Jo Stevens Portrait

Jo Stevens

Labour - Cardiff Central

17,179 (41.1%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 7th May 2015

Shadow Secretary of State for Wales

(since November 2021)

European Statutory Instruments Committee
10th Feb 2020 - 27th Jun 2022
Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
6th Apr 2020 - 29th Nov 2021
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Culture, Media and Sport Sub-committee on Online Harms and Disinformation
10th Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Sub-committee on Online Harms and Disinformation
10th Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 11th May 2020
DCMS Sub-Committee on Disinformation
12th Mar 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
European Statutory Instruments
18th Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Culture, Media and Sport Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
European Statutory Instruments Committee
18th Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Justice Committee
13th Mar 2017 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Secretary of State for Wales
6th Oct 2016 - 27th Jan 2017
Shadow Solicitor General
13th Jan 2016 - 6th Oct 2016
Shadow Minister (Justice)
7th Jan 2016 - 6th Oct 2016
Committee on Standards
9th Sep 2015 - 21st Jul 2016
Committee of Privileges
28th Oct 2015 - 21st Jul 2016
Committee on Privileges
28th Oct 2015 - 21st Jul 2016
Business, Innovation and Skills Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 1st Feb 2016


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Jo Stevens has voted in 762 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Jo Stevens Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Oliver Dowden (Conservative)
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
(27 debate interactions)
David T C Davies (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Wales
(20 debate interactions)
Lindsay Hoyle (Speaker)
(17 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Wales Office
(52 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(10 debate contributions)
Home Office
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Telecommunications (Security) Act 2021
(2,975 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Jo Stevens's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Jo Stevens

14th January 2021
Jo Stevens signed this EDM on Monday 18th January 2021

Godfrey Colin Cameron

Tabled by: Chris Stephens (Scottish National Party - Glasgow South West)
That this House is deeply saddened by news of the death of Godfrey Colin Cameron, a hardworking member of Parliamentary security staff and member of the PCS trade union who passed away aged just 55 after contracting covid-19; extends our sincere condolences to his devoted wife Hyacinth, children Leon and …
139 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Feb 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 114
Scottish National Party: 15
Independent: 5
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
18th March 2020
Jo Stevens signed this EDM on Tuesday 21st April 2020

Repatriation of UK nationals from countries that have closed borders

Tabled by: Jonathan Edwards (Independent - Carmarthen East and Dinefwr)
That this House notes that as a result of the covid-19 outbreak, a number of countries have closed their borders to contain the virus; notes that as a result many UK subjects are stranded; calls on the Government to negotiate with all countries where borders have closed, ways of repatriating …
70 signatures
(Most recent: 5 May 2020)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 30
Scottish National Party: 14
Liberal Democrat: 9
Independent: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 4
Conservative: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Green Party: 1
Alliance: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
View All Jo Stevens's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Jo Stevens, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


3 Urgent Questions tabled by Jo Stevens

Tuesday 30th April 2024
Tuesday 22nd June 2021

Jo Stevens has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Jo Stevens


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to impose certain duties upon Her Majesty’s Government to ensure the accuracy, completeness and utility of electoral registers; to make provision for the sharing of data for the purposes of electoral registration; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 15th November 2017
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason his Department has not made a decision on the acquisition of Newport Wafer Fab by Vishay Intertechnology within its 30-working day target.

Given the quasi-judicial nature of the government’s investment screening powers, and for commercial confidentiality and national security reasons, it would be inappropriate to comment on any specific acquisitions or the potential applicability of the NSI Act 2021. Decisions are always made within the statutory timeframes required by the Act. Transparency is of course a crucial part of the NSI Act, and as such, the Government has published an Annual Report detailing the use of NSI Act powers. The report and notices of any Final Orders that have been made are available on GOV.UK.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
31st Jan 2024
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when his Department plans to make a decision on the acquisition of Newport Wafer Fab by Vishay Intertechnology.

Given the quasi-judicial nature of the government’s investment screening powers, and for commercial confidentiality and national security reasons, it would be inappropriate to comment on any specific acquisitions or the potential applicability of the NSI Act 2021. Decisions are always made within the statutory timeframes required by the Act. Transparency is of course a crucial part of the NSI Act, and as such, the Government has published an Annual Report detailing the use of NSI Act powers. The report and notices of any Final Orders that have been made are available on GOV.UK.

Nusrat Ghani
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, if he will publish the (a) minutes of his meeting with Ed Woodward, executive vice-chairman of Manchester United, on 14 April 2021 and (b) any correspondence relating to that meeting.

The meeting was to discuss the safe return of fans and Covid certification, as part of ongoing work on event pilots. The European Super League was not discussed. I did not join the meeting.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, who else attended the meeting with Ed Woodward, executive vice-chairman of Manchester Untied, on 14 April 2021 with his Office; and whether any of those present were from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

The meeting was to discuss the safe return of fans and Covid certification, as part of ongoing work on event pilots. The European Super League was not discussed. I did not join the meeting.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, when the meeting with Ed Woodward, executive vice-chairman of Manchester United, that took place on 14 April 2021, was arranged.

The meeting was to discuss the safe return of fans and Covid certification, as part of ongoing work on event pilots. The European Super League was not discussed. I did not join the meeting.

16th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the value is of Government covid-19 awareness advertising on (a) a week by week basis for 2020 and (b) for (i) television, (ii) national radio networks, (iii) local radio networks, (iv) national media organisations and (v) for independent community media outlets.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQ 46692 given on 29 May 2020 and to PQ 45460 on 11 May 2020.

Penny Mordaunt
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
30th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, in how many cases businesses in Wales were found to be non-compliant with minimum wage legislation in each year since 2019.

All businesses – irrespective of their size or business sector – are responsible for paying the correct minimum wage to their staff. The government is clear that anyone entitled to be paid the minimum wage should receive it and takes robust enforcement action against employers who do not pay their staff correctly. HMRC enforces minimum wage regulations on behalf of DBT. Regional data for Wales has been provided in Table 1.

Table 1: National Minimum Wage arrears, workers identified, and penalties issued in Wales, 2019/20 to 2021/22.

Financial Year

Region

Arrears

Number of workers

Penalties issued

2019/20

Wales

£325,419

4,227

41

2020/21

Wales

£262,408

3,895

14

2021/22

Wales

£69,769

661

43

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
30th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many times her Department has taken enforcement action against businesses for non-compliance with minimum wage legislation in each financial year since 2015.

All businesses – irrespective of their size or business sector – are responsible for paying the correct minimum wage to their staff. The government is clear that anyone entitled to be paid the minimum wage should receive it and takes robust enforcement action against employers who do not pay their staff correctly. HMRC enforces minimum wage regulations on behalf of DBT.

Table 1: National Minimum Wage arrears, workers identified, and penalties issued from 2015/16 – 2021/22. Statistics for 2022/23 have not been published yet.

Financial year

Arrears

Number of workers

Penalties issued

2015/16

£10,281,396

58,080

815

2016/17

£10,918,047

98,150

821

2017/18

£15,615,609

201,785

810

2018/19

£24,447,919

221,581

1,008

2019/20

£20,836,609

263,350

992

2020/21

£16,758,324

155,196

575

2021/22

£16,316,841

120,295

696

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
30th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, how many employers in Wales her Department named as being non-compliant with minimum wage legislation in each year since 2019.

The government takes enforcement of the minimum wage seriously. We take robust action against employers who do not pay their staff correctly. Publicly naming employers who do not comply with the rules is an important part of enforcement.

Table 1: Employers named as being non-compliant with minimum wage legislation in Wales, 2019/20 to 2023/24. No rounds of the Naming Scheme took place in 2019/20 and 2022/23.

Financial Year

Region

Employers named

2019/20

Wales

N/A

2020/21

Wales

5

2021/22

Wales

14

2022/23

Wales

N/A

2023/24

Wales

25

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
23rd Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, when she plans to respond to the correspondence of 30 March 2024 from the hon. Member for Cardiff Central.

The correspondence from the hon. Member for Cardiff Central was responded to on 26th April 2024.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Business and Trade, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of employment practices in the direct sales industry in (a) Cardiff Central constituency, (b) England and (c) Wales.

The Government regularly engages with businesses with a range of employment practices across the UK to better understand current and future challenges and opportunities within sectors.

While the Government is unable to comment on the working practices of individual companies, we clear that businesses should always treat their workforce and partners fairly, and ensure they are fulfilling their legal responsibilities. An individual’s entitlement to employment rights such as the minimum wage are determined by their employment status (employee, limb (b) worker or self-employed).

The Government encourages individuals to seek advice from ACAS, who deal with questions from employers, individuals, and others about a wide range of employment relations matters. Where an individual is unable to resolve a dispute with their engager, they have the right to go to an Employment Tribunal.

Kevin Hollinrake
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether her Department plans to acquire the Wylfa site land at the book value assigned to it by Hitachi.

Wylfa is a candidate for new nuclear and one of a number of potential sites that could host civil nuclear projects. That said, no decisions on sites have been taken at present.

As a first step towards developing the new nuclear National Policy Statement, the Government is consulting on a proposed way forward for determining how new nuclear developments might be located. Separately, Great British Nuclear is working with Government to support access to potential sites for new nuclear projects.

Given the NPS consultation and any discussion regarding sites would be commercially sensitive, it is too early to say more on any approach to specific sites.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will take steps to acquire the Intellectual Property for the proposed advanced boiling water reactor development at Wylfa from Hitachi.

Wylfa is a candidate for new nuclear and one of a number of potential sites that could host civil nuclear projects.

As a first step towards developing the new nuclear National Policy Statement, the Government is consulting on a proposed way forward for determining how new nuclear developments might be located. Separately, Great British Nuclear is working with Government to support access to potential sites for new nuclear projects.

Given the NPS consultation and any discussion regarding sites would be commercially sensitive, it is too early to say more on any approach to specific sites.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if her Department will undertake a valuation of the land Hitachi owns at Wylfa.

Wylfa is a candidate for new nuclear and one of a number of potential sites that could host civil nuclear projects.

As a first step towards developing the new nuclear National Policy Statement, the Government is consulting on a proposed way forward for determining how new nuclear developments might be located. Separately, Great British Nuclear is working with Government to support access to potential sites for new nuclear projects.

Given the NPS consultation and any discussion regarding sites would be commercially sensitive, it is too early to say more on any approach to specific sites.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
18th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, if she will take steps to purchase the Wylfa site land from Hitachi.

Wylfa is a candidate for new nuclear and one of a number of potential sites that could host civil nuclear projects.

As a first step towards developing the new nuclear National Policy Statement, the Government is consulting on a proposed way forward for determining how new nuclear developments might be located. Separately, Great British Nuclear is working with Government to support access to potential sites for new nuclear projects.

Given the NPS consultation and any discussion regarding sites would be commercially sensitive, it is too early to say more on any approach to specific sites.

Andrew Bowie
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
16th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, pursuant to the Answer of 15 January 2024 to Question 9003 on Broadband: Voucher Schemes, of the applications received by Building Digital UK since December 2022 how many have been (a) made by and (b) granted to businesses and individuals in Wales.

Since December 2022, 4190 vouchers have been requested on behalf of businesses and residential premises in Wales under the Gigabit Broadband Voucher Scheme, all of which were approved by BDUK.

33 of these vouchers were approved under phase two of the voucher scheme and the other 4157 vouchers were approved under the previous phase.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
10th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Science, Innovation and Technology, how many gigabit broadband scheme vouchers have been (a) applied for and (b) granted as part of phase two of that scheme.

Overall, under the Gigabit Broadband Voucher Scheme and previous iterations, over 108,000 vouchers have been used to connect rural premises to a gigabit-capable connection.

Phase two of the Gigabit Broadband Voucher Scheme was implemented on 5 December 2022. As part of this phase, we increased the maximum voucher value available for homes and businesses to £4,500.

Since December 2022, Building Digital UK (BDUK) has received applications for over 12,800 vouchers, of which over 12,000 have been approved and issued to date.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Science, Innovation and Technology)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the annual cost to the UK music industry of unpaid copyright payments.

The Government has made no assessment of the annual cost to the UK music industry of unpaid copyright payments. Copyright licensing is a private, commercial matter between the parties concerned and the Government is not involved in these agreements.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the gross cost to UK artists of copyright payments avoided in the UK.

The Government has made no assessment of the gross cost to UK artists of copyright payments avoided in the UK. Copyright licensing is a private, commercial matter between the parties concerned and the Government is not involved in these agreements.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have been accepted for the Warm Home Discount scheme and who have not yet had that discount applied to their energy bill.

Under the Warm Home Discount Core Group, to qualify a person, or their partner, should have been in receipt of the Pension Credit Guarantee Credit element on the qualification date 7th July 2019. There are 1.3 million such households though not all of them have accounts with obligated energy suppliers.

Energy suppliers are required to pay a minimum of 1.1 million rebates to the Warm Home Discount Broader Group out of around 1.5 million households eligible under the mandatory eligibility criteria. In addition to the criteria set by Government, energy suppliers can get additional criteria approved by Ofgem making the eligible pool larger.

Most suppliers pay rebates to the Core Group between October and the end of January and we estimate that around 1.1 million will receive the rebate this winter. We expect energy suppliers to pay most of the Broader Group rebates, on a first-come first-served basis, by the end of February. Suppliers have until the 31st March to provide rebates under the scheme.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of people (a) eligible for and (b) in receipt of the Warm Home Discount since September 2019.

Under the Warm Home Discount Core Group, to qualify a person, or their partner, should have been in receipt of the Pension Credit Guarantee Credit element on the qualification date 7th July 2019. There are 1.3 million such households though not all of them have accounts with obligated energy suppliers.

Energy suppliers are required to pay a minimum of 1.1 million rebates to the Warm Home Discount Broader Group out of around 1.5 million households eligible under the mandatory eligibility criteria. In addition to the criteria set by Government, energy suppliers can get additional criteria approved by Ofgem making the eligible pool larger.

Most suppliers pay rebates to the Core Group between October and the end of January and we estimate that around 1.1 million will receive the rebate this winter. We expect energy suppliers to pay most of the Broader Group rebates, on a first-come first-served basis, by the end of February. Suppliers have until the 31st March to provide rebates under the scheme.

16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to bring forward legislative proposals to implement the EU Copyright Directive in UK law.

The deadline for implementing the EU Copyright Directive is 7 June 2021. The United Kingdom will leave the European Union on 31 January 2020 and the Implementation Period will end on 31 December 2020. The Government has committed not to extend the Implementation Period. Therefore, the United Kingdom will not be required to implement the Directive, and the Government has no plans to do so. Any future changes to the UK copyright framework will be considered as part of the usual domestic policy process.

12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when the findings from the final round of the Events and Research Programme will be published.

The Events Research Programme has now concluded. DCMS continues to work closely with other government departments and will be publishing the final Events Research Programme findings shortly.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will take steps to ensuring adequate ventilation in theatres and cinemas to help reduce the transmission of covid-19 by (a) issuing guidance to operators of theatres and cinemas services, (b) clarifying what standards operators should use to plan and measure ventilation, (c) outlining what enforcement activity he plans to take to ensure such guidance is followed and (d) making funds available to improve standards of ventilation.

Public Health England has published guidance on the ventilation of indoor spaces which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-ventilation-of-indoor-spaces-to-stop-the-spread-of-coronavirus/ventilation-of-indoor-spaces-to-stop-the-spread-of-coronavirus-covid-19

The Health and Safety Executive has published guidance on ventilation and air conditioning here:

https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/index.htm

Using this guidance, Local Authorities should assess the risk from COVID and implement the appropriate transmission risk controls. The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require employers to assess risks and implement the appropriate controls. HSE is the health and safety enforcing authority for local authority activities and can take proportionate enforcement action.

Venues are advised to pay due regard to the published guidance above, alongside any sector-specific guidance available.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many applications were made for Phase 2 of the Cultural Recovery Fund.

The attached table provides figures addressing the questions asked.

Payments through the Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) are typically made in multiple tranches. Final payment is typically made at the very end of the grant period, once activities and costs have been reported.

In both rounds of the CRF revenue grants programme, DCMS has been able to give recipients the flexibility to extend the grant period. For CRF1 awardees, they have been able to extend until 30 June 2021, and for CRF2 awardees until 31 December 2021.

As such, a significant number of CRF 1 awardees have only very recently concluded the grant period, and many CRF 2 awardees have not concluded the grant period yet.

Accordingly, final payment requests are still outstanding from both CRF1 and CRF 2 recipients. Only when final payment requests have been made will DCMS Arms Length Bodies make final payments.

In addition, payment schedules can be impacted by a number of factors, such as the provision of bank details and activity reports from applicants, as well as assurance processes undertaken by distributing arms-length bodies, in order to ensure best use of tax-payers’ money.

As the numbers show, over 83% of all awarded CRF funding has been paid.

Figures include revenue grants, capital grants, and loans from within the Culture Recovery Fund.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the longest period of time has been between the acceptance of an application and the full payment of the award of funds during phase 1 of the Cultural Recovery Fund.

The attached table provides figures addressing the questions asked.

Payments through the Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) are typically made in multiple tranches. Final payment is typically made at the very end of the grant period, once activities and costs have been reported.

In both rounds of the CRF revenue grants programme, DCMS has been able to give recipients the flexibility to extend the grant period. For CRF1 awardees, they have been able to extend until 30 June 2021, and for CRF2 awardees until 31 December 2021.

As such, a significant number of CRF 1 awardees have only very recently concluded the grant period, and many CRF 2 awardees have not concluded the grant period yet.

Accordingly, final payment requests are still outstanding from both CRF1 and CRF 2 recipients. Only when final payment requests have been made will DCMS Arms Length Bodies make final payments.

In addition, payment schedules can be impacted by a number of factors, such as the provision of bank details and activity reports from applicants, as well as assurance processes undertaken by distributing arms-length bodies, in order to ensure best use of tax-payers’ money.

As the numbers show, over 83% of all awarded CRF funding has been paid.

Figures include revenue grants, capital grants, and loans from within the Culture Recovery Fund.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many of the successful applicants in Phase 1 of the Cultural Recovery Fund are awaiting the receipt of funds; and how much funding remains to be paid.

The attached table provides figures addressing the questions asked.

Payments through the Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) are typically made in multiple tranches. Final payment is typically made at the very end of the grant period, once activities and costs have been reported.

In both rounds of the CRF revenue grants programme, DCMS has been able to give recipients the flexibility to extend the grant period. For CRF1 awardees, they have been able to extend until 30 June 2021, and for CRF2 awardees until 31 December 2021.

As such, a significant number of CRF 1 awardees have only very recently concluded the grant period, and many CRF 2 awardees have not concluded the grant period yet.

Accordingly, final payment requests are still outstanding from both CRF1 and CRF 2 recipients. Only when final payment requests have been made will DCMS Arms Length Bodies make final payments.

In addition, payment schedules can be impacted by a number of factors, such as the provision of bank details and activity reports from applicants, as well as assurance processes undertaken by distributing arms-length bodies, in order to ensure best use of tax-payers’ money.

As the numbers show, over 83% of all awarded CRF funding has been paid.

Figures include revenue grants, capital grants, and loans from within the Culture Recovery Fund.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many applications were made in Phase 1 of the Cultural Recovery Fund.

The attached table provides figures addressing the questions asked.

Payments through the Culture Recovery Fund (CRF) are typically made in multiple tranches. Final payment is typically made at the very end of the grant period, once activities and costs have been reported.

In both rounds of the CRF revenue grants programme, DCMS has been able to give recipients the flexibility to extend the grant period. For CRF1 awardees, they have been able to extend until 30 June 2021, and for CRF2 awardees until 31 December 2021.

As such, a significant number of CRF 1 awardees have only very recently concluded the grant period, and many CRF 2 awardees have not concluded the grant period yet.

Accordingly, final payment requests are still outstanding from both CRF1 and CRF 2 recipients. Only when final payment requests have been made will DCMS Arms Length Bodies make final payments.

In addition, payment schedules can be impacted by a number of factors, such as the provision of bank details and activity reports from applicants, as well as assurance processes undertaken by distributing arms-length bodies, in order to ensure best use of tax-payers’ money.

As the numbers show, over 83% of all awarded CRF funding has been paid.

Figures include revenue grants, capital grants, and loans from within the Culture Recovery Fund.

29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what declarations of interests have been made by his Department’s non-executive directors; and where is that information published.

Non-executive directors comply with the provisions of the Cabinet Office’s Code of Conduct for Board Members of Public Bodies.

Board members are required to submit any declarable interests annually; this information forms part of the independent National Audit Office review ahead of the publication of Departmental annual report and accounts.

Information on any relevant interests is published in the Department annual report and accounts, which are available on gov.uk.

29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what financial payments his Department makes to its non-executive directors; how many times his departmental Board will meet in 2021-22; and what work the non-executive directors undertake.

This information is published in the Department’s annual report and accounts, available on gov.uk.

(https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dcms-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-20)

The Department’s report and accounts for 2021-22 will be published in due course, in the usual way.

Departmental boards provide strategic leadership for each central government department, as well as advising on/challenging how the department is performing. Each board is chaired by the Secretary of State and includes junior ministers, the permanent secretary and non-executive board members. Non-executives are appointed to government departments from the public, private and voluntary sectors. Their role is to provide advice and bring an external perspective.

A summary of the work of non-executive directors across Government can be found in the Government Lead Non-Executive's annual report, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/government-lead-non-executives-annual-report-2019-to-2020

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when his Department’s current non-executive directors were appointed; what oversight officials of his Department had of the Ministerial appointments of those non-executive directors; and what assessment was made of the applicants' experience against the requirements for breadth and depth of experience set out in the Cabinet Office guidance on Departmental Boards of November 2014.

· Sherry Coutu was appointed on 11 March 2019

· Hemant Patel was appointed on 19 March 2020

· Baroness Laura Wyld was appointed on 15 June 2020

· Claudia Arney was appointed on 15 April 2021

· Priya Lakhani was appointed on 15 April 2021

Departmental officials have full oversight of all Non-Executive appointments. This includes providing advice and recommendations to me on the suitability of individuals to be appointed as Non-Executives.

The department aims to appoint Non-Executives who have experience within large and complex organisations and specific knowledge of the sectors it represents. This includes having an understanding and experience of organisations in both the public and private sectors. This is a key consideration made on the suitability of appointable candidates, without this experience it is unlikely an appointment will be made.

Departments follow the principles set out in Cabinet Office/HM Treasury ‘Corporate governance in central government departments: code of good practice.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when his Department’s current non-executive directors were appointed; what oversight officials had of Ministerial appointments of non-executive directors; and what assessment was made of their experience against the requirements for breadth and depth of experience set out in the Cabinet Office guidance on Departmental Boards of November 2014.

· Sherry Coutu was appointed on 11 March 2019

· Hemant Patel was appointed on 19 March 2020

· Baroness Laura Wyld was appointed on 15 June 2020

· Claudia Arney was appointed on 15 April 2021

· Priya Lakhani was appointed on 15 April 2021

Departmental officials have full oversight of all Non-Executive appointments. This includes providing advice and recommendations to me on the suitability of individuals to be appointed as Non-Executives.

The department aims to appoint Non-Executives who have experience within large and complex organisations and specific knowledge of the sectors it represents. This includes having an understanding and experience of organisations in both the public and private sectors. This is a key consideration made on the suitability of appointable candidates, without this experience it is unlikely an appointment will be made.

Departments follow the principles set out in Cabinet Office/HM Treasury ‘Corporate governance in central government departments: code of good practice.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what private companies are contracted to provide security services at his Department’s buildings that contain ministerial private offices; and whether there are closed circuit television cameras in any ministerial private office within his departmental estate.

As has been the case under successive Administrations, it is not government policy to comment on security procedures in government buildings.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
29th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the prevalence of children using live streaming services on TikTok to solicit in-app virtual gifts or donations in exchange for content.

We recognise the serious risks that children face online, including through the use of functionalities such as live streaming. The draft Online Safety Bill, published in May 2021, will ensure companies design their platforms to be safer for users.

The strongest protections in the legislation are for children. Unless services in scope are able to prove that children are not accessing their service, they will need to conduct a child safety risk assessment and provide safety measures for child users, keeping these under regular review.. Companies will also need to assess how the design and operation of the service, including functionalities such as instream payments and live-streaming, may increase or reduce the risks identified.

In addition, the UK’s regulatory regime for video sharing platforms requires UK-established video sharing platforms to take appropriate measures to protect under-18s from harmful material, TikTok is in scope of these requirements. Ofcom is working with UK-established video sharing platforms to help them understand their duties under this regime and will be able to take enforcement action against platforms that do not comply.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether a risk assessment has been carried out on the secure holding of CCTV footage within his Department.

As has been the case under successive Administrations, it is not government policy to comment on security procedures in government buildings.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his departmental IT systems routinely allow officials, advisers and ministers to access private email accounts from their office desktop computers, department-issue laptop computers and mobile phone devices.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether any departmental business has been conducted on private email addresses; and what mechanisms are in place to ensure that full records are kept of that business.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether any departmental business has been conducted on private email addresses; and what mechanisms are in place to ensure that full records are kept of that business.

I refer the Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

Oliver Dowden
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he or his ministers have had with theatres, music venues and other cultural operators ahead of the decision to delay the easing of the roadmap on 21 June 2021.

The Government has engaged extensively with stakeholders from all DCMS sectors throughout the pandemic through regular roundtables and ministerial calls with industry representatives.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has referred any Freedom of Information requests received by his Department to the central Cabinet Office Clearing House on Freedom of Information requests for advice on handling, in the last two years.

Freedom of Information requests are referred to the Clearing House in line with the published criteria available on gov.uk. The Clearing House, which has been in existence since 2004, provides advice to ensure a consistent approach across government to requests for information.

14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what impact assessment was carried out on the effect of the delay to lifting lockdown restrictions on 21 June 2021 on (a) theatres, (b) music venues and (c) cultural organisations.

The Prime Minister has always said that we would be led by data, not dates. The government has looked at the data very closely and assessed it against the four tests set out in our roadmap. It is on the basis of worsening data that we have taken the difficult call not to proceed with this reopening at this point, but to pause for four weeks.

There is uncertainty on test 3. The Delta variant is already driving the growth we are seeing in infection rates and hospitalisations, and at the same time non-COVID emergency demand on the NHS is the highest it has been since the start of the pandemic. We have assessed that we have not met test 4. Our assessment of the risks has been altered by the Delta variant: the latest data suggests the Delta variant is between 40% and 80% more transmissible than the Alpha variant.

Therefore, the Government announced a four-week pause at Step 3. We will use this time to get more vaccinations in arms, both first and second doses, and to learn more about the Delta variant. We anticipate that a four-week pause of this kind could significantly reduce the number of hospitalisations and deaths.

We recognise the challenging times facing all sectors currently, the Department has been working closely with stakeholders across the theatre industry, music venues and cultural organisations throughout the pandemic to maintain a complete picture of the financial impact of Covid-19 to ensure they survive this difficult period wherever possible.

Many of these organisations have benefitted from the significant cross-economy support available throughout this pandemic, including the generous employment schemes, grants, loans, a reduction in VAT to 5%, and business rates relief. And some businesses may further be eligible for the unprecedented Culture Recovery Fund - the largest one-off investment in UK culture - as we look to provide support for a wide range of cultural institutions including galleries, theatres, museums, music venues, comedy clubs and festivals, as audiences begin to return.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many former officials from his Department have subsequently been employed at Camelot UK Lotteries Limited in each of the last five years.

This information is not collected or held. However, officials are subject to the Business Appointment Rules.

As DCMS does not collect this data we cannot confirm whether any former officials have subsequently been employed at Camelot UK Lotteries Limited in the last five years.

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department’s human resources team has ever prevented former civil servants or special advisors from taking up a position at Camelot UK Lotteries Limited.

DCMS has not prevented former civil servants or special advisors from taking up a position at Camelot UK Lotteries Limited.

Upon leaving the civil service, all civil servants are subject to the Business Appointment Rules (BARs). BARs restrictions apply for two years after the last day of paid Civil Service employment for members of the Senior Civil Service and equivalents, including special advisers of equivalent standing. For those below the Senior Civil Service and equivalents, including special advisers of equivalent standing, the Rules continue to apply for one year after leaving the Civil Service, unless, exceptionally, the role has been designated as one where a longer period of up to two years will apply.

The aim of the Rules is to avoid any reasonable concerns that:

a. a civil servant might be influenced in carrying out his or her official duties by the hope or expectation of future employment with a particular firm or organisation, or in a specific sector; or

b. on leaving the Civil Service, a former civil servant might improperly exploit privileged access to contacts in Government or sensitive information; or

c. a particular firm or organisation might gain an improper advantage by employing someone who, in the course of their official duties, has had access to:

i. information relating to unannounced or proposed developments in Government policy, knowledge of which may affect the prospective employer or any competitors; or

ii. commercially valuable or sensitive information about any competitors

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many times officials in his Department have received hospitality from Camelot UK Lotteries Limited in each of the last 10 years.

Government departments publish quarterly details of occasions where Ministers and officials are in receipt of hospitality. This is published on the Gov.uk website and covers the last 10 years.

At the following link it is possible to apply filters to search for the documents specifically relating to DCMS and Transparency and Freedom of Information Releases over this period: [https://www.gov.uk/search/transparency-and-freedom-of-information-releases?content_store_document_type%5B%5D=transparency&organisations%5B%5D=department-for-digital-culture-media-sport&order=updated-newest]

22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many times Ministers in his Department have received hospitality from Camelot UK Lotteries Limited in each of the last 10 years.

Government departments publish quarterly details of occasions where Ministers and officials are in receipt of hospitality. This is published on the Gov.uk website and covers the last 10 years.

At the following link it is possible to apply filters to search for the documents specifically relating to DCMS and Transparency and Freedom of Information Releases over this period: [https://www.gov.uk/search/transparency-and-freedom-of-information-releases?content_store_document_type%5B%5D=transparency&organisations%5B%5D=department-for-digital-culture-media-sport&order=updated-newest]

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what additional funding his Department has received from the Treasury to fund the Sport Winter Survival Package.

The £300m Sport Winter Survival Package announced by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport will be fully funded by the Treasury.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)