Jack Dromey Portrait

Jack Dromey

Labour - Former Member for Birmingham, Erdington

Shadow Minister (Home Office)
4th Dec 2021 - 7th Jan 2022
Shadow Minister (Cabinet Office)
7th Jan 2021 - 4th Dec 2021
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions) (Pensions)
12th Jan 2018 - 7th Jan 2021
Shadow Minister (Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy) (Labour)
9th Oct 2016 - 12th Jan 2018
Shadow Minister (Home Affairs)
7th Oct 2013 - 27th Jun 2016
Regulatory Reform
26th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Minister (Housing)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2013
Business, Innovation and Skills Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 2nd Nov 2010


Division Voting information

Jack Dromey has voted in 1740 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
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All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Mike Penning (Conservative)
(61 debate interactions)
Guy Opperman (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
(55 debate interactions)
David Cameron (Conservative)
(50 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Justice
(196 debate contributions)
Home Office
(165 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(115 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(110 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Jack Dromey's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Jack Dromey

23rd September 2021
Jack Dromey signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 18th October 2021

Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall

Tabled by: Afzal Khan (Labour - Manchester, Gorton)
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; notes that this memorial now includes over 150,000 hand-painted hearts to symbolise all those who lost their lives during the coronavirus pandemic; praises the work of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Feb 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 97
Scottish National Party: 16
Liberal Democrat: 10
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Conservative: 4
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
22nd September 2021
Jack Dromey signed this EDM on Wednesday 22nd September 2021

Staffing reductions at the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency

Tabled by: Grahame Morris (Labour - Easington)
That this House acknowledges the work and dedication of staff employed across the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA); notes the agency plays a leading role in protecting and improving public health and supports innovations through research and development; is aware that the MHRA has three centres employing almost …
42 signatures
(Most recent: 7 Dec 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 30
Plaid Cymru: 3
Liberal Democrat: 2
Alba Party: 2
Scottish National Party: 1
Independent: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Conservative: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Jack Dromey's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Jack Dromey, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.



251 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Attorney General, whether his Department operates a red, amber and green rating system for categorising Freedom of Information requests according to their presentational sensitivity.

The Attorney General’s Office does not operate a red, amber and green rating system for categorising Freedom of Information requests according to their presentational sensitivity.

All FOI requests are treated exactly the same, regardless of who the request is from and their occupation.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 17 November 2021 to Question 73818, on Coronavirus: Public Inquiries, whether there will be a consultative process for the selection of chair of the covid-19 public inquiry; and what the timeframe for the selection of that chair will be.

On 12 May, the Prime Minister confirmed that a public inquiry into COVID-19 will be established on a statutory basis, with full formal powers, and that it will begin its work in spring 2022. The Prime Minister has committed to appointing an independent chair by the end of the year. The inquiry will be established on a statutory basis and the chair will be appointed in accordance with the Inquiries Act 2005.

Michael Ellis
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Attends Cabinet)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Minister is responsible for the covid-19 public inquiry.

On 12 May, the Prime Minister confirmed that a public inquiry into COVID-19 would be established on a statutory basis, with full formal powers, and that it will begin its work in spring 2022.

Further details will be set out in due course.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to page 131 of the Cabinet Office's Annual Report and Accounts 2020-21, who provided the machines for the manufacture of face coverings whose value has been written off by his Department.

The write down in the Cabinet Office - Annual Report and Accounts 2020/21 relates to an initial purchase of semi-automated face covering manufacturing plants acquired at the outset of the pandemic to provide initial domestic resilience while we were facing worldwide shortages. These machines were replaced by fully automated machines. As a result of this investment, more than 13 million masks for public use have already been made and millions more will be produced in the coming months. This programme has helped ensure public demand for face coverings has not affected the supply of higher-grade masks needed by NHS frontline staff.

19th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Cabinet Office Annual Report and Accounts 2020/21, page 131, published 15 July 2021, which companies were covered by the constructive losses incurred on the Ventilator Challenge Programme.

Throughout the pandemic, we have done whatever it takes to protect the NHS and save lives. This included launching the Ventilator Challenge, which saw more than 15,000 new machines delivered to the NHS, meaning every patient who needs a ventilator has been able to access one.

The Ventilator Challenge was run during the height of the pandemic and the Cabinet Office accepted the higher levels of risk that come with Research and Development projects where time is of the essence, entering into development contracts with a wide variety of vendors. An initial screening of the projects by a Technical Design Authority (comprised of clinicians, the regulator, external experts and officials) identified which ventilators design concepts were most likely to both pass validation and be manufacturable in volume.

Those design teams were issued conditional letters of intent to cover reasonable costs until the next (clinically informed) TDA, when work on the devices considered to be non-viable was stood down. In this way the list of potentially viable designs was whittled down to those that did pass the required validation tests, some of which were then taken into manufacture. There were therefore costs incurred in supporting designs that did not turn out to work, but it was not knowable at the outset which design concepts would and would not be successful.

As highlighted in the NAO report, even including the R&D costs expended on designs that did not progress, the average unit cost of the ventilators developed and manufactured compared favourably with that of the ventilators purchased in the market. Moreover the NAO report into the ventilator challenge remarked that given its overall approach, the Cabinet Office took reasonable steps to control the programme’s costs where it could.

19th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to answer Question 27109 on Chambers of Commerce: Essex, tabled on 5 June 2021 by the hon. Member for Birmingham, Erdington.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to PQ 27109 on 02 August 2021.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
13th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the value of procurement contracts awarded to British companies as part of the Government's National Infrastructure and Construction Procurement Pipeline 2020-21.

The Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) will publish the next iteration of its annual National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline in 2021, as stated in the NIS, and this will list future planned investments and procurements across infrastructure and construction.

The Pipeline is a tool provided by the government to support all companies across the UK to make critical business decisions and provide them with the certainty needed to invest in innovation and skills. The IPA is not the custodian of the data included within the Pipeline as this is owned by individual contracting authorities spanning both public and private sector. The procurements included within the Pipeline are only those with a high confidence of delivery and by including them within the Pipeline contracting authorities are providing a commitment to seek to deliver them as planned.

5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 1 July to Question 13907 on Chambers of Commerce: Essex, who the contact involved with the Essex Chambers of Commerce was; and what offer was made.

I refer the hon. Member to the letter dated 13 May 2020 from the Department for Health and Social Care to the Rt Hon Member for Witham. I am placing a copy of this letter in the libraries of both Houses.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to enforce Cabinet Office guidance on the use of private email accounts for government business by Ministers.

Further to the answers given on 8 July 2021, Cabinet Office Guidance to departments on the use of private emails provides guidance to departments (and their Ministers) on this issue.

5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he has taken to ensure emails sent by Ministers in the Department of Health and Social Care relating to government contracts are available for (a) requests under the Freedom of Information Act and (b) the public inquiry into the Government’s response to the covid-19 pandemic.

Further to the answers given on 8 July 2021, record keeping and the management of information within the Department of Health and Social Care is a matter for the Department of Health and Social Care.

29th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what private companies are contracted to provide security services at his Department’s buildings; and whether there are closed circuit television cameras in any ministerial private office within his Department's estate.

I refer the hon. Member to my response on 28 June 2021.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to answer Question 13907 on Chambers of Commerce: Essex, tabled on 10 June 2021 by the hon. Member for Birmingham, Erdington, and due for answer on 15 June 2021.

I refer the hon. Member to my answer given to PQ13907 on 1 July 2021.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what private companies are contracted to provide security services at his Department’s buildings that contain Ministerial private offices; and whether there are closed circuit television cameras in any Ministerial private offices within his Department's estate.

I refer the hon. Member to my response on 28 June 2021.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when his Department’s current non-executive directors were appointed; what oversight his officials had of the Ministerial appointments of those non-executive directors; and what assessment was made of the applicants' experience against the requirements for breadth and depth of experience set out in the Cabinet Office guidance on Departmental Boards of November 2014.

All financial payments to non-executive directors, their work and the work of the Board are published in the publicly available annual report and accounts, available on GOV.UK. For 2019/20: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-to-2020

All CO non-executive directors’ declarations of interest are published annually on GOV.UK here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/920469/Register_of_Non_Executive_Board_Members__Interests_August_2020.pdf

Appointment dates for the department’s non-executives are published in the annual report and accounts for each year on GOV.UK. For current non-executives see 2019/20 report: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-to-2020. For previously appointed non-executives, the relevant annual report is here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2018-to-2019

The process of NEDs is set out in Guidance: Role of government non-executives and departmental boards https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/role-of-government-non-executives and the overarching Code of Practice 2017, both published and available on GOV.UK. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/corporate-governance-code-for-central-government-departments-2017

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what declarations of interests have been made by his Department’s non-executive directors; and where those interests are published.

All financial payments to non-executive directors, their work and the work of the Board are published in the publicly available annual report and accounts, available on GOV.UK. For 2019/20: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-to-2020

All CO non-executive directors’ declarations of interest are published annually on GOV.UK here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/920469/Register_of_Non_Executive_Board_Members__Interests_August_2020.pdf

Appointment dates for the department’s non-executives are published in the annual report and accounts for each year on GOV.UK. For current non-executives see 2019/20 report: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-to-2020. For previously appointed non-executives, the relevant annual report is here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2018-to-2019

The process of NEDs is set out in Guidance: Role of government non-executives and departmental boards https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/role-of-government-non-executives and the overarching Code of Practice 2017, both published and available on GOV.UK. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/corporate-governance-code-for-central-government-departments-2017

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department operates a red, amber and green rating system for categorising Freedom of Information requests according to their presentational sensitivity.

The Cabinet Office does not operate a rating system for Freedom of Information requests. All FOI requests are treated exactly the same, regardless of who the request is from.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department operates a red, amber and green rating system for categorising Freedom of Information requests according to their presentational sensitivity.

The Cabinet Office does not operate a rating system for Freedom of Information requests. All FOI requests are treated exactly the same, regardless of who the request is from.

10th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the statement of the Paymaster General on 18 May 2021, Official Report, column 545, what the offer from the Essex Chamber of Commerce referred to is.

Further to my comments of 18 May 2021 in response to the Rt. Hon. Member for Ashton-under-Lyne, the Rt. Hon. Member for Witham was approached regarding an offer of PPE supply from a contact involved with the Essex Chamber of Commerce in May 2020. This was passed to the Department for Health and Social Care to respond.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
18th May 2016
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what level of funding was awarded to the UK from the DAPHNE and Progress programmes in each year to 2014; to which Departments this funding was awarded; and which regions received action grants under which headings.

This information is not held centrally.

24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what meetings (a) Ministers, (b) special advisers and (c) civil servants in his Department had with the hon. Member for Milton Keynes North between 1 May 2020 and 31 January 2021.

Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Ministers and Special Advisers have had no one-on-one meetings with my Hon. Friend the Member for Milton Keynes North between 1 May 2020 and 31 January 2021. Ministers have participated in MP-Roundtables, All-MP calls and MP tea surgeries during this period, some of which the Hon. Member for Milton Keynes North attended or received an invitation for. Details of meetings held by civil servants are not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the timetable is for his Department to make a decision any investigation into the proposed takeover of GKN Plc by Melrose Industries in the interests of National Security.

The procedure for interventions in mergers by Ministers on public interest grounds, including national security, is set out in the Enterprise Act 2002.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on introducing a new statutory entitlement to carer's leave for working people.

We will consider options for carer’s leave carefully and will set out our plans in due course.

11th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the effect of his policies on reducing the gap between the richest and the poorest areas in the UK since 2010.

This Government has made significant progress in addressing the gaps in productivity across the UK. Since 2010, £12 billion has been allocated to local areas via the Local Growth Fund; 10 Devolution Deals have been agreed, further shifting the balance of power away from Whitehall; and £2.6 billion worth of private sector investment has been attracted to Enterprise Zones across England.

Since March 2010, 57% of the rise in employment across the UK has come from outside London and the South East, and 69% of that rise in employment has come from outside London. That means there are over 1.3 million more people in work outside London, and over a million more outside London and the South East since March 2010.

Birmingham is an excellent example of growth occurring outside of London and the South East. More foreign businesses invested in Greater Birmingham & Solihull in 2014/15 than any other LEP region, and the LEP area attracted 73 new FDI projects; investors included world-famous brands such as Jaguar Land Rover, KPMG, Virgin Media and Amazon.

The Industrial Strategy, which my department is delivering, is a critical part of my Rt Hon Friend the Prime Minister’s vision of an economy that works for everyone, where the benefits of growth are shared up and down the country.

26th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 24 October 2016 to Question 49479, whether all EU-derived employment rights will be retained in primary legislation.

Pursuant to the answer of 24 October 2016, all law in this area at the time of exit will be brought under UK law as part of the Great Repeal Bill, ensuring continuity.

20th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure that the rights contained in the Working Time Regulations 1998 will be (a) protected in the long-term and (b) retained in legislation.

As a Government, we have been clear that we will do nothing to undermine workers’ rights. All law in this area at the time of exit will be brought under UK law as part of the Great Repeal Bill, ensuring continuity.

20th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure that the employment rights contained in the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 2006 will be (a) protected in the long-term and (b) retained in legislation.

As a Government, we have been clear that we will do nothing to undermine workers’ rights. All law in this area at the time of exit will be brought under UK law as part of the Great Repeal Bill, ensuring continuity.

19th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure that the rights of part-time and agency workers will be (a) protected in the long-term and (b) retained in primary legislation.

As a Government, we have been clear that we will do nothing to undermine workers’ rights. All law in this area at the time of exit will be brought under UK law as part of the Great Repeal Bill, ensuring continuity.

19th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will take steps to ensure that all EU-derived employment rights will be (a) protected in the long-term and (b) retained in primary legislation after the UK leaves the EU.

As a Government, we have been clear that we will do nothing to undermine workers’ rights. All law in this area at the time of exit will be brought under UK law as part of the Great Repeal Bill, ensuring continuity.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on introducing a new statutory entitlement to carer's leave for working people.

We will consider options for carer’s leave carefully and will set out our plans in due course.

21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of easing covid-19 restrictions for amateur choirs.

I know that the restrictions on singing are frustrating to large numbers of amateur choirs and performance groups across the country and that many people have made sacrifices in order to drive down infections and protect the NHS over the last year. I can assure you that everyone across Government wants to ease these restrictions as soon as possible.

However, it is important that we take a cautious approach in easing restrictions.

We will continue to keep guidance and restrictions under review, in line with the changing situation. As set out in the roadmap, we hope to remove all legal limits on social contact at step 4. Further detail on step 4 will be set out as soon as possible.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how the Government plans to use regulatory powers to ensure that an adequate broadband service is provided.

The Government is creating a regulatory environment that supports the market in delivering world-class broadband services and has taken a number of steps to support this aim. As part of the Digital Economy Bill, we are introducing a broadband Universal Service Obligation to be implemented by 2020. This will give everyone the legal right to broadband at a minimum speed of 10 Mbps.

We are reforming the Electronic Communications Code to cut costs and simplify the process of building mobile and broadband infrastructure on private land. We are making permanent the relaxations in the rules for deploying fixed broadband infrastructure in all areas except Sites of Special Scientific Interest that we introduced in 2013. This will also cut deployment costs for communications providers and speed up broadband roll-out. Similar planning relaxations are being made in relation to the deployment of mobile infrastructure.

As of 31 July this year, the Communications (Access to Infrastructure) Regulations 2016 gave rights to Communications Providers to share passive infrastructure across utility, transport and communications sectors which is designed to reduce the cost of broadband deployment.

In addition, building regulations have also been amended to introduce a requirement from January 2017 for all new buildings, and major renovations, to include in-building physical infrastructure to support superfast broadband connectivity. The Government has also put in place industry agreements with developers for fibre connections to be made available to all new build housing.

The Government continues to review the regulatory landscape to identify further opportunities for reform.

7th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether the Government plans to publish detailed plans for achieving a minimum 10Mbps broadband connection as a universal service obligation by 2020.

Ofcom has been commissioned to undertake detailed technical analysis which will help inform decisions on the design parameters for the USO. We will publish plans for a broadband USO once we have considered Ofcom’s report which is due to be completed by the end of the year.

25th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the European Regulation on a European Single Market for Electronic Communications on blocking access to child sexual abuse material online.

My Department supports the blocking of access to child sexual abuse material by industry and we are actively seeking to ensure that all European regulation, including the electronic communications framework - which is currently under review - does not impede this. The Government’s primary concern during negotiations on the Connected Continent (or Telecoms Single Market) Regulations was that the Internet Watch Foundation's (IWF) ability to block access to illegal images of child abuse was protected, and we are confident we have ensured this. Going forward, we will continue with our aim to ensure any future European regulation allows the blocking of such content.

22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the accessibility of early years services in the West Midlands.

The department is leading a cross government approach to champion the family hub model. The government is investing over £34 million to champion family hubs. This includes a National Centre for Family Hubs to provide expert advice, guidance and advocacy; a £10 million transformation fund to open family hubs in around 10 new areas in England; an evaluation innovation fund to build the evidence base; and work with local authorities to develop data and digital products that will support the practical implementation of family hubs. Further details are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/20m-to-provide-more-early-help-for-vulnerable-families.

Alongside this, the government is committed to delivering the action areas set out in the Early Years Healthy Development Review led by my right hon. Friend, the member for South Northamptonshire, more information is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-best-start-for-life-a-vision-for-the-1001-critical-days. One key action area was to champion family hubs as a place where parents and carers can access Start for Life services. To support delivery of this, the National Centre for Family Hubs will support councils to understand how best to build a family hub network, and to take steps at a national and local level to reduce the stigma some parents or carers experience when asking for help. We will consider the recommendations in the Action for Children report as we take forward this work.

We have not made an assessment of the accessibility of early years services in the West Midlands specifically. The work that the government is doing to champion the family hub model and support parents and carers to access Start for Life services is national in scope, and applicable, with local nuance, in all regions.

22nd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the (a) proposal to introduce a minimum guarantee of early years services and (b) recommendations of the Action for Children’s report entitled Beyond reach: barriers to accessing early years services for children, published on 21 September 2021.

The department is leading a cross government approach to champion the family hub model. The government is investing over £34 million to champion family hubs. This includes a National Centre for Family Hubs to provide expert advice, guidance and advocacy; a £10 million transformation fund to open family hubs in around 10 new areas in England; an evaluation innovation fund to build the evidence base; and work with local authorities to develop data and digital products that will support the practical implementation of family hubs. Further details are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/20m-to-provide-more-early-help-for-vulnerable-families.

Alongside this, the government is committed to delivering the action areas set out in the Early Years Healthy Development Review led by my right hon. Friend, the member for South Northamptonshire, more information is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-best-start-for-life-a-vision-for-the-1001-critical-days. One key action area was to champion family hubs as a place where parents and carers can access Start for Life services. To support delivery of this, the National Centre for Family Hubs will support councils to understand how best to build a family hub network, and to take steps at a national and local level to reduce the stigma some parents or carers experience when asking for help. We will consider the recommendations in the Action for Children report as we take forward this work.

We have not made an assessment of the accessibility of early years services in the West Midlands specifically. The work that the government is doing to champion the family hub model and support parents and carers to access Start for Life services is national in scope, and applicable, with local nuance, in all regions.

29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of (a) the effectiveness of the primary school assessment system and (b) whether that system reflects priorities of parents.

The Department ran a consultation in 2017 to seek views about key issues in the primary assessment system, including how we can ensure the assessment system is proportionate while continuing to support high standards in our primary schools. The consultation was open for 12 weeks and received 4,165 responses from a range of groups, including parents.

Our response set out a number of actions, including developing new and revised assessments by working closely with key stakeholders such as teachers. When developing new assessment policy, such as the new engagement model and the reception baseline assessment, the Standards and Testing Agency seeks the views of parents or their representative organisations to inform decision making. The response also set out how we would provide clearer and more meaningful information to parents on how their children are progressing as well as identifying where additional support may be required.

6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment her Department has made of the ability of maintained nursery schools and children's centres to remain financially viable following recent changes to their funding.

There have been no changes to the funding of maintained nursery schools and children centres. We are currently consulting on the introduction of an Early Years National Funding Formula to ensure a fairer allocation of early years funding to local authorities. The consultation document sets out our intention to provide supplementary funding for maintained nursery schools for at least two years in order to provide stability to the nursery school sector while they explore how to become more sustainable in the longer term, including exploiting the scope for efficiencies.

Local authorities have a duty under the Childcare Act 2006 to ensure sufficient children’s centres to meet the needs of local families. Local authorities must meet their statutory duties on children’s centres from funding that forms part of the Department for Communities and Local Government Business Rates Retention Scheme. In addition, other Government funding, including that for public health, adult skills training and troubled families may also be used locally to support services delivered wholly, or in part, through children’s centres. Local authorities must consult fully before any significant changes are made to children’s centre services.

6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many (a) nursery schools, (b) day-care facilities and (c) children's centres in (i) Birmingham, Erdington constituency, (ii) the West Midlands and (iii) the UK have (A) declared insolvency and (B) closed due to funding shortages in each of the last three years.

Nursery Schools

The Department for Education's register of educational establishments in England and Wales indicates that from the 31 August 2013 to 31 August 2016 eight maintained nursery schools closed, and 10 amalgamated or merged with another school. No closures were recorded in Birmingham, Erdington or the West Midlands.

The Department does not collect information on the reasons for the closure of nursery schools. Local authorities have a duty to secure sufficient childcare in their local area. In consultation with their Schools Forum, they are responsible for deciding how best to distribute early years funding across their locality.

There is a presumption against the closure of any nursery school. The local authority must consult on any proposed closures, clearly demonstrating the rationale for so doing.

Day-care facilities

The Department does not collect data on the number of childcare businesses that have closed. The Childcare and Early Years Provider Survey shows that the childcare market continues to expand.

  • The number of registered places in full day care settings rose by ten per cent between 2011 and 2013.

  • The long term increase in the number of full day care providers continued in 2013. In total there were 17,900 full day care settings in 2013 (compared to 17,600 in 2011).

Children’s centres

Local authorities have a duty under the Childcare Act 2006 to ensure sufficient children’s centres to meet the needs of local families. The Department does not collect information on the reasons for the closure of children’s centres.

According to data supplied by local authorities, a total of 259 children’s centres closed in the calendar years, 2013, 2014 and 2015. Forty nine of these closures were in the West Midlands. None of these were in Birmingham.

17th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to ensure the sustainability of the UK's honeybee population.

Pollinators are a high priority for Defra and in November 2014 we published the National Pollinator Strategy which forms a framework for collective action by the Government, other organisations and the public to ensure their sustainability.

The strategy identifies actions that everyone can take to help expand the all year-round availability of food, nectar and pollen for our bees. More information on the “Bees’ Needs: Food and a Home” awareness campaign is available at: www.wildlifetrusts.org/Bees-needs.

This year the Government announced the first ever pollinator and farm wildlife package, which will see more funding made available to those farmers and landowners who provide food and harbourage for bees through the new Countryside Stewardship Scheme.

Defra also supports the UK honeybee population through the action of our bee inspectors and our bee pest surveillance programmes (more than 6,000 apiary inspections per year) and the free training and advice we provide to beekeepers. We are developing a range of training aids and courses with the national beekeeping associations to improve bee husbandry standards across the country.

A good understanding of our bees’ needs is essential if we are to sustain our honeybee populations, and developing evidence is a key activity under the National Pollinator Strategy. This work programme includes a number of initiatives such as SmartBees that will benefit our honeybees. SmartBees is a €6 million EU research project, co-funded by Defra, which aims to improve our understanding of honeybees’ resistance to diseases and help beekeepers breed bees that have greater disease resistance and are better adapted to local climatic conditions and needs.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, with reference to the Government's No-Deal Readiness Report, what steps the Government plans to take to support the automotive industry in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal and exports of cars to the EU are subject to a 10 per cent tariff on finished vehicles in line with the EU’s Most Favoured Nation tariff.

Officials have regular ongoing engagement with the automotive sector and the Government will continue to work closely with the industry to support future trade.

The No-Deal Readiness Report sets out Government preparation for leaving without a deal in the areas of Manufactured Goods Regulation and Vehicles and Components, as well as the actions businesses should take. The Government has also published a technical notice on placing manufactured goods on the EU market after Brexit as well as dedicated, tailored advice for the automotive sector.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/placing-manufactured-goods-on-the-eu-internal-market-if-theres-no-deal

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-automotive-sector-and-preparing-for-eu-exit

As referred to in the No-Deal Readiness Report, we recognise that adapting to new regulatory requirements takes time, so the Government will provide continuity in goods regulation for a temporary period after exit day. If UK manufacturers, distributors and importers continue to meet EU requirements, their goods can still be placed on the EU market.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/837632/No_deal_readiness_paper.PDF

11th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of retaining the EU directives on (a) collective redundancies, (b) temporary and agency work and (c) working time on future diplomatic agreements and trade deals.

The Government will bring forward legislation in the next session that, when enacted, will repeal the European Communities Act 1972 and ensure a functioning statute book on the day we leave the EU. This ‘Great Repeal Bill’ will end the authority of EU law and return power to the UK. The Bill will convert existing European Union law into domestic law, wherever practical.

The Government will set out the content of the Bill and its implications in due course.
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of the UK’s temporary tariff schedule on (a) duties levied on automotive components and (b) levels of competition in the automotive sector.

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the Government will introduce the Temporary Tariff Regime (TTR) for imports into the UK that are not subject to alternative trade arrangements, applying for up to 12 months. The Government has published a Tax Information and Impact Note on the TTR, which is standard practice to support tax policy decisions.

Under the TTR, tariffs would be retained on a number of finished vehicles in order to support the automotive sector in light of broader challenging market conditions. Car makers relying on EU supply chains would not however face additional tariffs on car parts imported from the EU to prevent disruption to supply chains. Preserving access to good value intermediate goods will support the competitiveness of the UK’s own exports. The Government believes British business is in a strong position to compete in the global market once we have left the EU, selling British-made goods such as our high-quality British cars into markets across the world.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the Government has conducted an impact assessment of the potential effects on the UK automotive industry of (a) the UK temporary import tariff schedule and (b) the imposition of tariffs on UK exports.

The Government policy is to leave the EU with a deal. Doing so will allow both the EU and the UK to retain the reciprocal tariff arrangements that benefit both businesses and consumers until our future relationship is agreed. If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the Government will introduce the Temporary Tariff Regime (TTR) for imports into the UK that are not subject to alternative trade arrangements, applying for up to 12 months. The Government has published a Tax Information and Impact Note on the TTR, which is standard practice to support tax policy decisions.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions she has had with her Turkish counterpart to help ensure continuity of trade with Turkey in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal on 31 October 2019.

Recognising the importance of our trading relationship with Turkey, my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade spoke with her counterpart, Minister Pekcan, soon after taking up her role. They discussed the challenge of achieving continuity of trade, in a no deal scenario, given Turkey’s customs union with the EU.

Nevertheless they agreed that there continued to be a shared ambition for a strong future trading relationship between Turkey and the UK.

Conor Burns
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will take steps to make it a requirement of medical professionals to inform the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency of someone who is medically unfit to drive.

Healthcare professionals, doctors and opticians play an important role in the driver licensing process. They advise patients of the implications of their condition on driving, the effect of any treatment or medication and when they should notify the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

There are no plans to make it a requirement for healthcare professionals to notify the DVLA directly about a patient’s medical condition. However, healthcare professionals can and do notify the DVLA when they are concerned about a patient’s driving fitness. The General Medical Council’s guidance states that while they must make every reasonable effort to persuade patients to inform the DVLA, doctors can notify the DVLA of a patient’s medical condition, in confidence, if the patient does not do so. Similar guidance is available to opticians.

To assist the medical profession, the DVLA has a specific form that can be used for this purpose and provides a dedicated telephone line which allows doctors to discuss concerns directly with one of the DVLA’s doctors. The DVLA treats notifications received from doctors and opticians as a high priority.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what processes are in place to record instances of pavement riding and pavement parking during e-scooter trials.

The Department recognises that COVID-19 lockdowns have reduced the number of journeys being taken across all modes of transport and in the e-scooter trials. However, data is being gathered from over 30 trial areas across England over the course of 12 months. We expect the quantity of data gathered during the e-scooter trials to be sufficient to inform future decisions on whether and - if so - how to legalise e-scooters in the UK.

DfT has data sharing agreements in place with e-scooter operators taking part in the trials. We are also working with our third-party research contractors Arup and NatCen Social Research to ensure the data gathered through the trials is robust enough to answer our planned research and policy questions.

With regard to pavement riding, the Department is working closely with both e-scooter operators and local authorities on these issues. In addition to weekly meetings to monitor the progress of the trials, including rates of pavement riding, pavement parking and approaches to reducing them, we are currently finalising guidance for local authorities to encourage good parking behaviour.

Moreover, surveys and interviews, with e-scooter users and members of the public living in e-scooter trial areas, will be conducted across a range of trial areas to track and understand instances of pavement riding and pavement parking. This will be carried out by our contractors Arup and NatCen Social Research.

15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he plans to take in response to the effect of the covid-19 lockdown on the quantity of data gathered during e-scooter trials.

The Department recognises that COVID-19 lockdowns have reduced the number of journeys being taken across all modes of transport and in the e-scooter trials. However, data is being gathered from over 30 trial areas across England over the course of 12 months. We expect the quantity of data gathered during the e-scooter trials to be sufficient to inform future decisions on whether and - if so - how to legalise e-scooters in the UK.

DfT has data sharing agreements in place with e-scooter operators taking part in the trials. We are also working with our third-party research contractors Arup and NatCen Social Research to ensure the data gathered through the trials is robust enough to answer our planned research and policy questions.

With regard to pavement riding, the Department is working closely with both e-scooter operators and local authorities on these issues. In addition to weekly meetings to monitor the progress of the trials, including rates of pavement riding, pavement parking and approaches to reducing them, we are currently finalising guidance for local authorities to encourage good parking behaviour.

Moreover, surveys and interviews, with e-scooter users and members of the public living in e-scooter trial areas, will be conducted across a range of trial areas to track and understand instances of pavement riding and pavement parking. This will be carried out by our contractors Arup and NatCen Social Research.

12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with the aerospace sector on its restart and recovery following the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is working closely with the UK’s aerospace industry, including at sector level through the Aerospace Growth Partnership, to help retain jobs and return the sector to growth as soon as possible.

The Global Travel Taskforce has also undertaken extensive engagement with the transport industry, international partners, the tourism sector, business leaders, and the private testing sector and invited submissions from all of these partners on its work. The Taskforce has received contributions from a wide range of partners, including the aerospace industry, and is due to report its recommendations to the Prime Minister in November.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will take steps to introduce a covid-19 testing system for people arriving in the UK to help facilitate international travel.

The Government is actively working on the practicalities of using testing to release people from self-isolation earlier than 14 days. The Global Travel Taskforce is working at pace to consider how testing, technology and innovation can drive a recovery for international travel and tourism, without adding to infection risk or infringing on our overall NHS test capacity.

The taskforce will report to the Prime Minister no later than November, setting out recommendations for how the UK can support the recovery of international travel. I will update the House on its conclusions and outputs shortly.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, which commercial aviation routes will be prioritised when a testing infrastructure for international arrivals is introduced.

The Government is actively working on the practicalities of using testing to release people from self-isolation earlier than 14 days. The Global Travel Taskforce is working at pace to consider how testing, technology and innovation can drive a recovery for international travel and tourism, without adding to infection risk or infringing on our overall NHS test capacity.

The taskforce will report to the Prime Minister no later than November, setting out recommendations for how the UK can support the recovery of international travel. I will update the House on its conclusions and outputs shortly.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to consult organisations representing disabled people as part of the evaluation of the pilot e-scooter rental schemes.

The Department and local authorities have engaged with organisations representing disabled people in the design of e-scooter trials. We will continue to meet with them throughout the trial period and when considering what steps to take after trials.

The trials are to gather evidence on what impacts e-scooters have on the road. It is important that we gather evidence about the impacts on all road users including disabled people. We will be working with our evaluation contractor to do this, working with disabled persons’ groups where possible. We also want to work with them to learn how e-scooters can be a mobility aid for those less able to get around.

12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will place in the Library notes of meetings between Network Rail and (a) Ministers and officials of his Department and (b) the Mayor of the West Midlands on train services in the West Midlands.

Providing notes of (a) meetings between Network Rail and Ministers and officials about train services in the West Midlands would involve disproportionate costs to collect and collate as the request covers interactions with five train operating companies, which are likely to be commercially sensitive so would also require redacting. As regards (b) the Department would not have access to notes of any meetings between Network Rail and the Mayor of the West Midlands about train services in the West Midlands.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people received penalty points for refusing to submit to an eyesight test in each of the last five years.

The number of drivers who received penalty points for refusing to submit to an eyesight test in each of the last four years is shown in the table below. Most penalty points are removed from the driver’s record after four years, therefore information from 2013 is not available.

Year

Total

2014

0

2015

0

2016

1

2017

1

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people received penalty points for driving with uncorrected defective eyesight in each of the last five years.

In the last four years, 42 drivers received penalty points for the offence of driving with uncorrected defective eyesight. The table below shows the number of offences in each of the last four years. Most penalty points are removed from the driver’s record after four years, therefore information from 2013 is not available.

Year

Total

2014

1

2015

22

2016

12

2017

7

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many full Group 1 driving licenses were held in each of the last five years.

Information on the number of driving licences held in Great Britain in each of the last five years can be found at: http://data.gov.uk/dataset/driving-licence-data.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many Group 1 driving licences have been revoked for eyesight related conditions by age in each of the last five years.

The information held at Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency does not differentiate between the driving licences that have been refused and those that have been revoked. The number of Group 1 licences that have been refused or revoked for eyesight related conditions by age in each of the last five years is shown in the table below:

Age

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

15

1

0

0

0

0

16

13

17

13

9

11

17

84

80

84

78

68

18

74

79

72

74

65

19

58

45

59

50

78

20

44

45

60

50

53

21

38

54

40

49

39

22

44

53

34

39

43

23

54

38

28

39

48

24

37

42

39

49

39

25

46

46

47

41

49

26

31

46

37

45

38

27

38

42

32

45

44

28

39

32

35

35

40

29

33

39

40

27

45

30

38

29

32

28

45

31

34

42

26

35

49

32

34

34

30

44

35

33

23

44

36

31

44

34

30

37

30

34

35

35

25

39

39

36

34

36

39

36

26

47

34

37

31

38

30

28

25

38

25

23

31

46

24

39

38

55

33

29

23

40

28

37

37

37

32

41

26

28

37

42

29

42

36

37

35

42

36

43

28

43

42

47

41

44

31

37

50

44

41

45

39

41

41

58

59

46

47

35

24

52

54

47

39

40

50

52

47

48

43

56

52

38

61

49

64

50

45

45

46

50

45

64

60

66

45

51

52

64

51

62

47

52

43

51

46

58

56

53

55

63

69

56

43

54

67

65

49

37

50

55

62

71

69

56

66

56

63

57

61

63

58

57

53

68

71

62

66

58

55

61

56

57

46

59

75

50

59

60

52

60

61

74

74

68

70

61

52

64

69

56

59

62

64

77

58

61

66

63

59

56

68

62

64

64

52

60

73

71

58

65

65

71

71

62

89

66

61

85

90

86

96

67

80

83

109

110

78

68

82

102

117

98

93

69

453

455

271

176

212

70

202

210

270

302

243

71

93

113

116

121

95

72

278

284

230

157

201

73

201

218

296

261

247

74

125

131

104

111

124

75

235

261

230

193

262

76

172

242

342

369

291

77

130

135

148

136

154

78

267

310

253

209

263

79

211

275

371

379

305

80

150

180

182

150

142

81

279

319

227

207

236

82

277

286

342

420

322

83

144

147

159

170

134

84

243

267

206

156

210

85

196

262

341

307

247

86

121

138

154

123

113

87

183

193

119

110

153

88

150

198

198

229

195

89

71

95

67

88

82

90

95

116

80

61

66

91

73

91

99

103

79

92

35

38

41

34

39

93

30

27

41

23

31

94

24

36

33

33

8

95

14

15

7

11

0

96

10

8

4

2

10

97

10

8

6

3

4

98

3

2

1

1

2

99

1

1

0

0

0

100

0

1

1

1

1

101

0

1

0

0

0

102

0

0

0

0

0

103

0

2

0

0

0

Total

6,954

7,789

7,605

7,342

7,127

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, and its integrated social security protocol, provides for UK nationals who worked and accrued state pension entitlements in Belgium before 1 January 2021, but have not reached state pension age, to maintain their state pension rights accrued in Belgium payable ​on the date they would be eligible for state pension under the Belgian system, including with any indexation increases.

Further to my reply of 9th March 2021 (UIN 162545), State Pension arrangements remain unchanged following the UK’s Exit from the EU including for UK nationals who have relevant social security contributions in Belgium, as well as other EU member states.

All UK State Pension recipients in the EU will have their State Pension paid (including annual increases) in line with rates in the UK. These arrangements have been agreed with the EU and all its member states on a reciprocal basis in the Withdrawal Agreement for those who moved across borders up to 31 December 2020 and in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement for those who move across borders from 1 January 2021. This means that Belgium, and other EU Member States, will reciprocate the position outlined above in relation to pension entitlement in those States.

The Department for Work and Pensions, together with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and other departments, are working with the European Union and its Member States to ensure that that the Citizen's Right provisions under the agreements with the EU are implemented on both sides.

The UK Government is not entering any unilateral negotiations with Belgium on State Pensions.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the Government's policy is on UK nationals' access to accrued state pension entitlements in the event that a reciprocal bilateral agreement on state pension entitlements is not agreed with Belgium; and which Minister is responsible for that policy.

Further to my reply of 9th March 2021 (UIN 162545), State Pension arrangements remain unchanged following the UK’s Exit from the EU including for UK nationals who have relevant social security contributions in Belgium, as well as other EU member states.

All UK State Pension recipients in the EU will have their State Pension paid (including annual increases) in line with rates in the UK. These arrangements have been agreed with the EU and all its member states on a reciprocal basis in the Withdrawal Agreement for those who moved across borders up to 31 December 2020 and in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement for those who move across borders from 1 January 2021. This means that Belgium, and other EU Member States, will reciprocate the position outlined above in relation to pension entitlement in those States.

The Department for Work and Pensions, together with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and other departments, are working with the European Union and its Member States to ensure that that the Citizen's Right provisions under the agreements with the EU are implemented on both sides.

The UK Government is not entering any unilateral negotiations with Belgium on State Pensions.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the Government has entered into negotiations with the​ Belgian Government to ensure the continued state pension rights of UK nationals who have paid into the Belgian state pension system.

Further to my reply of 9th March 2021 (UIN 162545), State Pension arrangements remain unchanged following the UK’s Exit from the EU including for UK nationals who have relevant social security contributions in Belgium, as well as other EU member states.

All UK State Pension recipients in the EU will have their State Pension paid (including annual increases) in line with rates in the UK. These arrangements have been agreed with the EU and all its member states on a reciprocal basis in the Withdrawal Agreement for those who moved across borders up to 31 December 2020 and in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement for those who move across borders from 1 January 2021. This means that Belgium, and other EU Member States, will reciprocate the position outlined above in relation to pension entitlement in those States.

The Department for Work and Pensions, together with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and other departments, are working with the European Union and its Member States to ensure that that the Citizen's Right provisions under the agreements with the EU are implemented on both sides.

The UK Government is not entering any unilateral negotiations with Belgium on State Pensions.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the reciprocal pension rights of UK and Belgian nationals who have yet to reach state retirement age, which were accrued in Belgium or in the UK before the end of the transition period, are ​the subject ​of bilateral ​negotiations towards agreement between the UK and Belgium.

Further to my reply of 9th March 2021 (UIN 162545), State Pension arrangements remain unchanged following the UK’s Exit from the EU including for UK nationals who have relevant social security contributions in Belgium, as well as other EU member states.

All UK State Pension recipients in the EU will have their State Pension paid (including annual increases) in line with rates in the UK. These arrangements have been agreed with the EU and all its member states on a reciprocal basis in the Withdrawal Agreement for those who moved across borders up to 31 December 2020 and in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement for those who move across borders from 1 January 2021. This means that Belgium, and other EU Member States, will reciprocate the position outlined above in relation to pension entitlement in those States.

The Department for Work and Pensions, together with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and other departments, are working with the European Union and its Member States to ensure that that the Citizen's Right provisions under the agreements with the EU are implemented on both sides.

The UK Government is not entering any unilateral negotiations with Belgium on State Pensions.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, who will be responsible for ensuring that UK nationals do not lose state pension entitlements in the event that no reciprocal bilateral agreements on state pension entitlements are agreed with EU Member States.

State pension arrangements are unchanged following the UK’s Exit from the EU.

All individuals can aggregate relevant social security contributions made in EU member states towards meeting the minimum qualifying period for the UK state pension, and all UK state pension recipients in the EU will have their state pension paid (including annual increases) in line with rates in the UK. These arrangements have been agreed with the EU and all its member states on a reciprocal basis in the Withdrawal Agreement for those who moved across borders before 1 January 2021, and in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement for those who move across borders from 1 January 2021.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the reciprocal pension rights of UK and EU nationals who have yet to reach state retirement age, which were accrued in an EU Member State or in the UK before the end of the transition period, are now subject to bilateral agreements between the UK and each EU member state.

State pension arrangements are unchanged following the UK’s Exit from the EU.

All individuals can aggregate relevant social security contributions made in EU member states towards meeting the minimum qualifying period for the UK state pension, and all UK state pension recipients in the EU will have their state pension paid (including annual increases) in line with rates in the UK. These arrangements have been agreed with the EU and all its member states on a reciprocal basis in the Withdrawal Agreement for those who moved across borders before 1 January 2021, and in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement for those who move across borders from 1 January 2021.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, and its integrated social security protocol, provides for UK nationals who worked and accrued state pension entitlements in another EU Member State before 1 January 2021, but have not reached state pension age, to maintain their state pension rights accrued in the EU Member State, including with any indexation increases.

State pension arrangements are unchanged following the UK’s Exit from the EU.

All individuals can aggregate relevant social security contributions made in EU member states towards meeting the minimum qualifying period for the UK state pension, and all UK state pension recipients in the EU will have their state pension paid (including annual increases) in line with rates in the UK. These arrangements have been agreed with the EU and all its member states on a reciprocal basis in the Withdrawal Agreement for those who moved across borders before 1 January 2021, and in the Trade and Cooperation Agreement for those who move across borders from 1 January 2021.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the oral evidence to the Work and Pensions Committee, by the Permanent Secretary on DWP’s Annual Report and Accounts 2019-20 on 21 October 2020, Q96, HC 759 stating that 1,900 women have been identified by her Department as having been underpaid state pensions, what the total lump sum cash amount is that has so far been paid by her Department to those women in respect of those underpayments.

We are unable to provide you with the requested data at this time, the Department has plans to publish this data at a later date.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 2 July 2020 to Question 65109 on State Retirement Pensions: Females, what time limits apply to claiming previously underpaid state pension in cases where a female pensioner is now deceased.

The time limits are set out in The Social Security (Claims and Payments) Regulations 1987, regulation 30(6)(a), made pursuant to section 5(1)(q) of the Social Security Administration Act 1992. Successive governments have continued this policy.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what criteria her Department uses to determine the circumstances in which interest is added to back payments of a state pension.

The DWP has a discretionary special payment scheme and the current criteria has been in place since 2012. If a benefit payment has been delayed DWP can consider a payment to recognise any erosion in the value of the money. Special payments for ‘interest’ are calculated using HMRC’s repayment interest rate.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether entitlement to a Category D pension requires a person to make a claim.

A claim for a Category D State Pension is required (under section 1 of the Social Security Administration Act 1992), unless the individual is resident in Great Britain at age 80 and is already getting another category of State Pension (Section 1 and Social Security (Claims and Payments) Regulations 1987, Regulation 3(1)(b)).

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether a married woman is entitled to draw an immediate category BL pension when her husband reaches state pension age in cases where her husband has deferred taking his own pension.

Under The Pensions Act 2007 and The Social Security (State Pension and National Insurance Credits) Regulations 2009/2206, since 6 April 2010 where a husband has deferred claiming his State Pension, his spouse has been able to claim their State Pension Category BL top up from his State Pension age.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to use the Government’s administrative data to identify married women who are not receiving the level of state pension to which they are entitled; how many of those women have been identified; what the average value is of those backdated state pension payments, and if she will make a statement.

We are aware of a number of cases where individuals have been underpaid State Pension. We corrected our records and reimbursed those affected as soon as errors were identified.

We would encourage anyone who thinks they have failed to claim a State Pension increase they are eligible for to contact the department.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether a widow is entitled to claim back underpaid state pension for periods before she was widowed.

In circumstances where it is identified that individuals are entitled to arrears of underpaid State Pension, these are paid in accordance with relevant legislation (section 1 of the Social Security Administration Act 1992) if a claim to Category BL is required, and if a claim is not required Social Security ((Claims and Payments) Regs 1987, reg 3(cb)).

Any person seeking to claim can get assistance if they call The Pension Service on its Freephone number 0800 731 0469.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the underpayments of state pension to women who have not received their full state pension will be passed on to the (a) surviving spouse and (b) beneficiaries of a will where a female pensioner is deceased.

Where arrears of Cat BL pension are payable, they will be distributed to those who have a legitimate claim to the monies. This could include the surviving spouse and the beneficiaries of a will.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether (a) members of civil partnerships and (b) members of same sex marriages are able to claim a Category BL pension based on the contributions of a civil partner or spouse; and if she will make a statement.

Civil Partners and those in same sex marriages, who reach State Pension age before 6 April 2016, can derive entitlement to a Category BL basic State Pension if they fall into one of two groups. Either, they have no entitlement to basic State Pension based on their National Insurance contributions, or they get a basic State Pension of less than £80.45 per week (in 2020/21).

In all cases, their spouse or civil partner must have been born on or after 6 April 1950.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of married women (a) entitled to and (b) in receipt of a state pension through the National Insurance contributions of a their (i) husband, (ii) late husband or (ii) ex husband; and if she will make a statement.

It is not possible to estimate the number of married women entitled to a State Pension through the National Insurance contributions of their husband, late husband or ex-husband, because their entitlement will only be determined by a consideration of their individual circumstances.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the increase in impartial pensions guidance usage following the introduction of the Financial Guidance and Claims Act’s provisions for ensuring savers first receive impartial pensions guidance before accessing their pension savings.

Since its creation in January, the Money and Pensions Service has been working with government and pension providers in developing tests to determine how a stronger nudge into taking pensions guidance would work effectively in practice. Prior to its launch this work was progressed by Pension Wise under DWP.

An independent contractor has been appointed to carry out these tests in partnership with a number of pension providers. An evaluation report will be published this financial year, which will form the basis for which option is selected. Until the report has been published, we are unable to make an estimate in relation to an increase in the expected take up of Pension Wise guidance.

The Money and Pensions service continue to provide guidance appointments via Pension Wise, making 205,000 appointments available across their channels this financial year which would be almost three and a half times higher than Pension Wise’s first year of operation. Pension Wise have been successful in increasing demand for appointments year on year across all its channels.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of non-advised pension savers used a face-to-face or telephone appointment with the Pension Wise guidance service when accessing their pension benefits in each of the last four years since its introduction.

Below are the number of people who have sought guidance from Pension Wise year on year. As well as face-to-face and telephone appointments, since 2017 Pension Wise have also provided digital appointments. Information on the proportions of non-advised pension savers accessing their pension is not available. Over 50s with Defined Contribution pensions are eligible for guidance appointments with Pension Wise. Some of these customers may go on to seek independent financial advice.

Face to Face

Telephone

Digital

Total

2015/16

40,989

19,950

NA

60,939

2016/17

48,413

17,761

NA

66,174

2017/18

63,185

24,289

34677

122,151

2018/19

90,448

39,667

37,611

167,726

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
1st Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the timetable is for pension savers to start benefiting from the provisions of the Financial Guidance and Claims Act 2018 for ensuring that those savers receive impartial pensions guidance before accessing their pension savings.

Since its creation in January, the Money and Pensions Service has been working with government and pension providers in developing tests to determine how a stronger nudge into taking pensions guidance would work effectively in practice. Prior to its launch this work was progressed by Pension Wise under DWP.

An independent contractor has been appointed to carry out these tests in partnership with a number of pension providers. An evaluation report will be published this financial year, which will form the basis for which option is selected. Until the report has been published, we are unable to make an estimate in relation to an increase in the expected take up of Pension Wise guidance.

The Money and Pensions service continue to provide guidance appointments via Pension Wise, making 205,000 appointments available across their channels this financial year which would be almost three and a half times higher than Pension Wise’s first year of operation. Pension Wise have been successful in increasing demand for appointments year on year across all its channels.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 8 November 2018 to Question 186293 on Occupational Pensions, if she place in the Library the IORP2 transposition table that is sent to the EU Commission.

I will be placing a copy in the Library after it has been submitted to the European Commission.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 8 November 2018 Question 186293 on Occupational Pensions, when the transposition table that is required by the EU Commission as part of the IORP2 Directive will be published.

The Transposition Table for IORP II is being prepared and will be submitted to the EU Commission by the transposition date of 13 January 2019. There is no requirement in the Directive for publication by either the EU Commission or UK Government.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
31st Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, pursuant to the Answer of 18 October 2018 Question 177666 on Occupational Pensions, what steps her Department is taking to ensure members of the public are aware of the IORP2 Directive on occupational retirement savings.

The key elements of IORP II – for example, rules around scheme funding and supervision of schemes - are already required within UK law and the Pensions Regulator’s Codes of Practice. As such, appropriate communications about these measures are already in place.

The DWP has worked closely with the Pensions Regulator to develop communications about the new requirements introduced by IORP II. Information about this has been shared with industry stakeholders to communicate to individual pension schemes. The Pensions Regulator is currently considering the most appropriate format and content of communications about IORP II to release to other audiences.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
10th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when she plans to hold a consultation on the implementation of the IORP2 Directive on occupational retirement savings.

The UK was a strong and influential voice during the negotiations that produced the EU Directive 2016/2341 known as IORP II. Stakeholder and Government representatives worked together to negotiate a final text which supports the UK’s direction of travel on pensions policy. Consequently, many of the key elements of IORP II are already required within UK law and / or the Pensions Regulator’s existing Codes of Practice. Therefore, DWP does not intend to undertake a formal consultation exercise. However, we have consulted informally and extensively with industry, the Pensions Regulator and other stakeholders to explore which parts of the Directive to transpose into UK law and how this is best achieved.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will take steps to ensure that all health and safety regulations will be (a) protected in the long-term and (b) retained in legislation after the UK leaves the EU.

As a Government, we have been clear that we will do nothing to undermine workers’ rights. The United Kingdom has one of the best records on occupational safety and health in Europe and the wider world and the Government intends to keep it that way. Health and safety regulations are secondary legislation under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and the Government has no plans to change this.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many supported housing providers in (a) Birmingham, Erdington constituency and (b) the West Midlands will be affected by the local housing allowance cap on supported housing.

The Secretary of State has confirmed that the Government expects to make an announcement on the way forward for supported housing in early autumn.

Full impact and equality impact assessments will be undertaken in due course.

26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will publish (a) the minutes of the phone call between the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation and Topham Guerin on test and trace marketing materials on 26 May 2020, (b) who attended on behalf of Topham Geurin and (c) a list of which officials in his Department participated in that call.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will publish (a) the minutes of the phone call between Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation, Lord O'Shaughnessy and Boston Consulting Group on the covid-19 test and trace programme on 8 May 2020, (b) a list of which officials or special advisers from his Department participated in that call and (c) an explanation of the capacity in which Lord O'Shaughnessy was participating.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will publish (a) the minutes of the phone call between Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation, Lord O'Shaughnessy, and CEO of PUBLIC on the covid-19 test and trace programme on 10 May 2020, (b) a list of which officials or special advisers from his Department participated in that call and (c) an explanation of the capacity in which Lord O'Shaughnessy was participating.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if his Department will publish (a) the minutes of the phone call between the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation and Oxford Nanopore on covid-19 testing on 4 April 2020 and (b) a list of which officials in his Department participated in the call.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what records his Department holds on the referral of PPE Medpro by Baroness Mone to the high priority lane for personal protective equipment supply during the covid-19 outbreak.

On 17 November 2021, the Department published information relating to the teams and individuals who referred offers of support that were triaged using the high priority lane. Departmental records indicate that Baroness Mone identified Medpro as a potential supplier on 7 May 2020 and highlighted this opportunity by email on 8 May 2020.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which (a) Ministers, (b) special advisers and (c) civil servants referred Worldlink Resource to the high priority lane for the supply of personal protective equipment during the covid-19 outbreak.

Departmental Ministers, special advisers and civil servants did not refer these organisations to the high priority lane.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to his Department's publication entitled PPE procurement in the early pandemic, published on 17 November 2021, on what dates the original referrals to the high priority lane were made for (a) Eyespace Eyewear by the Rt hon. Member for Welwyn Hatfield, (b) Mazima Markets Ltd by Lord Leigh, (c) Skinnydip Ltd by Lord Leigh, (d) PPE Medpro Ltd by Baroness Mone and (e) SG Recruitment UK Ltd by Lord Chadlington.

Departmental records do not show the date where the referral for Eyespace Eyewear was made to the high priority route. However, the company contacted the Rt Hon. Member for Welwyn Hatfield (Grant Shapps MP) on 19 May 2020. The referral of Mazima Markets was made on 1 April 2020, Skinnydip Ltd on 28 March 2020, PPE Medpro Ltd on 8 May 2020, and the referral of SG Recruitment was made on 19 April 2020.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department holds a minute of the meetings between the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation, Lord O'Shaughnessy and OC&C strategy consultants on 13 April 2020; who attended the meeting on behalf of OC&C; whether officials or special advisers attended the meeting on behalf of his Department; and in what capacity Lord O'Shaughnessy was attending.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department holds a minute of the meeting between the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation, Lord Feldman and Abbott on the Abbott covid-19 test on 7 April 2020; whether (a) officials and (b) special advisers attended that meeting on behalf of his Department; and in what capacity Lord Feldman attended that meeting.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department holds a minute of the meeting between the then Secretary of State for Health, the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation, Lord Feldman and Oxford Nanopore on Nanopore covid-19 test development on 1 April 2020; whether (a) officials and (b) special advisers attended that meeting on behalf of his Department; and in what capacity Lord Feldman attended that meeting.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what Freedom of Information requests his Department has received in respect of correspondence and records of meetings between the former Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation, Lord Feldman, and Meller Designs Limited; when those requests were submitted; whether his Department plans to respond with the information requested; and if he will place a copy of those responses in the Library.

The Department has received two relevant Freedom of Information requests. The first was received on 2 March 2021 and responded to on 30 March 2021.The second was received on 28 June 2021 and is being considered for release. We aim to answer it as soon as possible. Copies of both requests and the response to the request of 2 March is attached.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, who represented Andrew Feldman Associates at the meetings of the Covid-19 Testing Taskforce on (a) 13 April 2020, (b) 17 April 2020, (c) 20 April 2020, (d) 27 April 2020, (e) 4 May 2020, (f) 11 May 2020, and (g) 18 May 2020.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department holds a minute of the meeting between the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation and Hanbury Strategy regarding industrialisation of testing on 6 April 2020; and who attended the meeting on behalf of (a) his Department and (b) Hanbury Strategy.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department holds minutes of the meetings between the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation and Abingdon Health on (a) 1 April 2020, (b) 29 April 2020 and (c) 13 May 2020; and who attended those meetings on behalf of (i) his Department and (ii) Abingdon Health.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department holds a minute of the meeting held on 6 April 2020 between the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Innovation and Meller Designs Limited regarding PPE; and who attended that meeting on behalf of (a) his Department and (b) Meller Designs Limited.

The Department does hold a minute of this meeting, which was attended by the former Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Lord Bethell), Departmental officials and David Meller.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the register of gifts and hospitality relating to Baroness Harding of Winscombe in her role as Executive Chair of Test and Trace.

Baroness Harding undertook an unpaid cross-Government role and was not appointed on civil service terms and conditions. As such, Baroness Harding was not required to maintain such a register. However, we can confirm that she did not receive any gifts or hospitality.

24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the attendees at negotiations for the contracts awarded to Meller Designs to help deliver the Government’s covid-19 response.

Six contracts with a total value of £163.6 million have been awarded to Meller Designs for the supply of personal protective equipment (PPE). The Contract Award Notices and contracts have been published at the following link:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/6ab193f8-1126-462d-b527-9f0847a26ed3?origin=SearchResults&p=1

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/d75c9b0a-da7e-48a4-8144-08b1f7bc6230?origin=SearchResults&p=1

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/c9aa5f29-f5b9-47ce-9253-f2fe215808e4

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/3f7b52f6-cb0c-49fd-a7df-1efecca43365

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/4c3aae51-8916-4a19-b1f1-8496af12b72a

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/aec7a74a-2f63-4bb6-9731-3219d208dc1b

All offers of PPE from suppliers received the same eight stage assurance process which selected suppliers based on the product type, clinical acceptability, price, forecasted delivery dates, volume and financial standing. This was all managed by a team of around 450 officials from a number of Government departments, who conducted the negotiations.

20th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the attendees at negotiations for the contracts awarded to Ocean Footprint to help deliver the Government’s covid-19 response.

One contract with a value of £5.9 million has been awarded to Ocean Footprint for the supply of personal protective equipment (PPE). The Contract Award Notice and contract has been published at the following link:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/notice/147fb5a3-3d6e-41ca-842b-60c72a0bb2bb?origin=SearchResults&p=1

All offers of PPE from suppliers received the same eight stage assurance process which selected suppliers based on the product type, clinical acceptability, price, forecasted delivery dates, volume and financial standing. This was managed by a team of around 450 officials from Government departments, who conducted the negotiations.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to address the persistent shortages of Registered Nurses in Birmingham’s hospitals as identified by the Care Quality Commission in December.

Individual National Health Service employers carry out their own recruitment to meet their local need.

The Government is committed to delivering 50,000 more nurses by the end of the Parliament and put the NHS on a trajectory to a sustainable long-term supply in future. We have set up a comprehensive work programme to improve retention and support return to practice, invest in and diversify our training pipeline and ethically recruit internationally.

The latest published NHS digital data shows that nurse numbers in NHS Trusts and CCGs have increased by almost 11,100 in the past year.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total value of contracts awarded to Medacs was in 2020 to help the Government’s response to covid-19.

The Medacs contracts have a maximum approved expenditure of £350 million over two years.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total value of contracts awarded to Meller Designs was in 2020 to help the Government’s response to covid-19.

Six contracts with a total value of £163.6 million have been awarded to Meller Designs for the supply of personal protective equipment (PPE). The Contract Award Notices and contracts have been published at the following link:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/6ab193f8-1126-462d-b527-9f0847a26ed3?origin=SearchResults&p=1

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/d75c9b0a-da7e-48a4-8144-08b1f7bc6230?origin=SearchResults&p=1

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/c9aa5f29-f5b9-47ce-9253-f2fe215808e4

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/3f7b52f6-cb0c-49fd-a7df-1efecca43365

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/4c3aae51-8916-4a19-b1f1-8496af12b72a

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/aec7a74a-2f63-4bb6-9731-3219d208dc1b

All offers of PPE from suppliers received the same eight stage assurance process which selected suppliers based on the product type, clinical acceptability, price, forecasted delivery dates, volume and financial standing. This was all managed by a team of around 450 officials from a number of Government departments, who conducted the negotiations.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total value of contracts awarded to Ocean Footprint in 2020 was to help the Government’s response to covid-19.

One contract with a value of £5.9 million has been awarded to Ocean Footprint for the supply of personal protective equipment (PPE). The Contract Award Notice and contract has been published at the following link:

https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/notice/147fb5a3-3d6e-41ca-842b-60c72a0bb2bb?origin=SearchResults&p=1

All offers of PPE from suppliers received the same eight stage assurance process which selected suppliers based on the product type, clinical acceptability, price, forecasted delivery dates, volume and financial standing. This was managed by a team of around 450 officials from Government departments, who conducted the negotiations.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the timetable is for NHS England to publish the Neonatal Critical Care Clinical Reference Group’s draft report of the neonatal care review.

A draft report of the neonatal care review will be consulted upon before being finalised; however, this draft will not be published. A final version of the findings and recommendations of the review will be published upon completion.

1st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many local maternity systems plans have been submitted to NHS England; and when he plans to make those plans publicly available.

As recommended in Better Births, local maternity systems have formed across England and are co-producing proposals with local women to make maternity services safer and more personal. Initial proposals have been shared with NHS England regional teams. These proposals are locally owned, and where they have not yet been published, the proposals will be published in due course, as part of continuing local engagement and co-production with women, staff and other stakeholders.

12th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 5 September 2017 to Question 6776, what steps his Department will take to include the recommendations of the national neonatal review due to publish its initial report in September 2017 for consultation in the Local Maternity System Plans which must be in place by October 2017; and what the timetable is for incorporating those recommendations in the period between publication of that review and the putting in place of those plans.

The Neonatal Critical Care Review has this month, set out initial themes and recommendations supported by detailed data packs at Neonatal Care level and Local Maternity Systems level. The Local Maternity System Plans are being incorporated into local planning arrangements.

20th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 13 July 2017 to Question 4054, whether the recommendations in the national neonatal review are intended to inform the development of local maternity system plans.

The Neonatal Critical Care Review is an important part of the Maternity Transformation Programme and the review findings will inform directly the development of Local Maternity System Plans.

10th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with the leaders of the (a) review of neonatal services and (b) Maternity Transformation Programme to ensure that their work plans are co-ordinated to ensure continuity of care for mothers whose babies are admitted to neonatal care.

My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health has not met with leaders of the Maternity Transformation Programme (MTP) or neonatal review to discuss continuity of care in neonatal services. The neonatal review, conducted by NHS England’s Women and Children’s Programme of Care and its Neonatal Critical Care Clinical Reference Group, reports progress of the review into neonatal services to the MTP Board, as the review forms part of the overall MTP.

The review focuses on a number of themes and variables including admission rates, length of stay, outcomes and pregnancy profiles. The findings of the neonatal review will inform the development and delivery of Local Maternity Plans, with recommendations that will include ensuring continuity of care for mothers whose babies are admitted to neonatal care.

10th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, to what extent the Maternity Transformation Programme is considering the tariff for transitional care as part of its review of the maternity tariff.

Better Births, the report of the National Maternity Review, recommended that a dedicated review of neonatal services should be taken forward, in light of its findings and their potential implications for the provision of neonatal care. Within that context, NHS England’s Women and Children’s Programme of Care and its Neonatal Critical Care Clinical Reference Group are undertaking a review of neonatal services under the auspices of the Maternity Transformation Programme. The review is focusing on a number of themes and variables including admission rates, length of stay, outcomes and pregnancy profiles.

The findings will inform the development and delivery of Local Maternity System Plans with recommendations that will include ensuring continuity of care for mothers whose babies are admitted to neonatal care.

The neonatal service review has a number of work streams including a pricing work stream. This involves the development of a pricing model to support the baby across the whole care pathway including transitional care.

10th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the remit is of the review of neonatal services; and whether that remit includes the tariff for (a) neonatal and (b) transitional care.

Better Births, the report of the National Maternity Review, recommended that a dedicated review of neonatal services should be taken forward, in light of its findings and their potential implications for the provision of neonatal care. Within that context, NHS England’s Women and Children’s Programme of Care and its Neonatal Critical Care Clinical Reference Group are undertaking a review of neonatal services under the auspices of the Maternity Transformation Programme. The review is focusing on a number of themes and variables including admission rates, length of stay, outcomes and pregnancy profiles.

The findings will inform the development and delivery of Local Maternity System Plans with recommendations that will include ensuring continuity of care for mothers whose babies are admitted to neonatal care.

The neonatal service review has a number of work streams including a pricing work stream. This involves the development of a pricing model to support the baby across the whole care pathway including transitional care.

8th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average waiting time is for talking therapy in Birmingham.

Information on the median waiting times for Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services by Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) in Birmingham for 2013-14 is shown in the following table.

Number of referrals entering treatment

Median waiting time (days)

NHS Birmingham and South Central CCG

3,320

26

NHS Sandwell and West Birmingham CCG

5,135

25

NHS Birmingham Cross City CCG

9,020

29

Source: Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC), IAPT Dataset

Notes:

  1. It is not possible to separate Sandwell from NHS Sandwell and West Birmingham CCG; as such, data for Sandwell is also included in this response
  2. The IAPT dataset contains information on referrals to IAPT services which provide talking therapies.
  3. Waiting time is measured by counting the number of days between a referral being received and the first treatment appointment. Currently, the presence of a valid therapy type is used as an indicator of whether treatment was provided in the course of the appointment.
  4. This data is based upon a count of referrals received by IAPT services, not distinct people. In order to be included in these figures, a referral must have had a first treatment appointment in the reporting period (1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014)

24th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what meetings (a) Ministers, (b) special advisers and (c) civil servants in his Department had with the hon. Member for Milton Keynes North between 1 May 2020 and 31 January 2021.

The information requested is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what financial payments his Department makes to its non-executive directors; how many times his departmental Board will meet in 2021-22; and what work the non-executive directors undertake.

This information is published in the Department’s annual report and accounts, available on gov.uk.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hm-treasury-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-to-2020

The Department’s report and accounts for 2020-21 will be published in due course, in the usual way.

Departmental boards provide strategic leadership for each central government department, as well as advising on/challenging how the department is performing. Each board is chaired by the Secretary of State and includes junior ministers, the permanent secretary and non-executive board members. Non-executives are appointed to government departments from the public, private and voluntary sectors. Their role is to provide advice and bring an external perspective.

A summary of the work of non-executive directors across Government can be found in the Government Lead Non-Executive's annual report, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/government-lead-non-executives-annual-report-2019-to-2020

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department operates a red, amber and green rating system for categorising Freedom of Information requests according to their presentational sensitivity.

The Treasury does not operate such a system.

All FOI requests are treated exactly the same, regardless of who the request is from and their occupation.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what comparative assessment he has made of the number of (a) additional HMRC customs agents that are required to manage the new trading rules with the EU under the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement and (b) those agents required in February 2020.

The Government does not employ customs agents/customs intermediaries directly, and it does not have a target for numbers of customs agents. Readiness of the customs intermediary sector relates to the capacity to make declarations, rather than numbers of staff employed. This is because the sector is varied and made up of a number of different business models including specific customs brokers, freight forwarders and fast parcel operators; all of which will require different numbers of staff to complete declarations and to provide their services. Many in the sector have innovated and brought in significant IT solutions to automate many processes which has reduced the numbers of staff they require. The Government has helped them to do this by making over £80 million of support available, including flexible grants that can be used for IT and training, as well as recruitment, depending on the needs of the business.

The Government knows the intermediary sector has used this support and increased capacity significantly. The findings of recent Ipsos Mori surveying of the sector (published on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/research-into-the-customs-intermediaries-sector-wave-2-report) show that customs intermediaries expected to increase their capacity four fold to meet additional demand. In addition, the Government has created an intermediary register on GOV.UK to help traders find an agent. This holds a list of intermediaries that traders could use and shows which are taking on new clients, and the services offered. Over 300 intermediaries have highlighted they are taking on new clients, including those that specialise in smaller traders or movements of goods subject to SPS controls.

The Government continues to monitor the situation closely and engage with the sector to understand the support it needs, keeping measures under review.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many additional customs agents have been employed by HMRC since February 2020.

The Government does not employ customs agents/customs intermediaries directly, and it does not have a target for numbers of customs agents. Readiness of the customs intermediary sector relates to the capacity to make declarations, rather than numbers of staff employed. This is because the sector is varied and made up of a number of different business models including specific customs brokers, freight forwarders and fast parcel operators; all of which will require different numbers of staff to complete declarations and to provide their services. Many in the sector have innovated and brought in significant IT solutions to automate many processes which has reduced the numbers of staff they require. The Government has helped them to do this by making over £80 million of support available, including flexible grants that can be used for IT and training, as well as recruitment, depending on the needs of the business.

The Government knows the intermediary sector has used this support and increased capacity significantly. The findings of recent Ipsos Mori surveying of the sector (published on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/research-into-the-customs-intermediaries-sector-wave-2-report) show that customs intermediaries expected to increase their capacity four fold to meet additional demand. In addition, the Government has created an intermediary register on GOV.UK to help traders find an agent. This holds a list of intermediaries that traders could use and shows which are taking on new clients, and the services offered. Over 300 intermediaries have highlighted they are taking on new clients, including those that specialise in smaller traders or movements of goods subject to SPS controls.

The Government continues to monitor the situation closely and engage with the sector to understand the support it needs, keeping measures under review.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the average response time to customs queries to HMRC through the CHIEF system in the most recent period for which figures are available; and what steps he is taking to improve the response time for businesses seeking customs advice from the CHIEF system.

The CHIEF system has been scaled to 360 million declarations per year as part of HMRC’s preparations for the end of the Transition Period and it continues to perform well. This equates to 111 declarations per second and a message response time of 5 seconds, which is within the service-level agreement for all transactions. HMRC continue to test the performance of the CHIEF system.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what training on customs requirements is being provided by his Department to help companies to adhere to the provisions of the EU–UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

HMRC do not directly provide training for companies but provide financial support through the £20 million SME Brexit Support Fund which opened on 15 March 2021. This fund gives traders access to practical support, including training for new customs, rules of origin and VAT processes. Smaller businesses can apply for grants of up to £2,000 to help them adapt to new customs and tax rules when trading with the EU.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what training has been provided by his Department to customs agents to help them to understand the provisions of the EU–UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement in the last three months.

HMRC do not directly provide training for customs agents, but have made over £80 million available through the Customs Grants Schemes to support IT, training and recruitment. These funds have been fully applied for and applicants are now finalising their claims by submitting evidence of training undertaken.

26th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the tax liability is for women who receive back payments of underpaid state pension in a single financial year; and if he will make a statement.

Income tax is calculated on arrears of state pension for the tax year in which the pensioner was entitled to receive it, and not in the year in which a lump sum is paid.

Where arrears of state pension are paid, income tax will only be due on any income that exceeds the personal allowance for the respective tax year.

In addition, HM Revenue and Customs will only collect income tax for the current tax year and the four preceding tax years for arrears payments made due to DWP error. Any arrears of state pension relating to earlier years will not be subject to income tax.

20th Dec 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 3.48 of the Autumn Statement 2016, on national minimum wage enforcement, what the (a) budget, (b) staffing capacity and (c) start date is of the campaign to raise awareness among workers and employers of their rights and responsibilities.

The Government is determined that everyone who is entitled to the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and National Living Wage (NLW) receives it. Anyone who feels they have been underpaid NMW or NLW should contact the Acas helpline on 0300 123 1100. HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) reviews all complaints that are referred to it.

The Government has more than trebled annual funding of minimum wage enforcement since 2014, providing a total budget of £25.3m in 2017/18. This investment has enabled a significant expansion of resources dedicated to enforcing the minimum wage.

There are currently 291 staff in HMRC's NMW teams, up from 237 in 2015/16. Other staff across HMRC contribute to enforcing NMW and NLW, including: lawyers, technical advisers, and those specialising in criminal investigations amongst others. However, HMRC does not record the specific numbers of those staff involved beyond those identified above or break down budget from the overall allocation. Paragraph 3.48 of the Autumn Statement 2016 provided funding from 2017/18 and so start dates for providing additional support for small businesses and the work to increase awareness of NMW rights and responsibilities are yet to be confirmed.

20th Dec 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to paragraph 3.48 of the Autumn Statement 2016, on national minimum wage enforcement, what the (a) budget, (b) staffing capacity and (c) start date is of the additional support targeted at small businesses.

The Government is determined that everyone who is entitled to the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and National Living Wage (NLW) receives it. Anyone who feels they have been underpaid NMW or NLW should contact the Acas helpline on 0300 123 1100. HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) reviews all complaints that are referred to it.

The Government has more than trebled annual funding of minimum wage enforcement since 2014, providing a total budget of £25.3m in 2017/18. This investment has enabled a significant expansion of resources dedicated to enforcing the minimum wage.

There are currently 291 staff in HMRC's NMW teams, up from 237 in 2015/16. Other staff across HMRC contribute to enforcing NMW and NLW, including: lawyers, technical advisers, and those specialising in criminal investigations amongst others. However, HMRC does not record the specific numbers of those staff involved beyond those identified above or break down budget from the overall allocation. Paragraph 3.48 of the Autumn Statement 2016 provided funding from 2017/18 and so start dates for providing additional support for small businesses and the work to increase awareness of NMW rights and responsibilities are yet to be confirmed.

20th Dec 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people were employed in each HM Revenue and Customs team working on enforcing minimum wage payments in (a) 2016-17 and (b) 2015-16.

The Government is determined that everyone who is entitled to the National Minimum Wage (NMW) and National Living Wage (NLW) receives it. Anyone who feels they have been underpaid NMW or NLW should contact the Acas helpline on 0300 123 1100. HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) reviews all complaints that are referred to it.

The Government has more than trebled annual funding of minimum wage enforcement since 2014, providing a total budget of £25.3m in 2017/18. This investment has enabled a significant expansion of resources dedicated to enforcing the minimum wage.

There are currently 291 staff in HMRC's NMW teams, up from 237 in 2015/16. Other staff across HMRC contribute to enforcing NMW and NLW, including: lawyers, technical advisers, and those specialising in criminal investigations amongst others. However, HMRC does not record the specific numbers of those staff involved beyond those identified above or break down budget from the overall allocation. Paragraph 3.48 of the Autumn Statement 2016 provided funding from 2017/18 and so start dates for providing additional support for small businesses and the work to increase awareness of NMW rights and responsibilities are yet to be confirmed.

20th Dec 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the (a) budget and (b) planned workforce is of HM Revenue and Customs' employment status and intermediaries team.

Responsibility for enforcing employment categorisation is shared across a number of teams within HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). The Employment Status and Intermediaries Team handles most of the cases. The budget for the Employment Status and Intermediaries team in 2016-17 is £10.637m, this covers the pay bill and travel & subsistence costs. Other costs are allocated centrally by HMRC and are not split to team level. There is currently the equivalent of 253 full time employees in the team.

Some cases are also handled by HMRC’s Fraud Investigation Service (FIS), Large Business and National Minimum Wage teams. In these teams it is not possible to isolate either the resource or budget allocated to enforcing employment categorisation as the resource is allocated according to the risk presented in the case. Multi-skilled teams working across all areas of the tax system tackle the largest and most serious cases with appropriate resource depending on the range of risks presented of which employment categorisation may be one.

20th Dec 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the (a) budget and (b) workforce is of each HM Revenue and Customs team responsible for enforcing employment categorisation.

Responsibility for enforcing employment categorisation is shared across a number of teams within HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). The Employment Status and Intermediaries Team handles most of the cases. The budget for the Employment Status and Intermediaries team in 2016-17 is £10.637m, this covers the pay bill and travel & subsistence costs. Other costs are allocated centrally by HMRC and are not split to team level. There is currently the equivalent of 253 full time employees in the team.

Some cases are also handled by HMRC’s Fraud Investigation Service (FIS), Large Business and National Minimum Wage teams. In these teams it is not possible to isolate either the resource or budget allocated to enforcing employment categorisation as the resource is allocated according to the risk presented in the case. Multi-skilled teams working across all areas of the tax system tackle the largest and most serious cases with appropriate resource depending on the range of risks presented of which employment categorisation may be one.

25th Nov 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much Growth Deal funding he plans to make available to the Mayor of the West Midlands Combined Authority from May 2017.

The Autumn Statement announced that the government will award £1.8 billion to Local Enterprise Partnerships across England. LEPs in the Midlands will receive a total of £392 million. Funding awarded to the West Midlands Combined Authority will be on top of the £162.7m already made available to the Black Country LEP from 2015/16, £89.4m to Coventry and Warwickshire and £378.8m to the Greater Birmingham and Solihull LEP. Awards to individual LEPs will be announced in the coming months.

24th Nov 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when the Government plans to publish the Midlands Engine strategy.

As announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer at the Autumn Statement, the Midlands Engine strategy will be published shortly.

24th Nov 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to publish the amount of funding the Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership will receive under the Growth Deal announced in paragraph 3.49 of the Autumn Statement 2016.

The Autumn Statement announced that the government will award £1.8 billion to Local Enterprise Partnerships across England. LEPs in the Midlands will receive a total of £392 million. A further £556 million will go to the North of England, £151 million to the East of England, £492 million to London and the South East, and £191 million to the South West. Awards to individual LEPs will be announced in the coming months.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for urgent and exceptional support have been made under the Windrush Compensation Scheme; and how many of those applications were successful.

Details regarding the amount of applications for urgent and exceptional support made under the Windrush Compensation Scheme; and how many of those applications were successful can be accessed at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/update-to-hasc-on-windrush-28-april-2020.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many outstanding claims there are under the Windrush Compensation Scheme.

The Home Office publishes information on how many claims have been submitted along with further data and information online at the following address: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/windrush-compensation-scheme-data-february-2021

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many claims under the Windrush Compensation Scheme have been resolved in (a) less than two months, (b) between two and four months, (c) between four and six months, (d) between six and 12 months and (e) over 12 months.

The Home Office has no published data to answer these questions. The information is not readily available in a reportable format nor held centrally and could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applicants to the Windrush Compensation Scheme have been deemed to be ineligible by (a) resident country, (b) reason for decision and (c) ages of the applicants.

The Home Office has no published data to answer these questions. The information is not readily available in a reportable format nor held centrally and could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many claimants under the Windrush Compensation Scheme (a) accepted and (b) did not accept the determination from her Department.

The Home Office has no published data to answer these questions. The information is not readily available in a reportable format nor held centrally and could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Tier 1 and Tier 2 reviews under the Windrush Compensation Scheme resulted in a change to the original decision.

The Home Office has no published data to answer these questions. The information is not readily available in a reportable format nor held centrally and could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many claimants under the Windrush Compensation Scheme received advice from the Citizens Advice; and how many of those claimants were successful.

The Home Office has no published data to answer these questions. The information is not readily available in a reportable format nor held centrally and could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many awards of legal fees have been made under the Windrush Compensation Scheme.

The Home Office has no published data to answer these questions. The information is not readily available in a reportable format nor held centrally and could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on the number of claimants under the Windrush Compensation Scheme seeking a Tier 1 or Tier 2 review the Department who had legal representation; and how many of those reviews were successful compared to those made by claimants who are not known to have been legally represented.

The Home Office has no published data to answer these questions. The information is not readily available in a reportable format nor held centrally and could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department holds on the number of claimants under the Windrush Compensation Scheme that had legal representation; and how many of those claims were successful compared to those made by claimants who are not known to have been legally represented.

The Home Office has no published data to answer these questions. The information is not readily available in a reportable format nor held centrally and could only be obtained at a disproportionate cost.

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
20th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how money raised by fines issued for the breaching of coronavirus restrictions is used by her Department.

The Secretary of State for the Department for Health and Social Care designated ACRO Criminal Records Office, as the organisation legally able to process Fixed Penalty Notices (FPN) issued in relation to the Coronavirus Regulations.

ACRO is responsible for the distribution of funds generated by fines under the Coronavirus Regulations to local authorities in England and Wales. The Home Office is not in receipt of money raised by these fines

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many drivers were routinely stopped by police forces in each of the last five years; and how many of those drivers were asked to take a 20 metre eyesight test.

The Home Office does not collect this information.

13th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the withdrawal of West Mercia Police from the Central Motorway Police Group on levels of public safety; and if she will make a statement.

Decisions on how the police enforce the law and deploy their available resources, including collaboration arrangements, are the responsibility of individual Chief Officers, taking into account the specific local problems and demands with which they are faced.

The Home Office has therefore not made any assessment of the effect of the withdrawal of West Mercia Police from the Central Motorway Police Group (CMPG) on levels of public safety.

13th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the decision of West Mercia Police to withdraw from the Central Motorway Police Group on its responsibility to collaborate effectively with other police forces.

Decisions on how the police enforce the law and deploy their available resources, including collaboration arrangements, are the responsibility of individual Chief Officers, taking into account the specific local problems and demands with which they are faced.

The Home Office has therefore not made any assessment of the effect of the withdrawal of West Mercia Police from the Central Motorway Police Group (CMPG) on levels of public safety.

12th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Central Motorway Police Group's collaboration with the European Traffic Police Network on improving road safety.

Decisions on how the police enforce the law and deploy their available resources are the responsibility of individual Chief Officers, taking into account the specific local problems and demands with which they are faced.

The Home Office has not made any assessments into the effectiveness of the Central Motorway Police Group’s (CMPG) collaboration with the European Traffic Police Network or in maintaining network resilience and traffic flow or of the ability of West Mercia Police to provide 24 hour patrols.

12th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Central Motorway Police Group in maintaining network resilience and traffic flow.

Decisions on how the police enforce the law and deploy their available resources are the responsibility of individual Chief Officers, taking into account the specific local problems and demands with which they are faced.

The Home Office has not made any assessments into the effectiveness of the Central Motorway Police Group’s (CMPG) collaboration with the European Traffic Police Network or in maintaining network resilience and traffic flow or of the ability of West Mercia Police to provide 24 hour patrols.

12th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the ability of West Mercia Police to provide 24 hour patrols following its withdrawal from the Central Motorway Police Group.

Decisions on how the police enforce the law and deploy their available resources are the responsibility of individual Chief Officers, taking into account the specific local problems and demands with which they are faced.

The Home Office has not made any assessments into the effectiveness of the Central Motorway Police Group’s (CMPG) collaboration with the European Traffic Police Network or in maintaining network resilience and traffic flow or of the ability of West Mercia Police to provide 24 hour patrols.

3rd Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the potential effect on public safety of decreasing the Counter Terrorism Policing and Protective Security Grant by 7.2 per cent in cash terms over the next two years.

The Government’s top priority is the safety and security of the public. We have protected Counter-Terrorism police spend in real terms over the Spending Review period and invested in counter-terrorism policing to grow key capabilities, including providing £144m to increase armed policing capability.

Funding for counter-terrorism policing is announced to Parliament ahead of the beginning of each financial year. The settlement for 2017-18 was published in a Written Ministerial Statement on 1 February 2017. Funding for 2018-19 will be announced in due course.

To reflect how we fight terrorism in the 21st century we have increased total spending on CT across Government by 30% from the planned comprehensive spending review £11.7bn to £15.2bn meaning more money for our Intelligence service, police and other agencies.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
28th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the budget is for the Counter Terrorism Policing and Protective Security Grant in 2017-18.

We have allocated £633 million resource and £42 million capital funding to support counter-terrorism policing in 2017-18, this includes funding for protective security.

In addition a further £32 million is being provided from the police transformation fund to support the uplift in armed policing capability and capacity.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the manufacturer and model is of the Prime Ministerial car.

The car used by the Prime Minister is a Jaguar. Further specifications of the car, such as the car's model, are not released on security grounds.

Ben Wallace
Secretary of State for Defence
10th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of police community support officers in England and Wales were BME in each year from 2005 to 2015.

The Home Office publishes data on the total number of full time equivalent police community support officers, and the number of full time equivalent police community support officers who are Black and Minority Ethnic (BME), in the annual ‘Police workforce in England and Wales’ statistical bulletin.

Number of full time equivalent police community support officers in England and Wales 1,2,3,4

As at 31 March...

Number of BME PCSOs (FTE)

Total number of PCSOs (FTE)

Proportion BME2

2005

879

6,148

14%

2006

1,029

6,768

15%

2007

1,577

13,529

12%

2008

1,813

15,807

11%

2009

1,893

16,507

11%

2010

1,870

16,918

11%

2011

1,686

15,820

11%

2012

1,443

14,393

10%

2013

1,350

14,205

10%

2014

1,193

13,066

9%

2015

1,126

12,331

9%

1. This table contains full-time equivalent figures that have been presented to the nearest whole number.

2. The proportion of PCSOs who are BME is calculated by dividing the number of BME PCSOs by the total number of PCSOs. The total number of PCSOs includes cases where the ethnicity was "not stated".

3. Figures have been confirmed by all police forces after collection and before publication each year.

4. Some totals here may not equate to the published figure if a police force has revised their figures since the publication.

The table contains data on the proportion of police community support officers who were BME from 31 March 2005 to 31 March 2015.

Data for 31 March 2015 (the latest period for which figures are available) can also be found in the tables of the July 2015 police workforce statistics publication:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/495631/police-workforce-tabs-mar15-revised-jan16.ods

3rd Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to bring forward legislative proposals for the regulation of the private security industry based on her Department's consultation on a future regulatory regime for the private security industry, published in September 2013.

The Government is committed to ensuring the integrity of the private security industry. A review of the Security Industry Authority is currently underway which has included a call for evidence from interested parties. That evidence is now being considered as part of a review, and a report will be published once that process has been completed. The Government will carefully consider the recommendations from the review in deciding what changes, including legislative proposals, to the existing regulatory regime should be brought forward.

26th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answers of 23 May 2016 to Questions 37209 and 37235, whether official guidelines on the policing of football matches abroad state that authority must be granted by her Department under section 26 of the Police Act 1996 to permit UK police officers to perform operational police duties abroad.

Guidelines on overseas police deployments include detail on when approval from the Home Office is required under section 26 of the Police Act 1996.

24th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 23 May 2016 to Question 37288, if she will publish statistics on how many European Arrest Warrant surrenders to and from each UK law enforcement agency of each type there have been in each region.

These statistics are provided by the National Crime Agency on their website at: http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics However, this does not provide statistics on surrenders by law enforcement and offence - these are recorded separately.

The following figures are therefore based on surrenders to and by relevant police force areas (excluding those law enforcement agencies that sit outside of regional police force areas (i.e., British Transport Police)). This, and the fact that these figures are taken from statistics for the relevant fiscal years, rather than the calendar years, explains the slight variation from the figures previously released.

Police Force Area

Surrenders to the UK Fiscal years 2009/10 to 2015/16

Cleveland

1

Durham

3

Northumbria

6

North East Region

10

Cheshire

6

Cumbria

4

Greater Manchester

46

Lancashire

42

Merseyside

43

North West Region

141

Humberside

9

North Yorkshire

8

South Yorkshire

13

West Yorkshire

47

Yorkshire and Humber Region

77

Derbyshire

9

Leicestershire

17

Lincolnshire

8

Northamptonshire

0

Nottinghamshire

10

East Midlands Region

44

Staffordshire

24

Warwickshire

2

West Mercia

8

West Midlands

25

West Midlands Region

59

Bedfordshire

5

Cambridgeshire

4

Essex

4

Hertfordshire

15

Norfolk

9

Suffolk

10

East of England Region

47

London, City of

22

Metropolitan Police

139

London Region

161

Hampshire

18

Kent

28

Surrey

6

Sussex

28

Thames Valley

18

South East Region

98

Avon & Somerset

22

Devon & Cornwall

15

Dorset

5

Gloucestershire

4

Wiltshire

1

South West Region

47

Dyfed-Powys

1

Gwent

4

North Wales

4

South Wales

13

Wales

22

Northern Ireland

34

Northern Ireland

34

TOTAL

740

Police Force Area

Surrenders from the UK Fiscal years 2009/10 to 2015/16

Cleveland

25

Durham

29

Northumbria

56

North East Region

110

Cheshire

103

Cumbria

18

Greater Manchester

268

Lancashire

122

Merseyside

106

North West Region

617

Humberside

104

North Yorkshire

36

South Yorkshire

136

West Yorkshire

360

Yorkshire and Humber Region

636

Derbyshire

69

Leicestershire

121

Lincolnshire

163

Northamptonshire

125

Nottinghamshire

145

East Midlands Region

623

Staffordshire

70

Warwickshire

42

West Mercia

79

West Midlands

373

West Midlands Region

564

Bedfordshire

129

Cambridgeshire

242

Essex

157

Hertfordshire

85

Norfolk

95

Suffolk

65

East of England Region

773

London, City of

11

Metropolitan Police

1967

London Region

1978

Hampshire

167

Kent

277

Surrey

58

Sussex

172

Thames Valley

273

South East Region

947

Avon & Somerset

128

Devon & Cornwall

85

Dorset

68

Gloucestershire

42

Wiltshire

41

South West Region

364

Dyfed-Powys

32

Gwent

18

North Wales

35

South Wales

55

Wales

140

Northern Ireland

196

Northern Ireland

196

TOTAL

6948

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrant surrenders (a) to and (b) from each UK law enforcement agency there have been of people suspected of violent, sexual or other offences against women in each year since 2004; and of which offence each of those people was suspected.

The statistics provided by the National Crime Agency on their website: http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics are not broken down in the manner requested (i.e., by gender). Additionally they are only available by offence-type from calendar year 2010.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average time taken to extradite suspected criminals is from category 2 (a) Type A and (b) Type B territories.

The European Arrest Warrant is designed to speed up the process of extradition. As set out in Command Paper Cm 8897 (Decision pursuant to Article 10(5) of Protocol 36 to The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union), in terms of average time taken for surrender from the UK to another country, it takes on average about three months to extradite someone under a European Arrest Warrant. Extradition to relevant non-EU countries takes on average about ten months but can, and often does, take considerably longer. Time limits are shorter under the European Arrest Warrant than under the European Convention on Extradition, resulting in shorter times in custody overall.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average time taken was to extradite suspected criminals from countries covered by the provisions of European Arrest Warrant scheme (a) before and (b) in each year after the Extradition Act 2003 came into force.

The European Arrest Warrant is designed to speed up the process of extradition. As set out in Command Paper Cm 8897 (Decision pursuant to Article 10(5) of Protocol 36 to The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union), in terms of average time taken for surrender from the UK to another country, it takes on average about three months to extradite someone under a European Arrest Warrant. Extradition to relevant non-EU countries takes on average about ten months but can, and often does, take considerably longer. Time limits are shorter under the European Arrest Warrant than under the European Convention on Extradition, resulting in shorter times in custody overall.

19th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assurances she has had from EU partners that UK law enforcement agencies could still participate in the (a) European Criminal Records Information System, (b) Schengen Information System, (c) Schengen Alert System, (d) European Arrest Warrant and (e) Europol in the event of a vote to leave the EU.

As set out in the Government’s White Paper on the process for withdrawing from the European Union, our arrangements for future cooperation under measures such as the European Arrest Warrant, the European Criminal Records Information System and the Schengen Information System would be brought into question. Aside from those States that are not in the EU but are in the Schengen border-free area, there are no precedents for non-Members being able to cooperate with these mechanisms fully outside the EU. We would also lose our status as a full member of Europol.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times the UK Football Policing Unit has requested information from other EU member states on football banning orders and other data relevant to the safe policing of football matches in each of the last 10 years.

This information is not held. The UK National Football Information Point within the UK Football Policing Unit exchanges information relevant to the safe policing of football matches with National Football Information Points in other EU countries, whenever UK national and club teams play against national or club teams from other EU member states.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police, emergency responders and other security and military personnel have been deployed from other EU member states to respond to emergencies and other security threats in the UK in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested is not held centrally by the Home Office.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police staff have been deployed to (a) each region of the UK from other EU member states and (b) other EU member states from each region of the UK to police (i) football matches and (ii) other sporting events in each of the last 10 years.

Whenever national football or club teams from England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland play a match outside of the UK, an assessment is made as to whether a UK police delegation can be useful to the host nation’s policing operation. However, the decision to request UK police officers rests with the relevant host nation. Similarly whenever national football teams or club teams from England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland host a match against a foreign club or national team, an assessment is made by the police and this will include whether they would welcome support from the relevant police force. Such consideration can also be given to other sporting events, but it is mainly applicable to football matches. We do not hold the specific detail asked for in the question.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many European Arrest Warrant surrenders (a) to and (b) from each UK law enforcement agency there have been in each year since 2010; and what type of offence each of those surrenders related to.

These statistics are available on the National Crime Agency Website at: http://www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/european-arrest-warrant-statistics

Figures for Scotland were not included prior to 2015.

9th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the (a) extra cost to police forces and (b) extra staff hours in police forces resulting from the change in the level of reported cases of contact child sex offences in the last two years.

Resourcing is an operational matter for individual Chief Constables. We have prioritised child sexual abuse as a national threat in the Strategic Policing Requirement to empower police forces to maximise specialist skills and expertise to prevent offending and resolve cases. This means that police forces must have in place the capabilities they need to protect children from sexual abuse.

In 2015/16 the Government provided an additional £10 million to the National Crime Agency to create specialist teams to tackle online child sexual exploitation. We have also made available £1.7 million to fund Operation Hydrant, which coordinates the handling of multiple non-recent child sexual abuse investigations specifically concerning institutions or persons of public prominence, and up to £1.5 million to support regional coordinators and analysts to oversee the implementation of the National Policing Plan for tackling child sexual exploitation.

9th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many traffic police officers were employed in each police force area in each of the last five years.

The number of full time equivalent police officers employed in traffic policing roles as at 31 March in each of the last 5 years is provided in the tables. Officers with multiple responsibilities are recorded under their primary function or role. Data for 31 March 2015 (the latest period for which figures are available) can also be found in the supplementary tables of the July 2015 police workforce statistics publication:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/444537/police-workforce-supptabs-mar15.ods

Reclassification of roles within a force can lead to fluctuations in the number of officers in a particular role.

As HMIC has made clear, there is no simple link between police numbers and crime levels, between numbers and the visibility of police in the community, or between numbers and the quality of service provided.

Decisions on the size and composition of the police workforce are operational matters for Chief Officers working with their Police and Crime Commissioners and taking into account local priorities. What matters is how officers are deployed, not how many of them there are.

9th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has had discussions with the Secretary of State for Justice on the potential implications of the proposals in the Policing and Crime Bill to put a limit of 28 days on pre-charge bail for the resources required for bail extension hearings.

A full Impact Assessment, setting out the cost across Criminal Justice System of the proposed bail reforms, was drawn up as part of the consultation process in late 2014 and was updated in the light of that consultation in March 2015. The Impact Assessment was updated again and published with the Policing and Crime Bill in February 2016; a copy of the latest version is available online at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/499365/Impact_Assessment_-_Reform_Pre-Charge_Bail.pdf

The Home Office and the Ministry of Justice have worked together closely in drawing up these proposals; I am of course a Minister in both Departments, and my Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Justice is one of the backers of the Policing and Crime Bill.

4th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 27 April 2016 to Question 34842, how much of the £3.95 million spent on Cyber Streetwise in 2014-15 was spent on (a) media spend and production, (b) PR, partnership and social, (c) research and (d) website; and how much of the £4.1 million spent on Cyber Streetwise in 2015-16 was spent on (i) media spend and production, (ii) PR, partnership and social, (iii) research and (iv) website.

Cyber Streetwise is a cross Government campaign, developed by private and public stakeholder partners and coordinated by the Home Office’s Research, Information and Communications Unit. It is designed to measurably make the UK a safer place to interact and do business online by increasing individual and SME adoption of safe online behaviours.

Government experts estimate that a significant proportion of cyber security issues would be avoided by safer online behaviours. Cyber Streetwise supports this by increasing digital confidence by informing people about the key things that keep them safer online. It does this by:

• Delivering actionable and positive solution focussed advice on how to be secure.

• Creating arresting communications that highlight the consequences and cut through low interest.

• Reminding and reinforcing individuals and SMEs of the core protective behaviours at the point of risk/incidence.

Currently our prioritised protective behaviours are: using strong passwords made up of three random words; installing security software on all devices; and regularly downloading software updates. Government and Industry experts agree that adopting these 3 behaviours will provide SMEs and individuals with the best protection against cyber-crime.

The impact of Cyber Streetwise on behaviours is evaluated via regular quantitative tracking research. Since its launch in January 2014, it is estimated that 2 million adults have adopted safer online behaviours that will better protect them.

The spend for Cyber Streetwise in 2014/15 and 2015/16 is as follows:

• 2014/15 - £3.95m excl VAT

• 2015/16 - £4.1m excl VAT

4th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the contribution of the Minister for Policing, Fire and Criminal Justice and Victims of 24 March 2016, Official Report, column 221, on the Policing and Crime Bill, in which types of situations her Department anticipates that police volunteers will have the need of CS spray for self-protection.

Currently, volunteers already have all the powers of a police constable as a Special Constable and have done so for over a century.

Chapter 1 of Part 3 of the Bill will enable chief officers to designate police staff with a wider range of police powers. They will also be able to confer police powers – other than the core powers reserved for warranted officers set out in Schedule 9 to the Bill – on volunteers. The intention is that the powers that can be conferred on employed staff and designated volunteers are the same. This includes the power to carry and use defensive sprays, such as CS or PAVA, in situations where the chief officer considers there to be an operational case for this. It is already the case that chief officers can equip police community support officers with defensive sprays; accordingly, the Bill simply codifies the existing position for staff. Chief officers must ensure appropriate training before conferring a power.

Since opening the recruitment for Volunteer Police Community Support Officers (VPCSOs) in the autumn of 2013, Lincolnshire Police have recruited 80 volunteers, who have been trained to the same standard as paid PCSOs. The College of Policing guidance in respect of VPCSOs has not yet been written.

4th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister for Policing, Fire and Criminal Justice and Victims of 24 March 2016, Official Report, column 221, on the Policing and Crime Bill, how many volunteer police community and support officers have been trained in Lincolnshire; what training those volunteers have received; and whether the training those volunteers have received is in line with the guidance to be issued by the College of Policing.

Currently, volunteers already have all the powers of a police constable as a Special Constable and have done so for over a century.

Chapter 1 of Part 3 of the Bill will enable chief officers to designate police staff with a wider range of police powers. They will also be able to confer police powers – other than the core powers reserved for warranted officers set out in Schedule 9 to the Bill – on volunteers. The intention is that the powers that can be conferred on employed staff and designated volunteers are the same. This includes the power to carry and use defensive sprays, such as CS or PAVA, in situations where the chief officer considers there to be an operational case for this. It is already the case that chief officers can equip police community support officers with defensive sprays; accordingly, the Bill simply codifies the existing position for staff. Chief officers must ensure appropriate training before conferring a power.

Since opening the recruitment for Volunteer Police Community Support Officers (VPCSOs) in the autumn of 2013, Lincolnshire Police have recruited 80 volunteers, who have been trained to the same standard as paid PCSOs. The College of Policing guidance in respect of VPCSOs has not yet been written.

4th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Home Office of 26 April 2016, Official Report, column 1363, on the Policing and Crime Bill, what steps she is taking to ensure that cybercrime is included in the crime statistics produced by the Office for National Statistics.

In April 2012, the Home Secretary transferred the responsibility for the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) and the publication of crime statistics to the independent Office for National Statistics (ONS) - to ensure the public had confidence in the statistics after years of poor data management.

A major strength of the CSEW has been its ability to compare crime types over time back to the 1980s. As ONS have acknowledged, over a period of time, new technologies such as the internet have expanded the scope of existing crime types and developed new ones, particularly in fraud and cybercrime. Therefore, following a period of extensive development work, ONS introduced new questions to the CSEW in October 2015. ONS have said that they will release estimates of fraud and cyber crime based on the first six months data (October 2015 to March 2016) alongside the main statistical bulletin in July 2016 and will label them as experimental statistics.

It is important to recognise that these data are not simply uncovering new crimes, but finding better ways of capturing existing crimes which were not measured as well in the past.

20th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2016 to Question 20367 and of 18 January 2016 to Question 22101, what the spend for the Cyber Streetwise campaign was on (a) media spend and production, (b) PR, partnership and social, (c) research and (d) website in (i) 2014-15 and (ii) 2015-16.

Cyber Streetwise is a cross Government campaign, developed by private and public stakeholder partners and coordinated by the Home Office’s Research, Information and Communications Unit. It is designed to make the UK a safer place to interact and do business online by increasing individual and SME adoption of safe online behaviours.

Government experts estimate that a significant proportion of cyber security threats could be avoided by safer online behaviours. Cyber Streetwise supports this by increasing digital confidence, informing people about key steps that keep them safer online. It does this by:

• Delivering actionable and positive solution focussed advice on how to be secure

• Creating arresting communications that highlight the consequences and cut through low interest

• Reminding and reinforcing individuals and SMEs of the core protective behaviours at the point of risk/incidence

The impact of Cyber Streetwise on behaviours is evaluated via regular quantitative tracking research. Since its launch in January 2014, it is estimated that 2 million adults have adopted safer online behaviours that will better protect them.

The spend for Cyber Streetwise in 2014/15 and 2015/16 is as follows:

• 2014/15 - £3.95 million excl VAT

• 2015/16 - £4.1 million excl VAT

20th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2016 to Question 20367, how the figure of approximately two million adults who have adopted safer online behaviours that will better protect them was reached; and how such behaviours were measured.

Cyber Streetwise is a cross Government campaign, developed by private and public stakeholder partners and coordinated by the Home Office. It is designed to measurably make the UK a safer place to interact and do business online by increasing individual and SME adoption of safe online behaviours.

Government experts estimate that a significant proportion of cyber security issues would be avoided by safer online behaviours. Cyber Streetwise supports this by increasing digital confidence by informing people about the key things that keep them safer online. It does this by:

• Delivering actionable and positive solution focussed advice on how to be secure

• Creating arresting communications that highlight the consequences and cut through low interest

• Reminding and reinforcing individuals and SMEs of the core protective behaviours at the point of risk/incidence

The impact of Cyber Streetwise on behaviours is evaluated via regular quantitative tracking research. Since its launch in January 2014, it is estimated that 2 million adults have adopted safer online behaviours that will better protect them.

This is estimated using data from the National Cyber Security Tracker. This is a regular non-random online panel survey of 2000 people, designed to measure the adoption (claimed behaviour) of safer cyber security behaviours amongst SMEs and the public.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many investigations into crimes categorised as violent crimes and sexual offences were assigned an outcome of investigation complete - no suspect identified in (a) each year since 2010 and (b) the most recent period for which figures are available.

In April 2014, the Government reformed crime outcome data to give greater transparency to the public about the investigation and prosecution of crime.

The requested outcomes data have been provided for the first available year (12 months to March 2015) and the most recent rolling year (12 months to September 2015) in the accompanying table. These have been given as proportions of recorded crimes recorded during the period rather than numbers as some forces were unable to supply data based on the new outcomes framework at the start of the period. The table also includes the proportion of crimes under active investigation awaiting an outcome from each period for further context.

More recent figures for the year to December 2015 will be published on Thursday April 21, 2016.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many requests have been made by police forces for mutual aid in each year since 2010.

The deployment of officers by police forces in England and Wales under mutual aid arrangements is an operational matter for those forces.

The Home Office does not routinely collect the requested information.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the contribution of the Minister for Policing, Fire and Criminal Justice and Victims of 10 February 2016, Official Report, column 1594, on the Police Grant Report (England and Wales), how many operational on-duty frontline police officers there were in (a) the latest period for which figures are available and (b) 2010.

The number and proportion of full time equivalent police officers employed in operational frontline roles as at 31 March 2015, the latest period for which figures are available, and 31 March 2010, are provided in the table.

As HMIC has made clear, there is no simple link between police numbers and crime levels, between numbers and the visibility of police in the community, or between numbers and the quality of service provided.

Decisions on the size and composition of the police workforce are operational matters for Chief Officers working with their Police and Crime Commissioners and taking into account local priorities. What matters is how officers are deployed, not how many of them there are.

18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been convicted of selling a knife to someone under age since the introduction of the Violent Crime Reduction Act 2006.

Relevant data for 2004 to 2014 is available within the Criminal Justice Statistics publication in the ‘Criminal justice statistics outcomes by offence data tool’, under offence ‘195 Criminal Justice Act 1988 S.141A(1) - Selling a blade to a person aged under 18.

The publication is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2014

Data for 2015 will be published in due course.

14th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect on the ratio of firearms instructors to police officers of the Government's policy to train an extra 1,500 firearms officers by April 2018.

At the Spending Review in December 2015, the Chancellor announced a major investment of £143 million to uplift armed policing capacity to respond more quickly and effectively to a marauding firearms attack.

The police have been working to allocate that spending to ensure maximum effect and are arranging for sufficient instructors and training places to be in place.

14th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the contribution of the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Home Office of 24 March 2016, Official Report, column 209, on the Policing and Crime Bill, how her Department defines warranted in the context of warranted officers; and what assessment she has made of whether Clause 28 of the Policing and Crime Bill would give warranted powers to staff and volunteers.

In the context of warranted officers and in relation to the Policing and Crime Bill, “warranted” means attested as a constable. The Bill sets out a series of reforms, endorsed in a public consultation, that will enhance the powers of chief police officers to designate police staff and volunteers with a broad range of powers or duties, other than those core powers that will be available only to constables. In making this distinction, we are underlining the central place of the constable in policing.

These reforms will free up police officers to concentrate on the core policing tasks that most require their particular powers and experience, while enabling chief police officers to deploy a flexible and balanced workforce with the appropriate mix of skills and experience to keep our communities safe. We know there is demand from forces to introduce these volunteer roles – Lincolnshire, for example, have already recruited and trained volunteer Police Community Support Officers, who are waiting for this Bill to pass so they can be given powers appropriate to their roles and training.

If it is acceptable to confer all the powers of a constable on one type of volunteer, namely special constables, it is inconsistent to object in principle to conferring a narrower set of powers on other suitably trained volunteers. Chief officers are best placed to decide how to shape their workforce to meet local need and the reforms in the Bill enable them to do just that.

14th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of the grant settlement and provisional settlements for police forces up to 2019-20 on the ratio of officers to members of the public.

The Government has protected overall police spending for the coming Spending Review period in real terms, when local income is taken into account. This is an increase of up to £900 million in cash terms by 2019/20. The public can be confident that over the next four years the police will have the resources they need to carry on cutting crime, fighting terrorism and keeping the people of this country safe.

The proportion of police officers in frontline roles in England and Wales has increased from 89% in March 2010 to 92% in March 2015. Ultimately, decisions on the size and composition of a police force’s workforce are for individual chief officers and Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs).

14th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it her policy that volunteers should not be used in the operational areas of (a) child sexual exploitation, (b) serious crime and (c) counter-terrorism under proposals in the Policing and Crime Bill.

Our consultation on the reform of the roles and powers of civilians and volunteers demonstrated the demand from forces for flexibility in how they deploy volunteer staff, and therefore we should not make assumptions about the operational areas where volunteers can make a contribution. For example, they can play a hugely valuable role in supporting vulnerable victims. As Victim Support told the consultation: “enabling chief officers to designate powers to volunteers would allow them to assist police officers in supporting victims of crime and improving service delivery.”

Volunteers will be subject to the same tests as police staff before they are designated with powers, namely that the chief officer must be satisfied that they are suitable, capable and adequately trained (that is, the tests set out in section 38(4) of the Police Reform Act 2002), so police forces will not be able to deploy volunteers on tasks they are not capable of performing.

If it is acceptable to confer all the powers of a constable on one type of volunteer, namely special constables, it is inconsistent to object in principle to conferring a narrower set of powers on other suitably trained volunteers. Under this Bill, however, Parliament will retain control of the list of core powers that will only be available to police officers. For example, all powers under counter-terrorism legislation are listed in Schedule 7 to the Bill as core powers of police officers.

These reforms will place the individual decision-making as to which personnel perform which roles firmly in the hands of chief officers, who have the professional expertise and local knowledge to know which powers are needed in their area. It is important that we do not restrict the operational powers of the police, who retain the right to deploy staff as they see fit.

14th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to recruit more police firearms instructors as a result of the Government's commitment to train 1,500 extra firearms officers by April 2018.

At the Spending Review in December 2015, the Chancellor announced a major investment of £143 million to uplift armed policing capacity to respond more quickly and effectively to a marauding firearms attack.

The Police have beenn working to allocate that spending to ensure maximum effect and are arranging for sufficient instructors and training places to be in place.

8th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much funding her Department plans to allocate to the College of Policing for (a) digital media investigators and (b) the mainstreaming cyber-crime training in each of the next three years.

The Home Office provides the College of Policing with annual funding through grant in aid, with some specific funding uplifts to develop certain programmes.

Development of the Digital Media Investigator (DMI) training, run by the College of Policing, will be funded by the Home Office for 2016/17 at a cost of £635,448. After this financial year the College will be expected to meet the costs of continuing the training though their grant in aid or a re-charge to forces.

The National Cyber Security Programme (NCSP) provides investment to increase the cyber security of the UK. The NCSP funded the development of the second phase of the Mainstream Cyber Crime Training course which was launched on 30 September 2015 by the College of Policing. This is a modular course consisting of a series of self-teach and interactive modules accessible to all police officers and staff, which gives an introduction to how to recognise and investigate cyber crimes. The course was developed so that once it was rolled out, there would be no ongoing cost to the College into 2016/17 and future years. It has now been licensed to forces to deliver themselves.

Since the introduction of the College of Policing’s Cyber Crime Training course for all police forces, which was rolled out nationally in February 2014 4,394 officers successfully completed it. The College of Policing reported on 30 March 2016, that 1,014 police officers had received DMI training up to that point.

8th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much has been received by (a) her Department, (b) police forces, (c) the CPS and (d) HM Courts and Tribunal Service under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 in each year since 2010.

The table below shows the total receipts for each department from all powers under the Proceeds of Crime Act in the financial year 1 April 2014-31 March 2015. The table includes data for England and Wales. The data for the Police also includes cash forfeiture receipts for the Police Service of Northern Ireland, but not confiscation receipts (under the devolution settlement, all confiscation receipts are retained by Northern Ireland, and the Home Office holds no data).

Total value of receipts in each year (in millions)

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

Home Office

£77.94m

£81.54m

£76.07m

£79.52m

£84.71m

Police

£28.43m

£29.48m

£24.45m

£29.81m

£25.62m

Crown Prosecution Service

£11.02m

£15.13m

£17.01m

£18.43m

£17.99m

Ministry of Justice/HM Courts & Tribunal Service

£11.84m

£11.73m

£12.78m

£13.52m

£15.54m

All other agencies

£26.65m

£25.19m

£21.83m

£17.75m

£25.56m

Grand Total

£155.88m

£163.07m

£152.14m

£159.03m

£169.42m

25th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions officials from her Department have had with the City of London Police on the performance of Action Fraud in the last 12 months.

The City of London Police (CoLP) is subject to ongoing scrutiny, in terms of both performance and financial management of the Action Fraud and the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau capabilities; this is an explicit condition of the funding arrangements. CoLP is also subject to a Ministerially approved improvement plan, which is overseen by officials, who meet CoLP on a regular basis to monitor progress and to ensure delivery.

We have seen significant improvement in performance; official figures show reports of fraud have trebled since Action Fraud was rolled out nationally, addressing the concern that fraud was an underreported crime type. The number of crime packages disseminated to local forces to consider investigation has also increased significantly, raising from around 40,000 in 13/14 to 75,000 in 14/15.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 5 January 2016 to Question 20367, what the educational basis is of adults adopting safer online behaviours; and under what cost headings the Cyber Streetwise campaign spent its funds in (a) 2014-15 and (b) 2015-16.

Cyber Streetwise is a cross Government campaign, developed by private and public stakeholder partners and coordinated by the Home Office’s Research, Information and Communications Unit. It is designed to measurably make the UK a safer place to interact and do business online by increasing individual and SME adoption of safe online behaviours.

The impact of Cyber Streetwise on behaviours is evaluated via regular quantitative tracking research. Since its launch in January 2014, it is estimated that 2 million adults have adopted safer online behaviours that will better protect them. Cyber Streetwise has spent its funds in (a) 2014-15 and (b) 2015-16 under the following categories:

• Media spend and production

• PR, partnership and social

• Research

• Website

16th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the cost to the public purse is of the Government's Cyberstreetwise programme for (a) 2014 and (b) 2015.

Cyber Streetwise is a cross Government campaign, developed by private and public stakeholder partners and coordinated by the Home Office’s Research, Insight and Communications Unit. It is designed to improve the online safety knowledge, behaviour and confidence of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) and individuals; driving down crime, saving victims’ money and reinforcing perceptions of the UK as a safe place to do business. Since its launch in January 2014, approximately 2 million adults have adopted safer online behaviours that will better protect them. Our 2015/16 strategic approach aims to drive measurable shifts in three key behaviours: using strong passwords made up of three random words; installing security software on all devices; and regularly downloading software updates which experts agree will provide SMEs and individuals with the most protection against cyber-crime.

The cost to of the Government of the Cyber Streetwise campaign for a) 2014/15 was £3.956 million (excluding VAT) and b) 2015/16 was £4 million (excluding VAT).

16th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers have been absent from work due to stress-related illnesses in each of the last five years.

The Home Office does not hold data centrally on the number of officers absent from work due to stress-related illnesses. The number of officers on long term absence at 31 March each year is collected, along with information on the number of officers on long term sickness. This is published annually by HMIC in their Value for Money profiles: https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmic/our-work/value-for-money-inspections/value-for-money-profiles/

These data do not allow the reasons for long term sickness to be identified.

Chief Constables, working with directly elected police and crime commissioners, are responsible for managing the police workforce effectively and ensuring the welfare of all officers and staff.

16th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many cyber specials there are in police forces; and how many such people have been recruited since January 2015.

The Home Office does not hold specific data in relation to this issue. We have consulted with the National Crime Agency (NCA) in providing this response in relation to NCA figures. We have provided a response to the police force question using information provided by forces. This is not exhaustive and therefore may not reflect the full number of Cyber Specials in place. Cyber Specials can be either Special Constables or volunteers.

There are 15 NCA Specials who have particular expertise in cyber crime. The NCA are also now recruiting a further seven. From the 15 in post now, 10 have been recruited since January 2015.

There are at least 23 Cyber Specials in police forces across England and Wales. In addition, a further nine are currently being recruited. From the 23 in post now, at least four have been recruited since January 2015.

16th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many National Crime Agency specials with particular expertise in cyber-crime there are; and how many such people have been recruited since January 2015.

The Home Office does not hold specific data in relation to this issue. We have consulted with the National Crime Agency (NCA) in providing this response in relation to NCA figures. We have provided a response to the police force question using information provided by forces. This is not exhaustive and therefore may not reflect the full number of Cyber Specials in place. Cyber Specials can be either Special Constables or volunteers.

There are 15 NCA Specials who have particular expertise in cyber crime. The NCA are also now recruiting a further seven. From the 15 in post now, 10 have been recruited since January 2015.

There are at least 23 Cyber Specials in police forces across England and Wales. In addition, a further nine are currently being recruited. From the 23 in post now, at least four have been recruited since January 2015.

16th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many staff have been employed in (a) the National Crime Agency's National Cyber Crime Unit and (b) each of the nine Regional Organised Crime Units for each year from 2010 to date.

Regional Organised Crime Units (ROCUs) provide capability to investigate serious and organised crime across police force boundaries, including but not limited to, cyber crime. At the end of September 2015, there were 1,626 full-time equivalent staff employed by forces in the nine Regional Organised Crime Units (ROCUs), excluding London.

These figures have only been centrally collected by the police, and shared with the Home Office, since the beginning of this financial year. Details on the number of staff employed in individual ROCUs are operationally sensitive and have therefore not been provided. The most recent figures for the number of National Crime Agency (NCA) officers employed in the National Cyber Crime Unit will be available in the National Crime Agency's Remuneration Review Body evidence to be published on the NCA's website shortly.

14th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much of the Police Innovation Fund was allocated to police forces in financial years (a) 2014-15 and (b) 2015-16.

The Police Innovation Fund 2014/15 allocated £53m to Police and Crime Commissioners (and their equivalents) in 2014/15 and 2015/16. The Police Innovation Fund 2015/16 allocated over £71m to Police and Crime Commissioners (and their equivalents) in 2015/16 and 2016/17.

14th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the potential effect on police workloads of planned reductions in local authority funding on (a) emergency planning, (b) vulnerability strategies, (c) youth offending services, (d) anti-social behaviour strategies and (e) community safety strategies.

Funding for local authorities in England is a matter for the Department for Communities and Local Government. Funding for local authorities in Wales is a matter for the Welsh Government.

It is for local authorities to decide how they spend their budgets on these and other issues. Many local authorities already understand the value of working closely with Police and Crime Commissioners and are best placed to make the right decisions for their communities locally.

PCCs have a duty under the provisions of the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act to work with local authorities in their respective police force areas.

14th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the potential effect on police workloads of planned reductions in Ministry of Justice spending in (a) victims' support services, (b) vulnerability strategies, (c) youth offending services and the Youth Justice Board and (d) legal aid.

Funding for these services is a matter for the Secretary of State for Justice, who has confirmed that Police and Crime Commissioners’ budgets for victims’ services have been protected over the period of the spending review, and final funding levels for 2016/17 will be confirmed as soon as possible. The Secretary of State for Justice has also appointed Charlie Taylor to conduct a review of the youth justice system which will report in the summer of 2016 and will make recommendations on how the youth justice system will operate in future.

The Ministry of Justice’s spending review settlement does not depend upon a reduction in criminal legal aid.

We expect Police and Crime Commissioners to continue to work closely with local partners to provide an efficient and effective criminal justice system for their police force areas.

1st Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has been made of potential changes in local council tax required to maintain overall police spending in real terms.

The Home Office worked closely with policing partners and other Government Departments as part of Spending Review preparations to ensure flexibility on council tax is a key part of the Spending Review settlement for the police.

The Spending Review makes provision for overall police spending to be protected in real terms, when council tax income is taken into account. The ten Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) in England with the lowest precept levels in each year will be able to raise their police precept level by up to £5 per year over the Spending Review period, compared to the usual two per cent. These provisions are an integral part of the overall Spending Review settlement for the police.

It is right that PCCs, in consultation with local taxpayers, should decide the level of police precept in their area each year.

1st Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has been made of the cost to police forces of (a) the apprenticeship levy and (b) a single tier pension.

Home Office officials have written to the National Policing Lead for Workforce Development to ensure that chief constables, who are the employers in each local force, are aware of the opportunity that apprenticeships present as they strive to develop greater workforce flexibility. A number of forces have already taken steps to develop apprentice models and a cross-force working group has been established by forces to consider the matter.

We worked closely with policing partners, as part of Spending Review preparations, to understand the impacts on forces of transition to the single-tier state pension. We continue to keep this under review.

1st Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Spending Review and Autumn Statement 2015, whether any reduction in the formula grant will be required for the (a) £1 billion Emergency Services Communication Programme and (b) £500 million additional counter-terrorism funding.

The Spending Review settlement set out £1 billion investment in the Emergency Services Network (ESN). Final decisions on the treatment of ESN core infrastructure costs within the overall police settlement in 2016/17 will be confirmed as part of the provisional police funding announcement in mid-December.

The overall size of Counter Terrorism Policing Grant is negotiated completely separately from the rest of central Government funding to the police. The Spending Review announcement confirmed a real terms increase in funding for counter-terrorism policing. As in previous years, the Counter Terrorism Policing Grant will be ring-fenced. The amount of this funding in 2016/17 will be confirmed as part of the provisional police funding announcement in mid-December.

6th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department has spent on (a) temporary agency staff, (b) consultants, (c) non-payroll staff, (d) administration and (e) marketing and advertising in real terms in each year since 2010-11.

The Home Office publishes monthly spending data for temporary agency staff, consultants and non-payroll staff. This information is available online, and can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/workforce-management-information-2015 >

Transparency Data was introduced by the coalition government in 2010, to enable the public to hold the Government to account, with the aim of reducing administration costs. The information available online through Transparency Data includes departmental spending on temporary staff, consultants and non-payroll staff. The previous administration did not compile or collate that information, and it is therefore not possible to provide comparative figures, or to establish what was previously spent, on the same basis.

The Home Office has reduced administration expenditure budgets by 50 per cent since 2010-11 in real terms. The Home Office is committed to a further 30 per cent reduction by 2019-20 over Spending Review 2015 period.

6th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what (a) the amount of any underspend expected against departmental expenditure limits in the current fiscal year and (b) her Department's latest forecast of total AME spend for this year are; and what the forecasts were for those two sums at the time of the Summer Budget 2015 and March Budget 2015.

(a) At the close of September 2015, we were not forecasting an underspend of Resource Departmental Expenditure Limit (RDEL)

At the close of September 2015, we were not forecasting an underspend of Capital Departmental Expenditure Limit (CDEL)

(b) At the close of September 2015, we were forecasting a total Annual Managed Expenditure (AME) spend for 2015-16 of £1,616 million.

At the time of the Summer Budget 2015 – when we had closed the accounts for June – we were forecasting:

• £9,805 million RDEL for the whole of 2015-16

• £363 million CDEL for the whole of 2015-16

• £1,618 million AME for the whole of 2015-16

At the time of the Spring Budget we were forecasting:

• £9,805 million RDEL for the whole of 2015-16

• £363 million CDEL for the whole of 2015-16

• £1,616 million AME for the whole of 2015-16

16th Sep 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she will provide the information on the police formula requested by the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for the West Midlands; and how the exemplifications described in Annex A of her Department's letter of 15 September 2015 will affect that force.

The consultation on police funding arrangements closed on 15 September and the responses are being analysed. The Government will consider these responses carefully to determine what changes, if any, are required. We will continue to engage with policing partners during this process and intend to provide information, including exemplifications of future allocations, as these develop. At this stage final force-level allocations have not been set and will not be determined until we have completed our analysis.

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the annual running costs of the Police Remuneration Pay Review Body have been since the formation of that body.

The Police Remuneration Review Body (PRRB) shares the same members and secretariat as the National Crime Agency Remuneration Review Body (NCARRB). The NCARRB was established in October 2013 and the PRRB was established in September 2014.

The set up costs for the PRRB were £118,337.47.

In 2013/14, the running costs of the Review Body were £142,354.55, all of which was in respect of the NCA remit.

In 2014/15, the running costs were £355,984.35, of which £213,590.61 was attributable to the PRRB, as the Review Body considered the policing remit for the first time.

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fraud offences involving online shopping have been recorded in each year since 2010.

The ONS publish the number of fraud offences recorded by Action Fraud in table A5 of their Crime in England and Wales publication (http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/crime-stats/crime-statistics/year-ending-december-2014/index.html). The total number of “online shopping and auctions” fraud offences recorded for the year ending December 2014 was 42,535.

Full annual data are only available from April 2014, following the phased introduction of centralised fraud reporting via Action Fraud. Previously, fraud offences were recorded by police forces and fraud offences involving online shopping could not be separately identified.

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the contribution by the hon. Member for Hemel Hempstead of 10 February 2015, Official Report column 637, what the timescale is for her Department's review of the police funding formula.

The Government has committed to a fundamental review of the police funding formula. We will consult with policing partners fully in due course.

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the set-up costs of the Police Remuneration Review Body were.

The Police Remuneration Review Body (PRRB) shares the same members and secretariat as the National Crime Agency Remuneration Review Body (NCARRB). The NCARRB was established in October 2013 and the PRRB was established in September 2014.

The set up costs for the PRRB were £118,337.47.

In 2013/14, the running costs of the Review Body were £142,354.55, all of which was in respect of the NCA remit.

In 2014/15, the running costs were £355,984.35, of which £213,590.61 was attributable to the PRRB, as the Review Body considered the policing remit for the first time.

1st Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will take steps to increase police visibility.

The decision as to how local policing teams are resourced, deployed and the duties those officers undertake is an operational matter for the relevant Chief Constable, in association with their Police and Crime Commissioner. This flexible approach allows forces to respond to the individual needs and priorities of their local communities.

5th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police officers in each force area were assigned to response in each of the last five years.

The table provided shows the number and proportion of full-time equivalent police officers within the response function for each police force area in England and Wales, as at 31 March 2010 to 31 March 2014.

The table also includes the number of full-time equivalent police officers within the neighbourhoods function as some forces are unable to make a clear distinction between these two functions.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many police stations have (a) been in operation and (b) closed in each police force area in each of the last five years.

This information is not held centrally. Decisions about the most effective use
of available resources, including the numbers and operating hours of police
stations, are a matter for the Police and Crime Commissioner and Chief
Constable locally, tailored to the needs of the local community.

24th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average police helicopter response times have been for each police force in each of the last five years.

The Home Office does not collect the figures for average air support response
times. Police air services are managed by the police under the National Police
Air Service.

23rd Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the annual cost of the National Police Air Service has been since 2012.

The running costs of the National Police Air Service (NPAS) are met by forces themselves. The NPAS Strategic Board, made up of Police and Crime Commissioners and chief constables, agrees how NPAS is financed and operated to meet the needs of all forces. In 2013/14, the Home Office made a £3.75 million one-off contribution to address a deficit in NPAS revenue budget. The Home Office has provided Capital Grant to NPAS in the following years:

2012/13 – £10.8 million

2013/14 – £13 million

2014/15 – £8.6 million (based on current estimates)

In addition the Home Office made capital payments direct to contractors for the building costs of Bournemouth Airbase (£0.3 million in 13/14 and £1.6 million in 14/15).

9th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many anti-social behaviour injunctions have been issued in each quarter of the last two years for which figures are available.

The Home Office does not hold data centrally on the number of anti-social behaviour injunctions. The data available relate to the number of anti-social behaviour orders issued on an annual basis by the courts. These are attached and are also available at the following link.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/355120/anti-social-behaviour-order-statistics-england-and-wales-2013.ods

28th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many traffic police officers were employed in each police force area in each of the last five years.

The table provided shows the number and proportion of full-time equivalent police officers within the traffic function for each police force area in England and Wales, as at 31 March 2010 to 31 March 2014.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many allegations of misconduct were made against the Police Service in each of the last five years; and how many police officers have been dismissed for misconduct in that period.

Data on the number of misconduct allegations is not collated centrally by the Home Office. Since December 2013 the College of Policing has been collecting information on officers dismissed from the police. Data for the first year is
currently out for verification by police forces and will be published by the College once verified. The public rightly expects police officers to act with the highest standards of integrity and for those suspected of misconduct to be
subject to formal disciplinary proceedings.

This Government has made the issue of police conduct and professionalism a priority. We have introduced legislation to prevent officers resigning or retiring toescape being held to account for their actions. The Government has also consulted on wide ranging reforms of the policedisciplinary system, following the Chapman Review. These reforms include holding police disciplinary hearings in public with legally-qualified chairs, which the Government intends to introduce in this
Parliament.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fixed penalty notices were issued for each type of offence in each of the last five years.

Available data relate to fixed penalty notices (FPNs) issued by the police in England and Wales to motorists between 2002 and 2012. These were in the most recent Home Office statistical release on Police Powers and Procedures,
available online via:
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-2012-to-2013

For easy reference, the total number of FPNs issued in England and Wales can be found in the following tables. Data for 2013 are scheduled to be published in April 2015.

Data on FPNs issued by the police for other types of offence are not collected centrally.

From 2011 onwards police began recording FPNs on a national recording system (PentiP). This data is not directly comparable with data from previous years. PentiP data is slightly lower than data from previous years due to (a) a number
of error records being removed from the system, and (b) the exclusion of FPNs resulting in court hearings, cancellations or no further action, which were included in data from the old system.

26th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many incidents of child abuse the police recorded in each of the last five years; and how many people have been arrested on charges of child abuse in each force area in each of the last five years.

The Home Office does not hold the requested information. The 11 individual offences of sexual abuse against children, which are collected by Home Office Statistics, are a subset of what could be categorised as ‘child abuse’.

23rd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times and on which dates she has met representatives of the Police Superintendents Association of England and Wales since May 2010.

Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery.
Details of ministerial meetings are passed to the Cabinet Office on a quarterly basis and are subsequently published on the Gov.uk website:
http://data.gov.uk/dataset/ministerial-data-home-office

23rd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times and on which dates she has met representatives of the Police Federation of England and Wales since May 2010.

Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery.
Details of ministerial meetings are passed to the Cabinet Office on a quarterly basis and are subsequently published on the Gov.uk website:
http://data.gov.uk/dataset/ministerial-data-home-office

23rd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times and on which dates she has met representatives of the Association of Chief Police Officers since May 2010.

Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery.
Details of ministerial meetings are passed to the Cabinet Office on a quarterly basis and are subsequently published on the Gov.uk website:
http://data.gov.uk/dataset/ministerial-data-home-office

23rd Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many times and on which dates she has met representatives of HM Inspectorate of Constabulary since May 2010.

Home Office Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of international partners, as well as organisations and individuals in the public and private sectors, as part of the process of policy development and delivery.
Details of ministerial meetings are passed to the Cabinet Office on a quarterly basis and are subsequently published on the Gov.uk website:
http://data.gov.uk/dataset/ministerial-data-home-office

9th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the (a) total cost and (b) cost in each principal category of expenditure was of the Police and Crime Commissioner elections in 2012; and in which months of 2012 costs for each of the principal items were incurred.

By introducing Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs), we have given everyone a direct say in policing in their area. PCCs are delivering a level of transparency, visibility and accountability that did not exist before 2012
under the invisible and unaccountable model of police authorities that preceded them.

The total cost of the national PCC elections in November 2012 was £66.8 million. This comprised:-
• £59.8 million for administering the elections – the breakdown of when this expenditure occurred will be placed in the House Library;
• £3.4million spent by the Home Office on promotional activity in March 2013; and
• £3.6 million that the Electoral Commission spent on mailing booklets. The
Home Office does not hold information on when these costs were incurred.

As the figures show, this expenditure occurred between February 2013 and March 2014.

15th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Criminal Finances Improvement Plan 2014, what steps she is taking to work with the private sector to maximise asset recovery.

Attacking criminal finances is central to our Serious and Organised Crime Strategy. Under the criminal finances improvement plan we are working across Government and with operational partners to explore how private sector skills and capabilities can be deployed to maximise asset recovery.

Our work with private sector partners specifically includes:
• The Government is exploring new ways of working with the private sector to improve the enforcement of confiscation orders.
• The Crown Prosecution Service and the Serious Fraud Office have completed a review of the use of receivers to enforce confiscation orders, resulting in the launch of an improved framework for the use of enforcement receivers.
• HM Courts and Tribunal Service is actively seeking an external provider for the future delivery of compliance and enforcement services for criminal financial impositions. This includes the collection and enforcement of fines, compensation, prosecutor costs, victims surcharge, fixed penalties and Confiscation Orders.

15th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Criminal Finances Improvement Plan 2014, what steps she is taking to strengthen her Department's ability to recover assets hidden overseas.

Attacking criminal finances is central to our Serious and Organised Crime Strategy. Under the Criminal Finances Improvement Plan, the Government is working with operational partners to strengthen the ability to recover assets hidden overseas.

Earlier this month the Government adopted the EU measures on the mutual recognition of confiscation orders, which should result in improved asset recovery from EU countries. The measure also includes an asset sharing agreement with all of the other 27 EU Member States. The Government continues to seek asset sharing agreements with other key jurisdictions outside the EU.

Specialist Crown Prosecution Service Asset Recovery Advisors have been appointed for Spain, UAE, the Caribbean and Europe, with a further post in South Africa to be filled early in the new year. There has already been improvements to performance as a result of this activity, including the first ever return of UK criminal assets from the UAE.

11th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what value of assets has been recovered from overseas confiscation orders in each of the last seven years.

This data has not previously routinely been collected in relation to all law enforcement and prosecution agencies. We are examining options to record performance in respect of confiscation orders made by overseas courts recognised and executed against property in the United Kingdom. Our recent adoption of the EU measure on the mutual recognition of confiscation orders, and the deployment of dedicated asset recovery liaison prosecutors to key jurisdictions, will result in an improved ability to assist our international partners on recovering the proceeds of crime located in the United Kingdom.

10th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many restraint orders to freeze assets were imposed in each of the last seven financial years.

The table below provides the number of restraint orders obtained in England and
Wales in each of the last seven years.

Number of Restraint Orders in England & Wales

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

1,497

1,796

1,665

1,856

1,593

1,466

1,417

As shown in the table below, more assets have been recovered since 2010 than
previously, although prosecutors now face greater difficulties in obtaining
restraint orders following the impact of the Court of Appeal decision in
Windsor & Ors v Crown Prosecution Service [2011] EWCA Crim 143.

Value of assets recovered in England & Wales

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

£148.86m

£159.90m

£170.53m

£177.40m

£193.86m

£182.44m

£188.97m

The Government has taken steps to address this by bringing forward provisions
in the Serious Crime Bill, which is currently before Parliament, to lower the
legal test for restraint to make it easier to obtain restraint orders earlier in
investigations. We are also working with operational partners to ensure that
the use of restraint orders is considered at the outset of all appropriate investigations.

9th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the results were of the Asset Recovery Incentivisation Scheme review.

The review’s findings are due to be presented to the Criminal Finances Board on 16 December. Recommendations arising from the review will be submitted to Ministers early in 2015.

22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2021 to Question 45090, on Ministry of Defence Guard Service: Conditions of Employment, how many of the 20 applications were made by MGS staff seeking promotion.

The Civil Service recruitment and selection process is anonymous. The recruiting Line Manager only gains more information on the status of individual candidates should they be selected for an interview. It is therefore not possible to ascertain the number of MGS employees who applied for promotion during the referenced recruitment campaign.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2021 to Question 45089, Ministry of Defence Guard Service: Conditions of Employment, whether a value-for-money analysis including the potential effect on staff (a) health, (b) safety, and (c) wellbeing was undertaken before the introduction of OMEC contracts.

A value-for-money analysis was provided through cost modelling and external benchmarking before the introduction of the OMEC contracts. The potential effects on staff health, safety and wellbeing were not specifically included as part of this analysis.

Staff health, safety and wellbeing are managed routinely through the application of Defence Joint Service Publication (JSP) 892 and in accordance with MOD Civilian HR Policy, Rules and Guidance.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2021 to Question 45088, Ministry of Defence Guard Service: Conditions of Employment, if he will arrange for trade union representatives to have access to the OMEC impact assessments.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 24 November 2021 to Question number 75991 to the hon. Member for Portsmouth South (Stephen Morgan).

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2021 to Question 45088, Ministry of Defence Guard Service: Conditions of Employment, if he will place in the Library a redacted copy of any impact assessments made prior to the introduction of Operational MGS Employment Contracts.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 24 November 2021 to Question number 75991 to the hon. Member for Portsmouth South (Stephen Morgan).

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 13 September 2021 to Question 45089, Ministry of Defence Guard Service: Conditions of Employment, how much of the estimated £63 million savings over 10 years of the introduction of Operational MGS Employment Contracts is expected to be realised (a) by year and (b) by other savings categories on which his Department holds data.

The table below shows the projected Operational Ministry of Defence Guard Service Employment Contracts savings, by year, as follows:

Financial Year

Projected Savings £million

2022-23

1.349

2023-24

2.774

2024-25

4.350

2025-26

6.155

2026-27

7.922

2027-28

8.001

2028-29

8.081

2029-30

8.162

2030-31

8.244

2031-32

8.326

Total

63.364

There are no other savings categories which contribute to this savings projection.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the potential savings to the public purse of introducing Operational MGS Employment Contracts.

It is estimated that the introduction of Operational MGS Employment Contracts will lead to savings of some £63 million over 10 years.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will publish impact assessments made prior to the introduction of Operational MGS Employment Contracts for civilian guards at UK military bases.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) Guard Service is an in-house guarding service provided to the MOD, Executive Agencies and Foreign Governments' Visiting Forces. As such it would not be appropriate to publish any impact assessments made prior to the introduction of Operational MGS Employment Contracts.

In addition, impact assessments pertaining to employment contracts are commercially sensitive and publication could negatively impact upon the ability of the MGS to compete for the delivery of Unarmed Guarding tasks across the Defence estate.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
24th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many security and military personnel and police have been deployed from other EU member states to respond to emergencies and other security threats in the UK in each year since 2010.

None. The deployment of the police is a Home Office responsibility.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
16th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to the evidence from his Department to the Home Affairs Select Committee, on hate crime and its violent consequences, where the £60 million funding for communities to come together has been spent by region.

We have spent over £60 million under the integration programme since 2010/11 to support projects that help create the conditions for people to live successfully alongside each other. Since April 2014, we have funded over 30 projects which reached over 644,000 people, providing 14,997 volunteering opportunities and hosting more than 17,900 events, groups and classes. We do not hold figures on the allocation of funding by region.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
16th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 9 of the evidence submitted by his Department to the Home Affairs Select Committee Inquiry on hate crime and its violent consequences, what training he plans to provide to editors and journalists; and when such training will be implemented.

The cross-Government Anti-Muslim Hatred Working Group has engaged with the Society of Editors and Independent Press Standards Organisation to discuss ways to tackle the negative portrayal of Muslims in the media. These discussions have considered suitable options for supporting journalists, including on matters of religious literacy such as appropriate terminology. This work is ongoing.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
24th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how much grant funding West Midlands Combined Authority will receive in financial year 2017-18 for (a) adult education, (b) transport, (c) the Work and Health Programme, (d) business support and (e) any other sources of funding by grant.

The West Midlands Combined Authority will receive a total of £70 million grant funding in 2017/18. This is separate to the funding that local authorities receive individually and is broken down as follows:

(a) Adult education: £Nil

(b) Transport: £33.5 million

(c) Work and Health Programme: £Nil

(d) Business support: £Nil

(e) Any other sources of funding by grant: £36.5 million (Gain share)

24th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he plans to publish funding allocations for Birmingham City Council.

My Department has already published local authority allocations for each year of this Parliament as part of the four year funding offer. Birmingham City Council is among the 97% of councils that have accepted this offer. The government will soon consult on a statutory provisional local government finance settlement for 2017-18 in the normal way.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
6th Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many tenants in (a) Birmingham, Erdington constituency and (b) the West Midlands live in supported housing owned by social landlords.

The department does not centrally hold information on the numbers on tenants in supported housing. The Homes and Communities Agency does publish information on the total stock of supported housing units in its statistical data return which is publically available online: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistical-data-return-statistical-releases

7th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the Government's press release, entitled Killer drivers to face life sentences, published on 4 December 2016, if she will take further steps to improve the enforcement of offences related to dangerous driving.

On Monday 5 December we launched a consultation on offences and penalties relating to causing death and serious injury.

How police enforce the law is the responsibility of individual Chief Police Officers, taking into account the specific local problems and demands with which they are faced. When an apparent offence is reported or they observe an apparent offence, they will decide on the appropriate course of action.

8th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the press release by the Trades Union Congress on employment tribunal claims, published on 4 November 2016, if she will make an assessment of the implications for her policies of the potential effect of employment tribunal fees on the number of people able to challenge employment discrimination in the workplace.

The Government is undertaking a post implementation review of the introduction of fees for proceedings in the Employment Tribunals. We expect to publish the conclusions of the review in due course.

8th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what representations her Department has received on the effect of tribunal fees on (a) working people and (b) people who have been treated unfairly at work.

The Government is undertaking a post implementation review of the introduction of fees for proceedings in the Employment Tribunals. We expect to publish the conclusions of the review, including the representations we have received on the impact of fees, in due course.

18th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much funding has been awarded to the UK from the Rights, Equality and Citizenship Programme for the period 2014 to 2020; what action grants have been so awarded; and to which Departments and under what headings any such funding has been awarded.

The information requested which relates to projects which have secured funding can be found at http://ec.europa.eu/justice/grants1/closed-calls/index_en.htm. Funding is provided to projects themselves as opposed to countries or government departments; projects may list UK based bodies as an applicant or as a partner in the project.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
18th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders in category (a) 1, (b) 2, and (c) 3 are being managed by multi-agency public protection arrangements (MAPPA) in England and Wales; and how many MAPPA-managed offenders there have been in each year since 2010.
20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people convicted of causing death by dangerous driving have not been subject to automatic release in the last three years.

The majority of people sentenced to immediate custody for the offence of causing death by dangerous driving are subject to the standard determinate sentence release provisions, with automatic release at the half-way point in accordance with the requirements of the Criminal Justice Act 2003. Some offenders serving this type of sentence may be eligible to be considered for release on home detention curfew (HDC) before their automatic release date, but those convicted of causing death by dangerous driving are presumed unsuitable for HDC and can only be considered in exceptional circumstances.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, whether his Department operates a red, amber and green rating system for categorising Freedom of Information requests according to their presentational sensitivity.

The Office of the Secretary of State for Wales works to answer Freedom of Information requests within the timescales set out in the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and does not operate a red, amber and green rating system in doing so.

David T C Davies
Assistant Whip