David Jones Portrait

David Jones

Conservative - Clwyd West

6,747 (16.8%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 5th May 2005


Retained EU Law (Revocation and Reform Bill)
7th Nov 2022 - 29th Nov 2022
Draft Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Bill
26th Nov 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
European Scrutiny Committee
30th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Draft Health Service Safety Investigation Bill (Joint Committee)
17th Apr 2018 - 27th Jul 2018
Draft Health Service Safety Investigations Bill (Joint Committee)
17th Apr 2018 - 27th Jul 2018
Minister of State (Department for Exiting the European Union)
17th Jul 2016 - 12th Jun 2017
Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 31st Oct 2016
Secretary of State for Wales
6th Sep 2012 - 15th Jul 2014
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Wales Office)
17th May 2010 - 6th Sep 2012
Shadow Minister (Wales)
8th Nov 2006 - 6th May 2010
Welsh Affairs Committee
17th Jul 2005 - 6th May 2010


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, David Jones has voted in 874 divisions, and 22 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Mar 2021 - Coronavirus - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 35 Conservative No votes vs 305 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 484 Noes - 76
10 Feb 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 526 Noes - 24
1 Dec 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 53 Conservative No votes vs 290 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 291 Noes - 78
4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
23 Jun 2020 - Independent Complaints and Grievance Scheme - View Vote Context
David Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 45 Conservative Aye votes vs 235 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 243 Noes - 238
10 Mar 2020 - Telecommunications Infrastructure (Leasehold Property) Bill - View Vote Context
David Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 301 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 306
27 Apr 2021 - Delegated Legislation - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Conservative No votes vs 222 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 89
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 38 Conservative No votes vs 271 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 441 Noes - 41
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 224 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 369 Noes - 126
14 Dec 2021 - Public Health - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 60 Conservative No votes vs 258 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 385 Noes - 100
22 Jun 2022 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Conservative No votes vs 106 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 70
18 Oct 2022 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 113 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 297 Noes - 110
22 Mar 2023 - Northern Ireland - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative No votes vs 281 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 515 Noes - 29
7 Mar 2023 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
David Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 107 Conservative Aye votes vs 109 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 299
18 Jul 2023 - Business without Debate - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative No votes vs 251 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 402 Noes - 21
25 Oct 2023 - Economic Activity of Public Bodies (Overseas Matters) Bill - View Vote Context
David Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 264 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 207 Noes - 269
4 Dec 2023 - Business without Debate - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative No votes vs 217 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 381 Noes - 37
10 Jan 2024 - Economic Activity of Public Bodies (Overseas Matters) Bill - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Conservative No votes vs 279 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 282 Noes - 235
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
David Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 57 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 58 Noes - 525
16 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
David Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Conservative Aye votes vs 262 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 68 Noes - 529
17 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
David Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 11 Conservative No votes vs 315 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 276
17 Jan 2024 - Safety of Rwanda (Asylum and Immigration) Bill - View Vote Context
David Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 266 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 536
View All David Jones Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(19 debate interactions)
Simon Hart (Conservative)
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury (Chief Whip)
(15 debate interactions)
David T C Davies (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Wales
(12 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(32 debate contributions)
Wales Office
(28 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all David Jones's debates

Clwyd West Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the Government to amend the Grocery Supply Code of Practice (GSCP) to require retailers, without exception, to:

- Buy what they agreed to buy
- Pay what they agreed to pay
- Pay on time

We believe the current GSCP is inadequate and doesn't protect farmers from unfair behaviour.

Mark Allen, aged 18, drowned after jumping into a freezing reservoir on a hot day in June 2018.

In May 2019 we watched whilst 3 throwlines were installed where he died.

Mark could have possibly been saved if they were in place beforehand.


Latest EDMs signed by David Jones

21st March 2024
David Jones signed this EDM on Monday 15th April 2024

Town and Country Planning

Tabled by: Edward Leigh (Conservative - Gainsborough)
That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, praying that the Town and Country Planning (Former RAF Scampton) (Accommodation for Asylum-Seekers etc.) Special Development Order 2024 (S.I., 2024, No. 412), dated 20 March 2024, a copy of which was laid before this House on 21 March 2024, be annulled.
22 signatures
(Most recent: 15 Apr 2024)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 22
1st February 2023
David Jones signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 1st February 2023

Exiting the European Union (No. 2)

Tabled by: Jeffrey M Donaldson (Independent - Lagan Valley)
TThat this House calls upon the Government to withdraw the Official Controls (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2023 (S.I., 2023, No. 17) because they are injurious to the integrity of the UK Internal Market in circumstances where the Northern Ireland Protocol has not been replaced by new arrangements that respect and protect …
19 signatures
(Most recent: 7 Feb 2023)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 11
Democratic Unionist Party: 7
Independent: 1
View All David Jones's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by David Jones, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


David Jones has not been granted any Urgent Questions

David Jones has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by David Jones

Introduced: 31st March 2014

To make provision about elections to and membership of the National Assembly for Wales; to make provision about the Welsh Assembly Government; to make provision about the setting by the Assembly of a rate of income tax to be paid by Welsh taxpayers and about the devolution of taxation powers to the Assembly; to make related amendments to Part 4A of the Scotland Act 1998; to make provision about borrowing by the Welsh Ministers; to make miscellaneous amendments in the law relating to Wales; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 17th December 2014 and was enacted into law.

Introduced: 31st March 2014

To make provision about elections to and membership of the National Assembly for Wales; to make provision about the Welsh Assembly Government; to make provision about the setting by the Assembly of a rate of income tax to be paid by Welsh taxpayers and about the devolution of taxation powers to the Assembly; to make related amendments to Part 4A of the Scotland Act 1998; to make provision about borrowing by the Welsh Ministers; to make miscellaneous amendments in the law relating to Wales; and for connected purposes.

This Bill received Royal Assent on 17th December 2014 and was enacted into law.


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
11th Nov 2022
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the cost of operating the Office of Speaker’s Counsel was in the most recent year for which figures are available.

The spend on the Office of Speaker’s Counsel for the financial year 2021/22 was £1.85m. The Office of Speaker’s Counsel provides legal advice to the Speaker, the Clerk and all departments of the House of Commons, as well as managing all litigation involving the Commission, the Corporate Officer or the Speaker. It also provides advice to Select Committees of the House.

24th Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent discussions he has had with the European Union on potential amendments to the Windsor Framework to streamline the movement of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

The Windsor Framework replaces the old Northern Ireland Protocol, addressing issues in its operation and protecting Northern Ireland’s place in the UK. We continue to have discussions with the EU on the operation of the Windsor Framework, including through the structures agreed as part of the Windsor Framework.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
16th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 29 November 2022 to Question HL3547 on Committee on Privileges, whether the second legal opinion produced by Lord Pannick on 12 October 2022 was commissioned at public expense.

As the Government set out in its response to HL3547, it remains the case that the Government does not comment on legal advice that may or may not have been sought or received. This is in line with the long-standing policy under successive administrations.

29th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the reasons are for the delay to the publication of the Office of National Statistics survey on Adult smoking habits in the UK: 2020 until 7 September 2021.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

12th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure the provision of advice to the public on the covid-19 restrictions applicable in (a) England and (b) Wales.

The UK Government is regularly publishing and updating information and guidance for the public on the Covid-19 outbreak. Where a matter is devolved, UK Government guidance available on GOV.UK is clear that measures apply in England-only and should be considered alongside local public health requirements, guidance and legislation in Wales.

The UK Government continues to work with the Welsh Government and other devolved administrations on decisions and guidance related to the current measures.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
8th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many meetings (a) ministers and (b) officials of her Department have had with (i) ministers and (ii) officials in the (A) Home Office and (B) Ministry of Justice to discuss retained EU law in the context of the Government's proposals for the removal of illegal migrants to Rwanda.

Ministers and officials at the Department for Business and Trade (DBT) have not had any meetings with ministers or officials at the Home Office or Ministry of Justice to discuss retained EU law (REUL) (now known as assimilated law), in the context of the removal of illegal migrants to Rwanda, although DBT officials regularly engage with both departments as a matter of course on their intentions for REUL/assimilated law falling within their areas of responsibility.

DBT is committed to working with any other government department to make the most of our freedoms outside the EU.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
5th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many items of retained EU law were (a) revoked and (b) assimilated before 1 January 2024.

At the end of 2023, approximately 700 pieces of Retained EU Law (REUL) were revoked via schedule 1 of the Act (“the revocation schedule”) and subsequent secondary legislation. Unless actively revoked, no REUL was sunset and instead became “assimilated law” after the end of 2023.

The Retained EU Law Dashboard is the government’s public catalogue of each piece of REUL confirmed by government departments, and their status. The dashboard currently features 5020 pieces of REUL and will be updated in January 2024, in line with our statutory commitments in the REUL Act and alongside the forthcoming first REUL parliamentary report.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
29th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps she is taking to ensure that hybrid heat pumps are included in the Government’s target of installing 600,000 heat pumps per year by 2028.

The Government consulted on the role of hybrid heat pumps through the consultation on ‘Improving Boiler Standards and Efficiency’ and will set out our response in due course.

Meanwhile, the Government is supporting targeted deployment of hybrid heating systems in defined circumstances in England through the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund and the Sustainable Warmth competition.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps she plans to take to support the installation of hybrid heat pumps in homes identified as unsuitable for heat pumps.

The Government consulted on the role of hybrid heat pumps through the consultation on ‘Improving Boiler Standards and Efficiency’ and will set out our response in due course.

Meanwhile, the Government is supporting targeted deployment of hybrid heating systems in defined circumstances in England through the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund and the Sustainable Warmth competition.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, with reference to her Department's policy paper entitled Heat pump net zero investment roadmap, published on 5 April 2023, what recent assessment she has made of (a) the level of progress toward the target of at least 600,000 heat pumps a year being installed by 2028 and (b) the potential role of hybrid heat pumps in meeting that target.

The Government remains fully committed to supporting the transition to low-carbon heating. This includes the aim to grow the market to 600,000 heat pump installations per year by 2028.

A range of measures are supporting this, including schemes like the Boiler Upgrade Scheme, the Energy Company Obligation and the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund. From 2025, we expect heat pumps will become the primary heating technology for new homes under the Future Homes Standard.

The Government consulted on the role of hybrid heat pumps through the consultation on ‘Improving Boiler Standards and Efficiency’ and will set out our response in due course.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
29th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will extend the support available under the Boiler Upgrade Scheme to include installation of hybrid heat pumps.

The Boiler Upgrade Scheme supports the transition away from fossil fuel heating to a low carbon alternative. Hybrid heat pumps are not currently eligible as the Government want to direct funding available to technologies that offer the greatest carbon savings, rather than those which would continue to involve the burning of fossil fuels for heating.

Heat pumps are suitable for the majority of UK homes, including off-gas grid and will play an important strategic role in decarbonising existing properties. The Government will keep our position on alternative heating technologies under review and make further assessments as supporting evidence develops.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
30th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps she is taking to encourage the take-up of hybrid heat pumps.

The recent consultation on Improving Boiler Standards and Efficiency explored the role hybrid heat pumps could play in supporting the transition to low carbon heat. A response will be published in due course.

In the meantime, the Government is supporting targeted deployment of hybrid heating systems in defined circumstances through the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund and the Sustainable Warmth competition. Qualifying hybrid heat pump systems will also be included in the new Clean Heat Market Mechanism scheme from 2024.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
30th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she has plans to consult on a biomass strategy in respect of off-grid heating.

On 5 September 2023, during Parliamentary debates on the Energy Act, the Government committed to exploring the potential of renewable liquid fuels for heat by issuing a consultation within 12 months.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of implementing a national pricing structure for the supply of electricity.

The British wholesale electricity market currently has a national pricing structure.

The Government is considering reforms to wholesale electricity pricing under the Review of Electricity Markets Arrangement (REMA). The recently published REMA consultation sets out the Government’s initial considerations on zonal and nodal pricing, which are two potential alternatives to national pricing under consideration.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the implications for his policies of the findings of DELTA-EE’s whitepaper, published on 26 October 2021, on the potential for reducing the cost of installed heat pumps.

The findings of Delta-EE’s white paper support existing evidence in demonstrating the potential for reductions in the installed cost of heat pumps. As made clear in the Government’s Heat and Buildings Strategy, published in October 2021, growing the number of heat pump installations to at least 600,000 a year by 2028 is contingent on the market finding ways to reduce the upfront cost of the systems. The Government has commissioned further research on this issue and will publish its conclusions later this year.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what analysis he has undertaken, including with the heat pump industry, on whether heat pumps can reach cost parity with traditional boilers by 2030.

The Government’s Heat and Building’s Strategy sets out its ambition to work with industry to reduce heat pump costs by 25-50% by 2025. These ambitions were endorsed by several major industry bodies.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of off-grid properties that are unsuitable for heat pumps and other low temperature heating technologies.

BEIS modelling on homes’ energy efficiency and electrical connections suggests it would be feasible to install heat pumps in around 80% of off gas grid homes, potentially rising to around 90% with fabric upgrades. The Department’s analysis indicates that most commercial and public buildings that use fossil fuel heating systems off the gas grid are technically suitable for a heat pump. For buildings on the gas-grid the Department estimates that around 90% will also be suitable for a heat pump.

Off-grid properties that cannot reasonably practicably install a heat pump will have a viable choice of high performing, commercially available alternative heating technologies that are consistent with net zero, such as high temperature heat pumps or solid biomass.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to provide a definition of hard-to-treat properties that are not suitable for conversion to low temperature heating technologies such as heat pumps.

BEIS modelling on homes’ energy efficiency and electrical connections suggests it would be feasible to install heat pumps in around 80% of off gas grid homes, potentially rising to around 90% with fabric upgrades. The Department’s analysis indicates that most commercial and public buildings that use fossil fuel heating systems off the gas grid are technically suitable for a heat pump. For buildings on the gas-grid the Department estimates that around 90% will also be suitable for a heat pump.

Off-grid properties that cannot reasonably practicably install a heat pump will have a viable choice of high performing, commercially available alternative heating technologies that are consistent with net zero, such as high temperature heat pumps or solid biomass.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the suitability of the Wylfa site on Anglesey for redevelopment as a new, large-scale nuclear power plant.

The Government believes there is an important role for large-scale nuclear in the UK and has been clear in its commitment to “at least one more” gigawatt power plant, subject to clear value for money for both consumers and taxpayers and all relevant approvals. The Wylfa Newydd site remains a candidate for new nuclear power, despite Hitachi’s withdrawal from the proposed nuclear project, and has the potential to host a range of nuclear technology – GW and/or small modular reactors – and the Government is continuing to discuss new projects with other viable companies and investors wishing to develop sites, including this one.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what role the development of nuclear power stations will have in the Government’s levelling up agenda; and whether regional disparities will be considered when determining which sites to prioritise for development.

New nuclear can bring significant economic benefits, including high-skilled employment, to regions across the UK. The construction of Hinkley Point C has to-date seen EDF spend £3.5 billion in the south-west and create well over 10,000 job opportunities. It is for private developers to propose and develop projects at suitable sites, however in recognising the importance of nuclear, the government has set out a new £120 million Future Nuclear Enabling Fund towards the development of nuclear projects. More details of the Fund and how it will operate will be released in due course. Government would expect to see similar levels of economic impacts to those at Hinkley in the regions where future power stations might be built.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential economic merits of proceeding with the Wylfa Nuclear Power plant project on Anglesey for (a) North Wales, (b) the Northern Powerhouse region and (c) the UK.

New nuclear projects can deliver significant local, regional, and national economic benefits, including high-skilled employment, to the UK. Government would expect to see similar levels of economic impacts to those at Hinkley in the regions where future power stations might be built.

The construction of Hinkley Point C has to-date seen EDF spend £3.5 billion in the south-west, and it is estimated that a large-scale nuclear plant would support around 10,000 jobs at peak of construction.

The Government has set out a new £120 million Future Nuclear Enabling Fund towards the development of nuclear projects. More details of the Fund and how it will operate will be released in due course.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to secure the development of the Wylfa nuclear site on a sustainable basis, in the context of the withdrawal of interest from Hitachi.

The Government is aware of the strong interest and support in North Wales for the development of this site and continues to discuss new projects with other viable companies and investors wishing to develop sites including Wylfa Newydd.

The Government has also set out a new £120 million Future Nuclear Enabling Fund towards the development of nuclear projects. There remain a number of optimal sites for new nuclear, including the Wylfa Newydd.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that future participants in the UK’s nuclear energy sector do not pose a threat to national security.

The Government takes nuclear security extremely seriously. All civil nuclear operators must comply with the UK’s world-leading nuclear security regulatory regime, overseen by a robust and independent regulator - the Office for Nuclear Regulation.

Furthermore, all investment involving critical infrastructure is subject to thorough scrutiny and needs to satisfy our robust legal, regulatory and national security requirements. The National Security & Investment Act gives the Government powers to scrutinise and intervene in acquisitions that may pose national security risks.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
6th Jan 2020
S4C
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to meet the acting Chair of the S4C Authority.

Ministers regularly meet with a range of people on a range of issues.

Officials have engaged closely with S4C, including the acting Chair of the S4C Authority, on a range of relevant matters.

6th Jan 2020
S4C
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when she last met the Chair of the S4C Authority.

Ministers regularly meet with a range of people on a range of issues.

Officials have engaged closely with S4C, including the acting Chair of the S4C Authority, on a range of relevant matters.

8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of participation in higher education by 18 year-old students from England compared to those from (a) Northern Ireland, (b) Scotland and (c) Wales.

There is no data source which enables a direct comparison of higher education (HE) participation for each UK nation due to differences in data coverage and methodology.

The most consistent measure available is the 18-year-old entry rate published by UCAS, which measures the proportion of 18-year-olds in the population that have been accepted to full-time undergraduate HE through UCAS. The data shows changes in the entry rates over time. However, around a third of young full-time undergraduate provision in Scotland (mainly full-time undergraduate provision at further education colleges) are not included in UCAS’s figures and so do not allow for a consistent comparison of HE participation with Scotland.

The latest UCAS data can be found at: https://www.ucas.com/data-and-analysis/undergraduate-statistics-and-reports/statistical-releases-daily-clearing-analysis-2023.

Alternative measures of participation which cover all HE are calculated by each of the UK nations. However, there are differences in methodology, such as differing coverage of pupils included in the measure and different age ranges for participation in HE. Data on these measures for each of the UK nations are signposted here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/participation-measures-in-higher-education-2021-to-2022.

19th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the potential merits of requiring local authorities to provide bins for the disposal of incontinence pads in men's public lavatories.

The Government encourages local authorities to consider such provision in public toilets to support those with this need but does not have powers to compel the provision of sanitary bins in public toilets. I would encourage the hon. Member to raise the issue locally.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jun 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of requiring dogs to be on a leash when on agricultural land.

We maintain that it is best practice to keep your dog on a lead around livestock. The Countryside Code advises dog walkers to always check local signs as there are situations where this is already a legal requirement for all or part of the year – for example when on Open Access Land between 1 March and 31 July.

There is a careful balance to be struck between the level of freedom people enjoy when accessing the countryside to walk their dogs, the welfare of those dogs who require regular exercise (including the freedom to exhibit normal behaviours) and the welfare of livestock and interests of their keepers. There is also a public safety consideration. The behaviour of certain livestock species can be unpredictable, especially when they are with their young. That is why the recently refreshed Countryside Code reminds dog walkers to let their dog off the lead if they feel threatened by livestock or horses. Releasing a dog will make it easier for both the dog and walker to reach safety and avoid getting hurt.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Not for EU labelling regime will apply to goods produced in Northern Ireland for sale in (a) Great Britain and (b) Northern Ireland.

The requirement for a “Not for EU” label will not apply to goods produced in Northern Ireland and sold in either Great Britain or Northern Ireland.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will ensure that any legislative proposals for the Not for EU labelling scheme are produced in sufficient time for them to be scrutinised by Members.

Yes, sufficient time will be given to Members to consider any forthcoming legislation.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government has conducted any consultation on the proposed introduction of not for EU labelling across the UK.

We have engaged closely with industry about these arrangements and will continue to do so in advance of changes taking effect in October 2024. We have met with businesses and trade bodies, through weekly forums along with separate bespoke engagements, to discuss these proposals. We will support businesses in adapting to these new arrangements.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential environmental impact of discarded disposable e-cigarettes.

The Department has not undertaken an assessment of the environmental impact of disposable vapes in the UK.

Our current priority is to work with regulators and the vaping sector to ensure producers, internet sellers and retailers of vaping products understand their obligations under environmental legislation and comply.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the current capacity of the European nitrogen production industry to meet the needs of British agriculture.

Due to the increase in cost of natural gas across the globe, the cost of production of nitrogen-based fertiliser types has increased significantly. It has also affected Europe and the global market with some fertiliser companies halting or reducing production due to high input costs.

Fertiliser supply in Britain is resilient. Britain sources both nitrogen-based and non-nitrogen fertiliser from a wide range of countries and produces ammonium nitrate fertiliser domestically, although prices are volatile caused by fluctuating gas prices. Domestic and imported nitrogen-based fertiliser prices dropped from May after their peak in March, coinciding with annual lower summer gas prices.

The fertiliser market has been flexible in continuing to source nitrogen-based fertiliser from the global market, and we understand from continued engagement with the sector that many farmers have switched their preferred nitrogen-based fertiliser from ammonium nitrate to urea and inhibited urea, reflecting the lower cost per tonne of nitrogen for crops. Although we have historically sourced most ammonium nitrate from Europe, other countries such as Algeria and Egypt are major sources of other nitrogen-based fertiliser such as urea.

Defra hosts Fertiliser Taskforce meetings with key industry figures including the National Farmers Union, the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board. We are continuing to monitor the security and stability of fertiliser and other supply chains, and work closely with colleagues across HM Government and devolved administrations as well as industry figures through the Taskforce.

To support farmers the Basic Payment Scheme payment will be made in 2 instalments to give farmers greater financial fluidity. Other actions taken include changes to guidance on farmers using manures, increased grants for farmers and growers, boosting research and development, and a delay to changes to the use of urea by at least a year. When the urea restrictions are introduced, they will be related to the use of ammonia inhibitors rather than a complete ban.

Defra is committed to promoting the use of less environmentally damaging fertilisers and better nutrient use efficiency. The efficient use of organic fertilisers can complement the use of mineral fertilisers, whilst reducing input costs. We know many farmers already use organic fertiliser to complement their nutrient management planning.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential impact on the British agricultural sector of the decision of CF Fertilisers to halt ammonia production at its Billingham plant.

CF Fertilisers produces ammonium nitrate fertiliser and nitric acid in the United Kingdom at Billingham. As a result of high gas prices the company has temporarily decided to import ammonia from overseas, rather than producing it on-site. The company expects to fulfil all ammonia and nitric acid contracts and all orders of Ammonium Nitrate contracted for delivery in the coming months. The supply and price of these products is a commercial matter for CF Fertilisers, and we expect supply to continue.

While global fertiliser prices have risen, the supply chain providing imports of fertiliser to the UK has remained dynamic. We are continuing to monitor the security and stability of fertiliser and other supply chains and work closely with colleagues across HM Government and devolved administrations as well as industry figures.

13th May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to help encourage dog owners to train dogs not to chase (a) farm livestock and (b) wild animals.

The Government takes the issue of livestock worrying and chasing very seriously, recognising the distress this can cause farmers and animals, as well as the financial implications.

New measures to crack down on livestock worrying in England and Wales are to be brought in through the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill, which was introduced in Parliament on 8 June 2021.The new measures will enhance enforcement mechanisms available to the police and expand the scope of livestock species and locations covered by the law. Improved powers will enable the police to respond to livestock worrying incidents more effectively.

The purpose of the livestock worrying legislation is to tackle the anti-social behaviour of those whose dogs worry or attack animals that are commonly found in agricultural settings and whose injury or death may have serious financial consequences for their keepers. Feral wild animals are outside the scope of this legislation. Protections for animals in their wild state are dealt with separately under different legislation.

In December 2021, Defra published research in collaboration with Middlesex University investigating measures to reduce dog attacks and promote responsible dog ownership across all breeds of dog.  The research considers the effectiveness of current dog control measures, and the report makes several recommendations, including strengthening the accreditation of dog trainers and providing dog awareness courses for those with dog control issues. The report will provide the basis for the consideration of reform in this area and the Government is already working with the police, local authorities, and animal welfare stakeholders to consider the recommendations further.

Guidance is available to educate owners about handling their dogs responsibly in the vicinity of livestock and animals, in order to prevent the occurrence of attacks or chasing. Natural England recently published a refreshed version of the Countryside Code, which highlights that it is best practice to keep dogs on a lead around livestock. The Code also makes specific reference to keeping dogs in sight and under control to make sure they stay away from livestock, wildlife, horses and other people unless invited. Moreover, the Code helpfully sets out certain legal requirements, encouraging visitors to always check local signs as there are locations where you must keep your dog on a lead around livestock for all or part of the year.

In addition, dog owners can prevent incidents of chasing by undertaking appropriate training. It is important that dogs are trained to behave well, ideally from a young age, and introduced gradually and positively to different environments, people and animals. Reward-based training for dogs is widely regarded as the preferred method of training. Owners who have concerns about controlling their dog’s behaviour may take advice from their vet or a suitably qualified dog behaviourist or trainer. The Animal Behaviour and Training Council maintains national registers of appropriately qualified trainers and behaviourists and The Code of Practice for the Welfare of Dogs also details best practice methods of training.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on UK agriculture of a foreign takeover of Morrisons plc.

We continue to monitor the situation. The Government is committed to ensuring that the UK remains open for business, while protecting the livelihoods of British workers and investment in the UK. We recognise that overseas investors play a major and positive role in stimulating economic growth in every part of the UK. In most cases, it is right that mergers are treated as a commercial matter for the parties involved.

We have received reassurances from Morrisons of the priorities of the potential new investor, including support of the relationships Morrisons has fostered with small suppliers and farmers and no material changes to existing payment practices are expected.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of appointing a (a) zoo and (b) aquarium expert to the new Animal Sentience Committee.

The Animal Welfare (Sentience) Bill creates an expert committee, the Animal Sentience Committee, which has powers to consider how Ministerial policy decisions have paid all due regard to the welfare of animals as sentient beings. The Bill introduces new powers for the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs to appoint appropriate committee members. Recruitment activity for the Committee will be in line with standard public appointments rules and will take place as soon as is practicable. This includes the principle that candidates should be drawn from a strong, diverse field, and that their skills, experiences and qualities should meet the needs of the Committee.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he expects to announce that zoos will be permitted to reopen.

We understand the challenges faced by zoos and aquariums during these unprecedented times. We also appreciate the significant opportunities zoos can provide for the public to access well managed and controlled outdoor spaces, and the potential to improve general wellbeing.

However, the Government has taken the decision that zoos and aquariums should not yet reopen, and the Health Protection (Coronavirus, Restrictions) (England) (Amendment) (No. 3) Regulations 2020, which came into force on 1 June, provide greater clarity and certainty on this. While each individual attraction can be made safer, it is vital that we do not move too quickly in reopening to ensure public health is protected.

We are continuing to work with the British and Irish Association of Zoos and Aquariums to understand how we can reopen zoos in a safe way as soon as possible with social distancing measures in place.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
15th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the average time taken was for a substantive response to letters to his office from hon. Members in the latest period for which figures are available.

In line with Cabinet Office guidance, Defra has a target of replying to correspondence within 20 working days where a response is required.

As you will understand, Defra is currently dealing with unprecedented volumes of correspondence due to COVID-19. All correspondence received from Members is being reviewed and will be responded to as soon as possible.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the arrangements will be for the oversight of the Traditional Speciality Guaranteed status of British regional and traditional food after the transition period.

At the end of the transition period, we will establish our Geographical Indication (GI) schemes, as part of our strategy to protect regional and traditional foods. All current UK GI-protected products, including TSGs like Traditionally Reared Pedigree Welsh Pork, will continue to enjoy legal protection in the UK.

The new UK GI schemes will welcome applications from the day the schemes enter into force. The Secretary of State will be responsible ultimately for decision-making on new GIs, but we will work closely with Devolved Administrations to run the new schemes. The current enforcement and control rules that apply for GI schemes in the UK will continue to apply after the transition period, including the role of local authorities in ensuring that protection for TSG products is upheld.

29th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what support her Department is providing to the Palestinian Authority to tackle the covid-19 pandemic in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

The UK has pledged £744 million to support the global humanitarian response to COVID-19. We?have?delivered?additional vital support in the Occupied Palestinian Territories by providing funding to WHO and UNICEF to purchase and co-ordinate the delivery of?medical equipment,?treat critical care patients, train frontline public health personnel and scale up laboratory testing capacity.

The UN assesses that although the current number of detected cases remains relatively low, the capacity of the Palestinian health system to cope with an expected increase in COVID-19 cases is poor. The situation is particularly severe in Gaza, where the health system has shortages in specialised staff, drugs and equipment. We continue to monitor the situation and are working closely with the UN and the international community to ensure a co-ordinated response.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
21st Jul 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether her Department is taking steps to help ensure that the interests of Palestinians are reflected in the negotiations for the free trade agreement with Israel.

Palestinian goods imported from the Occupied Palestinian Territories benefit from the trade preferences outlined in the bilateral agreement negotiated between the United Kingdom and the Palestinian Authority, which came into force on 1st January 2021. While the focus of these negotiations is trade with the State of Israel, we value our bilateral trade relationship with the Palestinian Authority too, and will continue to build upon our commercial links through our bilateral agreement.

5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent discussions her Department has had with the US Administration on the removal of UK tariffs on American whiskeys.

My Rt. Hon Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade has engaged with the US Trade Representative Katherine Tai and Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo, most recently on 12 November, to press for a resolution to the Section 232 tariffs. Our preference is the full removal of 232 tariffs, in which case the UK's tariffs on American whiskeys will not be required.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what consultations (a) she has held and (b) plans to hold with the North Wales Economic Ambition Board on the terms of free trade agreements she has concluded, or is seeking to conclude.

Ministerial colleagues at the Office of Secretary of State for Wales regularly engage with the North Wales Economic Ambition Board on a wide range of policy areas.

The Department for International Trade has established an extensive stakeholder engagement framework consisting of various mechanisms to allow business and civil society stakeholders the opportunity to feed into its trade policy, ensuring the UK position is well-informed and reflects the interests of the whole of the UK.

We want every relevant organisation, in every part of the UK, to feel engaged with our trade policy and we will continue to engage with a range of businesses, industry, civil society and all willing stakeholders in different ways as we continue to seek out the opportunities free trade provides us.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she is taking to help safeguard the interests of British agriculture in trade negotiations with the United States.

Any trade deal with the US must work for UK consumers, farmers, and companies. A deal with the US can help create opportunities for agricultural producers by opening up new markets for the UK’s high-quality produce.

As set out in our manifesto, we will not compromise our standards as we negotiate new trade deals. At the end of the transition period, all existing EU food safety, animal welfare, and environmental standards will be retained and form part of our domestic law. This includes all existing import requirements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to appoint a trade envoy to Libya.

The Prime Minister’s Trade Envoys are appointed at the discretion and direction of the Prime Minister.

The position of PM’s Trade Envoy to Libya has been vacant since my former colleague Sir Henry Bellingham stepped down as a Member of Parliament. I would take this opportunity to state my appreciation for all of the work he undertook to advocate UK trade in relation to Libya.

25th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what payments (a) have been made and (b) he plans to make to Avanti West Coast under the terms of the service quality regime agreed with that company.

To date, no fees have been paid to Avanti West Coast under the Service Quality Regime (SQR). This is because the first period to be assessed to determine the Performance Fee under SQR relates to the scores achieved between April and October 2023, and the evaluation process for this period is still underway.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)