Jo Stevens Portrait

Jo Stevens

Labour - Cardiff Central

Shadow Secretary of State for Wales

(since November 2021)
Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
6th Apr 2020 - 29th Nov 2021
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Sub-committee on Online Harms and Disinformation
10th Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
European Statutory Instruments Committee
18th Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
DCMS Sub-Committee on Disinformation
12th Mar 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
European Statutory Instruments
18th Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 12th Sep 2017
Justice Committee
13th Mar 2017 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Secretary of State for Wales
6th Oct 2016 - 27th Jan 2017
Shadow Solicitor General
13th Jan 2016 - 6th Oct 2016
Shadow Minister (Justice)
7th Jan 2016 - 6th Oct 2016
Committee on Privileges
28th Oct 2015 - 21st Jul 2016
Committee on Standards
9th Sep 2015 - 21st Jul 2016
Committee of Privileges
28th Oct 2015 - 21st Jul 2016
Business, Innovation and Skills Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 1st Feb 2016


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Friday 3rd December 2021
Prayers
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 14 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 1 Noes - 79
Speeches
Thursday 25th November 2021
Independent Fan-led Review of Football Governance

I congratulate the hon. Member for Chatham and Aylesford (Tracey Crouch) and her panel on their work, and thank the …

Written Answers
Thursday 18th November 2021
Coronavirus: Disease Control
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when the findings from the final round of …
Early Day Motions
Monday 27th January 2020
Protecting the oceans
That this House recognises and celebrates the importance of vibrant oceans to our global ecosystem; notes that our oceans are …
Bills
Automatic Electoral Registration (No. 2) Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
MP Financial Interests
Monday 4th October 2021
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: UK Music
Address of donor: Savoy Hill House, 7-10 Savoy Hill, London WC2R 0BU
Amount of donation …
EDM signed
Monday 18th January 2021
Godfrey Colin Cameron
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 18th July 2018
Counsellors and Psychotherapists (Regulation) and Conversion Therapy Bill 2017-19
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Jo Stevens has voted in 291 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Jo Stevens Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Oliver Dowden (Conservative)
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
(32 debate interactions)
Matt Warman (Conservative)
(5 debate interactions)
Nigel Huddleston (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(2 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(1 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Jo Stevens's debates

Cardiff Central Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Cardiff Central signature proportion
Petitions with most Cardiff Central signatures
Jo Stevens has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Jo Stevens

14th January 2021
Jo Stevens signed this EDM on Monday 18th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 117
Scottish National Party: 15
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
18th March 2020
Jo Stevens signed this EDM on Tuesday 21st April 2020

Repatriation of UK nationals from countries that have closed borders

Tabled by: Jonathan Edwards (Independent - Carmarthen East and Dinefwr)
That this House notes that as a result of the covid-19 outbreak, a number of countries have closed their borders to contain the virus; notes that as a result many UK subjects are stranded; calls on the Government to negotiate with all countries where borders have closed, ways of repatriating …
70 signatures
(Most recent: 5 May 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 31
Scottish National Party: 14
Liberal Democrat: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Conservative: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
View All Jo Stevens's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Jo Stevens, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


3 Urgent Questions tabled by Jo Stevens

Jo Stevens has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Jo Stevens


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to impose certain duties upon Her Majesty’s Government to ensure the accuracy, completeness and utility of electoral registers; to make provision for the sharing of data for the purposes of electoral registration; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 15th November 2017
(Read Debate)
Next Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Commons
Date TBA

120 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4 Other Department Questions
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, if he will publish the (a) minutes of his meeting with Ed Woodward, executive vice-chairman of Manchester United, on 14 April 2021 and (b) any correspondence relating to that meeting.

The meeting was to discuss the safe return of fans and Covid certification, as part of ongoing work on event pilots. The European Super League was not discussed. I did not join the meeting.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, who else attended the meeting with Ed Woodward, executive vice-chairman of Manchester Untied, on 14 April 2021 with his Office; and whether any of those present were from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

The meeting was to discuss the safe return of fans and Covid certification, as part of ongoing work on event pilots. The European Super League was not discussed. I did not join the meeting.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, when the meeting with Ed Woodward, executive vice-chairman of Manchester United, that took place on 14 April 2021, was arranged.

The meeting was to discuss the safe return of fans and Covid certification, as part of ongoing work on event pilots. The European Super League was not discussed. I did not join the meeting.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
16th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the value is of Government covid-19 awareness advertising on (a) a week by week basis for 2020 and (b) for (i) television, (ii) national radio networks, (iii) local radio networks, (iv) national media organisations and (v) for independent community media outlets.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQ 46692 given on 29 May 2020 and to PQ 45460 on 11 May 2020.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether ACOBA has (a) considered the appointment of and (b) provided advice to any (i) former ministers, (ii) civil servants and (iii) special advisors from the Department for Culture, Media and Sport on taking up a position at Camelot UK Lotteries Limited; and if he will make a statement.

ACOBA is an independent advisory Committee and publishes its advice online. I therefore refer the hon. Member to the relevant publications on GOV.UK.

The application of the Business Appointment Rules for civil servants and special advisers below Director General or equivalent is a matter for their employing department. Departments publish summary information in respect of individuals at SCS2 and SCS1 level, including special advisers of equivalent standing.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the annual cost to the UK music industry of unpaid copyright payments.

The Government has made no assessment of the annual cost to the UK music industry of unpaid copyright payments. Copyright licensing is a private, commercial matter between the parties concerned and the Government is not involved in these agreements.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the gross cost to UK artists of copyright payments avoided in the UK.

The Government has made no assessment of the gross cost to UK artists of copyright payments avoided in the UK. Copyright licensing is a private, commercial matter between the parties concerned and the Government is not involved in these agreements.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have been accepted for the Warm Home Discount scheme and who have not yet had that discount applied to their energy bill.

Under the Warm Home Discount Core Group, to qualify a person, or their partner, should have been in receipt of the Pension Credit Guarantee Credit element on the qualification date 7th July 2019. There are 1.3 million such households though not all of them have accounts with obligated energy suppliers.

Energy suppliers are required to pay a minimum of 1.1 million rebates to the Warm Home Discount Broader Group out of around 1.5 million households eligible under the mandatory eligibility criteria. In addition to the criteria set by Government, energy suppliers can get additional criteria approved by Ofgem making the eligible pool larger.

Most suppliers pay rebates to the Core Group between October and the end of January and we estimate that around 1.1 million will receive the rebate this winter. We expect energy suppliers to pay most of the Broader Group rebates, on a first-come first-served basis, by the end of February. Suppliers have until the 31st March to provide rebates under the scheme.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of people (a) eligible for and (b) in receipt of the Warm Home Discount since September 2019.

Under the Warm Home Discount Core Group, to qualify a person, or their partner, should have been in receipt of the Pension Credit Guarantee Credit element on the qualification date 7th July 2019. There are 1.3 million such households though not all of them have accounts with obligated energy suppliers.

Energy suppliers are required to pay a minimum of 1.1 million rebates to the Warm Home Discount Broader Group out of around 1.5 million households eligible under the mandatory eligibility criteria. In addition to the criteria set by Government, energy suppliers can get additional criteria approved by Ofgem making the eligible pool larger.

Most suppliers pay rebates to the Core Group between October and the end of January and we estimate that around 1.1 million will receive the rebate this winter. We expect energy suppliers to pay most of the Broader Group rebates, on a first-come first-served basis, by the end of February. Suppliers have until the 31st March to provide rebates under the scheme.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to bring forward legislative proposals to implement the EU Copyright Directive in UK law.

The deadline for implementing the EU Copyright Directive is 7 June 2021. The United Kingdom will leave the European Union on 31 January 2020 and the Implementation Period will end on 31 December 2020. The Government has committed not to extend the Implementation Period. Therefore, the United Kingdom will not be required to implement the Directive, and the Government has no plans to do so. Any future changes to the UK copyright framework will be considered as part of the usual domestic policy process.

12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when the findings from the final round of the Events and Research Programme will be published.

The Events Research Programme has now concluded. DCMS continues to work closely with other government departments and will be publishing the final Events Research Programme findings shortly.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will take steps to ensuring adequate ventilation in theatres and cinemas to help reduce the transmission of covid-19 by (a) issuing guidance to operators of theatres and cinemas services, (b) clarifying what standards operators should use to plan and measure ventilation, (c) outlining what enforcement activity he plans to take to ensure such guidance is followed and (d) making funds available to improve standards of ventilation.

Public Health England has published guidance on the ventilation of indoor spaces which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-ventilation-of-indoor-spaces-to-stop-the-spread-of-coronavirus/ventilation-of-indoor-spaces-to-stop-the-spread-of-coronavirus-covid-19

The Health and Safety Executive has published guidance on ventilation and air conditioning here:

https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/index.htm

Using this guidance, Local Authorities should assess the risk from COVID and implement the appropriate transmission risk controls. The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require employers to assess risks and implement the appropriate controls. HSE is the health and safety enforcing authority for local authority activities and can take proportionate enforcement action.

Venues are advised to pay due regard to the published guidance above, alongside any sector-specific guidance available.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many applications were made for Phase 2 of the Cultural Recovery Fund.

The attached table provides figures addressing the questions asked.

Payments through the Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) are typically made in multiple tranches. Final payment is typically made at the very end of the grant period, once activities and costs have been reported.

In both rounds of the CRF revenue grants programme, DCMS has been able to give recipients the flexibility to extend the grant period. For CRF1 awardees, they have been able to extend until 30 June 2021, and for CRF2 awardees until 31 December 2021.

As such, a significant number of CRF 1 awardees have only very recently concluded the grant period, and many CRF 2 awardees have not concluded the grant period yet.

Accordingly, final payment requests are still outstanding from both CRF1 and CRF 2 recipients. Only when final payment requests have been made will DCMS Arms Length Bodies make final payments.

In addition, payment schedules can be impacted by a number of factors, such as the provision of bank details and activity reports from applicants, as well as assurance processes undertaken by distributing arms-length bodies, in order to ensure best use of tax-payers’ money.

As the numbers show, over 83% of all awarded CRF funding has been paid.

Figures include revenue grants, capital grants, and loans from within the Culture Recovery Fund.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the longest period of time has been between the acceptance of an application and the full payment of the award of funds during phase 1 of the Cultural Recovery Fund.

The attached table provides figures addressing the questions asked.

Payments through the Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) are typically made in multiple tranches. Final payment is typically made at the very end of the grant period, once activities and costs have been reported.

In both rounds of the CRF revenue grants programme, DCMS has been able to give recipients the flexibility to extend the grant period. For CRF1 awardees, they have been able to extend until 30 June 2021, and for CRF2 awardees until 31 December 2021.

As such, a significant number of CRF 1 awardees have only very recently concluded the grant period, and many CRF 2 awardees have not concluded the grant period yet.

Accordingly, final payment requests are still outstanding from both CRF1 and CRF 2 recipients. Only when final payment requests have been made will DCMS Arms Length Bodies make final payments.

In addition, payment schedules can be impacted by a number of factors, such as the provision of bank details and activity reports from applicants, as well as assurance processes undertaken by distributing arms-length bodies, in order to ensure best use of tax-payers’ money.

As the numbers show, over 83% of all awarded CRF funding has been paid.

Figures include revenue grants, capital grants, and loans from within the Culture Recovery Fund.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many of the successful applicants in Phase 1 of the Cultural Recovery Fund are awaiting the receipt of funds; and how much funding remains to be paid.

The attached table provides figures addressing the questions asked.

Payments through the Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) are typically made in multiple tranches. Final payment is typically made at the very end of the grant period, once activities and costs have been reported.

In both rounds of the CRF revenue grants programme, DCMS has been able to give recipients the flexibility to extend the grant period. For CRF1 awardees, they have been able to extend until 30 June 2021, and for CRF2 awardees until 31 December 2021.

As such, a significant number of CRF 1 awardees have only very recently concluded the grant period, and many CRF 2 awardees have not concluded the grant period yet.

Accordingly, final payment requests are still outstanding from both CRF1 and CRF 2 recipients. Only when final payment requests have been made will DCMS Arms Length Bodies make final payments.

In addition, payment schedules can be impacted by a number of factors, such as the provision of bank details and activity reports from applicants, as well as assurance processes undertaken by distributing arms-length bodies, in order to ensure best use of tax-payers’ money.

As the numbers show, over 83% of all awarded CRF funding has been paid.

Figures include revenue grants, capital grants, and loans from within the Culture Recovery Fund.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many applications were made in Phase 1 of the Cultural Recovery Fund.

The attached table provides figures addressing the questions asked.

Payments through the Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) are typically made in multiple tranches. Final payment is typically made at the very end of the grant period, once activities and costs have been reported.

In both rounds of the CRF revenue grants programme, DCMS has been able to give recipients the flexibility to extend the grant period. For CRF1 awardees, they have been able to extend until 30 June 2021, and for CRF2 awardees until 31 December 2021.

As such, a significant number of CRF 1 awardees have only very recently concluded the grant period, and many CRF 2 awardees have not concluded the grant period yet.

Accordingly, final payment requests are still outstanding from both CRF1 and CRF 2 recipients. Only when final payment requests have been made will DCMS Arms Length Bodies make final payments.

In addition, payment schedules can be impacted by a number of factors, such as the provision of bank details and activity reports from applicants, as well as assurance processes undertaken by distributing arms-length bodies, in order to ensure best use of tax-payers’ money.

As the numbers show, over 83% of all awarded CRF funding has been paid.

Figures include revenue grants, capital grants, and loans from within the Culture Recovery Fund.

29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what declarations of interests have been made by his Department’s non-executive directors; and where is that information published.

Non-executive directors comply with the provisions of the Cabinet Office’s Code of Conduct for Board Members of Public Bodies.

Board members are required to submit any declarable interests annually; this information forms part of the independent National Audit Office review ahead of the publication of Departmental annual report and accounts.

Information on any relevant interests is published in the Department annual report and accounts, which are available on gov.uk.

29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what financial payments his Department makes to its non-executive directors; how many times his departmental Board will meet in 2021-22; and what work the non-executive directors undertake.

This information is published in the Department’s annual report and accounts, available on gov.uk.

(https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dcms-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-20)

The Department’s report and accounts for 2021-22 will be published in due course, in the usual way.

Departmental boards provide strategic leadership for each central government department, as well as advising on/challenging how the department is performing. Each board is chaired by the Secretary of State and includes junior ministers, the permanent secretary and non-executive board members. Non-executives are appointed to government departments from the public, private and voluntary sectors. Their role is to provide advice and bring an external perspective.

A summary of the work of non-executive directors across Government can be found in the Government Lead Non-Executive's annual report, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/government-lead-non-executives-annual-report-2019-to-2020

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when his Department’s current non-executive directors were appointed; what oversight officials of his Department had of the Ministerial appointments of those non-executive directors; and what assessment was made of the applicants' experience against the requirements for breadth and depth of experience set out in the Cabinet Office guidance on Departmental Boards of November 2014.

· Sherry Coutu was appointed on 11 March 2019

· Hemant Patel was appointed on 19 March 2020

· Baroness Laura Wyld was appointed on 15 June 2020

· Claudia Arney was appointed on 15 April 2021

· Priya Lakhani was appointed on 15 April 2021

Departmental officials have full oversight of all Non-Executive appointments. This includes providing advice and recommendations to me on the suitability of individuals to be appointed as Non-Executives.

The department aims to appoint Non-Executives who have experience within large and complex organisations and specific knowledge of the sectors it represents. This includes having an understanding and experience of organisations in both the public and private sectors. This is a key consideration made on the suitability of appointable candidates, without this experience it is unlikely an appointment will be made.

Departments follow the principles set out in Cabinet Office/HM Treasury ‘Corporate governance in central government departments: code of good practice.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when his Department’s current non-executive directors were appointed; what oversight officials had of Ministerial appointments of non-executive directors; and what assessment was made of their experience against the requirements for breadth and depth of experience set out in the Cabinet Office guidance on Departmental Boards of November 2014.

· Sherry Coutu was appointed on 11 March 2019

· Hemant Patel was appointed on 19 March 2020

· Baroness Laura Wyld was appointed on 15 June 2020

· Claudia Arney was appointed on 15 April 2021

· Priya Lakhani was appointed on 15 April 2021

Departmental officials have full oversight of all Non-Executive appointments. This includes providing advice and recommendations to me on the suitability of individuals to be appointed as Non-Executives.

The department aims to appoint Non-Executives who have experience within large and complex organisations and specific knowledge of the sectors it represents. This includes having an understanding and experience of organisations in both the public and private sectors. This is a key consideration made on the suitability of appointable candidates, without this experience it is unlikely an appointment will be made.

Departments follow the principles set out in Cabinet Office/HM Treasury ‘Corporate governance in central government departments: code of good practice.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what private companies are contracted to provide security services at his Department’s buildings that contain ministerial private offices; and whether there are closed circuit television cameras in any ministerial private office within his departmental estate.

As has been the case under successive Administrations, it is not government policy to comment on security procedures in government buildings.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the prevalence of children using live streaming services on TikTok to solicit in-app virtual gifts or donations in exchange for content.

We recognise the serious risks that children face online, including through the use of functionalities such as live streaming. The draft Online Safety Bill, published in May 2021, will ensure companies design their platforms to be safer for users.

The strongest protections in the legislation are for children. Unless services in scope are able to prove that children are not accessing their service, they will need to conduct a child safety risk assessment and provide safety measures for child users, keeping these under regular review.. Companies will also need to assess how the design and operation of the service, including functionalities such as instream payments and live-streaming, may increase or reduce the risks identified.

In addition, the UK’s regulatory regime for video sharing platforms requires UK-established video sharing platforms to take appropriate measures to protect under-18s from harmful material, TikTok is in scope of these requirements. Ofcom is working with UK-established video sharing platforms to help them understand their duties under this regime and will be able to take enforcement action against platforms that do not comply.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether a risk assessment has been carried out on the secure holding of CCTV footage within his Department.

As has been the case under successive Administrations, it is not government policy to comment on security procedures in government buildings.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his departmental IT systems routinely allow officials, advisers and ministers to access private email accounts from their office desktop computers, department-issue laptop computers and mobile phone devices.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether any departmental business has been conducted on private email addresses; and what mechanisms are in place to ensure that full records are kept of that business.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether any departmental business has been conducted on private email addresses; and what mechanisms are in place to ensure that full records are kept of that business.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

Oliver Dowden
Minister without Portfolio (Cabinet Office)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what impact assessment was carried out on the effect of the delay to lifting lockdown restrictions on 21 June 2021 on (a) theatres, (b) music venues and (c) cultural organisations.

The Prime Minister has always said that we would be led by data, not dates. The government has looked at the data very closely and assessed it against the four tests set out in our roadmap. It is on the basis of worsening data that we have taken the difficult call not to proceed with this reopening at this point, but to pause for four weeks.

There is uncertainty on test 3. The Delta variant is already driving the growth we are seeing in infection rates and hospitalisations, and at the same time non-COVID emergency demand on the NHS is the highest it has been since the start of the pandemic. We have assessed that we have not met test 4. Our assessment of the risks has been altered by the Delta variant: the latest data suggests the Delta variant is between 40% and 80% more transmissible than the Alpha variant.

Therefore, the Government announced a four-week pause at Step 3. We will use this time to get more vaccinations in arms, both first and second doses, and to learn more about the Delta variant. We anticipate that a four-week pause of this kind could significantly reduce the number of hospitalisations and deaths.

We recognise the challenging times facing all sectors currently, the Department has been working closely with stakeholders across the theatre industry, music venues and cultural organisations throughout the pandemic to maintain a complete picture of the financial impact of Covid-19 to ensure they survive this difficult period wherever possible.

Many of these organisations have benefitted from the significant cross-economy support available throughout this pandemic, including the generous employment schemes, grants, loans, a reduction in VAT to 5%, and business rates relief. And some businesses may further be eligible for the unprecedented Culture Recovery Fund - the largest one-off investment in UK culture - as we look to provide support for a wide range of cultural institutions including galleries, theatres, museums, music venues, comedy clubs and festivals, as audiences begin to return.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he or his ministers have had with theatres, music venues and other cultural operators ahead of the decision to delay the easing of the roadmap on 21 June 2021.

The Government has engaged extensively with stakeholders from all DCMS sectors throughout the pandemic through regular roundtables and ministerial calls with industry representatives.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has referred any Freedom of Information requests received by his Department to the central Cabinet Office Clearing House on Freedom of Information requests for advice on handling, in the last two years.

Freedom of Information requests are referred to the Clearing House in line with the published criteria available on gov.uk. The Clearing House, which has been in existence since 2004, provides advice to ensure a consistent approach across government to requests for information.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many former officials from his Department have subsequently been employed at Camelot UK Lotteries Limited in each of the last five years.

This information is not collected or held. However, officials are subject to the Business Appointment Rules.

As DCMS does not collect this data we cannot confirm whether any former officials have subsequently been employed at Camelot UK Lotteries Limited in the last five years.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many times officials in his Department have received hospitality from Camelot UK Lotteries Limited in each of the last 10 years.

Government departments publish quarterly details of occasions where Ministers and officials are in receipt of hospitality. This is published on the Gov.uk website and covers the last 10 years.

At the following link it is possible to apply filters to search for the documents specifically relating to DCMS and Transparency and Freedom of Information Releases over this period: [https://www.gov.uk/search/transparency-and-freedom-of-information-releases?content_store_document_type%5B%5D=transparency&organisations%5B%5D=department-for-digital-culture-media-sport&order=updated-newest]

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many times Ministers in his Department have received hospitality from Camelot UK Lotteries Limited in each of the last 10 years.

Government departments publish quarterly details of occasions where Ministers and officials are in receipt of hospitality. This is published on the Gov.uk website and covers the last 10 years.

At the following link it is possible to apply filters to search for the documents specifically relating to DCMS and Transparency and Freedom of Information Releases over this period: [https://www.gov.uk/search/transparency-and-freedom-of-information-releases?content_store_document_type%5B%5D=transparency&organisations%5B%5D=department-for-digital-culture-media-sport&order=updated-newest]

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department’s human resources team has ever prevented former civil servants or special advisors from taking up a position at Camelot UK Lotteries Limited.

DCMS has not prevented former civil servants or special advisors from taking up a position at Camelot UK Lotteries Limited.

Upon leaving the civil service, all civil servants are subject to the Business Appointment Rules (BARs). BARs restrictions apply for two years after the last day of paid Civil Service employment for members of the Senior Civil Service and equivalents, including special advisers of equivalent standing. For those below the Senior Civil Service and equivalents, including special advisers of equivalent standing, the Rules continue to apply for one year after leaving the Civil Service, unless, exceptionally, the role has been designated as one where a longer period of up to two years will apply.

The aim of the Rules is to avoid any reasonable concerns that:

a. a civil servant might be influenced in carrying out his or her official duties by the hope or expectation of future employment with a particular firm or organisation, or in a specific sector; or

b. on leaving the Civil Service, a former civil servant might improperly exploit privileged access to contacts in Government or sensitive information; or

c. a particular firm or organisation might gain an improper advantage by employing someone who, in the course of their official duties, has had access to:

i. information relating to unannounced or proposed developments in Government policy, knowledge of which may affect the prospective employer or any competitors; or

ii. commercially valuable or sensitive information about any competitors

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what additional funding his Department has received from the Treasury to fund the Sport Winter Survival Package.

The £300m Sport Winter Survival Package announced by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport will be fully funded by the Treasury.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what proportion of the Sport Winter Survival Package will be provided as (a) grants and (b) loans.

The mix of loans and grants will be driven by need and the ability to repay. The allocations announced on Tuesday 19 November 2020 were preliminary allocations made on a needs based assessment process, and reflect the submissions made from the individual sports. According to these initial allocations, we expect about £250m of the £300m funding to be loans, with the rest being grants. The funding process will be overseen by an independent decision-making board and supported by Sport England: the proportion of grants to loans will only be finalised once that decision-making process is complete.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the (a) interest rate and (b) terms will be for loans awarded under the Sport Winter Survival Package.

The loan terms are still being finalised, but we expect these to be on generous terms with initial repayment holidays. Further details will be set out when Sport England opens the scheme for applications shortly.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure that UK-based freelance journalists will be able to operate across European borders after the transition period.

On 1 September 2020, the Government launched a comprehensive communications campaign to help the UK prepare for the end of the transition period. This includes guidance on customs and mobility procedures important to workers and freelancers. My department will continue to engage with the press sector on the specific issues they may face.

We are seeking a reciprocal agreement with the EU that could allow UK citizens to undertake some business activities in the EU without a work permit, on a short-term basis. At the moment, we are unable to comment on the detail of these arrangements as discussions are ongoing.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many pieces of disinformation the Counter Disinformation Unit has reported to SnapChat since 1 March 2020; and how many of those disinformation posts have subsequently been removed by SnapChat.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. During the Covid-19 pandemic, it has been vitally important that the public has accurate information and DCMS is leading work across Government to tackle disinformation.

The Counter Disinformation Unit brings together cross-Government monitoring and analysis capabilities. The Unit’s primary function is to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and impact of disinformation and misinformation regarding Covid-19 and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken. It would not be appropriate for the Unit to provide a running commentary on the amount of misinformation/disinformation seen to date.

Throughout the pandemic, we have been working closely with social media platforms to quickly identify and help them respond to potentially harmful content on their platforms, including removing harmful content in line with their terms and conditions, and promoting authoritative sources of information.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many pieces of disinformation the Counter Disinformation Unit has reported to WhatsApp since 1 March 2020; and how many of those disinformation posts have subsequently been removed by WhatsApp.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. During the Covid-19 pandemic, it has been vitally important that the public has accurate information and DCMS is leading work across Government to tackle disinformation.

The Counter Disinformation Unit brings together cross-Government monitoring and analysis capabilities. The Unit’s primary function is to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and impact of disinformation and misinformation regarding Covid-19 and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken. It would not be appropriate for the Unit to provide a running commentary on the amount of misinformation/disinformation seen to date.

Throughout the pandemic, we have been working closely with social media platforms to quickly identify and help them respond to potentially harmful content on their platforms, including removing harmful content in line with their terms and conditions, and promoting authoritative sources of information.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many pieces of disinformation the Counter Disinformation Unit has reported to Facebook since 1 March 2020; and how many of those disinformation posts have subsequently been removed by Facebook.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. During the Covid-19 pandemic, it has been vitally important that the public has accurate information and DCMS is leading work across Government to tackle disinformation.

The Counter Disinformation Unit brings together cross-Government monitoring and analysis capabilities. The Unit’s primary function is to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and impact of disinformation and misinformation regarding Covid-19 and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken. It would not be appropriate for the Unit to provide a running commentary on the amount of misinformation/disinformation seen to date.

Throughout the pandemic, we have been working closely with social media platforms to quickly identify and help them respond to potentially harmful content on their platforms, including removing harmful content in line with their terms and conditions, and promoting authoritative sources of information.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many pieces of disinformation the Counter Disinformation Unit has reported to TikTok since 1 March 2020; and how many of those disinformation posts have subsequently been removed by TikTok.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. During the Covid-19 pandemic, it has been vitally important that the public has accurate information and DCMS is leading work across Government to tackle disinformation.

The Counter Disinformation Unit brings together cross-Government monitoring and analysis capabilities. The Unit’s primary function is to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and impact of disinformation and misinformation regarding Covid-19 and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken. It would not be appropriate for the Unit to provide a running commentary on the amount of misinformation/disinformation seen to date.

Throughout the pandemic, we have been working closely with social media platforms to quickly identify and help them respond to potentially harmful content on their platforms, including removing harmful content in line with their terms and conditions, and promoting authoritative sources of information.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many pieces of disinformation the Counter Disinformation Unit has reported to YouTube since 1 March 2020; and how many of those disinformation posts have subsequently been removed by YouTube.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. During the Covid-19 pandemic, it has been vitally important that the public has accurate information and DCMS is leading work across Government to tackle disinformation.

The Counter Disinformation Unit brings together cross-Government monitoring and analysis capabilities. The Unit’s primary function is to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and impact of disinformation and misinformation regarding Covid-19 and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken. It would not be appropriate for the Unit to provide a running commentary on the amount of misinformation/disinformation seen to date.

Throughout the pandemic, we have been working closely with social media platforms to quickly identify and help them respond to potentially harmful content on their platforms, including removing harmful content in line with their terms and conditions, and promoting authoritative sources of information.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many pieces of disinformation the Counter Disinformation Unit has reported to Instagram since 1 March 2020; and how many of those disinformation posts have subsequently been removed by Instagram.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. During the Covid-19 pandemic, it has been vitally important that the public has accurate information and DCMS is leading work across Government to tackle disinformation.

The Counter Disinformation Unit brings together cross-Government monitoring and analysis capabilities. The Unit’s primary function is to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and impact of disinformation and misinformation regarding Covid-19 and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken. It would not be appropriate for the Unit to provide a running commentary on the amount of misinformation/disinformation seen to date.

Throughout the pandemic, we have been working closely with social media platforms to quickly identify and help them respond to potentially harmful content on their platforms, including removing harmful content in line with their terms and conditions, and promoting authoritative sources of information.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many pieces of disinformation the Counter Disinformation Unit has reported to Google since 1 March 2020; and how many of those disinformation posts have subsequently been removed by Google.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. During the Covid-19 pandemic, it has been vitally important that the public has accurate information and DCMS is leading work across Government to tackle disinformation.

The Counter Disinformation Unit brings together cross-Government monitoring and analysis capabilities. The Unit’s primary function is to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and impact of disinformation and misinformation regarding Covid-19 and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken. It would not be appropriate for the Unit to provide a running commentary on the amount of misinformation/disinformation seen to date.

Throughout the pandemic, we have been working closely with social media platforms to quickly identify and help them respond to potentially harmful content on their platforms, including removing harmful content in line with their terms and conditions, and promoting authoritative sources of information.

10th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many pieces of disinformation the Counter Disinformation Unit has reported to Twitter since 1 March 2020; and how many of those disinformation posts have subsequently been removed by Twitter.

The Government takes the issue of disinformation very seriously. During the Covid-19 pandemic, it has been vitally important that the public has accurate information and DCMS is leading work across Government to tackle disinformation.

The Counter Disinformation Unit brings together cross-Government monitoring and analysis capabilities. The Unit’s primary function is to provide a comprehensive picture of the extent, scope and impact of disinformation and misinformation regarding Covid-19 and to work with partners to ensure appropriate action is taken. It would not be appropriate for the Unit to provide a running commentary on the amount of misinformation/disinformation seen to date.

Throughout the pandemic, we have been working closely with social media platforms to quickly identify and help them respond to potentially harmful content on their platforms, including removing harmful content in line with their terms and conditions, and promoting authoritative sources of information.

28th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many meetings (a) he or (b) he and the Prime Minister has had with Lord Charles Moore in 2020; and on what dates those meetings took place.

Meetings with external organisations and individuals undertaken in a ministerial capacity are published on GOV.UK on a quarterly basis.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the (a) UK online regulation framework and (b) effectiveness of UK online regulatory bodies of plans by (i) Apple, (ii) Microsoft and (iii) Google to enable DNS over HTTPS on their services and platforms.

DCMS continues to monitor the DNS over HTTPS roll out of all key companies, including Apple, Microsoft and Google and its potential impact on proposals for a new Online Harms Regulatory Framework.

The Online Harms regulator will have a suite of powers to take effective enforcement action against companies that fail to fulfill their duty of care. We will set out further details in the full Government response later this year.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions his Department has had with (a) Apple, (b) Google (c) Microsoft and (d) Mozilla on (i) new DNS over HTTPS protocol and (ii) the online safety and security of UK citizens.

We are aware of ongoing developments relating to the DNS over HTTPS protocol and are working with industry and other key stakeholders to understand potential unintended consequences arising from its implementation.

Ministers and officials have regular meetings and discussions with industry and other stakeholders on a range of issues, including online safety. Details of Ministerial meetings are published quarterly on the Gov.uk website.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of Apple's proposed decision to enable DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) in the upcoming updates for iOS and MacO on parents ability to keep their children safe online.

We are aware of ongoing developments relating to the DNS over HTTPS protocol and are working with industry and other key stakeholders to understand potential unintended consequences arising from its implementation. We are working closely with a wide range of relevant stakeholders to ensure that new technologies do not compromise the safety of children online.

24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will publish the scientific advice to the Government on the cricket ball being a natural vector of covid-19.

Officials are working very closely with the ECB and their medical experts to understand the unique qualities of cricket. We are working at pace to shape guidance that will allow the safe return of competitive cricket and other team sports. Any shared sporting equipment may risk transmission, but these risks can be mitigated with good hygiene practice as being adopted across a wide range of sectors.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he has taken to establish a replacement programme for Creative Europe.

While the Government has taken the decision not to seek participation in Creative Europe’s 2021-27 programme, we remain committed to supporting the UK’s thriving cultural and creative economy. We will continue to invest money directly into the UK's cultural and creative sectors, continuing to support and grow their world-class activity on the international stage. Now we have taken back control of our money, we are able to focus spending on specific UK priorities including on our world class arts, heritage and creative industries. Officials are developing options for domestic alternatives to Creative Europe, which will be considered in line with upcoming fiscal events including the Comprehensive Spending Review.

12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate he has made of the number of EU-based musicians that have performed in the UK in each year since 2015.

No such estimate has been made. However, this Government recognises the important contribution made by EU-based musicians to this country’s live music industry. The UK already attracts world class artists, entertainers and musicians and we will continue to do so in the future. Future reciprocal mobility arrangements are subject to negotiation and DCMS has been working closely with the music industry to inform these discussions.

12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate he has made of the number of music tourists from EU countries that have come to the UK in each year since 2015.

My department has not made a direct estimate of the number of music tourists from EU countries that have come to the UK in each of the last five years.

VisitBritain research shows that in 2017, over 2.6m international visitors attended a live music event while visiting the UK, representing 7% of the total visitors received.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effect on the music industry of applying the Tier 5 Visa rules to members of the music industry who are EEA citizens in the event that immigration rules for EU citizens are retained.

We intend to discuss mobility arrangements in a defined number of areas as part of negotiations on our future relationship with the EU. A reciprocal agreement based on best precedent will mean that UK citizens will be able to undertake some business activities in the EU without a work permit, on a short-term basis. The same would apply for EU citizens making business visits to the UK. All provisions are subject to negotiation, and we recognise the significance of this to the UK’s world renowned music industry.

These mobility arrangements will only represent what we agree reciprocally with the EU. The UK will set the rules in relation to immigration and mobility where no commitments are taken in negotiations.

27th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has undertaken an impact assessment on the effect on people who are both deaf and elderly of the decision by the BBC to end teletext pages 102 and 1610.

The BBC is operationally and editorially independent from the government; therefore, the government has no role in deciding whether BBC services, such as the BBC Red Button teletext service, should be continued.

It is the BBC’s responsibility to assess the potential effect of the closure of the BBC Red Button service on deaf and elderly people across the UK. The Government welcomes the BBC's decision to pause the closure of the Red Button service, ahead of its review of the impact of the closure on the most vulnerable including the elderly, and deaf and blind licence fee payers.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department will take to ensure that (a) deaf and (b) elderly BBC licence fee payers will be adequately provided for by the BBC.

The BBC is editorially and operationally independent of the Government and the Government has no say on what programmes or services the BBC provides for deaf or elderly licence fee payers.

However, the Royal Charter requires the BBC to serve all audiences - including deaf and elderly licence fee payers - through the provision of impartial, high-quality and distinctive output and services which inform, educate and entertain.

With regard to elderly licence fee payers, the Government is disappointed with the BBC's decision to restrict the over 75 licence fee concession to only those in receipt of pension credit. We recognise the value of free TV licences for over-75s and believe they should be funded by the BBC.

For deaf licence fee payers, Ofcom is responsible for setting a Code on Television Access Services, which includes guidance which must be observed by the BBC in relation to providing subtitles and signing on its television channels. The Code sets out 10-year statutory targets for the BBC in relation to subtitling (100%) and signing (5%). Ofcom is currently reviewing how the BBC should make its UK Public Services accessible.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Minister of State, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with representatives of the BBC on its decision to end BBC teletext pages 102 and 1610.

The BBC is operationally and editorially independent from the government; therefore, the government has no role in deciding whether BBC services, such as the BBC Red Button teletext service, should be continued.

It is the BBC’s responsibility to assess the potential effect of the closure of the BBC Red Button service on the public’s access to information. The Government welcomes the BBC's decision to pause the closure of the Red Button service, ahead of its review of the impact of the closure on the most vulnerable including the elderly, and deaf and blind licence fee payers.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of trends in cyber-enabled wildlife crime since 2015.

The Government part-funds the National Wildlife Crime Unit (NWCU). The NWCU publishes annual tactical assessments, which outline their analysis of current, emerging and future wildlife crime threats, including cyber-enabled wildlife crime.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether her Department has made an assessment of the effect a mutual recognition agreement with the US on animal welfare standards on the competitiveness of UK animal produce in the UK market.

US animal products are produced to a range of US animal welfare standards, partly because some US regulatory requirements apply at state level and others apply at federal level. Industry farm assurance schemes also exist in the United States and involve scheme members meeting scheme standards, which may exceed US regulatory requirements. The quality standards which apply to particular products imported from the US also reflect the commercial supply chain requirements of the importer, which may exceed the baseline regulatory standards applying in the US.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of removing agricultural tariffs on US imports on the viability of small and medium sized UK farms.

There has been no specific assessment completed of the impacts of the removal of tariffs on a bilateral basis on the viability of small and medium sized farms. Defra will consider the interests of all farmers, producers and consumers in the formulation of the Government’s future trade policy, including for a future trade agreement with the United States.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Williams Rail Review will be published before the Easter 2020 recess.

The Williams Rail Review white paper is expected to be published before the summer recess.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people who were advised by the Government to shield in March 2020 were in receipt of pension credit.

The Department does not hold this information.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many personal independence payment claimants have had their claim reassessed in the last six months.

The latest available data on Personal Independence Payment (PIP) award review and change of circumstances clearances can be found in Table 2A within the “Data tables: PIP experimental statistics on planned award review and change of circumstance registrations and clearances to October 2019” published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/personal-independence-payment-april-2013-to-october-2019

The latest available data (from the introduction of PIP in April 2013 to October 2019) on reassessments of Disability Living Allowance (DLA) claimants to PIP at initial decision can be found on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/. The “PIP Clearances” table can be filtered on “Reassessment Indicator” to only include data for DLA to PIP reassessments.

Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people aged 75 and over were in receipt of pension credit in each year from 2015 to 2019.

It is important to highlight that in 2017/18 there were around 1.7 million Pension Credit claimants, receiving around £5.1 billion of Pension Credit payments.

The Government wants to make sure that all pensioners eligible can claim the Pension Credit to which they are entitled. That is why on the 10 February we launched a nationwide campaign to raise awareness of Pension Credit. The aim of the campaign is to encourage those over State Pension age to check whether they’re eligible. We want to make it clear that having savings, a pension or owning a home are not automatic barriers to receiving Pension Credit; as well as explaining that even a small award of Pension Credit can provide access to a range of other benefits such as help with rent, council tax reduction schemes and heating costs.

The campaign includes a short, animated video that is being shown in GP waiting rooms and in Post Offices. It is also being shown to Facebook users over State Pension age and supported by other messaging on social media. We have also made the video and campaign materials available for stakeholders to use, as we know they are often one of the first places people turn to for information about Pension Credit.

An important part of our overall strategy to promote take-up is engaging with people who may be eligible to benefits at pivotal stages, such as when they claim State Pension or Attendance Allowance or report a change in their circumstances which may mean that they could be eligible for Pension Credit.

Pension Credit is an income-related benefit, which means that entitlement to the benefit will depend on an individual’s particular circumstances. It is therefore not possible to identify each person that is eligible, which is why we are encouraging people who think they may be eligible for Pension Credit to use the online Pension Credit calculator https://www.gov.uk/pension-credit-calculator to check if they are likely to be eligible and get an estimate of what they may receive.

Information on the number of Pension Credit claimants aged 75 and over between the years of 2015 and 2019 is shown below.

Year

Number of Pension Credit Claimants

2019

926,494

2018

951,529

2017

993,031

2016

1,033,380

2015

1,102,497

Note: Pension Credit is paid per household rather than per person like other benefits, therefore a Pension Credit Claimant can represent more than one person in receipt of Pension Credit. These figures represent the number of claimants as at August each year and represents those households where the main claimant is aged 75 and over and receiving payment.

The information is published and available at: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk

Guidance for users is available at: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many recipients of the Motability Scheme have had their eligibility reassessed and their (a) mobility scooters and (b) cars removed in the last six months.

The Department does not hold information on how many people have Motability vehicles. Therefore, we are unable to provide accurate information on the number of people who have been required to return a Motability vehicle in the last six months.

Motability is an independent organisation wholly responsible for the administration of the Motability Scheme. The details of the number of people returning Motability vehicles for the requested time period would only be contained within Motability’s Management Information.

4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made an assessment of the adequacy of the number of ventilators in use in the NHS in England.

Ventilator machines are usually linked to patients in Intensive Care Units/Critical Care/High Dependency Units, although some patients may have them at home or use Continuous Positive Airway Pressure machines to assist with their breathing.

Information on Critical Care Bed Capacity is published by NHS England and can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/critical-care-capacity/

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the current capacity in NHS England for patients with (a) respiratory failure and (b) multiple organ failure.

Highly specialised beds will only be needed by a minority of affected patients. As the Chief Medical Officer has said, hospitals are carefully considering how best to flex services to respond to extra demand. NHS England and NHS Improvement are working closely with providers across the country to support this.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to increase the capacity of NHS England for patients with (a) respiratory failure and (b) multiple organ failure in the event of an increase in these cases as a result of covid–19.

Highly specialised beds will only be needed by a minority of affected patients. As the Chief Medical Officer has said, hospitals are carefully considering how best to flex services to respond to extra demand. NHS England and NHS Improvement are working closely with providers across the country to support this.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will ensure parity of financial compensation for people affected by the infected blood scandal in each nation of the UK; and if he will make a statement.

The Government established the England Infected Blood Support Scheme in 2017 to provide dedicated ex-gratia financial and non-financial support to people infected by HIV and/or hepatitis C through treatment with National Health Service-supplied blood or blood products, and their affected families. This scheme is currently administered by NHS Business Services Authority.

We are working with our partners in the devolved nations and other relevant Government departments to improve parity of support across the United Kingdom.

We will consider any recommendations when the Infected Blood Inquiry reports, including those on compensation.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what research his Department has undertaken of the effect of air pollution on health in the UK.

The Department invests over £1 billion a year in health research through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The NIHR supports a broad spectrum of research on the health effects of air pollution through the Health Protection Research Unit (HPRU) in the Health Impact of Environmental Hazards at King’s College London and the HPRU in Environmental Change and Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The NIHR also funds relevant research through its Public Health Research Programme, including an investigation on the impact of London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone on children’s respiratory health.

The Department identifies priorities for research into air pollution using recommendations from the Committee on Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP) and Public Health England (PHE). It also commissions PHE and COMEAP to review and conduct such research.

5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the human rights situation in Bahrain in 2019; and if he will make a statement.

Our most recent assessment was published as part of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office's (FCO) Human Rights and Democracy Report in June 2019. Bahrain remains an FCO human rights priority country, particularly because of the use of the death penalty, allegations of torture and mistreatment in detention and concerns over freedom of expression and assembly. We monitor events in Bahrain closely and continue to encourage the Government of Bahrain to deliver on its international and domestic human rights commitments.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of the Israeli Government's ban on the export of some types of Palestinian agricultural produce to the Kingdom of Jordan on the Israel-Palestine peace process.

The UK is concerned about the impact of recent Israeli trade restrictions in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. We are committed to supporting Palestinian economic development. The UK Government strongly supports the principle of free trade. Businesses should be free to import Palestinian products without barriers. Her Majesty's Ambassador to Israel has raised this issue with the Government of Israel, most recently on 12 February. We welcome the agreement reached by the Government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority, on 20 February, to lift their respective trade restrictions. We urge both sides to ensure the continued implementation of this agreement.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what diplomatic steps he is taking to help end the dispute between the Government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority on trade of agricultural products.

The UK is concerned about the impact of recent Israeli trade restrictions in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. We are committed to supporting Palestinian economic development. The UK Government strongly supports the principle of free trade. Businesses should be free to import Palestinian products without barriers. Her Majesty's Ambassador to Israel has raised this issue with the Government of Israel, most recently on 12 February. We welcome the agreement reached by the Government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority, on 20 February, to lift their respective trade restrictions. We urge both sides to ensure the continued implementation of this agreement.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to promote democracy in the Democratic Republic of Congo; and if he will make a statement.

The UK is committed to promoting democracy in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and continues to work with international partners to press the DRC Government to improve political space, confirm release of political prisoners, recognise people's right to peaceful protest and refrain from using excessive force against protestors. The UK funds the Westminster Foundation for Democracy to build the capacity of the DRC Parliament and improve evidence-based law making and democratic accountability. In 2019 we also funded a local NGO to improve monitoring of violations against press freedom. More broadly, the UK continues to fund efforts to support stability and security as well as human rights in DRC through contributions to the UN peacekeeping mission MONUSCO, humanitarian funding and through the Department for International Development conflict programming supporting stabilisation and peacebuilding in the East.

5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether he has any plans to update the current guidance on cases of parental child abduction to Japan.

The FCO provides information on International Parental Child Abduction on GOV.UK, as well as country specific information for Japan. The British Government continues to work closely with our Japanese partners to ensure the 1980 Hague Convention is operated effectively. In 2019, Japan introduced new legislation, which should come into effect in 2020, with the aim of improving the enforcement process in international parental abduction cases. Gov.uk will be updated to reflect this when the legislation comes into effect.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make representations to his Colombian counterpart on the violence against (a) social activists and (b) FARC former combatants in that country; and if he will make a statement.

​The United Kingdom shares the concerns of the Colombian Government regarding the ongoing violence in Colombia as organised armed groups fight for control of illicit economies. We have been vocal in expressing our concern about the persistent high levels of violence and threats towards social activists, former FARC combatants and others, and the impact this has on the future of peace.

We regularly raise these issues with the Colombian Government and in multilateral fora. Most recently, our Permanent Representative to the United Nations spoke on this issue at the UN Security Council on 13 January. Our Embassy regularly raises concerns about specific communities with the relevant state actors in Colombia.

We remain steadfast in our support of the Colombian authorities as they work towards sustainable peace, and will continue to work closely with the Colombian Government and civil society on the peace process and related matters.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
21st Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to his Colombian counterpart on the safety and security of the 9,000 FARC members living outside of official reincorporation zones in Colombia.

The United Kingdom welcomes the Colombian Government's longstanding commitment to assisting former guerrilla fighters transition to civilian life following the peace agreement of 2016. We have committed almost £45 million over 5 years through the United Kingdom conflict Stability and Security Fund for Colombia to support development across conflict-affected regions. We have done this through programmes designed to build state capacity to ensure the safety of former fighters and of other vulnerable individuals and groups, including outside of official reincorporation zones.

Our Embassy regularly raises concerns about specific communities with the relevant state actors in Colombia.

We also raised our concern about this issue at the United Nations Security Council session on Colombia on 13 January, where we called on the Colombian government to accelerate its reintegration programmes for former combatants. We will continue to work closely with the Colombian government and civil society on the peace process and related matters.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the level of additional infrastructure required (a) in and (b) around the port of Holyhead to conduct checks on goods after the transition period.

The Border Delivery Group is working with departments and with the Welsh Government to understand the implications at the border, including for infrastructure, of the end of the transition period.

This work will include working closely with ports and locations, including Holyhead, which may require new infrastructure.

11th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the annual gross cost of checks on goods from the European Economic Area; and what estimate he has made of the (a) staffing costs and (b) infrastructure maintenance costs of those checks after December 2020.

No cross-departmental assessment is held on the annual cost of checking goods from the EEA.

The Border Delivery Group will work closely with all relevant departments and the border industry to ensure that the necessary staffing and infrastructure is in place for new border controls at the end of the transition period.

11th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what advice his Department has issued to businesses on the steps required to prepare for importing goods from the European Economic Area after December 2020.

In January 2020, HMRC wrote to 219,000 VAT-registered businesses that trade with the EU, explaining the actions they need to take to prepare for changes to customs arrangements after the transition period. The letter set out that businesses will need to make customs declarations for GB-EU trade and that they should start to prepare for this now by considering whether they want to use a customs agent or make declarations themselves. It also explained that businesses will need an Economic Operator Registration and Identification (EORI) number that starts with the letters GB to be able to submit customs declarations. HMRC has already issued around 200,000 of these. This letter was supported by emails and social media to reach a wider group of businesses.

Alongside this HMRC are continuing to engage with key stakeholders (including Business Representative Bodies and Trade Associations) to seek their input and amplify HMRC’s messaging to ensure it is wide reaching and readily available to those who need to take action. This includes monthly meetings with the top 35 organisations who represent over 500,000 businesses in the UK.

HMRC will continue to provide clear guidance on the actions businesses will need to take, and HMRC will engage with them throughout the transition period to support their readiness to comply with these new requirements.

13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many biometric residence permits have been returned to her Department within 10 days of issue as a result of (a) a mistake and (b) a defect with the permit.

The Home Office do not capture data relating to how many biometric residence permits have been returned to the department within 10 days of issue. The department is therefore, unable to answer this question.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she (a) has recently taken and (b) plans to take to engage the music industry on ensuring that the visa and immigration system supports the needs of that sector.

Free Movement will end on 31 December 2020 with the end of the Transition Period. Following the end of the Transition Period EEA and Swiss nationals will be able to continue to travel to the UK for holidays or short-term trips, without needing a visa. The current Immigration Rules, including those for visitors, contain a wide range of provisions to cater for artists, entertainers and musicians.

The Home Office continues to engage with DCMS and the creative sector to ensure the future immigration system contributes to the thriving cultural sector in the UK.

More detailed analysis on the points-based system and individual routes will be published shortly.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what qualitative data her Department (a) holds and (b) has commissioned on the benefits of Tier 5 Visa rules for EEA musicians and artistic performers to the UK music industry.

Overseas musicians and performers make an important contribution to the UK's creative sector and remain welcome in the UK and take part in events.

Our existing arrangements provide a number of routes for creatives to enter the UK and undertake work on a temporary basis. The Home Office continues to engage with the creative sector to ensure the future points-based immigration system will enable the UK’s cultural life to thrive.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's policy paper, The UK’s Points-Based Immigration System: Policy Statement, published on 19 February 2020, whether her Department has made an estimate of the proportion of EEA citizens working in the creative industries who would have been denied a visa under those proposals since 2004.

Musicians and performers are a valued and important part of UK culture. The UK attracts world class artists, entertainers and musicians and that is not going to change under the new system.

The Home Office continues to engage with the creative sector to ensure the future system will enable the UK’s cultural life to thrive.

In delivering on its manifesto commitments for a new points-based system, the Government has considered relevant views, evidence, and analysis.

More detailed analysis will be provided on the points-based system and individual routes will be published shortly.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that immigration rules support the needs of the music industry.

Non EEA visiting artists, entertainers and musicians can currently perform at events, take part in competitions and auditions, make personal appearances and take part in promotional activities for up to 6 months without the need for formal sponsorship or a work visa. They can also receive payment for appearances at permit free festivals for up to 6 months, or for up to one month for a specific engagement, under the Visitor route.

In future Artists wishing to come to the UK for longer-term work will need to do so under the points-based system. Under this system there will continue to be special arrangements for creative workers, which in future will encompass both EEA and non-EEA citizens.

The Home Office continues to engage with the creative sector to ensure the future system will enable the UK’s cultural life to thrive.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she plans to take to ensure the continued effective prosecution of wildlife criminals after the funding arrangement for the National Wildlife Crime Unit expires at the end of March 2020.

The Home Office will be providing specific funding of £136,000 to support the work of the National Wildlife Crime Unit in 2020/21. This will be in addition to the funding central Government will be providing to police forces in England and Wales to tackle all types of crime, including wildlife crime.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people claimed asylum in the UK on the basis of sexual orientation in 2018; and what proportion of those applications were refused.

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of asylum applications on the basis of sexual orientation and the initial decisions on such applications are published in the LGBT asylum data table under SOC_00 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets.

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to 2018, with the next planned update scheduled for August 2020.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Links:

Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

LGBT asylum data table:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/848102/asylum-sexual-orientation-dec-2018-tables.ods

Asylum and Resettlement Detailed Datasets

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets

Research and statistics calendar:

https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?keywords=immigration&content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=relevance

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many hours of LGBT+ sensitive training were delivered to officers who interview people claiming asylum on the grounds of sexual orientation in 2019.

The Home Office does not record the number of hours of LGBT+ sensitive training delivered to officers who interview individuals who claim asylum on the grounds of sexual orientation. LGBT+ training is a central theme throughout the Foundation Training Programme (FTP) that all asylum Decision Makers receive.

We are committed to an asylum system which is supportive and responsive to those claiming asylum on the basis of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to minimise the risk of victimisation to LGBT+ asylum seekers living in temporary accommodation.

We take the welfare of all our service users in asylum accommodation very seriously.

The new accommodation contracts contain several uplifts in order to safeguard the vulnerable, including LGBT+, service users. This includes specific training for all frontline provider staff and improved data sharing protocols which include the characteristics and needs of Service users at risk of with specific needs.

Further, we liaise with Micro Rainbow, a charity who organises safe housing and support for LGBT+ asylum seekers and refugees.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the risks to LGBT+ detainees in immigration removal centres.

The UK has a proud record of providing protection for asylum seekers fleeing persecution because of their sexual orientation. Each case is considered on its individual merits, with all available evidence carefully and sensitively considered in light of published country information.

Decisions on claims based on sexual orientation are reviewed by a second experienced caseworker as an additional safeguard.

Migrants, including asylum claimants, may be detained for immigration purposes only in accordance with Home Office detention policy, as set out in Detention general guidance and adults at risk in immigration detention. The detention decision must always be made on the basis of the individual’s particular circumstances and eligibility for detention.

All immigration removal centres take a strategic approach to equality and diversity, with identification, monitoring and support for all detainees with protected characteristics. Every detainee receives an individual risk assessment at the point of initial detention which is repeated when the detainee enters the immigration removal centre. The risk assessment is kept under review.

Guidance is available for Home Office and supplier staff on providing consistent standards of treatment for LGB detainees. This is provided in Detention Services Order 2/2016 ‘Lesbian, gay and bisexual detainees in the detention estate’ which is available on the gov.uk website: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/lesbian-gay-and-bisexual-detainees

Where transsexual individuals are detained, Detention Services Order 11/2012 on the ‘Care and Management of Transsexual Detainees’ sets out how individuals with these particular protected characteristics should be safeguarded and treated in detention. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/caring-for-and-managing-transsexual-detainees

The UK only ever returns those who both the Home Office and the Courts are satisfied do not need our protection and have no legal basis to remain in the UK.

We do not currently hold the data in the format you have requested, however published data is available on the number of individuals held in immigration detention and those that are returned, including the sexuality of the number of applicants and decisions made. Details of the number of Asylum claims made is also published, the data can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-september-2019/list-of-tables#detention-and-returns

Under section 8 (detentions and returns) and section 10 (Asylum on the basis of sexual orientation):

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many failed LGBT+ asylum seekers were deported from the UK in each year since 2015.

The UK has a proud record of providing protection for asylum seekers fleeing persecution because of their sexual orientation. Each case is considered on its individual merits, with all available evidence carefully and sensitively considered in light of published country information.

Decisions on claims based on sexual orientation are reviewed by a second experienced caseworker as an additional safeguard.

Migrants, including asylum claimants, may be detained for immigration purposes only in accordance with Home Office detention policy, as set out in Detention general guidance and adults at risk in immigration detention. The detention decision must always be made on the basis of the individual’s particular circumstances and eligibility for detention.

All immigration removal centres take a strategic approach to equality and diversity, with identification, monitoring and support for all detainees with protected characteristics. Every detainee receives an individual risk assessment at the point of initial detention which is repeated when the detainee enters the immigration removal centre. The risk assessment is kept under review.

Guidance is available for Home Office and supplier staff on providing consistent standards of treatment for LGB detainees. This is provided in Detention Services Order 2/2016 ‘Lesbian, gay and bisexual detainees in the detention estate’ which is available on the gov.uk website: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/lesbian-gay-and-bisexual-detainees

Where transsexual individuals are detained, Detention Services Order 11/2012 on the ‘Care and Management of Transsexual Detainees’ sets out how individuals with these particular protected characteristics should be safeguarded and treated in detention. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/caring-for-and-managing-transsexual-detainees

The UK only ever returns those who both the Home Office and the Courts are satisfied do not need our protection and have no legal basis to remain in the UK.

We do not currently hold the data in the format you have requested, however published data is available on the number of individuals held in immigration detention and those that are returned, including the sexuality of the number of applicants and decisions made. Details of the number of Asylum claims made is also published, the data can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-september-2019/list-of-tables#detention-and-returns

Under section 8 (detentions and returns) and section 10 (Asylum on the basis of sexual orientation):

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many LGBT+ asylum seekers have been the victim of a reported hate crime in (a) asylum accommodation and (b) immigration removal centres in each year since 2015.

The Government takes the welfare and safety of those in asylum accommodation very seriously and no form of ill-treatment or discrimination is tolerated.

We do not tolerate any kind of criminal activity in our accommodation or immigration removal centres, and any allegation of crime is immediately reported to the police for investigation. Reported incidents which are considered crimes are recorded by the police.

Information on the number of reported hate crimes is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people seeking asylum in the UK on the basis of sexual orientation are in immigration detention.

The UK has a proud record of providing protection for asylum seekers fleeing persecution because of their sexual orientation. Each case is considered on its individual merits, with all available evidence carefully and sensitively considered in light of published country information.

Decisions on claims based on sexual orientation are reviewed by a second experienced caseworker as an additional safeguard.

Migrants, including asylum claimants, may be detained for immigration purposes only in accordance with Home Office detention policy, as set out in Detention general guidance and adults at risk in immigration detention. The detention decision must always be made on the basis of the individual’s particular circumstances and eligibility for detention.

All immigration removal centres take a strategic approach to equality and diversity, with identification, monitoring and support for all detainees with protected characteristics. Every detainee receives an individual risk assessment at the point of initial detention which is repeated when the detainee enters the immigration removal centre. The risk assessment is kept under review.

Guidance is available for Home Office and supplier staff on providing consistent standards of treatment for LGB detainees. This is provided in Detention Services Order 2/2016 ‘Lesbian, gay and bisexual detainees in the detention estate’ which is available on the gov.uk website: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/lesbian-gay-and-bisexual-detainees

Where transsexual individuals are detained, Detention Services Order 11/2012 on the ‘Care and Management of Transsexual Detainees’ sets out how individuals with these particular protected characteristics should be safeguarded and treated in detention. This can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/caring-for-and-managing-transsexual-detainees

The UK only ever returns those who both the Home Office and the Courts are satisfied do not need our protection and have no legal basis to remain in the UK.

We do not currently hold the data in the format you have requested, however published data is available on the number of individuals held in immigration detention and those that are returned, including the sexuality of the number of applicants and decisions made. Details of the number of Asylum claims made is also published, the data can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-september-2019/list-of-tables#detention-and-returns

Under section 8 (detentions and returns) and section 10 (Asylum on the basis of sexual orientation):

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/asylum-and-resettlement-datasets

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether musicians and artistic performers from the EU will be subject to the Tier 5 (Creative and Sporting visa) temporary worker route from 1 January 2021.

Currently, visiting artists, entertainers and musicians can perform at events, take part in competitions and auditions, make personal appearances and take part in promotional activities for up to 6 months without the need for formal sponsorship or a work visa. They can also receive payment for appearance at permit free festivals for up to 6 months, or for up to one month for a specific engagement, under the Visitor route.

Artists wishing to come to the UK for longer-term work will need to do so under the points-based system. There will continue to be special arrangements for creative workers, which in future will encompass both EEA and non-EEA citizens.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending a statutory duty on flood response to the Fire and Rescue Service in England in line with that in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

A statutory duty for firefighters to respond to flooding is unlikely to make a significant difference to the Fire and Rescue Services which already provide effective response to flooding incidents. This has been demonstrated through the fantastic response of Fire and Rescue Services to a range of incidents in 2019 including the Lincolnshire and Yorkshire floods and the Toddbrook Reservoir incident; and more recently in response to this year’s severe storms.

Fire and Rescue Authorities in England already have the power to respond to all kinds of emergencies including flooding, under the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004, and placing a duty on them would remove local choice on responding to local emergencies.

The Government provides the Fire and Rescue Service with additional resource to tackle flooding via the provision of High-Volume Pumps and boats.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have had a (a) passport and (b) UK citizenship withdrawn under the Royal Prerogative in each year since 2013.

(a) The Secretary of State publishes the number of passports withdrawn under the Royal Prerogative in the annual Government Transparency Report: Disruptive and Investigatory Powers. The last Transparency Report was published in July 2018. A link to that report can be found here;

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/727961/CCS207_CCS0418538240-1_Transparency_Report_2018_Web_Accessible.pdf

(b) Citizenship is not withdrawn under the Royal Prerogative, it is the British Nationality Act 1981 that provides the Secretary of State with powers to deprive a person of citizenship status under the circumstances set out at sections 40(2) and 40(3) of the Act.

Section 40(2) allows the Secretary of State to deprive any person of British citizenship, should they deem it conducive to the public good to do so.

Section 40(3) allows the Secretary of State to deprive a person who has obtained citizenship by naturalisation or registration, where the Secretary of State is satisfied citizenship was obtained by means of fraud, false representation or concealment of material fact.

Three reports have been published to date in 2015, 2017 and 2018, which have included figures for section 40(2) deprivations. Figures from May 2010 to December 2014 are included in the 2015 report, from January to December 2015 in the 2017 report and January 2016 to December 2017 in the 2018 report. The links to these reports are below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/473603/51973_Cm_9151_Transparency_Accessible.pdf

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/593668/58597_Cm_9420_Transparency_report_web.pdf

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disruptive-and-investigatory-powers-transparency-report-2018

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Home Department, how many Unexplained Wealth Orders have been issued in each quarter since the implementation of those orders.

Since implementation, 15 unexplained wealth orders (UWOs) have been granted in relation to 4 cases.

The quarterly breakdown is as follows:

3 UWOs were granted in relation to 1 case in Q4 of 2017/18

3 UWOs were granted in relation to 1 case in Q1 2019/20

9 UWOs were granted in relation to 2 cases in Q2 2019/20

4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of a single location in Wales for scanning settled status application documents on vulnerable applicants in Wales.

EU citizens make a huge contribution to our economy and society, and we want them to stay. The EU Settlement Scheme enables them to do so and over 3 million people have now made applications, to which more than 2.7 million have been granted status.

The application process for the EU Settlement Scheme is straightforward and user-friendly, and is accessible on any smartphone, tablet or computer using internet browsers.

There are multiple ways to have identity documents checked, including using the EU Exit: ID Document Check app or by posting identity documents to the Home Office. There are also over 100 locations nationwide, provided by local authorities, where applicants have their passport scanned and verified.

The ID document scanning service is provided at the discretion of each local authority. The viability and cost of offering the ID document scanning service in each location is a matter for each local authority. There are currently seven local authorities participating in Wales; Bridgend, Caerphilly, Cardiff, Ceredigion, Conway, Gwynedd and Rhondda Cynon Taf.

The Home Office would encourage as many local authorities as possible to offer this service, and we continue to work with local government bodies across the UK to increase the provision of this service.

Participating local authorities do not receive funding from central Government to provide this service. Charges for using this service, payable directly to the local authority, can be set to cover the cost of providing the service. Some local authorities have elected to provide the service for free to residents, whilst others have elected to set a fee.

The Home Office has a range of structures in place nationally to support the most vulnerable people in making their application to the EU Settlement scheme, including up to £9 million grant funding for 57 voluntary and community organisations. This includes funding allocated to charities in Wales.

The EUSS Grant Scheme was set up as a result of extensive engagement with voluntary and community sector organisations representing different vulnerable groups. We continue to engage with stakeholders to ensure appropriate support is in place for vulnerable applicants.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the effect on vulnerable people of charging a fee for scanning supporting documents for Settled Status at a single location in Wales.

EU citizens make a huge contribution to our economy and society, and we want them to stay. The EU Settlement Scheme enables them to do so and over 3 million people have now made applications, to which more than 2.7 million have been granted status.

The application process for the EU Settlement Scheme is straightforward and user-friendly, and is accessible on any smartphone, tablet or computer using internet browsers.

There are multiple ways to have identity documents checked, including using the EU Exit: ID Document Check app or by posting identity documents to the Home Office. There are also over 100 locations nationwide, provided by local authorities, where applicants have their passport scanned and verified.

The ID document scanning service is provided at the discretion of each local authority. The viability and cost of offering the ID document scanning service in each location is a matter for each local authority. There are currently seven local authorities participating in Wales; Bridgend, Caerphilly, Cardiff, Ceredigion, Conway, Gwynedd and Rhondda Cynon Taf.

The Home Office would encourage as many local authorities as possible to offer this service, and we continue to work with local government bodies across the UK to increase the provision of this service.

Participating local authorities do not receive funding from central Government to provide this service. Charges for using this service, payable directly to the local authority, can be set to cover the cost of providing the service. Some local authorities have elected to provide the service for free to residents, whilst others have elected to set a fee.

The Home Office has a range of structures in place nationally to support the most vulnerable people in making their application to the EU Settlement scheme, including up to £9 million grant funding for 57 voluntary and community organisations. This includes funding allocated to charities in Wales.

The EUSS Grant Scheme was set up as a result of extensive engagement with voluntary and community sector organisations representing different vulnerable groups. We continue to engage with stakeholders to ensure appropriate support is in place for vulnerable applicants.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to review the application fee for British citizen naturalisation; and if she will make a statement.

The Border, Immigration and Citizenship System (BICS) is predominately funded by the user, and we think it is right that those who use it contribute to its cost, thereby reducing the burden on the UK taxpayer. We keep our fees for immigration and nationality applications under review and ensure they are within the parameters agreed with HM Treasury and Parliament, as set out in Section 68 (9) of the Immigration Act 2014.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking support EU nationals living in the UK that (a) lack mental capacity and (b) do not have a power of attorney with their application for settled status.

The Home Office has put in place a comprehensive vulnerability strategy to ensure that the EU Settlement Scheme is accessible to all.

A user group of external stakeholders who represent the needs of vulnerable individuals has been established to work with the Home Office to assess and understand relevant risks and issues and to ensure the right support arrangements are in place for applicants, including those who lack mental capacity.

The Home Office is working closely with the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, Department for Health and Social Care, NHS England as well as with stakeholders including the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, the Care Provider Allice and Local Government Association. This collaboration ensures local authorities and partners can work together to identify and support those without mental capacity to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.

Applicants who need additional support, or those who are assisting them, can call the Settlement Resolution Centre or contact one of the 57 voluntary and community grant funded organisations who can provide immigration advice to individual applicants.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of the application process for settled status for EU nationals living in the UK that are homeless.

The Home Office has put in place measures to ensure that the EU Settlement Scheme is accessible to all vulnerable applicants, including those who are homeless.

A user group of external stakeholders who represent the needs of potentially vulnerable individuals, including those who are homeless, has been established to work with the Home Office to ensure the right support arrangements are in place.

There is provision in policy to allow for a wide range of evidence to be provided by applicants in order to prove their residence, including confirmation from a charity or support group. There is also provision for applicants to apply without the standard evidence of identity and nationality where they can not provide it due to compelling practical or compassionate reasons or circumstances beyond their control, which may include being homeless or destitute.

The Home Office has introduced a range of support including up to £9 million grant funding for 57 voluntary and community organisations, to ensure those that require the most support to apply to the scheme can access it. This includes funding allocated to charities that support the homeless.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what progress his Department has made on regulating estate agents' fees since his Department's consultation on the home buying and selling process closed in December 2017.

The Government is clear that estate agent fees should be set by the market. However, where agents receive a referral fee these must be disclosed to consumers before they make any decision to purchase.

In February 2019, National Trading Standards Estate and Letting Agents Team (NTSELAT) published guidance for estate agents which makes it clear they must disclose referral fees. We have asked NSTELAT to monitor this, and in February 2020 they reported that the majority of agents do disclose that they will receive a referral fee. NTSELAT will to continue to monitor and report back any concerns.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
13th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many and what proportion of displaced Grenfell Tower residents are now in permanent accommodation.

According to the latest data from the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Council (RBKC), as of 12 March 2020, of the 201 households from Grenfell Tower and Walk that require rehousing, 194 households have moved into permanent accommodation. This equates to over 95 per cent of Grenfell households that require rehousing now living in permanent accommodation.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people aged 75 or over have been prosecuted for failure to hold a TV licence in each year since 2015.

The Ministry of Justice has published the number of prosecutions, convictions and sentencing outcomes for the non-payment of television license fees up to December 2018. The number of prosecutions of individuals aged 75 or over can be found in the accompanying table.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of pregnant women placed in solitary confinement in each prison in (a) 2017, (b) 2018 and (c) 2019; and what the average length of time was for each woman to be placed in solitary confinement.

HMPPS does not hold people in solitary confinement but there are occasions where, for their own safety or that of others and in line with PSO 1700, prisoners are segregated from the main population of the prison.

Our policy is clear that pregnant women should only be held in segregation exceptionally. Healthcare visits and assessments by a doctor and healthcare staff take place regularly on segregation units to ensure that prisoners can be removed from segregation if there are any physical or mental health grounds to do so. An initial healthcare screen is completed by a doctor or registered nurse within two hours of a prisoner being placed in segregation.

We do not hold central data on the number of pregnant women that have been placed in segregation units, although governors of individual prisons will be aware of numbers of pregnant women in segregation in their establishment.

We are conducting a review of our policy on Mother and Baby Units, which includes looking at what information related to pregnancy and birth can be collected centrally and published. The review is due to be published in the Summer.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women gave birth (a) inside each prison and (b) on the way from prison to hospital in (i) 2017, (ii) 2018 and (iii) 2019.

Every effort is made to transfer pregnant women to hospital to give birth. On the rare occasions that births take place in prisons, it is owing to the unpredictability of labour.

The information requested is not currently collected centrally as a matter of routine. Information on births in prisons is recorded by the prison, and on births in transit from prison to hospital by either the prison or the NHS Trust, depending on the mode of transport used. It would not be possible to collect and collate this information without incurring disproportionate cost.

I am able to state, however, on the basis of specific data collection exercises we have conducted, that there were fewer than five births in prison in 2018. We are unable to publish a more specific number because this would risk identifying individuals and therefore confidentiality, which contravenes the Data Protection Act.

We are conducting a review of our policy on Mother and Baby Units, which includes looking at how we can improve the data available in relation to pregnancy and births. This is a complex area and there are sensitive issues relating to use of confidential medical information. The review is due to be published in the summer.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many convictions there have been for child sexual abuse committed in the (a) 1970s and (b) 1980s since the police service began the national operation coordinating claims of non-recent child sexual abuse in 2014.

The question seeks statistics on convictions arising from Operation Hydrant, the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) co-ordination hub established in June 2014, to deliver the national policing response, oversight, and coordination of historic child sexual abuse cases. The hub covers investigations concerning persons of public prominence, or in relation to those offences which took place within institutional settings. Statistics produced by Operation Hydrant are not comparable with national crime statistics as some suspects could be charged with more than one offence.

The Ministry of Justice Court Proceedings database holds information on people who have been proceeded against, found guilty and sentenced for specific criminal offences in England and Wales. However, this system only captures information on the principal offence for which a person was convicted and does not specifically refer to cases that are part of Operation Hydrant.

A further breakdown of data held on the court proceedings database shows that there have been 3,318 convictions in total for historic child abuse offences (where the abuse occurred in the period 1 January 1970 to 31 December 1989). Specifically, this includes 1409 cases in the 1970s and 1909 in the 1980s. These cases cover convictions where:

  • there was at least one count of child sexual abuse on the indictment;
  • the offence fell within the Home Office sexual offences group;
  • we know that the victim was under the age of 16 at the time of the offence; and
  • the defendant pleaded guilty or was found guilty of at least one count of child sexual abuse on 1 July 2014 or later

Where a defendant has committed an offence in both the 1970s and the 1980s, these are accounted for separately. The data provided covers the period up to 30 September 2019.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have applied for the return of their child to the UK from another country under the 1980 Hague Convention in each of the last five years.

The number of cases where the return application under the 1980 Hague Convention was made through the Central Authority in England and Wales for the years 2014 - 2018 is set out in the table. This information is published by the Royal Courts of Justice at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/829393/2018_RCJ_tables.xlsx. The England and Wales figures for 2019 are expected to be published in July 2020. The numbers of cases reported from Scotland and Northern Ireland in the table have not been published separately.

Applications for 1980 Hague Convention returns

Calendar year

England and Wales

Scotland

Northern Ireland

2014

170

30

4

2015

220

37

10

2016

232

30

7

2017

224

33

6

2018

154

33

8

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure that the UK remains a world leader in lawtech after the UK leaves the EU.

These questions have been passed to the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice as the Minister responsible for legal services.

Government has a shared vision for a broad, deep and flexible partnership with the EU, including ambitious arrangements for services and investment, outlined in the Political Declaration. The Ministry of Justice is working closely with the rest of government on planning for negotiations.

Ministers and officials have extensive, frequent and varied engagement with representatives from the legal services sector on a range of issues, including UK and EU relations and future trade. Part of this engagement includes sponsoring the Brexit Law Committee.

The UK is a magnet for talent and home to innovative and successful new companies, and the Government is committed to ensuring that UK legal services, courts, and English law remain world-leading, and a competitive choice for business. This includes supporting the growth of the UK lawtech sector. To this end the Ministry of Justice launched and sponsors the industry-led LawTech Delivery Panel, and recently awarded a £2m grant to Tech Nation to drive innovation in the legal sector and create an environment that allows the UK’s lawtech sector to thrive.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions he has had with representatives of the legal services sector on the future relationship between the UK and the EU in relation to legal services.

These questions have been passed to the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice as the Minister responsible for legal services.

Government has a shared vision for a broad, deep and flexible partnership with the EU, including ambitious arrangements for services and investment, outlined in the Political Declaration. The Ministry of Justice is working closely with the rest of government on planning for negotiations.

Ministers and officials have extensive, frequent and varied engagement with representatives from the legal services sector on a range of issues, including UK and EU relations and future trade. Part of this engagement includes sponsoring the Brexit Law Committee.

The UK is a magnet for talent and home to innovative and successful new companies, and the Government is committed to ensuring that UK legal services, courts, and English law remain world-leading, and a competitive choice for business. This includes supporting the growth of the UK lawtech sector. To this end the Ministry of Justice launched and sponsors the industry-led LawTech Delivery Panel, and recently awarded a £2m grant to Tech Nation to drive innovation in the legal sector and create an environment that allows the UK’s lawtech sector to thrive.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the status of legal services in the future UK-EU relationship.

These questions have been passed to the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice as the Minister responsible for legal services.

Government has a shared vision for a broad, deep and flexible partnership with the EU, including ambitious arrangements for services and investment, outlined in the Political Declaration. The Ministry of Justice is working closely with the rest of government on planning for negotiations.

Ministers and officials have extensive, frequent and varied engagement with representatives from the legal services sector on a range of issues, including UK and EU relations and future trade. Part of this engagement includes sponsoring the Brexit Law Committee.

The UK is a magnet for talent and home to innovative and successful new companies, and the Government is committed to ensuring that UK legal services, courts, and English law remain world-leading, and a competitive choice for business. This includes supporting the growth of the UK lawtech sector. To this end the Ministry of Justice launched and sponsors the industry-led LawTech Delivery Panel, and recently awarded a £2m grant to Tech Nation to drive innovation in the legal sector and create an environment that allows the UK’s lawtech sector to thrive.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Wales, what discussions he has had with the Welsh Government on UK Government financial support for tackling the flooding caused in Wales by storm Dennis.

My Department and others are determined to ensure that all of those affected by flooding are supported in the best way possible. Flood response in Wales is a devolved matter. The UK Government will look seriously at any request from the Welsh Government for additional support and assistance for flood relief, including additional finances.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales
15th Jan 2020
What recent assessment he has made of the potential effect on the Welsh economy of the EU Withdrawal Agreement.

The Withdrawal Agreement allows us to get Brexit done and leave the European Union in a smooth and orderly manner at the end of the month.

The Government will maximise the opportunities of Brexit for Wales and the whole of the UK, taking back control of our money, our laws, our trade and our borders.

Simon Hart
Secretary of State for Wales