Naz Shah Portrait

Naz Shah

Labour - Bradford West

First elected: 7th May 2015


Shadow Minister (Home Office)
4th Dec 2021 - 15th Nov 2023
Pensions (Extension of Automatic Enrolment) (No. 2) Bill
8th Mar 2023 - 15th Mar 2023
Shadow Minister (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
19th Sep 2021 - 4th Dec 2021
Shadow Minister (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
10th Apr 2020 - 19th Sep 2021
Shadow Minister (Equalities Office) (Women and Equalities)
10th Jul 2018 - 10th Apr 2020
Home Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 23rd Jul 2018
Home Affairs Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 3rd May 2017


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Naz Shah has voted in 629 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Naz Shah Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(14 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
(12 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(20 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(19 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Naz Shah's debates

Bradford West Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

The Education Committee has recently recommended introducing a statutory home educated register, and greater assessment of home educated children. These recommendations are in contrast to the views of many parents who home educate.

Remove the clauses relating to 'Children not in school' from Part 3 of the Schools Bill, and do not pursue compulsory registration of all home-schooled children. We see no evidence that this would be beneficial, and we believe the proposals place a discriminatory burden on supportive parents.

Current legislation allows for public use of fireworks 16 hours a day, every day, making it impossible for vulnerable groups to take precautions against the distress they can cause. Better enforcement of existing law is insufficient; limiting their sale & use to licensed displays only is necessary.

Recognise the state of Palestine to help stop the conflict from Israel. Not recognising the Palestinian state allows Israel to continue their persecution of the Palestinians.

The Government should introduce sanctions against Israel, including blocking all trade, and in particular arms.

Government should support vulnerable children & #endchildfoodpoverty by implementing 3 recommendations from the National Food Strategy to expand access to Free School Meals, provide meals & activities during holidays to stop holiday hunger & increase the value of and expand the Healthy Start scheme

Black Women in the U.K. are 5 times more likely to die during pregnancy and after childbirth compared to White Women (MBRRACE, 2019). We need more research done into why this is happening and recommendations to improve health care for Black Women as urgent action is needed to address this disparity.

The Government must make a public statement on the #kissanprotests & press freedoms.

India is the worlds largest democracy & democratic engagement and freedom of the press are fundamental rights and a positive step towards creating a India that works for all.

The UK Government plans to introduce “Magnitsky law”, a law which targets people who commit gross human rights violations. Through this law or alternative means, this petition urges the UK Government to impose sanctions on China for their human rights violations on the Uyghur people.


Latest EDMs signed by Naz Shah

11th March 2024
Naz Shah signed this EDM on Tuesday 12th March 2024

Alleged comments by Frank Hester

Tabled by: Dawn Butler (Labour - Brent Central)
That this House expresses its shock regarding the alleged comments made by Frank Hester reported by The Guardian about the hon. Member for Hackney North and Stoke Newington and all Black women; believes these alleged comments to be both racist and violent in nature; notes that Mr Hester is a …
70 signatures
(Most recent: 26 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 37
Scottish National Party: 15
Liberal Democrat: 10
Plaid Cymru: 3
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 2
Conservative: 1
Independent: 1
Alba Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
26th February 2024
Naz Shah signed this EDM on Thursday 29th February 2024

Conduct of the hon. Member for Ashfield and the Rt hon. Members for Fareham and South West Norfolk

Tabled by: Dawn Butler (Labour - Brent Central)
That this House is shocked and appalled by the recent conduct of certain Members in respect of their remarks relating to Islam; believes that the recent remarks made by the hon. Member for Ashfield and the Rt hon. Members for Fareham and South West Norfolk are Islamophobic and constitute a …
27 signatures
(Most recent: 6 Mar 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 14
Scottish National Party: 7
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alliance: 1
Green Party: 1
Workers Party of Britain: 1
View All Naz Shah's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Naz Shah, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Naz Shah has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Naz Shah has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Naz Shah has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recommendations (a) the Government has adopted and (b) are outstanding from the 2017 Equality and Human Rights Commission's report entitled A roadmap to race equality.

The recommendations of the 2017 Equality and Human Rights Commission's report refer to action in the areas of employment, education, house, health and criminal justice. That same year the Government launched The Race Disparity Audit (RDA) to drive change by publishing authoritative data and analysis about the variances in treatment or outcome affecting people of different ethnicities in those areas and others.

Since October 2017, the Government has used RDU data and analysis to support and launch a number of initiatives including:

  • Department of Health and Social Care’s independent review of mental health legislation and practice to tackle the issue of mental health detention.

  • New powers for the Office for Students to hold Universities to account for how well their students do; and independent university league tables agreed to highlight progress made on reducing student disparities. The Sunday Times Good University Guide is now including ethnic minority attainment gaps as part of theirs.

  • The allocation of £90m of dormant assets to the creation of a new, independent organisation - Youth Futures Foundation (YFF). YFF aims to overcome the barriers to training and employment opportunities that young people from an ethnic minority background experience.

  • Established a new Commission on Race and Ethnic Disparities to examine all aspects of continuing racial and ethnic inequalities in Britain. It will build on the work of the Race Disparity Unit. The Commission will carry out a deeper examination of what the causes of these disparities are, and seek to establish what works to address them effectively.

  • Implemented 16 recommendations from the Lammy Review, to improve the treatment and outcomes of BAME people in the criminal justice system, and have committed to enacting a further 17.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
7th Jun 2023
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many times the Government's Crime and Justice Taskforce has met since January 2020; and on what dates those meetings occurred.

I refer the Hon. Member to the list of current Cabinet Committees contained here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-cabinet-committees-system-and-list-of-cabinet-committees, and would also like to refer the Hon. Member to the answer given to PQ107708. It is a long-established precedent that information about the discussions that have taken place in Cabinet and its Committees, and how often they have met, is not normally shared publicly.

27th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what guidance his Department has published on the import of Nordic Spirit nicotine patches since the end of the transition period.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will bring forward a new UK Government Debt Management Bill to help ensure debt collection is fair in the long term.

The Government is currently considering responses to a Call for Evidence on public sector debt management, which closed in September 2020. The government will publish an update in due course and make further announcements in the usual way.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much Government funding has been allocated to covid-19 messaging for non-English speaking BAME groups through (a) television, (b) radio and (c) written publications.

I refer the Hon. member to the answers given to PQ 55066 on 10 June 2020, PQ 46692 on 29 May 2020 and to PQ 45460 on 11 May 2020.

The Government is working with specialist multicultural marketing agencies, addressing barriers by targeting audiences with bespoke COVID communications. Core marketing materials are translated into multiple languages nationally and on request from Local Authorities and external stakeholder groups. We are also utilising trusted voices, relevant channels, and translated messages to reach a wide range of audiences across the country. This helps the Government to maximise the impact of its ongoing multichannel communications strategy.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he has taken to help ensure that critical covid-19 messaging is able to reach (a) Pakistani / Urdu / Pushto, (b) Bangladeshi / Sylheti, (c) Sikh / Punjabi, (d) Indian / Hindi and (e) Gujarati people.

I refer the Hon. member to the answers given to PQ 55066 on 10 June 2020, PQ 46692 on 29 May 2020 and to PQ 45460 on 11 May 2020.

The Government is working with specialist multicultural marketing agencies, addressing barriers by targeting audiences with bespoke COVID communications. Core marketing materials are translated into multiple languages nationally and on request from Local Authorities and external stakeholder groups. We are also utilising trusted voices, relevant channels, and translated messages to reach a wide range of audiences across the country. This helps the Government to maximise the impact of its ongoing multichannel communications strategy.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what proportion of Government covid-19 advertising spend has been allocated to (a) radio, (b) TV, (c) social media and (d) print media; and how much and what proportion of that spend has been allocated to (i) BAME sources of media and (ii) other media outlets in each category.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQ 46692 given on 29 May 2020 and to PQ 45460 on 11 May 2020.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
8th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what (a) processes and (b) procedures are in place to elect members to commissions established by the Government.

As has been the case under successive administrations, Government establishes a range of statutory and non-statutory commissions, with different functions. Where a commission’s work is long term it may be listed on the public appointments Order in Council and appointments will be made by ministers in line with the Governance Code for Public Appointments. If the work of a commission is short-term, members may be appointed in line with the long standing practice that ministers can directly appoint individuals to undertake short-term pieces of work.

5th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much the Government has spent on advertisements in print newspapers during the covid-19 outbreak; which newspapers have received sponsored content from the Government during the outbreak; and what criteria the Government uses to determine which newspapers will receive such sponsored advertisements.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answers given to PQ 45535 on 18 May 2020 and to PQ 46692 on 29 May 2020.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government has taken to ensure that the boards of public bodies are representative.

I refer the Hon. member to the response given to PQ 23397 on 5 March 2020.

15th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, whether she plans to improve processes for reporting businesses selling age-restricted products to underage customers.

Enforcement of sales of age-restricted products is governed by distinct legislation and the respective lead department.

The Department supports enforcement efforts in England and Wales through funding for Citizens Advice Consumer Service, to relay crucial intelligence to local Trading Standards. To report suspected illegal sales to minors, the public is encouraged to contact Citizens Advice on 0808 223 1133, or Advice Direct Scotland on 0808 164 6000.

Additionally, individuals can report suspected traders to the police using the non-emergency number, 101.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
15th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what steps he is taking to prevent the closure of local post offices.

Government is committed to ensuring the long-term sustainability of the Post Office network and has provided over £2.5 billion in funding to support the Post Office network over the past decade and is providing a further £628 million for the Post Office between 2022 and 2025.

The Post Office network is not in decline. As CEO Nick Read confirmed recently, the network is as large as it has been for about five years with around 11,700 branches. Government continues to monitor Post Office's network numbers and performance, and Post Office publishes an annual network report.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what specific steps she is taking to support (a) Post Offices and (b) convenience stores with the rising cost of living.

Our business rates package announced by the Chancellor in the Autumn Statement will help the high streets and small businesses. This comes after the Government reversed the Health and Social Care Levy, enabling smaller firms to reduce their National Insurance bills even further by increasing the Employment Allowance.

Furthermore, on 9 January, the Government announced the Energy Bills Discount Scheme. Under the new scheme, eligible non-domestic customers receive a per-unit discount to their energy bills during the 12-month period from 1 April 2023 to 31 March 2024, subject to a threshold level of £107/MWh for gas and £302/MWh of electricity. This scheme followed the Energy Bill Relief Scheme which ensured business were protected from excessively high energy bills over the winter period.

Additionally, in April 2023, Post Office made improvements to postmasters’ remuneration, including increasing payments for banking deposit transactions by 20%. This is in addition to improvements made by Post Office in August 2022.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
18th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, what steps her Department is taking to investigate the installation of (a) biomass boilers and (b) solar panels by (i) A Shade Greener and (ii) other commercial rent-a-roof companies.

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer I gave to the Hon Member for Islwyn (Chris Evans) on 18 March to question UIN 18120.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Warm Home Discount helpline is accessible for users with disabilities.

Ofcom requires all landline and mobile telephone communications providers to provide a number of services for customers with disabilities, including access to an approved text relay service. The Warm Home Discount helpline has operators trained in taking calls from text relay services. The helpline also has a step-by-step Interactive Voice Response interface at the beginning of calls to help users navigate the service.

In addition to the telephone service, users can write to the Warm Home Discount helpline at: 110552 Warm Home Discount Scheme, PO Box 26965, Glasgow, G1 9BW.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
17th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department is taking steps to provide support to people whose property was previously eligible for a Warm Home Discount payment but is no longer eligible and has a low energy performance certificate rating.

Households not receiving rebates under the Warm Home Discount may still be able to receive assistance under the Industry Initiatives element of the scheme. This can include benefit entitlement checks, financial assistance, debt-write off, energy advice as well as energy efficiency measures. Over 327,000 households were helped under that route last winter.

For longer-lasting reductions in their energy bills, low-income households may be eligible for energy efficiency measures through government schemes including the Energy Company Obligation (ECO), Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund and Home Upgrade Grant. Over 39% of households in Bradford West have benefitted from energy efficiency measures installed under ECO since 2013.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that people who do not have a direct relationship with an energy supplier benefit from the Energy Support Scheme.

The Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding will provide support of £400 for energy bills for around 900,000 households without a domestic electricity supply. Those eligible for the Energy Bills Support Scheme Alternative Funding will need to submit a short online form via the Government’s GOV.UK pages, with the application portal due to open this month.

Graham Stuart
Minister of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
9th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what support is in place for home owners with 25 year leases on solar panels, who are unable to get any equity from a Mortgage lender, or able to buy out or amend their solar panel leases.

The Government is aware that homeowners have leased their roof space to receive free solar panels under commercial “rent a roof” schemes.  Under these arrangements, the panel providers remain owners of the equipment and receive the Feed-in Tariffs (FIT) payments from the energy supplier, while the homeowner benefits from the savings they make on their electricity bills.

The FIT scheme allowed for such assignment of rights to FIT payments, but it did not prescribe how such arrangements should work: it was for the parties involved to arrive at a mutually beneficial agreement. While the FIT was a government scheme which provided the framework for an investment opportunity, the various marketing approaches and offers that commercial ‘rent a roof’ companies employed were not government schemes.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
3rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to review the existing laws on supply and distribution of fireworks.

The Government takes the issues associated with the sale and use of fireworks seriously. That is why there is a comprehensive regulatory framework already in place for fireworks that controls the sale, availability and use.

We have no current plans to place further restrictions on the sale of fireworks to the public but we continue to monitor the situation. We are committed to promoting the safe and considerate use of fireworks through our programme of action, including through education and awareness raising.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has made to ensure that (a) banqueting halls and (b) wedding venues can reopen to serve food and entertainment whilst adhering to covid-19 guidelines; and whether the Government has made an assessment of the potential merits of allocating additional funding from the public purse to businesses in those sectors where adherence to those guidelines is not possible.

The Government has provided an unprecedented package of financial support to help businesses across the country during the COVID-19 outbreak, including those in the weddings industry.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister has announced that from 1 August celebratory meals or receptions of up to 30 people for weddings and civil partnerships will be allowed to take place. Over time, we will assess whether gatherings of this type for other purposes can be made possible and when larger wedding receptions can take place.

We continue to advise against live entertainment performances at weddings, due to the risks of people singing or shouting over loud music, which create risks of transmission.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he categorises aesthetics and wellbeing businesses in the beauty industry; what businesses it categorises in the beauty industry; and what his timetable is for those businesses reopening.

Government has published a list of business types that fall under the close contact services guidance. All businesses that provide cosmetic procedures or treatments for aesthetic and beauty purposes fall into the definition of a beauty salon.

We have now provided close contact services in England, except Leicester, with the certainty they need to reopen from Monday 13 July, subject to them following the COVID-secure guidelines.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the reopening of soft tissue therapist businesses.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy discusses a wide range of topics and policy issues with ministers across Government, including the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care.

We have now provided other close contact services like massage therapists, reflexologists and other therapeutic services in England except Leicester with the certainty they need to reopen from Monday 13 July, subject to them following the COVID-secure guidelines.

5th Dec 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if her Department will take steps to help ensure that (a) athletes, (b) footballers and (c) teams from Northern Cyprus can participate in international sporting events.

In accordance with the rest of the international community, with the sole exception of Turkey, the UK does not recognise the self-declared “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” as an independent state.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if she will make an assessment with the Chancellor of the Exchequer of the potential merits of introducing similar tax reliefs for grassroots music venues as exist for other cultural businesses.

The Government is committed to supporting our grassroots music venues, which are the lifeblood and research and development centres of our world-leading music sector.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is in regular discussions with all parts of the music industry, including live venues at every level. We are working with industry and across Government to improve the sector's economic resilience to future economic shocks, as we did through the pandemic, and the recent Energy Bills Support Scheme.

We will continue to engage with the sector on the impact of current pressures. As part of this engagement, I recently met the Music Venues Trust to discuss issues facing the live music sector, and how to support growth of the music sector and wider Creative Industries.

Regarding support for Bradford West specifically, across all artforms and disciplines, the Arts Council has invested £21.86 million since 2018/19 in 145 projects. This includes seven successful music specific applications, including:

  • Nightrain, a 400 capacity live music venue, received £11,000 in 2021 via the Supporting Grassroots Live Music Fund to purchase new sound equipment, which enabled the venue to offer more opportunities to up and coming bands.

  • Nightrain also received two Culture Recovery Fund awards, totalling £168,500.

  • 18 Bradford West based projects received Culture Recovery Funding totalling £3.93 million. These included producers and cultural venue The Brick Box, including The Brick Box Rooms, which are often utilised for music performances. The Brick Box received £25,000 through the Arts Council’s Emergency Response funds for organisations, £105,000 through Culture Recovery Fund and £90,000 in National Lottery Project Grants.

  • Another music sector organisation which received Culture Recovery Fund support was Pro Audio Systems, who received £263,000, enabling the provision of quality electronic audio equipment to venues in the region.

  • Lukas Hornby, Bradford-based producer, DJ, VJ, composer and musician received £2,500 from the Arts Council’s Emergency Response fund for individuals.

  • National Lottery Project Grant awards have also been made to grassroots community choirs the Friendship Choir (£14,000) and Millside Voices Community Choir (£15,000).

The Creative Industries have been identified by this Government as a priority growth sector. We will shortly be publishing a Creative Industries Sector Vision that will set out our ambitions, shared with industry, to support all parts of the creative sector to 2030. We look forward to working with the music industry to deliver on these objectives.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what funding her Department is providing to grassroots music venues in Bradford West constituency.

The Government is committed to supporting our grassroots music venues, which are the lifeblood and research and development centres of our world-leading music sector.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is in regular discussions with all parts of the music industry, including live venues at every level. We are working with industry and across Government to improve the sector's economic resilience to future economic shocks, as we did through the pandemic, and the recent Energy Bills Support Scheme.

We will continue to engage with the sector on the impact of current pressures. As part of this engagement, I recently met the Music Venues Trust to discuss issues facing the live music sector, and how to support growth of the music sector and wider Creative Industries.

Regarding support for Bradford West specifically, across all artforms and disciplines, the Arts Council has invested £21.86 million since 2018/19 in 145 projects. This includes seven successful music specific applications, including:

  • Nightrain, a 400 capacity live music venue, received £11,000 in 2021 via the Supporting Grassroots Live Music Fund to purchase new sound equipment, which enabled the venue to offer more opportunities to up and coming bands.

  • Nightrain also received two Culture Recovery Fund awards, totalling £168,500.

  • 18 Bradford West based projects received Culture Recovery Funding totalling £3.93 million. These included producers and cultural venue The Brick Box, including The Brick Box Rooms, which are often utilised for music performances. The Brick Box received £25,000 through the Arts Council’s Emergency Response funds for organisations, £105,000 through Culture Recovery Fund and £90,000 in National Lottery Project Grants.

  • Another music sector organisation which received Culture Recovery Fund support was Pro Audio Systems, who received £263,000, enabling the provision of quality electronic audio equipment to venues in the region.

  • Lukas Hornby, Bradford-based producer, DJ, VJ, composer and musician received £2,500 from the Arts Council’s Emergency Response fund for individuals.

  • National Lottery Project Grant awards have also been made to grassroots community choirs the Friendship Choir (£14,000) and Millside Voices Community Choir (£15,000).

The Creative Industries have been identified by this Government as a priority growth sector. We will shortly be publishing a Creative Industries Sector Vision that will set out our ambitions, shared with industry, to support all parts of the creative sector to 2030. We look forward to working with the music industry to deliver on these objectives.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has made an assessment of the potential merits of a ticket levy on large music events and arenas to increase funding for grassroots music.

The Government is committed to supporting our grassroots music venues, which are the lifeblood and research and development centres of our world-leading music sector.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is in regular discussions with all parts of the music industry, including live venues at every level. We are working with industry and across Government to improve the sector's economic resilience to future economic shocks, as we did through the pandemic, and the recent Energy Bills Support Scheme.

We will continue to engage with the sector on the impact of current pressures. As part of this engagement, Minister Lopez recently met the Music Venues Trust to discuss issues facing the live music sector, and how to support growth of the music sector and wider Creative Industries.

The Creative Industries have been identified by this Government as a priority growth sector. We will shortly be publishing a Creative Industries Sector Vision that will set out our ambitions, shared with industry, to support all parts of the creative sector to 2030. We look forward to working with the music industry to deliver on these objectives.

18th Mar 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Answer of 10 May 2023 to Question 182611 on Teachers: Qualifications, if she will take steps to make the Education Accreditation Scheme available to online education providers for adult learners.

The Online Education Accreditation Scheme (OEAS) was launched by the department in April 2023. The objective of the scheme is to bring regulatory oversight to an unregulated part of the education sector. The scheme is not designed to cover all forms of online education but to focus where the need for quality assurance is most pronounced, which is to pupils of compulsory school age. The OEAS is only open to applications from those providers offering full-time education online to pupils of compulsory school age. The government has no plans to expand the scheme to online education providers for adults.

5th May 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when she plans to introduce an alternative student finance product for Muslim students.

I refer the hon. Member for Bradford West to the answer of 24 March 2023 to Question 167263.

25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether she has plans to require (a) distance, (b) remote learning and (c) online education providers to make information on the qualifications of their teachers and tutors publicly available.

On 20 March 2023, the Department launched the Online Education Accreditation Scheme (OEAS). This scheme provides for the voluntary accreditation of full-time, online-only education providers. The OEAS is non-statutory, but the Department’s aim is that commissioners of full-time online education for school-age pupils in England should use accredited providers for new places wherever possible.

As a condition of accreditation under the OEAS, applicants must consistently meet the Online Education Standards. These standards are modelled on the Independent School Standards, which ensure the safety and suitability of education provided in registered independent schools.

25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that teaching provided by distance and online remote learning education providers meet the required teaching standards.

On 20 March 2023, the Department launched the Online Education Accreditation Scheme (OEAS). This scheme provides for the voluntary accreditation of full-time, online-only education providers. The OEAS is non-statutory, but the Department’s aim is that commissioners of full-time online education for school-age pupils in England should use accredited providers for new places wherever possible.

As a condition of accreditation under the OEAS, applicants must consistently meet the Online Education Standards. These standards are modelled on the Independent School Standards, which ensure the safety and suitability of education provided in registered independent schools.

17th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether her Department plans to release advance information on GCSE and A Level Exams in 2023.

On 29 September, the Department and Ofqual confirmed examinations will largely return to well-established, pre-pandemic arrangements in summer 2023.

The Department confirmed that advance information will not be provided for any examinations taken in summer 2023. The Department has, however, decided that formulae and equation sheets for GCSE mathematics, physics and combined sciences examinations should be provided in summer 2023, as was the case for examinations in 2022. Ofqual has also confirmed a return to pre-pandemic grading in 2023. To protect pupils against the disruption of recent years, and in case pupils’ performance is slightly lower than before the COVID-19 pandemic, senior examiners will use the grades achieved by previous cohorts of pupils, along with prior attainment data, to inform their decisions regarding where to set grade boundaries.

These decisions reflect that while the 2023 cohort may have experienced some disruption due to the pandemic over the course of their qualifications, it has not been as significant as that experienced by pupils who received qualifications in 2022. Pupils will, for example, have had more time to cover the curriculum, practise assessments and use education recovery programmes and interventions.

3rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average income is of families with at least one parent in work who are (a) eligible and (b) ineligible for the 30-hour early education entitlement for three and four year olds.

All three and four-year-olds are eligible for 15 hours free early education, regardless of parental income or working status. An additional 15 hours is available to parents who are working at least 16 hours a week at national minimum wage or living wage, but earn under £100,000 per year. This applies to single-parent households as well as both parents in a two-parent household, unless one partner is in receipt of certain benefits (Incapacity Benefit, Severe Disablement Allowance, Carer’s Allowance or contribution-based Employment and Support Allowance).

The department holds some data on parental income levels from the 2019 Childcare and Early Years Survey of Parents, but not the relevant data to be able to assess against eligibility for the 30 hours entitlements. We are currently collecting our next set of data through the 2021 Childcare and Early Years Survey of Parents, scheduled for release in July 2022.

3rd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made an estimate of the number of families who are in work but unable to access the 30-hour early education entitlement for three and four year-olds.

All three and four-year-olds are eligible for 15 hours of free early education, regardless of parental income or working status.

Families are entitled to 30 hours free childcare if the sole parent in a single parent family, or both parents in a two-parent household, are working at least 16 hours a week at national minimum wage or living wage, but earns under £100,000 per year. Approximately 72% of eligible families were registered to take up a 30 hours free childcare place in January 2021.

The number of children eligible for 30 hours changes each year due to changing cohort size and parental employment changes. An estimated 460,000 children may have been eligible in January 2021, although this estimate does not account for the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on parental employment.

In 2019, the childcare and early years survey of parents found that of those not taking up the 30 hour entitlement offer, 52% gave reasons relating to eligibility, such as being unable to meet the income thresholds by either working too little or earning above £100,000 per year. The remaining 48% gave reasons unrelated to eligibility, mostly relating to not requiring the free childcare. However, 7% of parents surveyed said their provider did not offer the 30 hours of free childcare. Further statistics from the survey can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/childcare-and-early-years-survey-of-parents-2019.

4th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the Workforce Development Fund will be extended to (a) maintained nurseries and (b) early year settings.

The Workforce Development Fund is funding from the Department of Health and Social Care to support the continuing professional development (CPD) of staff across the adult social care sector. There are no plans to extend it to maintained nursery schools or early years settings.

Separately, the Department for Education is investing up to £180 million to build a stronger, more expert workforce in the early years sector, where we know that the COVID-19 outbreak has exacerbated the outcomes gap and set back children’s learning and development, particularly in language and maths, hitting those from disadvantaged backgrounds the hardest. This funding comprises the Early Years Education Recovery Programme, the Nuffield Early Language Programme and a further investment in the Professional Development Programme.

These initiatives complement our reforms to the Early Years Foundation Stage to accelerate and embed real change for young children, which is more important than ever in light of the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak. This recovery package aims to target disadvantaged areas and will largely be available to maintained nursery schools and childminders.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to consult teachers and schools before further changes are made to the school year.

The Government recognises the COVID-19 outbreak and associated education restrictions have had an impact on children and young people’s education.

The Government has appointed Sir Kevan Collins as Education Recovery Commissioner to oversee the long-term plan. Sir Kevan will engage with parents, pupils and teachers to develop this proposal and review how evidence-based interventions can be used to address the impact the COVID-19 outbreak has had on education. We are considering all options to address lost education to ensure the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak is addressed as comprehensively as possible.

Term dates for the current and next academic year have already been set and published by local authorities, governing bodies, and academy trusts, but schools are free to offer summer activities to pupils should they so wish. We are making £200 million available to secondary schools to fund a short summer school, offering a blend of academic teaching and enrichment activities. We are recommending a focus on incoming Year 7 pupils, but schools are free to target those most in need of support.

25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to shorten the school summer 2021 holidays to help students to catch up on learning missed as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises the COVID-19 outbreak and associated education restrictions have had an impact on children and young people’s education.

The Government has appointed Sir Kevan Collins as Education Recovery Commissioner to oversee the long-term plan. Sir Kevan will engage with parents, pupils and teachers to develop this proposal and review how evidence-based interventions can be used to address the impact the COVID-19 outbreak has had on education. We are considering all options to address lost education to ensure the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak is addressed as comprehensively as possible.

Term dates for the current and next academic year have already been set and published by local authorities, governing bodies, and academy trusts, but schools are free to offer summer activities to pupils should they so wish. We are making £200 million available to secondary schools to fund a short summer school, offering a blend of academic teaching and enrichment activities. We are recommending a focus on incoming Year 7 pupils, but schools are free to target those most in need of support.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the recommended maximum class-room size is for (a) primary and (b) secondary schools during the covid-19 outbreak.

During this period of national lockdown, schools should only allow vulnerable children and the children of critical workers to attend face-to-face education. Every school will have a different number of children who need to attend. It is important that on site provision is provided for these pupils, there is no limit to the numbers of these pupils who may attend, and schools should not limit attendance of these groups. This is because we are reducing overall social contact across areas and the country rather than individually by each institution.

On 7 January, the Department published further guidance which sets out what all schools will need to do during the COVID-19 outbreak from January 2021. This includes the system of controls which schools must continue adopt to the fullest extent possible to reduce risks in their school and create an inherently safer environment. The guidance is available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/950510/School_national_restrictions_guidance.pdf.

Schools should continue to minimise contact between individuals and maintain social distancing wherever possible. This can be achieved through keeping groups separate and by maintaining the distance between individuals. Whilst schools are attended by vulnerable children and the children of critical workers only, where possible schools should keep group sizes small. Any additional space available where there are lower numbers of pupils attending should be used wherever possible to maximise the distance between pupils and between staff and other people.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether independent schools are eligible to receive support under the scheme to provide laptops to children to support remote learning.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

This includes over 700,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to local authority maintained schools, trusts and local authorities by 11 January. Support through this programme does not cover schools that are not state funded.

The Department has delivered 1,980 laptops and tablets directly to Bradford local authority. We have also delivered devices to academy trusts that include schools in Bradford, which are not included in this figure. Data on the number of laptops delivered by parliamentary constituency is not available. This is because most laptops have been delivered to academy trusts and local authorities, which are responsible for distributing them to schools, usually in multiple constituencies.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many laptops (a) were allocated from March to December 2020 and (b) he plans to allocate in 2021, to schools in Bradford West constituency.

The Government is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care services, including securing 1.3 million laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children and young people.

This includes over 700,000 laptops and tablets that were delivered to local authority maintained schools, trusts and local authorities by 11 January. Support through this programme does not cover schools that are not state funded.

The Department has delivered 1,980 laptops and tablets directly to Bradford local authority. We have also delivered devices to academy trusts that include schools in Bradford, which are not included in this figure. Data on the number of laptops delivered by parliamentary constituency is not available. This is because most laptops have been delivered to academy trusts and local authorities, which are responsible for distributing them to schools, usually in multiple constituencies.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the guidance on teacher assessments has been made available to teachers of A-Levels and GCSEs.

In light of the increase in COVID-19 rates, the Government has made the decision to limit attendance at schools and colleges to reduce the number of contacts between households. As a result, examinations will not go ahead in the summer as planned.

The Department and Ofqual have launched a two week consultation on how to fairly award all pupils a grade that supports them to progress to the next stage of their lives. The consultation can be accessed from the Ofqual website and will be open until 29 January 2021. We strongly encourage all our stakeholders, including students and their parents, to respond.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has confirmed he wishes teachers to assess the standard at which pupils are performing and thus the grade they should receive. The consultation proposes that teachers will be supported in doing so through training, guidance, and papers to inform assessments. Guidance materials will be made available after the consultation has closed and the detail of the approach is agreed. The consultation also proposes and seeks views on approaches to assessment which will allow teachers to assess pupils’ performance on content they have had an opportunity to study, despite the disruption, whilst continuing to ensure they have sufficient breadth of knowledge to enable them to successfully progress.

The Department recognises the challenges faced by schools, teachers, and pupils, and knows that disruption has been felt differently across the country and between schools and colleges in the same area, and between pupils within individual institutions. In order to support schools to make up for lost learning, the Government has provided a £1 billion catch-up programme. This includes a £650 million catch-up premium for all schools in recognition of the fact that all pupils will have been impacted by disruption to their education. Additionally, the £350 million National Tutoring Programme is an ambitious scheme that will provide additional, targeted tuition support for disadvantaged pupils who need the most help to catch up.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the teacher assessments due to take place in summer 2021 will take into account the effect on students of education missed during 2020 as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

In light of the increase in COVID-19 rates, the Government has made the decision to limit attendance at schools and colleges to reduce the number of contacts between households. As a result, examinations will not go ahead in the summer as planned.

The Department and Ofqual have launched a two week consultation on how to fairly award all pupils a grade that supports them to progress to the next stage of their lives. The consultation can be accessed from the Ofqual website and will be open until 29 January 2021. We strongly encourage all our stakeholders, including students and their parents, to respond.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education has confirmed he wishes teachers to assess the standard at which pupils are performing and thus the grade they should receive. The consultation proposes that teachers will be supported in doing so through training, guidance, and papers to inform assessments. Guidance materials will be made available after the consultation has closed and the detail of the approach is agreed. The consultation also proposes and seeks views on approaches to assessment which will allow teachers to assess pupils’ performance on content they have had an opportunity to study, despite the disruption, whilst continuing to ensure they have sufficient breadth of knowledge to enable them to successfully progress.

The Department recognises the challenges faced by schools, teachers, and pupils, and knows that disruption has been felt differently across the country and between schools and colleges in the same area, and between pupils within individual institutions. In order to support schools to make up for lost learning, the Government has provided a £1 billion catch-up programme. This includes a £650 million catch-up premium for all schools in recognition of the fact that all pupils will have been impacted by disruption to their education. Additionally, the £350 million National Tutoring Programme is an ambitious scheme that will provide additional, targeted tuition support for disadvantaged pupils who need the most help to catch up.

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to update Public Health England guidance in response to the new covid-19 variant; and when that guidance will be available to schools.

All evidence suggests that the new variant of concern is more transmissible than previous cases and is now the dominant strain across the country.

However, the data suggests that this effect is broadly uniform across age groups. The new variant does not appear disproportionately more transmissible among children than adults, nor is there any evidence that the new variant is more transmissible in schools than elsewhere in society.

Previous Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) advice has been clear that the measures that reduced transmission of the older variant all continue to apply for the new variant, including those in schools. Those measures are now all the more important.

25th Apr 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to ensure the quality of drinking water.

The UK has a very high standard of drinking water quality. In England, in 2021, public water supply compliance with the Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 2016 was 99.97% and private water supply compliance with the Private Water Supplies (England) Regulations 2016 was 96.9%.

Water companies and local authorities (who are the enforcers for private water supplies) are responsible for identifying risks to the quality of the drinking water. They have comprehensive monitoring programmes in place and are required to sample the drinking water supply for any element, organism or substance that they believe may cause the supply not to be wholesome. The Drinking Water Inspectorate and local authorities take enforcement action should any breach of the standards in the regulations occur. More information can be found in the annual reports https://www.dwi.gov.uk/what-we-do/annual-report/.

To continue to protect public health, Defra are working with the Drinking Water Inspectorate to establish an expert advisory board. The board will consider a range of international research to help us ensure our drinking water standards and regulations are based on the latest evidence.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish a timetabled plan for ensuring that food retailers and producers make as much left-over food produce as possible available to foodbanks and other charities.

Businesses are required to follow the food and drink waste hierarchy. This lays out a prioritised list of options to reduce waste. From preventing surplus and waste arising in the first place, to redistribution to charities and commercial redistributors, followed by sending to animal feed.

Food and drink waste hierarchy: deal with surplus and waste - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Businesses are aided in this through following the Defra supported Waste Resources Action Programme (WRAP) led Food Waste Reduction Roadmap. This sets out a plan for businesses to reduce their food waste and increase redistribution through a Target, Measure and Act approach. By measuring and acting on waste, businesses can take targeted action and more surplus will be redistributed.

To date, 314 businesses have committed to the Roadmap. Recent data from WRAP stated that in 2021 over 106,000 tonnes was redistributed, worth over £330 million and the equivalent of over 253 million meals. Over 40,000 tonnes from the retail sector alone. Data from businesses implementing Target, Measure, Act revealed that they were collectively responsible for 90% of the increase in surplus redistributed between 2018 and 2020 redistributing almost 26,000 tonnes more food between them in 2020 than in 2018.

A consultation on options to improve the reporting of surplus and waste by large food businesses in England has recently closed. Defra will publish a government response in due course.

WRAP Food waste measurement roadmap 2021 Progress report

In order to bolster the capability and capacity of the redistribution sector to take advantage of the increase in surplus made available by businesses, nearly £13 million has been awarded to over 250 redistribution organisations since 2018 across the country. This funding has provided important infrastructure such as additional warehousing, vehicles, fridges and freezers.

Mark Spencer
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken ensure that people on the covid-19 shielded patient list who were not registered for free food parcels by 1 August 2020 can continue to have priority access to supermarket home deliveries.

The Government has successfully secured the agreement of supermarkets to continue to provide support to the clinically extremely vulnerable.

Supermarkets continue to provide support to their vulnerable customers through offers such as priority access to delivery slots, in-store shopping assistance, and home delivery of food boxes which can be purchased over the phone for customers without internet access.

Additionally, there are a number of options available for individuals who identify as vulnerable and want help accessing food. Vulnerable individuals can contact their local authority, or one of Defra’s charity partners (AgeUK, Scope or RNIB), to be referred for the Priority Food Delivery Scheme. Through this scheme, vulnerable individuals or their carers can shop online with priority access to Tesco or Iceland delivery slots.

Vulnerable individuals can also request help from an NHS volunteer responder in gaining access to food, prescriptions and other essential items by calling the phone line or visiting the Royal Voluntary Service website.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Bus Service Recovery Grant will be extended beyond March 2022.

We have provided unprecedented support for local transport during the pandemic. For bus, operators and local authorities have received funding through the £1.5bn Coronavirus Bus Service Support Grant, and the ongoing £226.5m Bus Recovery Grant.

The Government is committed to seeing the bus sector return to financial self- sufficiency. Discussions are ongoing regarding the costs and benefits of measures to support the sector beyond April, and we are working closely with stakeholders to understand the potential challenges and possible mitigations once recovery funding ends. Recognising the need for further support, an additional £29m uplift will be provided to recipients of the Bus Recovery Grant this financial year.

2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps the Government plans to take to reduce the costs of Day 2 and Day 8 covid-19 tests for people entering the UK.

The government continues to work with the travel industry and private testing providers to further reduce testing costs, while ensuring travel is as safe as possible. The cost of PCR tests has fallen since the introduction of post-arrival lateral flow testing for eligible vaccinated passengers. Testing requirements for unvaccinated passengers are also regularly reviewed.

Testing costs are minimal for fully vaccinated passengers and under 18s. Eligible fully vaccinated passengers and under 18s arriving into the UK now just need to take a lateral flow test post arrival, with a free confirmatory PCR test if they receive a positive result. The rule changes make testing on arrival simpler and cheaper for people across the country.

Robert Courts
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)