire and Rescue Adviser, will engage with the Department for Education on its proposals on the way forward, ahead of its publication.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
5th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions her Department had with the Department for Education before the decision to withdraw government guidance that most new schools are expected to be fitted with automatic fire sprinkler systems.

The Department for Education’s consultation on Fire Safety Design for Schools – Building Bulletin (BB) 100 Revised closed on 15 August and the Department for Education is considering responses.

We will engage with the Department for Education on its proposals on the way forward, ahead of its publication .

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
18th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many hand-held radar speed detectors are in use by police constabularies in England; and whether her Department has made an assessment of the merits of recruiting and training civilian volunteers to use such detectors.