Graham P Jones Portrait

Graham P Jones

Labour - Former Member for Hyndburn

Committees on Arms Export Controls
22nd Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Regulatory Reform
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committees on Arms Export Controls
10th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Defence Sub-Committee
12th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Defence Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Opposition Assistant Whip (Commons)
8th Oct 2010 - 18th Sep 2015


Division Voting information

Graham P Jones has voted in 1595 divisions, and 5 times against the majority of their Party.

2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Graham P Jones voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 56 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 390
2 Dec 2015 - ISIL in Syria - View Vote Context
Graham P Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 65 Labour Aye votes vs 153 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 397 Noes - 223
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Graham P Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 69 Labour Aye votes vs 138 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 241 Noes - 256
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Graham P Jones voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 66 Labour No votes vs 139 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 267 Noes - 233
19 Oct 2011 - Deferred Division - View Vote Context
Graham P Jones voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 71 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 306 Noes - 95
View All Graham P Jones Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Stunell (Liberal Democrat)
(35 debate interactions)
Nick Gibb (Conservative)
Minister of State (Education)
(32 debate interactions)
John Bercow (Speaker)
(31 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Transport
(86 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(75 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(70 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Graham P Jones's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Graham P Jones

22nd October 2019
Graham P Jones signed this EDM on Wednesday 30th October 2019

Welfare and survival of Asian elephants used in tourism

Tabled by: Rupa Huq (Labour - Ealing Central and Acton)
That this House is concerned about the increasing risk of extinction to Asian elephants; notes that in India and South East Asia some Asian elephants are snatched from the wild when very young, deprived of food and water for months whilst tightly confined in cages, beaten and stabbed with iron …
34 signatures
(Most recent: 4 Nov 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 18
Conservative: 5
Scottish National Party: 5
Independent: 3
Crossbench: 1
Green Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
The Independent Group for Change: 1
8th May 2019
Graham P Jones signed this EDM on Thursday 22nd August 2019

STATE-FUNDED LEGAL REPRESENTATION FOR VICTIMS OF TERRORISM

Tabled by: Stephen Lloyd (Liberal Democrat - Eastbourne)
That this House expresses concern that victims of terrorist atrocities are not automatically eligible for legal aid; regrets that a recently published government review rejected introducing automatic non-means-tested legal aid funding to bereaved families after a state-related death; notes that state organisations involved in deaths from terrorist attacks have access …
81 signatures
(Most recent: 9 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 41
Conservative: 9
Liberal Democrat: 8
Scottish National Party: 8
Independent: 7
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
Plaid Cymru: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 2
Non-affiliated: 1
Crossbench: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Graham P Jones's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Graham P Jones, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Graham P Jones has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Graham P Jones has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

3 Bills introduced by Graham P Jones


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to allow local authorities to apply selective licensing conditions to improve housing standards.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 17th July 2013

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to give local authorities the power to apply selective licensing conditions to private landlords in exempted areas with social housing stock


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 24th April 2012

The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to introduce a licensing scheme for scrap metal dealers; to enable magistrates’ courts to add restrictions to licences to deal in scrap metal; to require that financial transactions in trade in scrap metals be restricted to cashless payments; to give police officers powers to search properties owned by scrap metal dealerships; to provide that scrap metal proven to have been obtained through theft may be classified as criminal assets; to introduce criminal charges for theft of scrap metal which take into account aspects of the crime other than the value of the scrap metal stolen; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 15th November 2011

267 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
33 Other Department Questions
23rd Jul 2019
To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what discussions the Commission has had on establishing in-house BSL interpretation service for deaf visitors.

The House of Commons provides a range of British Sign Language (BSL) interpretation services for visitors to the Palace of Westminster and currently holds the Action on Hearing Loss ‘Louder than Words’ charter mark, which is re-accredited every three years.

Visitors on a commercial, ticketed tour can choose a BSL self-guided option which has been tested and approved by a range of deaf groups.

Visitors on a democratic access tour can also choose a BSL self-guided option, although in most cases a BSL signer would be booked and made available. The bicameral Visitor Services team has booked 35 BSL interpreters for visitors attending tours or watching parliamentary business, such as select committees, since the start of 2018. BSL interpretation can also be provided for visiting schools, although in most cases the schools themselves will bring their own interpreter.

The House is investigating the provision of a basic level of BSL training across the Visitor Services team. Training staff to a sufficiently high level of expertise to lead or interpret tours or other visiting activities has to date proved difficult due to the level and duration of training required combined with the frequency of staff turnover. The Restoration and Renewal of the Palace of Westminster is expected to provide an opportunity for wider improvements in relation to accessibility and inclusion, including interpretation.

16th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what recent discussions she has had with her European counterparts about minimum EPC standards for the private rented sector.

The Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property)(England and Wales) Regulations 2015 were made in March this year following a full public consultation, and establish an EPC minimum of E for domestic and non-domestic private rented sector properties from April 2018.


Officials in the Department liaise regularly with the insulation industry, local authorities, and other stakeholders on a range of energy efficiency issues including the minimum EPC standards for the private rented sector. Discussions have also been held recently with French officials about domestic energy efficiency issues including minimum standards.


16th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what recent discussions she has had with local authorities about minimum EPC standards for the private rented sector.

The Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property)(England and Wales) Regulations 2015 were made in March this year following a full public consultation, and establish an EPC minimum of E for domestic and non-domestic private rented sector properties from April 2018.


Officials in the Department liaise regularly with the insulation industry, local authorities, and other stakeholders on a range of energy efficiency issues including the minimum EPC standards for the private rented sector. Discussions have also been held recently with French officials about domestic energy efficiency issues including minimum standards.


16th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what recent discussions she has had with the cavity wall insulation industry about minimum EPC standards in the private rented sector.

The Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property)(England and Wales) Regulations 2015 were made in March this year following a full public consultation, and establish an EPC minimum of E for domestic and non-domestic private rented sector properties from April 2018.


Officials in the Department liaise regularly with the insulation industry, local authorities, and other stakeholders on a range of energy efficiency issues including the minimum EPC standards for the private rented sector. Discussions have also been held recently with French officials about domestic energy efficiency issues including minimum standards.


10th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the 2015-16 adult social skills budget for Hyndburn is; and what the percentage change from last year's budget is.

The funding available for Adult Skills in 2015/16 is outlined in the Skills Funding Letter. The letter sets out the Government’s priorities for the budget and it is for providers to decide how they use their adult skills funding to reflect those priorities and meet the needs of learners and employers in their local area.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/skills-funding-letter-april-2015-to-march-2016

30th Oct 2014
To ask the Deputy Prime Minister, what assessment he has made of the performance of local enterprise partnerships (LEPs); and which LEPs he has assessed as (a) highest and (b) lowest performing.

The Government does not routinely carry out assessments of performance of Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs). As partnerships of business and civic leaders, LEPs are first and foremost accountable to their local community and local businesses.

10th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, if he will introduce a scheme aimed at bring every house in England up to a national minimum standard for energy efficiency.

The Government has a target of improving the energy efficiency of 1 million homes by March 2015 and as of June we have improved over 750,000 homes through the Energy Company Obligation (ECO), Green Deal and other home energy efficiency incentives. We are also consulting on regulations to require more minimum energy performance standards in the private rented sector.

In addition, we have laid draft Regulations to create a new fuel poverty target that seeks to ensure that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency standard of Band C by 2030. We are also proposing that interim milestones of as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable reach Band E by 2020 and Band D by 2025 be laid out in the forthcoming Fuel Poverty Strategy.

10th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, if he will introduce a scheme to bring pre-1919 housing stock up to a national standard of energy efficiency.

The Government has a target of improving the energy efficiency of 1 million homes by March 2015 and as of June we have improved over 750,000 homes through the Energy Company Obligation (ECO), Green Deal and other home energy efficiency incentives. We are also consulting on regulations to require more minimum energy performance standards in the private rented sector.

In addition, we have laid draft Regulations to create a new fuel poverty target that seeks to ensure that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency standard of Band C by 2030. We are also proposing that interim milestones of as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable reach Band E by 2020 and Band D by 2025 be laid out in the forthcoming Fuel Poverty Strategy.

10th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, if he will introduce a policy to bring homes in deprived local authority wards up to a national minimum standard for energy efficiency.

The Government has a target of improving the energy efficiency of 1 million homes by March 2015 and as of June we have improved over 750,000 homes through the Energy Company Obligation (ECO), Green Deal and other home energy efficiency incentives. We are also consulting on regulations to require more minimum energy performance standards in the private rented sector.

In addition, we have laid draft Regulations to create a new fuel poverty target that seeks to ensure that as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable achieve a minimum energy efficiency standard of Band C by 2030. We are also proposing that interim milestones of as many fuel poor homes as is reasonably practicable reach Band E by 2020 and Band D by 2025 be laid out in the forthcoming Fuel Poverty Strategy.

8th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what estimate he has made of the proportion of Green Deal Home Improvement funding that has been allocated to deprived areas.

The Green Deal Home Improvement Fund (GDHIF) is applied for by householders on a non means tested basis across England and Wales.

Currently the department has not published any geographic breakdowns on GDHIF, as these would form part of the more detailed quarterly series of statistics (https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/green-deal-and-energy-company-obligation-eco-statistics#quarterly-statistics).

29th Aug 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much was allocated in each Lancashire borough under the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund.

The Department published the number of Green Deal Home Improvement Fund (GDHIF) active applications, vouchers issued and payments made up to the end of July 2014, in the latest monthly Official Statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/green-deal-and-energy-company-obligation-eco-monthly-statistics-august-2014.

Currently, the Department has not published any geographic breakdowns on the GDHIF, as these would form part of the more detailed quarterly series:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/green-deal-and-energy-company-obligation-eco-statistics#quarterly-statistics.

Therefore, the Department will consider publishing geographic breakdowns relating to GDHIF in the following quarterly release planned for publication on 18 December, covering the period up to the end of September 2014.

29th Aug 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how much has been allocated to each local authority area under the Green Deal Home Improvement Fund.

The Department published the number of Green Deal Home Improvement Fund (GDHIF) active applications, vouchers issued and payments made up to the end of July 2014, in the latest monthly Official Statistics:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/green-deal-and-energy-company-obligation-eco-monthly-statistics-august-2014.

Currently, the Department has not published any geographic breakdowns on the GDHIF, as these would form part of the more detailed quarterly series:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/green-deal-and-energy-company-obligation-eco-statistics#quarterly-statistics.

Therefore, the Department will consider publishing geographic breakdowns relating to GDHIF in the following quarterly release planned for publication on 18 December, covering the period up to the end of September 2014.

29th Aug 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what steps he is taking to refund people who paid for a Green Deal assessment prior to the exhaustion of the fund.

The Green Deal Home Improvement Fund (GDHIF) shut to new applications on July 24th. A contribution towards the cost of a Green Deal Assessment Report was only available to customers who made a successful application to the Fund, and who went on to install measures as a result.

Assessments are the most popular part of Green Deal – by the end of July 2014 over 300,000 Green Deal Assessments were undertaken. Assessments provide a tailored picture of the first steps people can take to be more energy efficiency and potentially reduce their bills – they are not just for GDHIF.

A contribution towards the cost of a Green Deal Assessment Report cost was only available to customers who made a successful application to the Fund, and who went on to install measures as a result.

Assessments are the most popular part of Green Deal – by the end of July 2014 over 300,000 Green Deal Assessments were undertaken. Assessments provide a tailored picture of the first steps people can take to be more energy efficiency and potentially reduce their bills – they are not just for GDHIF.

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what conversations he has held with (a) energy companies, (b) cavity wall insulation companies and (c) local authorities on the effect of the Government's changes to the Energy Company Obligation on the UK's ability to meet its carbon-saving obligations.

Ministers and officials have had meetings with many interested parties in recent months, including energy suppliers, insulation companies and local authorities, at which the Government’s proposed changes to the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) were discussed.

These and other stakeholders, such as consumer organisations and Ofgem, are represented on the ECO Steering Group, which meets on a monthly basis. The terms of reference for the group, along with minutes of meetings and other papers, are made publicly available via Gov.uk:

https://www.gov.uk/government/groups/energy-company-obligation-eco-steering-group

15th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, if he will hold discussions with cavity wall insulation companies on potential job losses arising from changes in the Energy Company Obligation.

The Government will publish its response to the consultation on the future of the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) shortly.

26th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, for what reason allowing employers which wish to continue with current apprenticeship funding arrangements to do so was not listed as an option in his Department's recent consultation on the future of apprenticeships.

The Apprenticeships Funding Reform Technical Consultation sought evidence on the practical implications for employers of two new systems for routing apprenticeship funding: the PAYE model and the Apprenticeship Credit. The practical implications of the current system are already well understood, therefore we did not include this in the technical consultation. We are giving careful consideration to all feedback received, before announcing our next steps in the autumn.

26th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, to which locations pending applications for hydraulic fraturing relate.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave him on 30 June 2014, Official Report, Column 426W:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmhansrd/cm140630/text/140630w0004.htm#1407011000033

25th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many hydraulic fracturing licences are pending approval in (a) England, (b) Lancashire and (c) Hyndburn constituency.

There is no “hydraulic fracturing licence”. DECC issues Petroleum Exploration and Development Licences (PEDLs). However, PEDLs are not specific to shale gas and do not give permission for operations, but grant exclusivity to licensees in relation to hydrocarbons (including shale gas but also other forms) within a particular area. All operations, such as drilling, hydraulic fracturing or production, however require planning permission, and applications are subject to public consultation. They also require access agreement with relevant landowner(s), Environment Agency permits, HSE scrutiny, and DECC consent before operations can commence. DECC is not currently considering any applications for hydraulic fracturing in the UK.

24th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what quality standards will be imposed on employers when apprenticeship funding moves directly to employers.

The 2013 consultation on Apprenticeship funding reform sought evidence on the feasibility and impact of three different mechanisms for giving employers more control over the funding. Following consideration of the responses to this consultation, the pure provider payment model was ruled out on the basis that it was the least likely to deliver the intended aim of giving employers true purchasing power.

The subsequent Technical Consultation published in March 2014 sought views on two models - a PAYE model and an apprenticeship credit model which are consistent with an employer-led Apprenticeships system. We are currently evaluating the responses to this consultation and will announce which payment mechanism we plan to pursue in the autumn.

We have established a ministerial advisory panel on Apprenticeship standards, made up of experts to advise the Secretary of State on the approval or rejection of employer designed Apprenticeship standards and assessment approaches.

We will refresh the Skills Funding Agency register of approved Apprenticeship training providers to ensure that only reputable providers are able to offer Apprenticeship training and organisations doing so will be subject to Ofsted inspection.

24th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what factors he took into account in deciding not to adopt a pure provider payment model in reform of apprenticeship funding.

The 2013 consultation on Apprenticeship funding reform sought evidence on the feasibility and impact of three different mechanisms for giving employers more control over the funding. Following consideration of the responses to this consultation, the pure provider payment model was ruled out on the basis that it was the least likely to deliver the intended aim of giving employers true purchasing power.

The subsequent Technical Consultation published in March 2014 sought views on two models - a PAYE model and an apprenticeship credit model which are consistent with an employer-led Apprenticeships system. We are currently evaluating the responses to this consultation and will announce which payment mechanism we plan to pursue in the autumn.

We have established a ministerial advisory panel on Apprenticeship standards, made up of experts to advise the Secretary of State on the approval or rejection of employer designed Apprenticeship standards and assessment approaches.

We will refresh the Skills Funding Agency register of approved Apprenticeship training providers to ensure that only reputable providers are able to offer Apprenticeship training and organisations doing so will be subject to Ofsted inspection.

23rd Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps he is taking to improve competition in the Insolvency Practitioner market.

The Government is taking a number of steps in this area:

- A measure in the Deregulation Bill will introduce the option for an insolvency practitioner to specialise in either corporate or individual insolvency. This will encourage new entrants into the profession, which will benefit creditors without lowering standards;

- There are a number of red tape challenge measures in the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill which will reduce costs and remove unnecessary processes in insolvency cases;

- Also in the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill are measures which will strengthen the regulatory framework for insolvency practitioners to boost confidence in the regime;

- The Government has also been consulting on measures to improve the transparency and accountability of how fees are charged by insolvency practitioners.

23rd Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how he plans to measure the insolvency industry's success in voluntarily implementing the recommendations of the Graham Review.

Teresa Graham's review of pre-pack administration identified how existing practice in pre-pack administration did not in all cases deliver the best result for creditors and the wider economy, in particular where sales are made to a connected party.

The Government hopes that the voluntary measures recommended in Ms Graham's report – all of which were accepted by Government – will be put into effect by those concerned as envisaged by Ms Graham.

After they have had time to have effect, the Government will evaluate whether they have indeed addressed the concerns evidenced by Ms Graham and the resulting outcomes. This will include for example whether the measures have increased transparency, returns to creditors, and more generally strengthened business confidence in the pre-pack process.

As recommended by Ms Graham, the government will be taking a backstop power in the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill so we will be able to legislate in future if necessary.

23rd Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what discussions he has held with the Insolvency Service on the implementation of the recommendations made in the Graham Review on pre-pack administration.

Officials in the Insolvency Service regularly advise me on the full range of insolvency policy matters, including on pre-pack administration when required.

17th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many onshore petroleum exploration and development licence applications are pending approval in (a) the UK, (b) England, (c) Lancashire and (d) Hyndburn constituency.

There are no onshore petroleum exploration and development licence applications pending approval in the UK.

11th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what support his Department is giving to local authorities to implement changes to apprenticeship funding.

We are giving employers control of the funding for the training and assessment of the apprenticeships that they design. This will enable them to work directly with education and training providers to secure the most effective training for their apprentices. We will be testing a new funding model via apprenticeship starts in the 2014-15 academic year based on standards developed by our Trailblazer groups of employers. We will develop a comprehensive communication programme for employers (including local authorities) to help them understand the changes.

11th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what recent discussions he has had with training providers on changes to apprenticeship funding.

Discussions have been held with a wide range of training providers as well with the Association of Training Providers and Association of Employment and Learning Providers (AELP) about our apprenticeship funding reforms. I spoke about this issue at the AELP's National Conference earlier this month.

11th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, for what reason the option of maintaining the current provider-funded model was dropped in his Department's second consultation on funding reform for apprenticeships.

The 2013 consultation on apprenticeship funding reforms sought evidence on the feasibility and impact of three different models for reforming apprenticeship funding. Following consideration of the responses to these, the second consultation sought views on two models—a PAYE model and an apprenticeship credit—that are consistent with an employer-driven apprenticeships system. A pure provider payment model was ruled out, as evidence from the first consultation indicated that this model was the least likely to deliver the intended aim of giving employers true purchasing power.

4th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, how many (a) cats, (b) dogs and (c) horses were rehomed after their release from laboratories following research in 2012.

I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Home Office.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

Under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, authority may be given to

re-home animals where those animals were bred or held for supply for use in

regulated procedures, or were intended for use in regulated procedures, or have

been used in regulated procedures. This may also apply to animals which are

being kept under the care of the Named Veterinary Surgeon after completing

procedures, and is always contingent on our acceptance of certain reassurances

relating to Section 17A of the Act. Records of each animal re-homed would be

kept locally at the licensed establishment so that they can be available to

Home Office Inspectors on request.

European Directive 2010/63/EU, which was implemented in the UK and other

Member States on 1 January 2013, does not provide legal grounds on which the UK

can impose a mandatory obligation of re-homing under the Animals (Scientific

Procedures) Act 1986. Nevertheless, we have provided guidance on re-homing

animals in our Guidance on the Operation of the Animals (Scientific Procedures)

Act 1983, section 5.21.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of his proposed changes to energy company obligation funding on families in fuel poverty who were in flood risk areas.

The impact of the proposed changes to the Energy Company Obligation was estimated in the Assessment of Impacts published alongside the consultation document on 5th March:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/the-future-of-the-energy-company-obligation

No specific estimate was made for those fuel poor families specifically living areas of flood risk.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change intends to complete a full Impact Assessment as part of the Government's response to the consultation later in the year.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, whether his proposed changes to the energy company obligation will reduce funding availability for flood-risk homes which are automatically defined as hard-to-treat.

Homes at risk of flooding are not automatically defined as having hard-to-treat cavity walls, however flood-risk homes with hard-to-treat cavity walls are eligible for funding under the Energy Company Obligation. Proposed changes to the scheme will enable more homes to receive funding for energy efficiency measures, including those homes that are at risk of flooding.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, how many with the homes with hard-to-treat cavity walls and which require insulation measures are situated in flood risk areas.

DECC does not hold information on how many of homes that are considered to have hard to treat cavity walls are situated in flood risk areas.

To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what the electoral registration figures were in each ward in the recent confirmation dry run conducted in (a) Lancashire County Council and (b) Hyndburn constituency.

The Electoral Commission informs me that the confirmation dry run involved matching all entries on the electoral registers against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) Customer Information System database. Entries would be marked as green if they matched with DWP, amber if they were a partial match or red if there was no match.

It is not possible to provide results for the divisions used by Lancashire County Council area as the matching was carried out using the district councils' electoral wards. However, the table for all the wards within the district authorities in the Lancashire County Council area and the table for Hyndburn constituency have been deposited in the House of Commons' Library.

Results for all wards are available on the Commission's website here: http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/__data/assets/excel_doc/0003/163146/Confirmation-dry-run-2013-Results-Wards.xls

7th Mar 2018
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions there have been for the offence of handling stolen goods as a result of the theft or resale of local authority library books in each of the last five years.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of the number of handling stolen goods offences prosecuted as a result of the theft or resale of library books. This information could only be obtained by examining CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

While the CPS does not maintain a central record of the number of prosecutions arising out of the theft of local authority library books, records are held showing the number of offences of handling stolen goods in which a prosecution commenced.

The table below shows the number of these offences in each of the last five available years.

-

2012-2013

2013-2014

2014-2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

Theft Act 1968 { 22 }

13,923

12,819

11,325

9,792

8,401

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

There is no indication of the number of individual defendants prosecuted for these offences or the final outcome of the prosecution proceeding or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at the time of finalisation. It is often the case that defendants will be prosecuted for more than one offence in the same set of proceedings.

Robert Buckland
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
24th Jul 2019
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish in table format (a) a list of the ministerial redundancy payments issued since August 2010 and (b) which former ministers accepted those payments.

This information is not held centrally. Section 4 of the Ministerial and other Pensions and Salaries Act 1991 sets out Ministers’ entitlement to severance payments. Payments to individuals are processed by the relevant departments. Any such payments are published in each department’s audited annual accounts, and these accounts can be found on GOV.UK.

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
10th Jan 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will take steps to ensure that staff at the HM Revenue and Customs office in the Blackburn office are offered exit compensation terms in place on the date of the closure announcement.

Exit compensation terms for Civil Servants are set according to the rules of the Civil Service Compensation Scheme in place at the time of exit.

Oliver Dowden
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many new applications have been made to the non-domestic Renewable Heat Incentive scheme since it opened in November 2011 for (a) air-source and (b) ground and water-source heat pumps; and what the cost of that scheme has been to each government department that has incurred any such cost in each year since it began.

The following tables show the number of full applications for a) Air Source Heat Pumps and b) Ground Source Heat Pumps and Water Source Heat Pumps under the non-domestic Renewable Heat Incentive. The latest application data the department has is up to the end of October 2016; as such 2016 does not represent a full year of applications.

Air source heat pumps

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Full applications

0

0

0

11

158

118

Actuals and accruals

-

-

-

£4,033

£105,918

£193,233

Ground source heat pumps

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Full applications

7

54

92

126

276

198

Actuals and accruals

£1,236

£116,154

£409,475

£1,173,057

£5,756,337

£5,246,909

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many applications were made under the renewables obligation for (a) onshore and (b) offshore wind; and what the annual cost to the public purse was of each of those subsidies between 2010 and 2016.

The number of applications approved for accreditation under the renewables obligation (RO) for onshore and offshore wind projects in the UK between the financial years 2010/11 to 2015/16 were:

Technology

Total number of applications for accreditation between 2010/11 and 2015/16

Micro onshore wind projects up to and including 50kW capacity

142

Onshore wind projects above 50kW capacity

590

Offshore wind projects

17

Source: Ofgem:

RO accredited stations list (downloaded 24 November 2016): https://www.renewablesandchp.ofgem.gov.uk/Public/ReportManager.aspx?ReportVisibility=1&ReportCategory=0

The costs of the RO are reclaimed from electricity consumers, not from general taxation. The annual costs of supporting onshore and offshore wind through the RO from 2010/11 to 2015/16, in £ million nominal prices were:

RO costs £/million

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

Onshore wind

£397.8

£482.6

£557.1

£755.6

£786.8

£803.0

Offshore wind

£253.9

£371.1

£698.5

£988.7

£1,108.0

£1,429.7

Source: Ofgem:

Renewables Obligation library: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/environmental-programmes/ro/contacts-publications-and-data/publications-library-renewables-obligation-ro

Renewables Obligation Annual Report 2014-15: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications-and-updates/renewables-obligation-ro-annual-report-2014-15

Renewables Obligation register and compliance certificates report: https://www.renewablesandchp.ofgem.gov.uk/Public/ReportManager.aspx?ReportVisibility=1&ReportCategory=0

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many new applications have been made to the domestic Renewable Heat Incentive scheme since it opened in April 2014 for (a) air-source and (b) ground and water-source heat pumps; and what the annual cost to the public purse was of each of those subsidies.

The following tables show the number of total applications for air source heat pumps and ground source heat pumps under the domestic Renewable Heat Incentive. The latest application data the department has is up to the end of October 2016; as such 2016 does not represent a full year of applications.

Air source heat pumps

2014

2015

2016

Total applications (new and legacy)

7,689

13,714

4,783

Actuals and Accruals

£1,873,300

£11,027,489

£13,317,544

Ground source heat pumps

2014

2015

2016

Total applications (new and legacy)

3,127

3,727

1,131

Actuals and Accruals

£3,073,978

£16,554,779

£19,054,131

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to improve the protection of businesses from cyber attacks after the cyber attack on Pitney Bowes.

The Government is aware of the cyber attack on Pitney Bowes and urges all organisations to ensure they have appropriate cyber security controls in place to protect themselves.

The Government’s National Cyber Security Strategy (2016-2021) is backed with £1.9 billion investment to transform the nation’s cyber security and make the UK the safest place to live and do business online. As part of the strategy we have opened the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), which provides guidance and support to help businesses be more resilient to cyber attacks. This includes the Small Business Guide and an online staff training module, plus the Board Toolkit and '10 Steps to Cyber Security' guidance for larger organisations, as well as a programme of business engagement activity. The NCSC is the lead Government organisation for managing cyber incidents and has led on 658 incidents in the last year, providing support to almost 900 victim organisations, handling almost 1,800 incidents since commencing operations.

In addition, the Government is currently undertaking a Review of Cyber Security Incentives and Regulations to help understand the effectiveness of Government support to date and what more can be done to ensure businesses of all sizes are effectively managing their cyber risks.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs on shared intelligence from the US Government on Huawei's proposed role in developing the UK's 5G network.

DCMS Ministers have regular discussions with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office on a range of cyber security topics, including in relation to the UK’s telecommunications networks.

Widespread deployment of 5G and full fibre networks is a primary objective of Government policy. The Government published the Telecoms Supply Chain Review in July, which recommended the introduction of a new framework for telecoms security based on evidence and a hard-headed assessment of the risks. The Government has not yet made a final decision on individual high risk vendors and the additional controls that will be applied to them.

Matt Warman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions has he had with Ofcom on ensuring that public service broadcasters retain a prominent position in electronic programming guides.

The Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has regular meetings with Ofcom as part of normal government business. The Government recognises the value and importance of high quality public service content and the need for this to be widely accessible to viewers. That is why under the Digital Economy Act 2017, the government required Ofcom to publish a report which looks at the ease of finding PSB content across all platforms. Ofcom’s consultation on proposed changes to the linear EPG Code and the future of the prominence regime closed in October and the government looks forward to the publication of its findings.

13th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 6 November 2018 to Question 185569 on Wembley Stadium, if he will publish the minutes of the meeting between the Minister for Sport and Civil Society and the Chief Executive of the Football Association.

Details about such meetings, including discussion and schedules, are kept confidential - to allow full and frank discussions between Ministers and agencies.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had and with whom on the proposed sale of Wembley Stadium since 13 September 2018.

Since that date, the Minister for Sport and Civil Society spoke to Martin Glenn, the Chief Executive of the Football Association. The Government has been clear all along that any proposed sale of the stadium was a commercial matter between The FA and Mr Khan and we respect Mr Khan's decision to withdraw his bid. I am confident Wembley will continue to thrive with the FA as its custodians.

13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much local content television channels established under the Local Digital Television Programme Services Order 2012 have broadcast since their inception.

Since the launch of the first local television service in Grimsby in November 2013, a total of 34 local TV stations have launched across the UK. Ofcom collects information annually on the performance of local television services and has included analysis of the sector's performance in its annual Communication Market Report published since 2016. The Communications Market Reports for 2016 and 2017 are available from the Ofcom website.

13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what information his Department holds on the annual operating (a) profits and (b) losses of local television stations established under the Local Digital Television Programme Services Order 2012.

Since the launch of the first local television service in Grimsby in November 2013, a total of 34 local TV stations have launched across the UK. Ofcom collects information annually on the performance of local television services and has included analysis of the sector's performance in its annual Communication Market Report published since 2016. The Communications Market Reports for 2016 and 2017 are available from the Ofcom website.

6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will estimate the number of books that are stolen each year from local authority-run libraries and illegally sold.

The Department does not collect information about the number of books from local authority run libraries that are stolen and sold each year. Local library authorities are responsible for providing public library services including managing book stock available for library lending.

Michael Ellis
Attorney General
26th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when her Department plans to make an announcement on its review of fixed odds betting terminals.

A review of gaming machines and social responsibility measures was launched in October 2016, which included a look at the Fix Odds Betting terminals. Purdah interrupted the final stages of our consideration of the evidence received and the subsequent internal, cross government process of approval and sign off. I'm afraid, therefore, that we are back at the start of the process and that as a consequence of it taking at least 12 weeks I would not expect any further announcement until October at the earliest.

15th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, how many libraries have closed in the last six years.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport does not commission specific information relating to the closure of public libraries, but does monitor closely proposed changes to library service provision throughout England. Based on desk research undertaken by the Department, we estimate that from January 2010 to January 2016 approximately 110 static public libraries in England closed completely.

Annual statistics on public libraries are collected and published by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy and this includes details of the net number of libraries open as at 31 March of each year, but specific details of library closures since 2010 are not available from these statistics. Changes in these net figures will reflect a combination of library closures, new libraries opening, as well as libraries that are no longer part of the local authority statutory library service but remain open as community-run libraries.

18th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has had with bookmakers on the single-staffing of high street betting shops.

I meet with the betting industry, Gambling Commission, and other interested organisations regularly. I am aware of the concerns around single-staffing of high street betting shops but expect bookmakers to adhere to their statutory requirements and minimum voluntary standards to protect staff from risk.

1st Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the efficacy of current legislation on fixed-odds betting terminals; and if he will bring forward proposals for local authorities to determine locally the provision of such gaming machines.

New legislation came into force to improve player protections on FOBTs in April, and the law was also changed to require planning applications to be submitted to local authorities for new betting shops. Government measures on FOBTs are very new, but we are working with the Gambling Commission and industry to ensure they are effectively evaluated.

We are also pushing the industry to do more on social responsibility, including self-exclusion pilots that are currently underway in Chatham and Medway. This is the first multi-operator scheme of its kind.

I will be meeting with the Gambling Commission, Association for British Bookmakers and the Campaign for Fairer Gambling next week to discuss FOBTs and related issues.

11th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if he will hold discussions with the English Premier League on increased investment in grassroots football, in response to the recent sale of broadcasting rights.

I have regular discussions with the Premier League and will continue to press the importance that this huge investment needs to benefit the game as a whole. This includes benefiting clubs lower down the football pyramid, supporters, and the grassroots of the game, through increased investment in facilities, community programmes and other schemes.

11th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if he will make it his policy to encourage the English Premier League to increase its investment in grassroots football in line with the increase in revenue arising from the recent sale of broadcast rights.

I have regular discussions with the Premier League and will continue to press the importance that this huge investment needs to benefit the game as a whole. This includes benefiting clubs lower down the football pyramid, supporters, and the grassroots of the game, through increased investment in facilities, community programmes and other schemes.

1st Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, if he will commission research on the effects on consumers of fixed odds betting terminals which is based on analysis of the operation of a live terminal.

The government is committed to following an evidence based approach towards gambling legislation. The Responsible Gambling Trust (RGT) ​has recently carried out ​a significant programme of research into gaming machine usage​, which was published on Monday 1st December​. We now want to consider carefully the depth of findings and are taking advice from key organisations such as the Gambling Commission before thinking about next steps. I look forward to seeing the industry taking full advantage of the information provided by this research to bear down hard on the harm that gambling can cause.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he plans to take to ensure that 16 and 17 year olds in Lancashire classed as not known in respect of their education, training or employment status by Lancashire County Council's internal scrutiny committee are identified and helped into further education and apprenticeships.

Under the 2008 Education and Skills Act, local authorities have a statutory duty to identify and track participation of 16 and 17-year-olds in education or employment with training, to support those who are not participating to do so, and to make sure there is sufficient, suitable education and training provision to meet their needs. Local authorities also have a duty to work with schools to identify those young people who need targeted support or who are at risk of not participating post-16. Alongside this, they must lead the September Guarantee process which guarantees all young people a suitable place in further education at the end of years 11 and 12.

In line with these duties, where a young person is identified as ‘Not in Education, Employment and Training’ (NEET), the local authority has a responsibility to work with them. Similarly, where a young person’s destination is identified as ‘not known’, the local authority must continue to try to locate and contact the young person through various routes.

Local authorities may choose to organise their tracking of young people in a variety of ways; however, all local authorities have a duty to submit monthly data to the Department for Education’s ‘National Client Caseload Information System’ (NCCIS). This data is then published by the department, throughout the year in various publications, for transparency purposes.

The department publishes the NEET scorecard annually, which pulls together all of the NCCIS data published throughout the previous year and other relevant data. The scorecard ranks local authorities into 5 groups based on their performance on the percentage of 16 and 17-year-olds NEET and whose activity is not known. The department actively performance manages those local authorities in the bottom group. These actions can vary from engagement at official level, meetings and ministerial letters.

As this year’s scorecard has yet to be published, it will not be possible to confirm at this time exactly what action will be taken with individual local authorities. However, as local authority groups will be based on the NCCIS NEET and participation data, published on 20 June 2019[1], which shows that Lancashire County Council’s NEET and not known percentage is 10%, of which 8% were not known, which is above the North West average of 3.2% and the England average of 2.9%, it is likely that performance management action will be taken in relation to Lancashire local authority.

The department’s performance management approach has worked well in the past, with the majority of the local authorities contacted achieving improvements in their submitted data. Where improvements are not achieved, in a reasonable timeframe, the department follows up at official level with formal meetings to agree action plans and deadlines for improvement.

[1] NEET and Participation Local Authority Figures: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/neet-and-participation-local-authority-figures.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to provide additional funding to local authorities who record an increase in the number of pupils with special educational needs.

Our ambitions for children and young people with complex special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are exactly the same as for every other child and young person. As part of this, we are pleased to announce that we will be providing an additional £700 million, 10% in high needs funding next year alone, which will help local authorities to ensure that they can continue to offer the right support for children and young people with the most complex SEND.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to increase funding to schools in order to allow them to cover the one per cent shortfall in the planned 3.5 per cent increased pay award for teachers.

In July the Department announced that it was accepting the School Teachers’ Review Body (STRB) recommendation in full for a 2.75% uplift to the minima and maxima of all pay ranges and allowances.

In recognition of the difference between this award and the 2% the Department has assessed schools can afford on average nationally, it is providing an additional £105 million of funding for schools this year. This is on top of the £321 million the Department is already providing this year through the Teachers’ Pay Grant to cover the ongoing cost of the 2018 pay award.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will publish the latest statistics on people between 16 and 24 years old who are not in education, employment or training in each local authority area.

The latest estimates for young people aged 16 to 24 who are not in education, employment or training (NEET) in England and the English regions, based on 2018 quarterly Labour Force Survey (LFS) data, will be published on 28 February 2019 by the department as part of the series and can be accessed at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-neet.

However, due to sample size limitations in the LFS data, it is not possible to produce reliable estimates for local authority level geographies.

For young people aged 16 to 17, local authorities are required to monitor the extent to which young people are meeting their duty to participate in education or training through the department’s National Client Caseload Information System (NCCIS). Local authority level NEET estimates for England are published annually as transparency data from NCCIS and can be accessed at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/neet-and-participation-local-authority-figures. However, these estimates should be used with caution as the headline NEET measure includes people whose activities are not known in order to incentivise local authorities to track all young people.

8th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department's policies of the recommendations of the September 2018 Commission on Religious Education Religion and Worldviews report entitled The Way Forward.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State decided that accepting the Commission’s main proposals would be incompatible with his commitment to make no changes to the curriculum, other than those already announced, during the remaining lifetime of this Parliament.

He did however announce improvements to bursaries for initial teacher training and new funding for religious education subject knowledge enhancement courses. His full response to the Commission is set out in a letter of 6 December 2018 which can be found at: www.religiouseducationcouncil.org.uk/news/government-response-to-the-commission-on-re/.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
29th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of children in Year 3 and above who will be affected by the new means-tested entitlement for free school meals in households on universal credit with work-related earnings of more than £7,400 a year.

Our new criteria for free school meals eligibility will increase the number of children eligible by around 50,000 children by 2022. Due to the generous protections we will provide, all children receiving free school meals at the point the threshold is introduced, and all those who gain eligibility during the rollout of Universal Credit, will continue to receive free school meals until the end of Universal Credit rollout. After this point, those children who were protected – should they still be in school – will continue to be protected until the end of their current phase of education. Our protection arrangements will also cover pupils in receipt of benefits-related free school meals in Reception, Year 1 and Year 2, as well as those in Year 3 and above.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he has plans to include fostering as a recognised professional occupation.

The government’s independent review into foster care and the Education Select Committee inquiry considered the status of foster parents, including whether foster parents should be considered as professionals or employees. The department is carefully considering the recommendations of both reports and the government response will be published in spring this year. The Education Select Committee report is available here: https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/education-committee/inquiries/parliament-2017/inquiry1/.

The independent review of foster care is available here: https://www.gov.uk/
government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/%0b679320/Foster_Care_in_England_Review.pdf
.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many new teaching assistants were employed in (a) England, (b) Lancashire and (c) Hyndburn constituency in each of the last five years.

The number of full-time equivalent teaching assistants employed in state-funded schools in England is published each year in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical series available online at:

www.gov.uk/government/collections/statistics-school-workforce

Statistics on the number of new teaching assistants employed each year in England, Lancashire and Hyndburn are not available in the requested format.

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
15th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate has she made of the number of teaching assistants employed in (a) England, (b) Lancashire and (c) Hyndburn constituency.

The latest available figures on the number of full-time equivalent teaching assistants in state-funded schools are from November 2013 and are published online at:

www.gov.uk/government/statistics/school-workforce-in-england-november-2013

Nick Gibb
Minister of State (Education)
10th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people used children and young people's social care services in each district authority in Lancashire in the last period for which figures are available.

The available information is given in the table below:

Referrals to children’s social care, children in need and children looked after in Lancashire local authority in the year ending 31 March 2014.

Number

Referrals1,2 to children’s social care throughout the year

19,460

Children in need1 as of 31 March 2014

9,035

Children looked after as of 31 March 2014

1,590

Source: Children in Need census, SSDA903

1. Lancashire used two reporting systems to produce their Children in Need return in 2014 so we highlighted in the publication that we had some concerns over the quality of the data.

2. If a child has more than one referral in the year then each will be counted.

This data is only available at local authority and national level. Figures on referrals and children in need are published annually within the ‘Characteristics of children in need’ statistical first release:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/characteristics-of-children-in-need-2013-to-2014

Figures on the number of children looked after are published annually within the ‘Children looked after in England, including adoption’ statistical first release: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption--2

10th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the total level of (a) income and (b) expenditure is for children and young people's social care in each district authority in Lancashire.

The available information for Lancashire local authority is shown in the table below. Figures at district authority level within Lancashire are not available.

Income and expenditure statistics on children and young people's services for Lancashire local authority (1)

Year: 2013-14

Total expenditure (£000)

Income (£000)

Net current expenditure (£000)

Sure Start children's centres and early years

28,077

775

27,302

Children looked after

71,390

48

71,342

Other children's and families services

0

0

0

Safeguarding children and young people's services

25,978

267

25,711

Family support services

29,370

69

29,300

Services for young people

13,868

52

13,816

Youth justice

6,561

2,783

3,779

Capital Expenditure from Revenue (CERA) (Children's and young people's services)

0

0

0

TOTAL CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICES EXPENDITURE (including CERA)

175,245

3,995

171,250

TOTAL CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S SERVICES EXPENDITURE (excluding CERA)

175,245

3,995

171,250

1. An explanation of each expenditure category within the Section 251 outturn can be found in the guidance documentation at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/section-251-outturn-2013-to-2014-guidance-for-local-authorities

Totals may not be the sum of the constituent parts due to rounding.

1st Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions she has had with amateur theatre and arts groups on proposed changes to the Child Performance Regulations on performance hours and breaks.

The Department for Education ran a public consultation this summer, from 23 June to 29 August, on proposed changes to the Child Performance Regulations. We first announced our intention to do so last December, during the passage of the Children and Families Bill (now Act) 2014.

The consultation was open to all those with an interest, including the amateur sector. A full consultation report will be published later this year.

1st Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what consideration she has given to regulating smaller amateur theatre and arts groups under a separate class under the Child Performance Regulations.

The child performance licensing system is designed to provide a check that suitable arrangements are made to ensure the safety and wellbeing of children when they take part in performances, and that their education does not suffer when they do. This principle applies regardless of whether the performances are put on by amateur or professional organisations.

We therefore have no plans to introduce differential licensing arrangements for different types or sizes of organisation. We are, however, planning to remove some unnecessary and outdated restrictions and have recently consulted on other options to improve flexibility, but without reducing any of the important safeguards. We expect the resulting changes to benefit all types of organisation involved in child performances and, of course, the children themselves.

1st Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the effect of matron licence fees on participation in theatre and arts groups.

The Department for Education has made no assessment of the effect of local authority fees for licensing of matrons (otherwise referred to as chaperones) on participation in theatre and arts groups.

29th Aug 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much pupil premium funding has been allocated to each borough in Lancashire in each year since that scheme's introduction.

The Department for Education does not hold pupil premium allocations broken down by borough. Pupil premium allocations are published each year at top tier local authority, constituency and school level. The allocations for each year are available online at:

2014-15
www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2014-to-2015-illustrative-allocation-tables.

2013-14
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20131216163513/https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pupil-premium-2013-to-2014-final-allocation-tables.

2012-13
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20131216163513/http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/financialmanagement/schoolsrevenuefunding/a00200697/pupil-premium-2012-13.

2011-12
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20131216163513/http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/adminandfinance/financialmanagement/schoolsrevenuefunding/settlement2012pupilpremium/a0075963/pupil-premium-2011-12.

The pupil premium allocations for Lancashire for each year going back to its introduction in 2011-12 are: £45.9 million in 2014-15 (provisional based on illustrative pupil numbers), £37.1 million in 2013-14, £21.7 million in 2012-13, and £12.4 million in 2011-12.

24th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure Ofsted is able to undertake the proposed increase in inspections of apprenticeship providers.

Our apprenticeship reforms will improve quality by involving employers in defining the new standards and assessment and by controlling the funding of apprenticeships. Ofsted will continue to play an important role in ensuring the quality of teaching and learning in registered training providers. We are discussing the arrangements with Ofsted as part of the Trailblazer project.

19th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans his Department has to encourage the collection, storage and use of rainwater in (a) commercial and (b) residential properties.

The 25 Year Environment Plan sets out our ambitions to improve water efficiency. We have committed to work with the water industry to agree what cost effective measures, including rainwater storage, are required to improve water efficiency for both commercial and residential properties.

David Rutley
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
31st Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU on food prices for products sourced from developing countries.

The UK currently sources only a small proportion of its food from developing countries. The most important drivers of retail food price inflation, including for products sourced from developing countries, are commodity prices, exchange rates and oil prices.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what plans he has to meet his Yemeni counterpart to discuss how aid can reach people in need without being intercepted and captured by Houthi rebels.

The UK remains extremely concerned by constraints on humanitarian access within Yemen. We regularly raise obstructions to humanitarian access and aid distributions with all parties at the highest levels and call for compliance with the UN Security Council Resolution 2451.

The Foreign Secretary discussed the issue of humanitarian access across Yemen with his Government of Yemen counterparts earlier this year, and on 17 July UK officials raised the issue with the Government of Yemen’s Prime Minister Maeen Abdulmalik Saeed in Riyadh. I discussed it during my visit in the Gulf region last week. The UK will continue to press this issue with senior Yemeni counterparts.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether the Government has provided aid to the Government of Venezuela in the last 12 months.

The UK Government has not provided any bilateral official development assistance (ODA) direct to the Government of Venezuela in the last 12 months. ODA eligible programmes have taken place in Venezuela but spend has been delivered through local and international non-governmental organisations and multilateral organisations.

The UK Government is very concerned by the growing humanitarian crisis in Venezuela and we are exploring how best we may compliment international humanitarian aid efforts within Venezuela and the wider region. We urge the Venezuelan government to facilitate access to humanitarian assistance for the Venezuelan population.

21st Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department has made of the merits of using unarmed drones to deliver humanitarian aid in Syria.

Aid delivered by road by trusted humanitarian partners is by far the most effective way to meet needs in Syria and to ensure that it reaches those most in need. We have, however, examined all options as part of our determination to do everything we can to alleviate the suffering of the Syrian people.

Airdrops, manned or using drones, are not capable of meeting either the scale of needs or delivering many of the kinds of aid that could address the priority needs that we see in Syria (e.g. safe drinking water, health support). Furthermore, we judge that such an operation would carry a high level of risk because the consent is needed of those who control the airspace and those on the ground that could threaten aircraft. There is nothing to suggest that the Assad regime would provide such consent, given that it continues to use the denial of aid as a weapon of war.

1st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department has made of the increasing number of drug-resistant malaria cases in Vietnam and of the growing prevalence of anti-malarial drug resistance in the Greater Mekong Region.

The World Health Organisation has a strong presence in the Greater Mekong Sub Region (including Vietnam): it continuously works with national governments to assess multidrug resistance and support policy responses. DFID supports the WHO in this essential work. Despite the real concern about drug resistance in Vietnam and the Sub Region, there has been a major decline in the rate of malaria cases and deaths. In Vietnam, between 2013 and 2015, the reported cases declined from 17,128 to 9,331 cases and reported deaths from 6 to 3.

3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what support the UK is offering to Yazidi people.

UK aid is reaching hundreds of thousands of people across Iraq, including the most vulnerable groups, such as Yazidis. All UK-funded aid is distributed on the basis of need to ensure that no-one is discriminated against on the grounds of race, religion or ethnicity. The UK works with the Government of Iraq, Kurdish Regional Government, the UN and the international community to support the rights of all minorities and to ensure our aid reaches those in greatest need.


To date, the UK has committed £79.5 million to the humanitarian crisis in Iraq.


4th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps he is taking to ensure that information on licences granted by the Export Control Joint Unit is (a) accessible and (b) comprehensible to the public.

The Government publishes Official Statistics on a quarterly and annual basis on export licences granted and refused on GOV.UK. These include a country level data report, providing data per country and a statistical commentary report that summarises and provides context and explanation for the key data trends. These are available to view at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data.

A searchable database that allows bespoke searches of this information, based on specific licence types, destinations and goods, is also available at https://www.exportcontroldb.trade.gov.uk/sdb2/fox/sdb/SDBHOME.

All information published on GOV.UK must comply with guidelines set by the Government’s Digital Service. This includes a mandatory requirement for all published information to be written in plain English to ensure that it is clear and concise.

We are reviewing all export control content on GOV.UK to ensure it is as clear and simple as possible for exporters and other members of the public.

Graham Stuart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what arms sales between the UK and Qatar were carried out from 2010 to 2017.

Arms sales data by region are published annually on GOV.UK.

The Government publishes Official Statistics about export licences granted and refused each quarter. The data currently includes details of licences up to 31 December 2016. Data for the period 1 January 2017 to 31 March 2017 will be published on 18 July 2017. The data can be accessed on GOV.UK

Licences granted are not necessarily a measure of exports shipped in a given period as they are valid for between two and five years. Licensing data only provides a partial indication of sales as exporters only declare export values for a subsection of licences (Standard Individual Export Licences). Some licences expire before they are used and in these circumstances exporters must submit a further application, which can result in an element of double counting.

The value of arms export licences issued from 2010 to 2017 are:-

Year Value (£)

2010 £3,082,468

2011 £439,488

2012 £354,419

2013 £4,255,887

2014 £10,547,414

2015 £140,925,288

2016 £1,822,648

24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to maintain existing contracts between Northern Rail and subcontractors in the event that Northern Rail is taken into Government control.

In the event that any franchise were to be taken into Government control, the standard practice would be for a Transfer Scheme to be put in place between the existing and new operator to transfer those existing contracts and assets that would be required for the continued running of the railway.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to help ensure that more public charging points are provided for electronic vehicles.

We want to encourage private sector investment to build and operate a self-sustaining public network that is affordable, reliable and accessible.

Government funding and leadership, alongside private sector investment, has supported the installation of more than 21,000 public chargepoints, 2,100 of which are rapid – creating one of the largest networks in Europe. In August the Secretary of State announced that funding for this year’s on street residential charging scheme, which offers grants to local authorities to support investment at a local level, would be doubled from £2.5 to £5 million. Highways England has also committed £15m to ensure there are chargepoints (rapid where possible) every 20 miles on 95% of the Strategic Road Network by 2020.

This is in addition to the £400m Chargepoint Infrastructure Investment Fund announced at the Autumn budget in 2017.

25th Jul 2019
M65
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to work with Transport for the North to expand the M65 to Bradford and Leeds.

The Department announced in March 2019 that Highways England would work with Transport for the North on a study looking at options for improving road links between the M65 and north and west Yorkshire. The output of this study will inform consideration of the case for future investment.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to increase funding to the Access for All scheme to allow more stations to be upgraded.

We have made a further £300m available, which has been allocated to projects until 2024. If the programme continues to be delivered successfully, DfT will make submissions for further funding in due course. In the meantime, if the industry installs, replaces or renews station infrastructure this will need to comply with current accessibility standards.

24th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government supports the reinstatement of the rail link between Skipton and Colne.

Local stakeholders have championed the reinstatement of the Colne-Skipton railway line and work is currently progressing to assess the proposed scheme and determine if it can be made affordable, will attract sufficient traffic, and is part of the right long-term solution for trans-Pennine rail traffic.

We expect to receive the results later this year to inform a decision as to whether the scheme should progress to the ‘develop’ stage of the Government’s Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline. This is part of our new approach to rail enhancements to ensure we address the needs of passengers and freight, and that funding commitments appropriately reflect the stage of development of schemes.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
24th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the regulation of the sale of drones.

As set out in the Government’s recent drone consultation response on 7 January 2019, my Department is working with the Home Office and the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy on product standards for drones. The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has also published new product standards for drones which will become fully applicable by 2022. These include a mandatory requirement for drones to be fitted with geo-awareness software and being remotely identifiable before being placed on the market.

At an international level, the International Organization for Standardization is currently developing standards for drone safety and operation in which the British Standards Institution (BSI) committee members represent the UK. It is vital that we balance maintaining the UK’s world-leading position in aviation safety and security with supporting the development of this emerging industry.

Michael Ellis
Attorney General
31st Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department has taken to introduce hedgehog crossing signs.

The Department for Transport has been exploring the options for a traffic sign to make drivers aware of the presence of hedgehogs and other small animals in the road ahead, in locations where there have been a high number of animal casualties. The Department expects to make an announcement on this in due course.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to increase funding for the Access for All scheme to improve the provision of step-free access at train stations.

The Inclusive Transport Strategy, published on 25 July 2018, included a commitment to extend our Access for All programme across rail Control Period 6 (2019 to 2024) with an additional £300m of funding from the public purse. We have received more than 300 nominations for this funding and plan to announce the successful stations in April next year.

29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the time required for all train stations in England and Wales to have step free access at the current pace of works funded by the Access for All funding scheme.

It is this Government which is giving funding to continue the Access for All programme into the 2019 to 2024 period. Around 75% of rail journeys in the UK now have step free access to and between every platform, which compares with only 50% of journeys in 2005.

29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the timescale for implementing step-free access at all train stations through the Access for All funding scheme.

We are committed to improving accessibility at railway stations. However, many stations date from a time when the needs of disabled passengers were simply not considered.

Therefore whenever infrastructure work is carried out at a station by the industry, it must comply with the relevant EU and UK accessibility standards. This includes major projects such as Crossrail, but also Network Rail’s ongoing renewals programme. However, in recognition of the scale of the problem, and to increase the pace of delivery, the Access for All programme was launched to provide access improvements over and above those required to be delivered by the rail industry, targeting stations not due to have their access improved as part of other projects.

We plan to announce the next tranche of Access for All projects in April and the Stations will all be completed by 2024 at the latest.

23rd Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to ensure the safety of HGV drivers using (a) lay-bys and (b) overnight parking places.

Enforcement against criminal activity against HGV drivers and their vehicles is a matter for the police. The Department will continue to engage with stakeholders to encourage the development of more safe, secure and high-quality lorry parking facilities. In particular, Highways England is developing its role as statutory planning consultee for such developments on the strategic road network, and this will include consideration of desirable criteria for lorry parking such as security features. In addition, the Department will consider how best to promote the uptake in the UK of the forthcoming EU-wide classifications for safe and secure lorry parking sites.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has plans to reform taxi regulation legislation; and if he will make a statement.

At a Westminster Hall Debate last year, the Rt Hon John Hayes MP announced the formation of a Task and Finish group to consider any taxi and private hire regulatory issues, their causes and potential remedies. The group’s remit includes considering the use and effectiveness of powers currently available to licensing authorities.

The Group has now submitted its report and Ministers are considering the recommendations made. The report and response will be published soon.

27th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress has been made by the Taskforce on the design and facilities of Motorway Service Areas to ensure more Changing places toilets are installed in motorway service stations.

The Government is clear that customers should have access to toilet facilities at motorway service areas that are appropriate to their needs. The Taskforce was announced by the previous minister, John Hayes and the Government is now considering how the provision of Changing Places facilities can be increased at Motorway Service Areas as part of the Inclusive Transport Strategy. Alongside this, we are also working closely with MSA operators to understand how better facilities might increasingly be provided as part of their investment and renewal plans.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of staffing levels at DVLA in each year between 2009 and 2017.

The table below shows the number of full time equivalent staff employed at the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency in each financial year between 2008/09 and 2016/17:

Financial Year

Full Time Equivalent

2008-09

5,690.0

2009-10

5,614.0

2010-11

5,561.3

2011-12

5,469.0

2012-13

5,612.6

2013-14

4,985.1

2014-15

5,147.0

2015-16

5,429.9

2016-17

5,351.2

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department plans to make any changes to the budget it has allocated to the Northern Powerhouse initiative for investing in transport.

The Government remains committed to the plans it set out at the Spending Review for transport investment in support of the Northern Powerhouse initiative.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what total private investment in rail has been in each region of the UK in each year since 2005.

Between 2006/07 and 2012/13 the private investment in Great Britain's railways amounted to £3,573 million. This includes all enhancements in relation to tracks and signalling, rolling stock and stations and other investments

This information is not available on a regional basis.

Further details of this funding are available on ORR's website at the following link:

https://dataportal.orr.gov.uk/displayreport/report/html/5cc4eb14-fe68-4b72-aebf-81625df90d86

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what data his Department collects on private investment in (a) rail infrastructure and (b) rolling stock in each region.

The Department does not collect information about private investment in rail infrastructure or rolling stock on either a National or Regional basis.

ORR publishes data regarding private investment broken down by expenditure type: tracks and signalling; rolling stock; stations and other investment. However, this information is only published for Great Britain as a whole.

Further details of this funding are available on ORR's website at the following link:

https://dataportal.orr.gov.uk/displayreport/report/html/5cc4eb14-fe68-4b72-aebf-81625df90d86

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what representations he has received from (a) local authorities and (b) hon. Members in Lancashire on rolling stock in Lancashire.

Discussions have taken place with Lancashire County Council on the provision of rolling stock for a new Manchester to Burnley and Blackburn via Rochdale service. A number of representations have been received from hon. Members concerning rolling stock in Lancashire, including at the Westminster Hall debate on rolling stock provision in the North of England on 12 March 2014.

3rd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department plans to recalculate universal credit payments to take account of recipients who are required to make 53 rent payments in a year.

Neither tenants or landlords lose a week’s rent in a 53 weekly rent payment year as has been alleged; no year contains 53 weeks. The problem is alignment between weekly and monthly cycles. Each month the UC housing element is a constant figure but claimants with weekly tenancy agreements will be required to make either four or five rent payments within this period. If the claimant always pays their rent on time, in five payment months they are effectively making payment for part of the following month. That month will always be a four rent payment month, so the combination of the advance payment and the ‘overpayment’ of housing support during that month will get the claimant back on track.

Where a landlord charges rent weekly on a Monday, because of the way the calendar falls every 5 or 6 years, they will seek 53 rent payments in a year, with the 53rd payment in part covering the tenancy for the first few days of the following year. The effect of this is that, over the course of the next housing association rental year, a tenant’s UC payments will accurately reflect their liability, irrespective of the 53 payment weeks.

There is a separate issue with respect to the way the calculation in the Universal Credit regulations converts a weekly liability into a monthly allowance. The conversion is achieved by multiplying the weekly rent by 52 and then dividing by 12. This effectively means one day’s rent a year (two days in a leap years) are not covered by UC. We are currently considering whether this formulation around weekly rents, and potentially other weekly amounts in the UC calculation, should be amended.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people under 21 years old have claimed housing support entitlement as part of universal credit since the ending of means testing for that component in March 2018.

The housing costs element, in line with all other elements in Universal Credit, has always been subject to means testing for all Universal Credit claimants.

Numbers of people under 21 years claiming housing support entitlement as part of Universal Credit since March 2018 is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department plans to maintain a central record of the number of people who use foodbanks in the UK.

We have no current plans to develop official national statistics on food bank use. However, the Office for National Statistics is leading a project to improve statistics on household food insecurity by reviewing all existing official and non-official sources of data and looking at options to fill data gaps in partnership with government departments, including the Department for Work and Pensions.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the value of the new bereavement support payment to affected families.

We intend to assess the impact of Bereavement Support Payment once sufficient evidence is available to assess all aspects of the policy.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information her Department holds on the number of (a) universal credit claimants who have lost benefit income as a result of benefit migration and (b) single parents who have lost benefit income as a result of universal credit in areas of Lancashire where its roll-out has not yet been made compulsory.

Data is not available that distinguishes these cases from other new claims to Universal Credit.

Currently, claimants moving from existing benefits to Universal Credit will only do so because they will have had a change in their circumstances that would previously, under the legacy system, have triggered a new claim to benefits or tax credits. Entitlement would have been calculated based on the rules of their new benefit, taking in to account their new circumstances.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will place in the House of Commons Library a lookup file of every (a) postcode and (b) postcode sector in the UK to its nearest JobCentre Plus office.

There are currently no plans to put this information in the House of Commons Library as the information is in the public domain. A search facility is available on gov.uk which enables the public to find the nearest Jobcentre Plus office for the specific post code entered in to the search tool.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
10th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will place a set of electronic shapefiles showing in full the boundaries of all the areas of the UK covered by each different JobCentre Plus office in the Library.

This information is not currently held by the Department in the format required. However, our systems are configured to map postcodes against offices.

There is a local office search page on GOV.UK, where the allocated Jobcentre Plus office and any relevant contact information can be obtained by entering a postcode

This is available at http://los.direct.gov.uk/

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
12th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the effect of future changes to housing benefit for claimants under 21 years of age on (a) claimants' labour mobility and (b) the wider economy.

This policy will not affect Housing Benefit claimants; rather it will affect new claims to Universal Credit Full Service from 1 April 2017. This policy will also be implemented alongside the Youth Obligation – a new and intensive package of labour market support for 18-21 year-olds looking to get back into work.

30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether savings to the public purse over the current Parliament, which his Department estimated will accrue from changes in housing benefit for people under 21 years of age includes the costs of evictions and temporary accommodation potentially resulting from those changes; and whether he has made an assessment of the effect of those changes on young peoples' labour mobility.

It is important to make clear that the changes referred to will only affect claimants on Universal Credit Full service – they will not affect those on Housing Benefit. Since the policy was initially announced, we have worked in collaboration with key housing stakeholders such as Crisis and Shelter to make sure the policy includes the right exemptions to protect the most vulnerable people; we are therefore confident about the robustness of the policy.

7th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many disability organisations stated in their responses to the consultation on the future of the Independent Living Fund in 2012 that they were (a) supportive of and (b) opposed to the closure of the fund.

Due to the nature of both the consultation and the responses, DWP undertook a qualitative rather than quantitative assessment of the responses received; statistical information as requested is therefore not available.

A summary of the consultation responses is available in the Government’s response to the consultation published on GOV.UK https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/184115/future-of-ilf-response.pdf

7th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many disability organisations which responded to his Department's consultation on the closure of the Independent Living Fund (a) supported and (b) opposed non-ring-fenced funding.

The consultation on the Future of the Independent Living Fund did not ask any specific questions in relation to the ring-fencing of future funding.

A summary of the consultation responses is available in the Government’s response to the consultation published on GOV.UK https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/184115/future-of-ilf-response.pdf

13th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions he has held with the Association of Gas Safety Managers about access to properties to undertake statutory gas safety checks.

Neither myself nor the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions have held any discussions with the Association of Gas Safety Managers about access to properties to undertake statutory gas safety checks.

The Health and Safety Executive provides guidance to landlords on what to do if a tenant prevents access for a gas safety check: http://www.hse.gov.uk/gas/domestic/faqlandlord.htm

8th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) minor, (b) serious and (c) fatal accidents at work have been reported in each region and constituent part of the UK in each of the last five years.

These statistics are published on the Health and Safety Executive website at www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/regions/regtab.xls for the latest year, and www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/regions/reghist.xls for the previous five years.

7th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions he has had with learning disability charities on the closure of the Independent Living Fund.

In July 2012 the Department consulted extensively on the future of the Independent Living Fund, including a large number of disability organisations. The consultation received approximately 2000 responses, 79 of these responses were from disability organisations.

7th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the effect on learning disability outcomes of the closure of the Independent Living Fund.

The potential implications of closing the Independent Living Fund and devolving the full funding to Local Authorities (LA) are set out clearly in the Equality Analysis published on 6 March 2014.

25th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many complaints his Department has received on the Access to Work scheme in each of the last five years.

Access to Work complaints are handled in accordance with the DWP two tier complaints process. The figures that are available since the introduction of that process are:

Customer complaints received

Year

2011/12 (Q4 only)

2012/13

2013/14

Number of complaints

121

75

157

24th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people with chronic conditions have been reassessed as eligible for higher-rate disability living allowance in each of the last five years.

We do not hold the information requested.

12th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of the extension of the shared accommodation rate to people under the age of 35 years.

The final research outputs from DWP's independent evaluation of the changes to the Local Housing Allowance are due to be published this summer. The research will cover the impact of extending the age threshold for the Shared Accommodation Rate.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the overall cost to his Department of data entry associated with universal credit.

There are no dedicated data entry roles and accordingly no cost to the department can be reliably estimated.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the cost to his Department was of data entry used under universal credit in each quarter since 2010.

There are no dedicated data entry roles and accordingly no cost to the department can be reliably estimated.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many staff his Department has employed in data entry roles relating to universal credit in (a) England, (b) the North West and (c) Lancashire in each quarter since 2010.

There are no dedicated data entry roles and accordingly no cost to the department can be reliably estimated.

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what change there has been in his Department's data entry spending in the last year; and what the reasons are for any such change.

There are no dedicated data entry roles and accordingly no cost to the department can be reliably estimated.

24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment has he made of the recent cyber attack on Pitney Bowes and its impact on the primary care provision within the (a) East Lancashire CCG and (b) East Lancashire hospitals NHS trust.

Pitney Bowes machines are not connected to National Health Service networks and therefore no effect has been seen to any NHS equipment. We are aware that East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust’s franking machines were affected and contingency plans were immediately actioned. This resulted in the Clinical Commissioning Group and a few other local companies franking the mail for the hospital in order to ensure patients received their letters.

Both East Lancashire Clinical Commissioning Group and East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust have confirmed that there was no impact to the provision of care as a result of the recent malware attack.

Nadine Dorries
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust on preparations for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

The Department is working with its partners across Government, arm’s length bodies, local authorities, industry and the wider health and care system to ensure that all relevant parties are prepared for exiting the European Union. The quality and safety of patient care is paramount in our preparedness plans.

The Department, alongside NHS England and NHS Improvement, is ensuring that there is regular communication with frontline National Health Service organisations and stakeholders in the health and social care sector regarding EU Exit preparations. NHS England will be holding EU Exit Roadshows in the lead up to 31 October building on the regular communication that the Department and NHS England has with the frontline.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Prime Minister's statement of 24 July 2019, what steps he is taking to recruit more nurses.

There are currently over 16,700 more nurses on wards when compared to 2010. The latest data published by the University and College Admissions Service (on 11 July 2019) shows that there has been a 4.6% increase in the number of undergraduate applicants to pre-registration nursing and midwifery courses when compared to the equivalent point in 2018.

The Department has put in place a number of actions to increase nursing workforce supply, including improving staff retention, return to practice, overseas recruitment and expanding nursing associates.

The interim People Plan (published on 3 June 2019) puts staff at the heart of National Health Service policy and delivery and sets out how we will secure a capable and motivated multidisciplinary healthcare workforce, of a sufficient size, to meet population health needs. It sets out the immediate actions needed to grow the nursing workforce across all settings by over 40,000 in the next five years. A final People Plan will be published in due course.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the additional funding for the NHS announced by the Prime Minister will be used to increase the number of nursing bursaries.

The education funding reforms announced in the 2015 Spending Review started to take effect from August 2017 and pre-registration nursing students began to access student loans rather than receiving a National Health Service bursary.

In January 2019, the NHS published its Long Term Plan which sets out a 10 year vision for healthcare in England. The NHS Interim People Plan, published on 3 June, sets out the immediate actions needed to grow the nursing workforce across all settings by over 40,000 in the next five years.

We will work with the NHS and the Higher Education Institution sector to improve awareness of the financial support packages available to all undergraduate and postgraduate healthcare students and how they can be accessed.

23rd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of trends in the level of waiting times at A&E at the Royal Blackburn Hospital.

NHS England publishes monthly performance data for accident and emergency (A&E) waiting times for each trust rather than individual hospital site level. Performance data for the East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ae-waiting-times-and-activity/

East Lancashire Hospitals Trust A&E performance

June 2019

May 2019

June 2018

% seen in 4 hours or less

81.4%

78.4%

85.6%

Total attendances

15,621

16,180

17,371

Total attendances in 4 hours or less

12,714

12,683

14,863

Source: NHS England Operational Statistics1

Despite continued high numbers of attendees, performance shows, on average, more than four out of five attendees are seen/treated/admitted/discharged within four hours of arrival. This level of performance has been sustained throughout the months of May, June and July.

The Trust is working hard to ensure robust plans are in place to achieve the A&E standard of 95% of patients admitted, transferred or discharged within four hours of arrival in all types of A&E departments.

Note:

1https://www.england.nhs.uk/statistics/statistical-work-areas/ae-waiting-times-and-activity/ae-attendances-and-emergency-admissions-2019-20/

23rd Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the sale value of NHS property has been since Sir Robert Naylor's review of NHS Property and estates; and what recent estimate he has made of the sale value of NHS property due to be sold.

The latest published data shows that National Health Service trusts, foundation trusts and the Department, including its arm’s-length bodies and wholly owned property companies, disposed of 301 surplus sites between April 2015 and March 2017, generating £439 million in receipts from unconditional sales. This data is available online, as part of Cabinet Office’s ‘Transparency Report: Government’s land and property disposals in 2015-16 and 2016-17’, published in April 2018 at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/697773/Transparency_report_Government_s_land_and_property_disposals_2015-16_and_2016-17__1_.pdf

Similar data relating to the 2017-18 financial year will be published in due course.

The Department annually collects data on properties owned by NHS trusts and foundation trusts which has been declared surplus and planned for future disposal. This collection does not include properties owned by the Department, its arm’s-length bodies and wholly owned property companies. Information reported directly by trusts show that as at 31 March 2018 the total declared market value of surplus and potentially surplus land was £260 million; however, many organisations were not able to provide figures due to data limitations, including commercial confidentiality. This data is available at the following link:

https://digital.nhs.uk/data-and-information/publications/statistical/nhs-surplus-land/2017-18-england

11th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much money was spent on translation services in the NHS by language in the last financial year.

Information on expenditure on translation services is not held centrally. There has been no central audit of translation services in the National Health Service, as these services are commissioned by individual NHS organisations.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
11th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department takes to audit the (a) quality, (b) necessity and (c) value for money of translation services in the NHS.

Information on expenditure on translation services is not held centrally. There has been no central audit of translation services in the National Health Service, as these services are commissioned by individual NHS organisations.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
14th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of NHS medium secure learning disability services in East Lancashire.

Medium Secure Unit (MSU) Learning Disability (LD) services continue to be provided at the Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust Whalley site - there are 40 beds available and currently occupancy is running at 100%.

A new 40 bed MSU LD service has now been approved and building has commenced at the Maghull Health Park. This is planned to be completed by May 2020.

Following the outcome of a consultation on proposals to stop providing services at Mersey Care Whalley, NHS England have committed to the beds at Maghull being provided by Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust.

The 40 beds at the Maghull Health Park will provide MSU LD services for the whole of the North West.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
26th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has plans to encourage Clinical Commissioning Groups to fund transport for vulnerable and disabled patients to events supported by their own social prescribing schemes.

NHS England advises that the operation and use for non-emergency patient transport services is a matter for local commissioners – including transport services to support vulnerable and disabled patients to social prescribing schemes.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if his Department will end the policy of imposing financial penalties on local authorities which do not meet targets on transfers of care.

No-one should stay in hospital longer than necessary. That is why we have invested an additional £2 billion over three years to support adult social care and reduce delayed transfers of care.

We will look at performance data in November, to identify the poorest performers and agree what action to take. Whilst this includes looking at financial allocations for 2018-2019, we confirm that this funding will remain with local government, and be used for adult social care.

11th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many hospital walk-in centres have closed between 2010 and 2017.

This information is not held centrally.

NHS Improvement published a review of walk-in centres in 2014. This can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nhs-walk-in-centre-services-in-england-review

8th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to increase the level of investment in training for 16 to 25 year olds in the adult care sector.

The Department continues to spend significant levels of funding to train and develop the adult social care workforce, including those aged between 16-25.

In 2016/17, the Department will provide £23 million in funding to Skills for Care for the training and development of the adult social care workforce including for 16-25 year olds. This includes £12 million for the Workforce Development Fund which provides support to employers for modules and qualifications for their workers in adults’ services in the private and voluntary sectors.

The Department is working closely with the sector skills council partner, Skills for Care, through programmes such as apprenticeships in social care and Care Ambassadors which promote positive image of the sector in schools and colleges.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what contribution his Department plans to make to the Royal College of Ophthalmologists' consultation on raising standards for refractive surgery.

Refractive eye surgery is regulated through providers being registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) and doctors carrying out the surgery must be registered with the General Medical Council.

Once the Royal College of Ophthalmologists refractive surgery standards are published, the General Medical Council would expect a doctor to be aware of them. When carrying out inspections and assessments of services, the CQC would also expect a provider to be following best practice guidance, which would include the standards published by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists.

These processes are well established and so the Department would not have a direct role in assisting in the implementation of the refractive surgery standards. However, the Department will maintain an interest in the consultation and the work of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists in this area.

13th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how his Department plans to assist with the implementation of new refractive surgery standards being drawn up by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists.

Refractive eye surgery is regulated through providers being registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) and doctors carrying out the surgery must be registered with the General Medical Council.

Once the Royal College of Ophthalmologists refractive surgery standards are published, the General Medical Council would expect a doctor to be aware of them. When carrying out inspections and assessments of services, the CQC would also expect a provider to be following best practice guidance, which would include the standards published by the Royal College of Ophthalmologists.

These processes are well established and so the Department would not have a direct role in assisting in the implementation of the refractive surgery standards. However, the Department will maintain an interest in the consultation and the work of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists in this area.

19th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with (a) East Lancashire and (b) Blackburn and Darwen clinical commissioning groups on the cost of outsourced mental health services.

No Ministers in the Department have held such discussions with East Lancashire and Blackburn and Darwen Clinical Commissioning Groups.

19th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the total cost to the NHS has been of outsourced mental health services in each of the last three years.

We do not hold this information centrally.


Departmental Ministers regularly discuss a number of mental health issues with NHS England officials, although no discussions specifically about the cost of outsourced mental health services have taken place.

19th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with NHS England on the cost of outsourced mental health services.

We do not hold this information centrally.


Departmental Ministers regularly discuss a number of mental health issues with NHS England officials, although no discussions specifically about the cost of outsourced mental health services have taken place.

23rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he had with EMIS Health on data protection.

No discussions between My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State and EMIS about data protection have taken place.

10th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how much funding has been (a) received for and (b) spent on adult social care services provided by each district authority in Lancashire.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre does not hold the data requested at district authority level. Not all councils have adult social care responsibilities. Councils with adult social care responsibilities (CASSRs) in Lancashire are: Lancashire county council, Blackpool unitary authority and Blackburn with Darwen unitary authority. Lancashire County Council is responsible for social care in the district authorities (Burnley, Chorley, Fylde, Hyndburn, Lancaster, Pendle, Preston, Ribble Valley, Rossendale, South Ribble, West Lancashire, Wyre).

Such information as is available is the number of adults in receipt of council-funded social services from the three councils with adult social care responsibility during the period 2013-14.

The information in Table 1 below is derived from the Referrals, Assessments and Packages of Care (RAP) returns, table P1. RAP returns are collected annually from Councils with Adult Social Services Responsibilities (CASSRs) and refer to the reporting year 1 April to 31 March. All data are final and rounded to the nearest 5.

Table 1: Number of clients receiving services in Lancashire, Blackpool and Blackburn with Darwen provided or commissioned by the CASSR during the period 2013-14

Total

Lancashire

28,350

Blackpool (Unitary authority)

4,845

Blackburn with Darwen (Unitary authority)

2,825

Source: RAP P1

Note:

Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5.

Funding allocations to authorities with social services responsibilities will consider the fact that they are responsible for adult social care.

Adult social care is one of the services supported through the Local Government Finance Settlement. Funding from the Local Government Finance Settlement is unhypothecated i.e. local authorities are able to use it for any service. For this reason it is not possible to say how much funding has been provided for any particular service, including adult social care. It is up to local authorities to prioritise their budgets based on the needs and priorities of local people in their area.

Local authorities do report expenditure on adult social care. The Latest expenditure data is from the 2013/14 financial year. Table 2 below shows expenditure in Lancashire:

Table 2

Councils with Adult Social Services Responsibilities (CASSRs) in Lancashire

Social Care Expenditure (2013/14 prices, £ million)

Lancashire

357.67

Blackpool (Unitary authority)

46.27

Blackburn with Darwen (Unitary authority)

41.94

10th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people were in receipt of adult social care services in each district authority in Lancashire in the latest period for which figures are available.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre does not hold the data requested at district authority level. Not all councils have adult social care responsibilities. Councils with adult social care responsibilities (CASSRs) in Lancashire are: Lancashire county council, Blackpool unitary authority and Blackburn with Darwen unitary authority. Lancashire County Council is responsible for social care in the district authorities (Burnley, Chorley, Fylde, Hyndburn, Lancaster, Pendle, Preston, Ribble Valley, Rossendale, South Ribble, West Lancashire, Wyre).

Such information as is available is the number of adults in receipt of council-funded social services from the three councils with adult social care responsibility during the period 2013-14.

The information in Table 1 below is derived from the Referrals, Assessments and Packages of Care (RAP) returns, table P1. RAP returns are collected annually from Councils with Adult Social Services Responsibilities (CASSRs) and refer to the reporting year 1 April to 31 March. All data are final and rounded to the nearest 5.

Table 1: Number of clients receiving services in Lancashire, Blackpool and Blackburn with Darwen provided or commissioned by the CASSR during the period 2013-14

Total

Lancashire

28,350

Blackpool (Unitary authority)

4,845

Blackburn with Darwen (Unitary authority)

2,825

Source: RAP P1

Note:

Figures have been rounded to the nearest 5.

Funding allocations to authorities with social services responsibilities will consider the fact that they are responsible for adult social care.

Adult social care is one of the services supported through the Local Government Finance Settlement. Funding from the Local Government Finance Settlement is unhypothecated i.e. local authorities are able to use it for any service. For this reason it is not possible to say how much funding has been provided for any particular service, including adult social care. It is up to local authorities to prioritise their budgets based on the needs and priorities of local people in their area.

Local authorities do report expenditure on adult social care. The Latest expenditure data is from the 2013/14 financial year. Table 2 below shows expenditure in Lancashire:

Table 2

Councils with Adult Social Services Responsibilities (CASSRs) in Lancashire

Social Care Expenditure (2013/14 prices, £ million)

Lancashire

357.67

Blackpool (Unitary authority)

46.27

Blackburn with Darwen (Unitary authority)

41.94

9th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the average waiting time is for mental health talking therapies in (a) England, (b) the North West, (c) East Lancashire and (d) Hyndburn constituency.

The average national waiting time for Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme therapies for the last quarter of 2014/15 (quarter two) was 4.8 weeks. The quarter two data for the North of England region show that the average waiting time is 5.3 weeks. The average waiting time for the East Lancashire Clinical Commissioning Group is 6.3 weeks. Data are not collected by constituency.

Over £400 million is being invested over the spending review period to make a choice of psychological therapies available for those who need them in all parts of England.

The Department’s 2014-15 Mandate to NHS England makes clear that ‘everyone who needs it should have timely access to evidence based services’. The Mandate sets a clear objective for NHS England to deliver the key objectives of the IAPT programme – providing access to therapies to 15% of those eligible (around 900,000 people) per year by 2015, with a recovery rate of 50%.

We have put in place the first waiting times standards in mental health, a significant milestone on the road to parity.

The new five-year plan for mental health, Achieving Better Access to Mental Health Services by 2020, sets out our ambition and the immediate actions we will take this year and next to achieve better access and waiting times in mental health services.

We have identified £40 million additional spending to kick start change in the current year. We have freed up a further £80 million from existing budgets for 2015/16. This will, for the first time ever, enable the setting of access and waiting time standards in mental health services. This will include treatment within six weeks for 75% of people referred to the IAPT programme, with 95% of people being treated within 18 weeks.

Starting this year, the Department and NHS England will work together with mental health system partners to develop detailed proposals for the introduction of further access and waiting time standards from 2016 onwards.

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether a GP surgery on an Alternative Provider Medical Services contract can transfer onto a General Medical Services contract without a tendering exercise.

There is no automatic right for a contractor holding an Alternative Provider Medical Services (APMS) contract to transfer to a General Medical Services contract.

It is for a commissioner to decide on the appropriate process for the award of a new contract for clinical services in accordance with the National Health Service (Procurement, Patient Choice and Competition) (No.2) Regulations 2013. There is no requirement to competitively tender all health care service contracts under the regulations and decisions will be based on the local circumstances. Monitor has published guidance for commissioners to support their decision making and is able to provide further advice when requested.

In addition, the provider would need to satisfy the eligibility criteria set out in the National Health Service (General Medical Services Contracts) Regulations 2004. It is not necessarily the case that the holder of an APMS contract will satisfy all of these eligibility requirements.

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many GP surgeries in (a) England, (b) Lancashire and (c) Hyndburn constituency are on (i) an Alternative Provider Medical Services contract and (ii) General Medical Services contracts.

The requested information is contained in the following table.

2010

2011

2012

20131

England

General Medical Services (GMS) Practices

4,538

4,581

4,458

4,345

Alternative Provider Medical Services (APMS) Practices

262

276

260

271

North West Strategic Health Authority

GMS Practices

787

793

768

..

APMS Practices

57

60

53

..

Lancashire Area Team

GMS Practices

..

..

..

162

APMS Practices

..

..

..

7

East Lancashire Teaching Primary Care Trust (PCT)

GMS Practices

47

47

45

..

APMS Practices

2

2

2

..

NHS East Lancashire clinical commissioning group (CCG)

GMS Practices

..

..

..

44

APMS Practices

..

..

..

2

1Hyndburn constituency was held within and serviced by East Lancashire Teaching PCT in 2010-2012 and by NHS East Lancashire Clinical Commissioning Group in 2013. Prior to the formation of the Area Teams in April 2013, the region of Lancashire was contained within the North West Strategic Health Authority

'..' denotes not applicable

Notes:

Data as at 30 September in each year

GP workforce statistics are not available at constituency level; figures are shown for those NHS Organisations in operation at the time of the relevant census

Data Quality:

The Health and Social Care Information Centre seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data but responsibility for data accuracy lies with the organisations providing the data. Methods are continually being updated to improve data quality where changes impact on figures already published. This is assessed but unless it is significant at national level figures are not changed. Impact at detailed or local level is footnoted in relevant analyses.

Further details and definitions of GP Practice contracts can be found in our annual Census publication:

http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB13849

10th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many GP surgeries in (a) England, (b) Lancashire and (c) Hyndburn constituency have transferred from an Alternative Provider Medical Services contract to a General Medical Services contract since 2010.

The requested information is contained in the attached table.

7th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many ambulance calls were responded to by (a) the police and (b) the fire service in (i) England, (ii) Lancashire and (iii) Hyndburn constituency in each of the last five years.

The performance standard for ambulance response times is that 75% of Category A life threatening calls are responded to within eight minutes.

Information on the percentage of ambulance responses to Category A immediately life threatening calls that failed to respond within eight minutes in England and the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust since April 2004 is shown in the following table.

Data relating to Lancashire and Hyndburn constituency is not collected separately. Lancashire and Hyndburn constituency is covered by the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust.

Data around the numbers of ambulance calls responded to by the police and the fire service is not collected centrally.

Table showing the percentage of ambulance responses to Category A immediately life threatening calls that were not responded to within eight minutes in England and in the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust, April 2004 to March 2014

England

North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust

2004-05

23.8%

23.3%

2005-06

24.7%

25.7%

2006-07

25.4%

27.3%

2007-08

22.9%

24.4%

2008-091

25.7%

25.7%

2009-10

25.7%

27.0%

2010-11

25.1%

26.4%

2011-122

23.9%

23.3%

2012-133

Category A (April to May 2012):

24.5%

23.2%

Red 1 (June 2012 to March 2013):

26.0%

26.5%

Red 2 (June 2012 to March 2013):

24.4%

23.4%

2013-14

Red 1:

24.4%

24.1%

Red 2:

25.2%

22.6%

Notes:

1From 1 April 2008, NHS ambulance trusts measured response times from the point when the call is presented to the control room telephone switch. Previously, response times were measured from the point when certain details had been ascertained from the caller. Therefore, data from 2008-09 onwards are not comparable with earlier years.

2Data up to 2010-11 are from the KA34 data collection by the Health and Social Care Information Centre, and not necessarily consistent with later data, which are supplied via NHS England.

3From June 2012 onwards, the single Category A eight minute response standard was replaced by two separate standards, Red 1 and Red 2. Due to differences in clock start definitions, it is not possible to aggregate performance of Red 1 and 2 into a total Category A performance.

Source: Ambulance quality indicators, NHS England

7th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what proportion of ambulances responding to the most serious calls failed to respond within eight minutes in (a) England, (b) Lancashire and (c) the Hyndburn Constituency in each of the last 10 years.

The performance standard for ambulance response times is that 75% of Category A life threatening calls are responded to within eight minutes.

Information on the percentage of ambulance responses to Category A immediately life threatening calls that failed to respond within eight minutes in England and the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust since April 2004 is shown in the following table.

Data relating to Lancashire and Hyndburn constituency is not collected separately. Lancashire and Hyndburn constituency is covered by the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust.

Data around the numbers of ambulance calls responded to by the police and the fire service is not collected centrally.

Table showing the percentage of ambulance responses to Category A immediately life threatening calls that were not responded to within eight minutes in England and in the North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust, April 2004 to March 2014

England

North West Ambulance Service NHS Trust

2004-05

23.8%

23.3%

2005-06

24.7%

25.7%

2006-07

25.4%

27.3%

2007-08

22.9%

24.4%

2008-091

25.7%

25.7%

2009-10

25.7%

27.0%

2010-11

25.1%

26.4%

2011-122

23.9%

23.3%

2012-133

Category A (April to May 2012):

24.5%

23.2%

Red 1 (June 2012 to March 2013):

26.0%

26.5%

Red 2 (June 2012 to March 2013):

24.4%

23.4%

2013-14

Red 1:

24.4%

24.1%

Red 2:

25.2%

22.6%

Notes:

1From 1 April 2008, NHS ambulance trusts measured response times from the point when the call is presented to the control room telephone switch. Previously, response times were measured from the point when certain details had been ascertained from the caller. Therefore, data from 2008-09 onwards are not comparable with earlier years.

2Data up to 2010-11 are from the KA34 data collection by the Health and Social Care Information Centre, and not necessarily consistent with later data, which are supplied via NHS England.

3From June 2012 onwards, the single Category A eight minute response standard was replaced by two separate standards, Red 1 and Red 2. Due to differences in clock start definitions, it is not possible to aggregate performance of Red 1 and 2 into a total Category A performance.

Source: Ambulance quality indicators, NHS England

19th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on using the increased fixed-odds betting terminals levy to treat gambling addiction in the NHS.

No such discussions have taken place.

The Responsible Gambling Trust expects to distribute £6,292,000 on treatment, education and research in 2014-15 and is funded by the gambling industry and further donations.

2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions the Government has had with the US Government on shared intelligence on Huawei's proposed role in developing the UK's 5G network.

Widespread deployment of 5G and full fibre networks is a primary objective of Government policy. The Government published the Telecoms Supply Chain Review in July, which recommended the introduction of a new framework for telecoms security based on evidence and a hard-headed assessment of the risks. The Government has not yet made a final decision on individual high risk vendors and the additional controls that will be applied to them. Our international partners must take their own approach based on their own circumstances, network architectures, capabilities and risk assessments.

The United States of America and the United Kingdom are natural, resilient and strong partners and allies, and we will continue to work closely together, including on the issue of telecoms security.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what plans he has to meet representatives of the Lima Group to discuss the political and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela.

On 4 February the former Minister for Europe and the Americas attended a Lima Group meeting in Ottawa at the invitation of the Canadian Foreign Minister. He addressed the meeting and spoke with several Lima Group colleagues including the Colombian, Brazilian and Chilean Foreign Ministers and the Peruvian Vice Foreign Minister. On 18 June, the former Foreign Secretary and the former Minister for Europe and the Americas met President Duque and Foreign Minister Holmes of Colombia, and discussed the situation in Venezuela and the impact on Colombia, the most impacted country in the region. On 5 August I spoke the Peruvian Foreign Minister, where they discussed the situation in Venezuela and its impact on the region. We continue to work closely with the Lima Group, the Organisation of American States, the United States and like-minded European and international partners to find a peaceful solution to the Venezuela crisis.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
26th Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will place in the Library a copy of the minutes of the meetings held between HRH the Prince of Wales and officials of the Cuban Government during his recent visit to that country.

In accordance with long-standing Royal practice, The Prince of Wales’ conversations are private

14th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what advice his Department has given to HRH the Prince of Wales on raising human rights abuses in Cuba with representatives of the Cuban Government on his forthcoming visit to that country.

The UK government regularly raises human rights issues as part of our dialogue with the Cuban government. We believe the best way to encourage progress on human rights in Cuba is through dialogue and practical diplomacy, which is best enabled through engagement. This is reflected in our policy of engagement with Cuba, in which TRHs' trip will play an important role.

29th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with the Government of the People's Republic of China on its use of the social credit system to identify and detain citizens of Uighur ethnicity.

We have serious concerns about the human rights situation in Xinjiang and the Chinese Government’s deepening crackdown; including credible reports of re-education camps and widespread surveillance and restrictions targeted at ethnic minorities.

During China’s Universal Periodic Review at the UN Human Rights Council on 6 November, the UK made a statement which described our concern about the treatment of ethnic minorities in China, including Uyghurs. We issued a specific recommendation, calling on China to implement the recommendations by the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on Xinjiang, and to allow the UN to monitor the implementation. We also raised our concerns about Xinjiang in our Item 4 statement at the September UN Human Rights Council, and we supported the statement of 26 October by the European External Action Service highlighting concerns about Xinjiang.

I raised our concerns about Xinjiang with Vice Minister Guo Yezhou during my visit to China on 22 July 2018. The Foreign Secretary also raised our concerns about the region with Chinese State Councillor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi during his visit to China on 30 July 2018.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to support the international community's commitment to the Ottawa Mine Ban Treaty.

As one of its founding signatories, the UK strongly supports the international community's commitment to the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction (known as the Ottawa Convention). As well as working to meet our own convention-based commitments to clear our sovereign territory in the Falkland Islands of anti-personnel mines, the UK is committed to the global efforts to tackle the scourge of anti-personnel mines through our international mine action programmes. As a demonstration of the UK's commitment, the Secretary of State for the Department for International Development announced on 4 April 2017 that the UK would triple its spending on mine action in developing countries, taking UK expenditure to £100million over the three years to March 2020. The UK also regularly encourages states who have not signed the Convention to do so, most recently fully supporting Austria, as the outgoing President of the Convention, in urging all non-States Parties to join without delay, as well as encouraging signatory states to fulfil their obligations.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what reports his Department has received on the changing level of threat of Islamist terrorism in Bangladesh.

The British Government is concerned by the increase in terrorist and extremist-related violence in Bangladesh. Since the 1 July 2016 attack on the Holey Bakery Café in Dhaka, targeting foreign nationals, the Government has continued to raise its concerns over security directly with senior officials in the Bangladeshi government. We will continue to engage with regional partners and the wider international community to support efforts to address terrorism, extremism and to promote human rights in Bangladesh.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department plans to take to assist Bangladeshis living in the UK to bring their families to the UK in the event of an escalation in political violence in Bangladesh.

The UK has consistently called upon all parties to refrain from using violence, intimidation and confrontational action. The UK will continue to engage constructively with all political parties in Bangladesh and with international partners, to strengthen democratic accountability and build the willingness and capacity to hold future participatory elections. We are under no obligation to consider asylum claims lodged outside UK territory and it is not appropriate to do so. Those who need international protection should claim asylum in the first safe country they reach; that is the fastest route to safety.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what account his Department plans to take of alleged human rights abuses in Bangladesh in advising on any future trade deal with that country; and what assessment he has made of the potential merits of imposing sanctions on Bangladesh in order to improve that country's respect for political and other rights.

The Prime Minister, my Rt Hon. Friend the member for Maidenhead (Mrs May) has established the Department for International Trade to promote British trade across the world and ensure the United Kingdom takes advantage of the huge opportunities open to us. The Government is currently reviewing its trade policy. We will engage fully with a broad range of stakeholders, including both governments and business over the coming weeks and months, taking a large number of political and economic factors into consideration.

We are concerned about protection of human rights in Bangladesh, but believe that engagement, not sanctions, is the correct course of action. Sanctions would isolate Bangladesh at a time when it is, like so many, facing the global threat of terrorism. Trade sanctions would have a damaging effect on Bangladesh’s development and on efforts to bring people out of poverty.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
2nd Sep 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department has taken to encourage the Prime Minister of Bangladesh to (a) hold fair and open elections in 2019 and (b) ensure Bangladesh's International Crimes Tribunal investigates impartially the 1971 War of Independence.

The United Kingdom will continue to engage constructively with all political parties in Bangladesh and with international partners, to strengthen democratic accountability and build the willingness and capacity to hold future participatory elections. Peaceful, credible elections are the true mark of a mature functioning democracy, and all political parties share a responsibility for delivering them. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office named Bangladesh as one of its 30 Human Rights Priority Countries in its 2015 report. The report cited the confrontational actions of the two main political parties as one of the areas of particular concern.

The Government has made clear its support for Bangladesh’s efforts to bring to justice those accused of atrocities committed during the 1971 War of Independence. However, this must be done in a way that meets appropriate international legal standards. NGOs continue to raise concerns about the process and we urged the Bangladesh government to ensure compliance with these standards during Bangladesh’s second Universal Periodic Review at the UN Human Rights Council in 2013. We continue to emphasise these points in our discussions with the Bangladeshi authorities.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent contact the Government has had with the Free Syrian Army.

On 4 November, the Foreign Secretary and I met Khaled Khoja, President of the Syrian National Coalition, and Osama Abu Zayd, Spokesperson for the Free Syrian Army. The meeting was an opportunity to hear firsthand about the situation on the ground inside Syria, as well as to underline to President Khoja and his delegation the British Government’s commitment to supporting the moderate Syrian opposition in pursuit of a political solution to the conflict in Syria.

3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of whether attacks by ISIL against Iraqi Yazidis constitute to genocide.

The Government believes that recognition of genocides should be a matter for international courts. It should be a legal, rather than political determination, decided by international judges after consideration of all the evidence available in the context of a credible international judicial process. I deplore the targeting and persecution of Yezidis and other minorities by the so called Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant. We continue to urge the Government of Iraq to do all it can to ensure the security and rights of all minority communities in Iraq, including the Yezidi. We are working in Iraq to build consensus around the importance of freedom of religion or belief; and supporting practical projects on community dialogue with civil society and faith groups. The UK is supporting the international humanitarian relief effort in Iraq by providing £79.5m to help the 3.2 million internally displaced Iraqis, including many who have fled their homes on account of ISIL’s persecution on the grounds of religion. The money is providing clean water, sanitation, essential medicines, and funding for NGOs and charities, some of which is specifically designed to protect women and children.

29th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with representatives of the Burmese Rohinga people.

I visited Rakhine State for the second time in July, during my visit to Burma. While there, I met representatives of both Rakhine and Rohingya communities, visited camps for the internally displaced, viewed projects we are supporting, and raised our serious concerns about the treatment of the Rohingya at senior level, with both local and central Burmese government.

29th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether the Government considers that Burma's Rohinga minority are subject to genocide.

It is clear that the Rohingya are being persecuted and denied the most basic rights in Rakhine. Any judgment on whether genocide has occurred is a matter for international judicial decision, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies.

Our approach is to seek an end to all violations, irrespective of whether they fit the definition of specific international crimes. I and other Government Ministers take every appropriate opportunity, both publicly and in private, to press the Burmese authorities to take urgent steps to address the situation of the Rohingya.

22nd Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what precautions his Department is taking to protect its staff based in West Africa from the Ebola virus.

We have withdrawn UK-based family members from Freetown, as well as those staff whose underlying medical conditions may make them more likely to require medical attention locally. We have reviewed working practices to avoid staff being exposed to the Ebola virus and issued guidance to all staff and their families in the region on how best to protect themselves against the virus.

3rd Oct 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to revise the current duty collection arrangements on post duty point dilution tax avoidance.

At Budget 2018, the government announced its plans to prohibit the practice of post duty point dilution (PDPD) from April 2020. From that date, wine and made-wine producers will not be able to use PDPD to reduce the excise duty they must pay. Legislation to be included within Finance Bill 2019-20 will give HM Revenue & Customs new sanctions that may be applied to any producer that continues to use PDPD after that date.

There are no plans to revise the existing arrangements for duty collection.

3rd Oct 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to reduce the rate of duty on spirits distilled by smaller distilleries in the UK.

The government has no current plans to introduce a small spirits relief. However, all taxes are kept under review and the impact of such a change is considered at each fiscal event; including its effect on the industry and wider economy.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to raise the pension tax allowance above the current rate of 25 per cent.

The Government wishes to encourage pension saving, to help ensure that people have an income, or funds on which they can draw, throughout retirement. This is why, for the majority of savers, pension contributions are tax-free. Furthermore, investment growth of assets in a pension scheme is not subject to tax. Up to 25% of the pension pot can be taken tax-free. After this, payments of pensions are subject to income tax at an individual’s marginal rate, to reflect the fact that these are a form of deferred income and have not been previously taxed.

In addition, the Government is committed to keeping taxes low to ensure people keep more of what they earn.

In April of this year, the Government met its commitment to raise the personal tax-free allowance to £12,500, one year early. This means the Government has now raised the personal allowance by over 90% in less than a decade. In 2019-20, over 32 million individuals will see their income tax bill reduced and 1.74 million people on the lowest incomes will have been taken out of income tax altogether since 2015-16. A typical basic rate taxpayer will pay £1,205 less income tax compared to 2010-11.

The Government keeps all aspects of the tax system under review and any decisions on future changes will be taken as part of the annual Budget process in the context of the wider public finances.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jul 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to increase funding to the Charity Commission in order to investigate complaints against charities and build public trust in the charitable sector.

In January 2018 the Charity Commission was allocated an additional £5m per year from the Government to help it respond to significant increases in demand on its core regulatory functions. Any future funding will be decided as part of the upcoming Spending Round.

23rd Jul 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to undertake a review of the level of taxation on (a) beer and (b) pubs.

All taxes are kept under review and the impact of a change to beer duty or other taxes is considered at each fiscal event, including their effect on pubs and the wider economy.

20th Nov 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 19 November 2018 to Question 190861 on Religious Buildings: VAT, whether his Department has plans to remove VAT on the repair and maintenance of places of worship after the UK leaves the EU.

The UK will leave the EU at the end of March next year. The UK and EU negotiating teams have already reached agreement on the terms of an implementation period that will start on 30 March 2019 and last until 31 December 2020. During the implementation period, the UK will no longer be a Member State of the European Union, but market access will continue on current terms. We therefore will not remove VAT on repair and maintenance of places of worship during the implementation period.
13th Nov 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to remove VAT from services and items included for the repair and maintenance of (a) churches and (b) other religious buildings.

Under the current EU rules, the government cannot remove VAT on the repair and maintenance of places of worship.

The government recognises the importance of places of worship in our communities and provides funding to cover the cost of repairs and maintenance of listed places of worship through The Listed Places of Worship Grant Scheme, managed by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport.

28th Jun 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to ensure that (a) churches and (b) other places of worship continue to have adequate insurance for metal and stone theft after making a claim.

The Government believes that it is important that everyone has access to suitable insurance products at the right price.

As a rule, insurers use their claims experience and other industry-wide statistics to set the terms and price at which they will offer insurance cover. Insurers make a risk assessment based on the likelihood a claim being made and the potential cost of that claim.

To assist with building costs, the Government made up to £42 million per annum available for the Listed Places of Worship Grant Scheme which provides grants towards the VAT paid on repairs, maintenance and alterations to listed buildings that are used principally as places of worship. Since its inception in 2001, the scheme has made 48,196 individual grants to 17,324 places of worship at a total cost of over £223m. The scheme applies to all faiths and denominations and is delivered UK wide.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Jul 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much revenue has been collected by HM Revenue and Customs every year since 2010 from (a) underpayment and (b) previously undeclared income.

Since April 2010, HMRC’s Debt Management group has collected £278.3 billion in underpaid tax, and HMRC’s compliance activities into all types of non-compliance have generated almost £160 billion of additional compliance yield.

11th Jul 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many people have been prosecuted for crimes related to tax evasion in each year since 2010.

Positive Charging Decisions (PCD's)

Convictions

Acquittals

2010/11*

2011/12

501

401

31

2012/13

739

522

33

2013/14

880

682

40

2014/15

1254

623

64

2015/16

1067

774

70

2016/17

1067

768

77

*Lower level data on Positive Charging Decisions not held for 10-11, therefore unable to provide Tax Evasion figures for this year.

11th Jul 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many HM Revenue and Customs staff working in tax investigations have been employed in each year since 2010.

The number of staff employed in the HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) Criminal Investigation Directorate each year since 2010 (as at 31st March) is as follows:

Financial Year

Staffing Numbers

2009/10

1913

2010/11

1967

2011/12

2436

2012/13

2401

2013/14

2488

2014/15

2456

2015/16

2695

2016/17

4611

The figures provided include all resource, including managers, deployed both operationally and non-operationally within the Directorate.

From 1 April 2016 the HMRC Fraud Investigation Service (FIS) was formed from the merger of the Criminal Investigation and Specialist Investigation Directorates.

Since the creation of FIS from 1 April 2016, the focus and deployment of the previous specialist civil investigation and criminal investigation resource has been brought together in line with HMRC’s Serious Fraud Strategy. This means HMRC deploy the appropriate criminal and civil resource to their case work, which makes it difficult for 2016-17 to ring-fence resource deployment that is specifically on criminal investigation.

11th Jul 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many HM Revenue and Customs staff have been employed in each year since 2010.

The number of HM Revenue and Customs staff employed in each year since 2010 (as of 31 March each year) is set out in the table below.

31-Mar-10

FTE

70,700

Headcount

78,057

31-Mar-11

FTE

66,881

Headcount

74,380

31-Mar-12

FTE

66,373

Headcount

74,886

31-Mar-13

FTE

64,342

Headcount

72,600

31-Mar-14

FTE

60,918

Headcount

68,851

31-Mar-15

FTE

56,330

Headcount

63,470

31-Mar-16

FTE

58,621

Headcount

65,402

31-Mar-17

FTE

60,704

Headcount

67,127

FTE – Full Time Equivalence

23rd Nov 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the savings to the public purse which will accrue from changes in housing benefit for people under 21 years of age.

The Government is ending automatic entitlement to the housing element of Universal Credit – which is gradually replacing Housing Benefit - for out-of-work 18-21 years olds. This is forecast to save £100m over this Parliament.

2nd Sep 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many full-time members of staff in his Department (a) were working on the Northern Powerhouse initiative before the EU referendum, (b) are currently working on the initiative and (c) are projected to work on the initiative in 2016-17.

Our ambitious plans to build a Northern Powerhouse remain a government priority. The Commercial Secretary to the Treasury and Minister for the Northern Powerhouse will lead the work across the whole of government to help make the North a powerhouse for the UK economy. This will build on the strong progress made over the last two years.

The Northern Powerhouse cuts across a range of policy areas within the Treasury, including devolution, local growth, transport, trade and investment, enterprise and innovation and skills and education. Officials from across these wider policy areas continue to be engaged on the Northern Powerhouse agenda.

19th Jan 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent discussions he has had with waste operators on the effect of planned changes to the Landfill Communities Fund.

The government has received representations from a number of waste operators on this issue. We are taking views into consideration and our priority is to ensure that the LCF operates effectively and encourages money to be spent in the communities that need it.

19th Jan 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on waste operators of planned changes to the Landfill Communities Fund.

The LCF is a tax credit scheme into which landfill operators contribute voluntarily. The impact of the changes to the LCF announced at Autumn Statement 2015 is set out in Reform and value of the Landfill Communities Fund. This document can be found here:


https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reform-and-value-of-the-landfill-communities-fund/reform-and-value-of-the-landfill-communities-fund

25th Nov 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent comparative assessment he has made of the rate of productivity in the UK and other G7 countries.

Output per hour grew 0.9 per cent in Q2 2015 and 0.5 per cent in Q3 but raising UK productivity is a long term challenge. The government published the productivity plan in July, created the National Infrastructure Commission in October and set out further measures in the Autumn Statement.

29th Oct 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 23 October 2015 to Question 12045, on tax credits, if he will publish that data in the form in which it is available.

HM Revenue and Customs is now able to provide the data in the format requested.


The table below shows the number of mandatory reconsiderations for tax credits undertaken by Synnex-Concentix UK Ltd since the start of the contract. The data is accurate as at 2 November 2015.


Within Week

Number

One

1,136

Two

133

Three

160

Four

117

Five

97

Six

94

Seven

89

Eight

70

Nine

44

Ten

38

More than ten

106


29th Oct 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many independent tribunals have been brought to challenge mandatory reconsiderations of tax credits by Concentrix in each month since that company has been under contract with his Department.

The following table outlines the number of applications HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) received from HM Court and Tribunal Service (HMCTS) as a result of a mandatory reconsideration decision made by Concentrix.


Month

Number of applications HMRC received from HMCTS following a mandatory reconsideration decision made by Concentrix

March 2015

3

April 2015

1

May 2015

6

June 2015

5

July 2015

3

August 2015

3

September 2015

19

Prior to March 2015 HMRC did not receive any applications from HMCTS challenging a mandatory reconsideration decision made by Concentrix.

15th Oct 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many mandatory reconsiderations for tax credits which were undertaken by Concentrix took (a) one, (b) two, (c) three, (d) four, (e) five, (f) six, (g) seven, (h) eight, (i) nine, (j) 10 and (k) more than 10 weeks in each year since that company has been contracted by the Department.

The information requested is not available in the form requested.

13th Oct 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many Help to Buy mortgages have been refused by the Government despite being accepted by the participating bank.

The Government has established a criteria of eligibility for Help to Buy mortgages for participating banks to uphold. The responsibility of approving or rejecting a Help to Buy mortgage is given to participating banks.

There are currently two existing Help to Buy schemes; the Help to Buy: mortgage guarantee scheme and the Help to Buy: equity loan scheme. The eligibility criteria for each of these schemes can be found on the Help to Buy website: http://www.helptobuy.org.uk

13th Oct 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many Help to Buy mortgages have been declined on the basis of a poor credit rating.

The Government does not collect information on the number of Help to Buy mortgage applications declined on the basis of a poor credit rating.

19th Jun 2014
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to hypothecate funds received from the increased fixed-odds betting terminals levy to fund NHS gambling addiction treatment.

The Responsible Gambling Trust (which is funded by the gambling industry and further donations) expects to distribute £6,292,000 on treatment, education and research in 2014/15. This provides funding to specialist charities, such as GamCare, which provide gambling addiction treatment.

24th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps police forces are taking to improve the recording of thefts of catalytic converters from motor vehicles.

The Government recognises the distress and disruption that metal theft, including the theft of catalytic converters, can cause.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) publishes police recorded crime data on metal theft offences annually which can be found here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/focusonpropertycrimeappendixtables. Whilst the ONS data does not separate out theft of catalytic converters, this would be recorded under non-infrastructure related incidents.

We continue to work closely with the police, industry and others to understand what more we can do to tackle vehicle-related theft.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
4th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has had discussions with Lancashire Constabulary on preparations for the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

It is the duty of any responsible Governmnet to prepare for every eventuality including the scenario that we leave the EU without agreeing a deal.

We are working closely with operational partners - including the police - on contigency planning so we can ensure the safety and security of our citizens in all scenarios.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to allocate additional funding to Lancashire constabulary to tackle anti-social behaviour.

It is important that the police and local agencies have the powers they need to tackle local issues quickly and effectively. That is why we reformed the tools and powers available to tackle Anti-Social Behaviour through the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

In 2019/20 Lancashire Police are receiving £285.1 million of funding, an increase of £18.4 million, on 2018/19. Funding for 2020-21 for individual forces will be announced as part of the provisional police settlement later this year. Decisions about the allocation of police resources are for Chief Constables and democratically accountable Police and Crime Commissioners, who are best placed to meet the needs of their local community.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to review how Clare's Law is implemented by police forces in England and Wales.

Domestic abuse is a devastating crime and the Government is committed to doing everything we can to tackle it.

The Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme (DVDS, also known as “Clare’s Law”) was rolled out across all 43 police forces in England and Wales in March 2014, and recent data shows that applications and disclosures made under the scheme are increasing.

In the year ending March 2018, there were a total of 5,649 disclosures made under the scheme, representing a 66% increase on the previous year. In the year ending March 2018, applications under the “Right to Know” element of the scheme increased by 47%, and “Right to Ask” applications increased by 111%.

We will continue to work with the National Police Chiefs’ Council and the College of Policing to ensure that the DVDS and the guidance underpinning it are being used consistently and effectively to prevent harm and to keep potential victims of domestic abuse and their families safe.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to allocate the funding for 20,000 extra police officers to local forces according to how many police officers each force has lost since 2010.

We recognise that demand on the police is changing and we are acting. We are committed to recruiting 20,000 additional police officers over the next three years to tackle the rise in crime. This is the start of a new relationship between the Government and the police, and we will work even more closely together to protect the public.

The National Policing Board has been set up to provide strong leadership and deliver on our commitment to recruit 20,000 more police officers. Following the first meeting, the government and police will move at pace to drive forward our plans to bolster the police’s ranks.

All force-level funding allocations will be set out in the usual way at the pro-visional police funding settlement in December. The Government is working with the sector through a number of important details, including on allocating officers between different functions and activities to ensure maximum value from this additional resource.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Home Office)
3rd Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Serious Crime Act 2015 on prosecuting perpetrators of financial abuse.

The Serious Crime Act 2015 introduced a new domestic abuse offence of coercive or controlling behaviour in intimate and familial relationships. The statutory guidance underpinning the offence is clear that financial abuse, such as controlling the victim’s finances, is a type of behaviour that can form part of a purposeful pattern of behaviour over time to exert power, control or coercion over another person.

In 2017-18 960 offences of coercive or controlling behaviour have been charged and reached a first hearing, more than three times the volume in the previous year. This shows that the offence is having an impact and sends a strong message that coercive or controlling behaviour will not be tolerated.

On 21 January we published our landmark draft Domestic Abuse Bill and consultation response which will transform the cross-Government response to this devastating crime. The draft Bill includes provisions for a statutory definition of domestic abuse, including economic abuse. Replacing ‘financial’ with ‘economic’ acknowledges how broad this form of abuse is and how many aspects of a victim’s life it can affect, such as limiting their access to fundamental resources such as money, food, transport, employment and housing. This will raise awareness of the issue of economic abuse and also enable frontline professionals and the criminal justice system to better understand, recognise and tackle it, so that victims can be supported to achieve the economic stability that they need.

The draft Bill is underpinned by a comprehensive package of non-legislative action which we have set out in our consultation response, including a commitment to review the effectiveness of the coercive or controlling behaviour offence to ensure it is fit for purpose and that it adequately protects victims from abuse. In addition, we have committed to update the statutory guidance and CPS legal guidance on the offence to include economic abuse and provide guidance on how this form of abuse can manifest itself as part of a pattern of coercive control

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps the National Retail Crime Steering Group has taken to tackle violence in the retail sector.

Any act of violence or abuse against retail staff is a serious matter which is why tackling it is the number one priority issue for the National Retail Crime Steering Group, which I co-chair with the British Retail Consortium.

Through this group, we have developed a Violence Reduction Strategy which includes activities to increase reporting of violence and abuse, develop a framework for effective preventative training for retail staff and private security, work with PCCs to raise the priority of this crime type in their policing plans and work with wider Criminal Justice stakeholders to ensure that sentencing guidelines and aggravating thresholds are appropriate.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many enforcement actions have been taken on unauthorised traveller settlements in each local authority area in each year since 2008.

The Home Office does not collect information on the enforcement actions taken by the police relating to unauthorised traveller settlements.

10th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, in what form his Department records incidents of (a) metal and (b) stone theft from heritage buildings; and how many of those incidents to place in each month of this year.

The Office of National Statistics publishes statistics on metal thefts annually, based on information provided by police forces. The most recent statistics, for the year ending March 2017 were published in December 2017. Statistics relating to the year to March 2018 will be published later this year.

Thefts of stone are not recorded separately in the crime statistics published by the Office of National Statistics. Such thefts will be incorporated within the overall statistics relating to thefts.

Victoria Atkins
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 19 June 2018 to Question 153803 on Metals: Theft, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to ban squatting in commercial properties to prevent the theft of (a) metal and (b) other commodities from those properties.

We have no plans to legislate to ban squatting in commercial properties to prevent the theft of metals of other commodities. The police can already take action if those who squat in such premises commit crimes when entering or staying in such premises, including crimes relating to criminal damages and thefts.

10th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of metal theft crimes were committed alongside incidences of illegal occupation of commercial premises.

The Department does not hold this information. Statistics relating to metal theft are published annually by the Office for National Statistics, but this does not include information relating to the circumstances or specific locations of these thefts.

28th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance his Department issues to police forces on tackling the resale of stolen metal and stone.

The Home Office does not issue guidance to the police specifically on the resale of stolen metal or stone.

The Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 was introduced specifically to make it more difficult for thieves to dispose of stolen metal through metal recycling yards. There is no similar specific legislation in relation to stolen stone, as its disposal or resale routes are very different.

We do encourage victims of all such crimes to report them to the police, so that they can be investigated. The local response to these crimes is, however, a matter for chief constables and Police and Crime Commissioners who, as operational leaders and elected local representatives, must decide how best to deploy resources to respond to these crimes.

14th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps he is taking to break the link between commercial squatting and metal theft.

The Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013 provides a strong legislative basis for tackling all forms of metal theft by making it more difficult for criminals to dispose of stolen metal through scrap metal yards.

The police can take action against commercial squatters who commit other crimes, including thefts of metal or other commodities, when entering or staying in a property. Enforcement is a matter for chief constables and Police and Crime Commissioners who must decide how best to deploy their resources to respond to the crimes affecting their local communities.

11th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been detained in police custody in each year since 2010.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of persons detained for more than 24 hours under Part IV of PACE. Data can be found in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical bulletin in accompanying table D_03, the latest of which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/561975/other-pace-police-powers-procedures-hosb1516-tables.ods

Data, broken down by those detained over 24 hours and up to 36 hours, those detained for more than 36 hours, and those detained for longer than 36 hours under a warrant for further detention can be found in Table D_01 of the same release. For detentions exceeding 36 hours, the time in custody under warrant issued by a magistrate can be found in Table D_02.

Data for earlier years can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

The Home Office does not collect centrally information on the number of persons detained for less than 24 hours, therefore it is not possible to provide a total figure for the number of people detained in police custody each year.

Information on how many people have been detained in police custody for more than 24 hours on mental health grounds is not held centrally.

11th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been detained in police custody for more than 24 hours on mental health grounds in each year since 2010.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of persons detained for more than 24 hours under Part IV of PACE. Data can be found in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical bulletin in accompanying table D_03, the latest of which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/561975/other-pace-police-powers-procedures-hosb1516-tables.ods

Data, broken down by those detained over 24 hours and up to 36 hours, those detained for more than 36 hours, and those detained for longer than 36 hours under a warrant for further detention can be found in Table D_01 of the same release. For detentions exceeding 36 hours, the time in custody under warrant issued by a magistrate can be found in Table D_02.

Data for earlier years can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

The Home Office does not collect centrally information on the number of persons detained for less than 24 hours, therefore it is not possible to provide a total figure for the number of people detained in police custody each year.

Information on how many people have been detained in police custody for more than 24 hours on mental health grounds is not held centrally.

11th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been detained in police custody in each year since 2010 for more than (a) 24, (b) 48 and (c) 72 hours.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of persons detained for more than 24 hours under Part IV of PACE. Data can be found in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical bulletin in accompanying table D_03, the latest of which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/561975/other-pace-police-powers-procedures-hosb1516-tables.ods

Data, broken down by those detained over 24 hours and up to 36 hours, those detained for more than 36 hours, and those detained for longer than 36 hours under a warrant for further detention can be found in Table D_01 of the same release. For detentions exceeding 36 hours, the time in custody under warrant issued by a magistrate can be found in Table D_02.

Data for earlier years can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

The Home Office does not collect centrally information on the number of persons detained for less than 24 hours, therefore it is not possible to provide a total figure for the number of people detained in police custody each year.

Information on how many people have been detained in police custody for more than 24 hours on mental health grounds is not held centrally.

29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether a date has been set for resuming the processing of settlement visa applications following the judgment of the Supreme Court of 22 February 2017.

A temporary hold on decision-making in respect of some settlement visa applications was introduced on 22 February 2017 so that the implications of the Supreme Court judgment handed down that day in MM (Lebanon) & Others could be considered.

The settlement visa applications affected are those under Appendix FM to the Immigration Rules which fall to be refused and which involve a child or do not meet the minimum income requirement. The temporary hold will be lifted once the judgment’s findings have been addressed.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of implications for her Department's policy on settlement visa applications of the Supreme Court judgment of February 2017.

A temporary hold on decision-making in respect of some settlement visa applications was introduced on 22 February 2017 so that the implications of the Supreme Court judgment handed down that day in MM (Lebanon) & Others could be considered.

The settlement visa applications affected are those under Appendix FM to the Immigration Rules which fall to be refused and which involve a child or do not meet the minimum income requirement. The temporary hold will be lifted once the judgment’s findings have been addressed.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for settlement visas have been (a) rejected, (b) processed and (c) paused since 22 February 2017.

Information on family settlement visas is published quarterly in the Immigration Statistics which are available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-january-to-march-2017/list-of-tables#visas.

A temporary hold on decision-making in respect of some settlement visa applications was introduced on 22 February 2017 so that the implications of the Supreme Court judgment handed down that day in MM (Lebanon) & Others could be considered. The temporary hold will be lifted once the judgment’s findings have been addressed.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
31st Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with the Home Office on the Government's proposal to continue direct grant funding to support independent domestic violence advisers and multi-agency risk assessment conference coordinators after March 2017.

The Home Office has engaged closely with other Government departments through the Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) Inter-Ministerial Group to oversee delivery of the VAWG strategy including the commitment of increased funding of £80m for VAWG services.

The Home Office has also engaged closely with commissioners and voluntary sector partners on support for independent domestic violence advisers, and our move to support better local collaboration and early intervention through the VAWG Service Transformation Fund.

26th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will take steps to increase the number of police officers in Lancashire to 2009 levels.

This Government has maintained protection for police spending in a fair provisional funding deal for policing.

Decisions on the size, composition and deployment of a police force's workforce are matters for Chief Constables, in association with Police and Crime Commissioners.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
25th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the cost of monitoring and policing anti-fracking protests since 2010 in (a) Lancashire and (b) the UK.

It is an operational decision for Chief Constables, working with their applicable Police and Crime Commissioner to determine the levels of resources required for the police to monitor and manage such events.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of its annual income has been held in reserve by Thames Valley Constabulary in each of the last five years.

It is up to Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and Chief Constables to decide how to allocate their resources, including the efficient use of reserves, based on local priorities. The total amount of revenue funding received by each PCC (formerly Police Authorities) and the total amounts of usable reserves, taken from publically available force area accounts are included in the table below. This includes total core Government funding area from the Home Office, Legacy Council Tax Grants and locally raised precept income. It excludes specific grants such as the Innovation Fund and other locally raised income.


Hertfordshire Police Authority/PCC reserves


Year

Reserves £m

Total revenue funding £m

Reserves as % of government grant+precept

31 Mar 2011

19.4

197.4

9.8%

31 Mar 2012

24.9

191.5

13.0%

31 Mar 2013

28.0

189.7

14.8%

31 Mar 2014

36.7

185.2

19.8%

31 Mar 2015

47.9

181.1

26.5%


Lancashire Police Authority/PCC reserves


Year

Reserves £m

Total revenue funding £m

Reserves as % of government grant+precept

31 Mar 2011

20.1

285.6

7.0%

31 Mar 2012

26.3

273.5

9.6%

31 Mar 2013

27.5

273.5

10.1%

31 Mar 2014

35.8

266.0

13.4%

31 Mar 2015

49.3

258.9

19.1%




Thames Valley Police Authority/PCC reserves

Year

Reserves £m

Total revenue funding £m

Reserves as % of government grant+precept

31 Mar 2011

41.1

395.0

10.4%

31 Mar 2012

48.2

383.4

12.6%

31 Mar 2013

45.8

382.2

12.0%

31 Mar 2014

49.1

375.9

13.1%

31 Mar 2015

51.4

369.7

13.9%


3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of its annual income has been held in reserve by Lancashire Constabulary in each of the last five years.

It is up to Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and Chief Constables to decide how to allocate their resources, including the efficient use of reserves, based on local priorities. The total amount of revenue funding received by each PCC (formerly Police Authorities) and the total amounts of usable reserves, taken from publically available force area accounts are included in the table below. This includes total core Government funding area from the Home Office, Legacy Council Tax Grants and locally raised precept income. It excludes specific grants such as the Innovation Fund and other locally raised income.


Hertfordshire Police Authority/PCC reserves


Year

Reserves £m

Total revenue funding £m

Reserves as % of government grant+precept

31 Mar 2011

19.4

197.4

9.8%

31 Mar 2012

24.9

191.5

13.0%

31 Mar 2013

28.0

189.7

14.8%

31 Mar 2014

36.7

185.2

19.8%

31 Mar 2015

47.9

181.1

26.5%


Lancashire Police Authority/PCC reserves


Year

Reserves £m

Total revenue funding £m

Reserves as % of government grant+precept

31 Mar 2011

20.1

285.6

7.0%

31 Mar 2012

26.3

273.5

9.6%

31 Mar 2013

27.5

273.5

10.1%

31 Mar 2014

35.8

266.0

13.4%

31 Mar 2015

49.3

258.9

19.1%




Thames Valley Police Authority/PCC reserves

Year

Reserves £m

Total revenue funding £m

Reserves as % of government grant+precept

31 Mar 2011

41.1

395.0

10.4%

31 Mar 2012

48.2

383.4

12.6%

31 Mar 2013

45.8

382.2

12.0%

31 Mar 2014

49.1

375.9

13.1%

31 Mar 2015

51.4

369.7

13.9%


3rd Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of its annual income has been held in reserve by Hertfordshire police in each of the last five years.

It is up to Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and Chief Constables to decide how to allocate their resources, including the efficient use of reserves, based on local priorities. The total amount of revenue funding received by each PCC (formerly Police Authorities) and the total amounts of usable reserves, taken from publically available force area accounts are included in the table below. This includes total core Government funding area from the Home Office, Legacy Council Tax Grants and locally raised precept income. It excludes specific grants such as the Innovation Fund and other locally raised income.


Hertfordshire Police Authority/PCC reserves


Year

Reserves £m

Total revenue funding £m

Reserves as % of government grant+precept

31 Mar 2011

19.4

197.4

9.8%

31 Mar 2012

24.9

191.5

13.0%

31 Mar 2013

28.0

189.7

14.8%

31 Mar 2014

36.7

185.2

19.8%

31 Mar 2015

47.9

181.1

26.5%


Lancashire Police Authority/PCC reserves


Year

Reserves £m

Total revenue funding £m

Reserves as % of government grant+precept

31 Mar 2011

20.1

285.6

7.0%

31 Mar 2012

26.3

273.5

9.6%

31 Mar 2013

27.5

273.5

10.1%

31 Mar 2014

35.8

266.0

13.4%

31 Mar 2015

49.3

258.9

19.1%




Thames Valley Police Authority/PCC reserves

Year

Reserves £m

Total revenue funding £m

Reserves as % of government grant+precept

31 Mar 2011

41.1

395.0

10.4%

31 Mar 2012

48.2

383.4

12.6%

31 Mar 2013

45.8

382.2

12.0%

31 Mar 2014

49.1

375.9

13.1%

31 Mar 2015

51.4

369.7

13.9%


26th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of annual income has been held in reserve by Herefordshire Constabulary in each of the past five years.

It is up to Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) and Chief Constables to decide how to allocate their resources, including the efficient use of reserves, based on local priorities.

Herefordshire is covered by the West Mercia police force area. The total amount of revenue funding received by the West Mercia PCC (formerly West Mercia Police Authority) and the total amounts of usable reserves, taken from publically available force area accounts are included in the following table.

This includes total core Government funding area from the Home Office, Legacy Council Tax Grants and locally raised precept income. It excludes specific grants such as the Innovation Fund and other locally raised income.

Year

Reserves £m

Revenue funding (government grant+precept) £m

Reserves as % of total revenue funding

31 Mar 2011

43.8

212.6

20.6%

31 Mar 2012

37.8

206.9

18.3%

31 Mar 2013

46.1

204.6

22.5%

31 Mar 2014

53.1

201.6

26.4%

31 Mar 2015

63.9

198.5

32.2%

26th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether Hertfordshire Constabulary's reserves have been subject to CIFPA auditing for the 2014-15 financial year.

Hertfordshire Constabulary’s final 2014/15 Statement of Accounts are published on the force website. The accounts have been independently audited and include the force’s level of reserves for 2014/15.

10th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many complaints have been received on the charge for using the 101 non-emergency police number in the last three years.

The Department has received 49 complaints about the charge for using the 101 police non-emergency number in the last three years.

Research by Ofcom shows that a small fixed charge does not deter people from calling the service and reduces the likelihood of it being used inappropriately.

The latest Crime Survey (published July 2013) shows that use of the 101 number has increased since 2011.

10th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the 101 non-emergency police number on the number of non-essential 999 calls.

Whilst we have monitored the effect of the 101 non-emergency police number on the number of 999 calls, we have not undertaken an official assessment. We are currently considering, with other government departments, options to review the impact of 101, including on 999.

4th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) cats, (b) dogs and (c) horses were retired and rehomed under European Union Directive 2010/63/EU in 2013.

The Home Office does not hold the information requested.

Under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, authority may be given to
re-home animals where those animals were bred or held for supply for use in
regulated procedures, or were intended for use in regulated procedures, or have
been used in regulated procedures. This may also apply to animals which are
being kept under the care of the Named Veterinary Surgeon after completing
procedures and is always contingent on our acceptance of certain reassurances
relating to Section 17A of the Act. Records of each animal re-homed would be
kept locally at the licensed establishment so that they can be available to
Home Office Inspectors on request.

European Directive 2010/63/EU, which was implemented in the UK and other Member
States on 1 January 2013, does not provide legal grounds on which the UK can
impose a mandatory obligation of re-homing under the Animals (Scientific
Procedures) Act 1986. Nevertheless, we have provided guidance on re-homing
animals in our Guidance on the Operation of the Animals (Scientific Procedures)
Act 1983, section 5.21.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions she has had with her EU counterparts on the export of stolen scrap metal.

Home Office Ministers have regular meetings with Ministerial colleagues and
EU counterparts as part of the process of policy development and delivery. As
was the case with previous administrations, it is not the Government's practice to
provide details of all such meetings.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what advice her Department has issued to police forces on working with the UK Border Force in preventing the export of stolen scrap metal.

The Home Office has not issued guidance on this point to police forces.
However, work is underway in UK Border Force and other law enforcement
organisations to tackle this problem, including the better profiling and
identification of containers that may contain stolen metal. They are also
looking at whether there are technological solutions that can be used to better
secure our borders.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what organisation will take over the competencies of the National Metal Theft Taskforce once funding for that body ends.

The Home Office will continue to contribute to the funding of the National
Metal Theft Taskforce until 30 September 2014. The decision to provide funding
until that date ensures the Taskforce operates concurrently with the first year
of the new licensing scheme under the Scrap Metal Dealers Act 2013. After that
date, future enforcement activity will become the responsibility of individual
police forces based on their local crime priorities. It was never the
intention that the Taskforce would continue indefinitely.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment her Department has made of the level of stolen scrap metal exported for sale abroad.

The Home Office has not undertaken an assessment of the level of stolen scrap
metal exported for sale abroad.

We are aware of the risk that stolen metals may be directly exported and so
work is underway with UK Border Force and other law enforcement organisations
to deal with this, including the better profiling and identification of
containers that may contain stolen metal. We are also looking to see whether
there are any technological solutions we can use to better secure our borders.

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the proportion of applicants for scrap metal dealer's licences who were not known to their local authority under the previous registration system.

No estimate has been made of the proportion of applicants for scrap metal
dealer's licences who were not known to their local authority under the
previous registration system

18th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 6 September 2018 to Question 169313 on military aircraft: storage, (a) how many and (b) what models of aircraft are held in storage.

Aircraft held in storage are part of the Sustainment Fleet which includes aircraft undergoing upgrade or maintenance.

The number of aircraft available varies from day-to-day according to normal fleet management activities.

Figures for fixed and rotary wing aircraft as at 1 October 2018 are given in the table below. They exclude contractor provided aircraft fleets with the exception of Voyager which is included for completeness.

Aircraft

Service

Sustainment Fleet

Air Seeker (Rivet Joint)

RAF

0

Atlas A400M

RAF

5

Bae 146

RAF

0

C-17 Globemaster

RAF

2

C-130J Hercules

RAF

5

Hawk T1

RAF/RN

44

Hawk T2

RAF

5

Lightning

RAF

0

Sentinel

RAF

1

Sentry

RAF

1

Shadow/King Air 350

RAF

0

Tornado

RAF

9

Tucano

RAF

10

Typhoon

RAF

35

Voyager

RAF

2

Avenger

Navy

0

Defender

Army

0

Islander AL Mk1

Army

0

Stuart Andrew
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many aircraft of each (a) model and (b) type owned and operated by the armed forces are in storage.

The number of aircraft available varies from day-to-day according to normal fleet management activities, aircraft held in storage are part of the Sustainment Fleet for undergoing upgrade or maintenance.

Stuart Andrew
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate his Department has made of the number of landmines in Yemen.

The Ministry of Defence does not undertake its own estimates of the number of landmines in Yemen.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the number of live land mines laid by the British Army that are present in former war zones.

The Ministry of Defence does not hold this information.

The UK was a founding signatory of the Ottawa Convention banning land mines and a number of UK organisations such as Mines Advisory Group (MAG) and the Halo Trust are at the forefront of global efforts to make the world mine-free.

19th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to train the security forces of the Yemini Government in landmine disarmament.

The UK is not providing training of any kind to the security forces of the Government of Yemen.

24th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the number of Brimstone missiles used by Saudi Arabia in the conflict on Yemen.
8th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans he has to meet his Belgian counterpart to discuss the procurement of F-35 Joint Striker Fighters by that country.

The Joint Strike Fighter is a collaborative Programme, and the UK is one of nine Partner Nations. The US Government leads on all aspects of Joint Strike Fighter Foreign Military Sales. The UK has no plans to discuss the procurement of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter with Belgium.

4th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many black and minority ethnic personnel have served in each regiment of the Army in each of the last 10 years.

The number of black and minority ethnic personnel serving in each Regiment of the Army in each of the last 10 years is detailed in the tables below:

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what discussions he has had with the leader of Lancashire County Council on the UK leaving the EU without a deal.

We have stepped up our preparedness significantly and are speaking regularly to councils and partners, including through a delivery board and a network of nine regional lead chief executives. Every council has designated a Brexit Lead Officer to work with central government to intensify their local preparations and, in total, we have made £77 million available to help local areas get ready for Brexit.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
24th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans the Government has for the formation of a Pennine Lancashire unitary authority.

It is for those in the area to consider whether a Pennine Lancashire unitary authority would be the best way forward, as my Rt Hon Friend, the then Secretary of State, told the House on 22 July 2019 (HCWS1790). If the area requests that we formally invite councils to submit a proposal for such an authority, we would do so if that request demonstrates local opinion is coalescing around a single unitary option for the area, which would be likely to meet our publicly announced criteria for unitarisation.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
12th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of recruiting a new Chair of the Lancashire Local Enterprise Partnership.

Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEP) are independent bodies, supported by an accountable local authority. Government ensures uniform standards are met through the National LEP Assurance Framework, which sets out that chairs are expected to be influential local leaders of high integrity. To meet these standards each LEP makes its own decisions locally for recruitment and associated costs which are subject to scrutiny by the accountable body.

18th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the social housing system supports those with mental health problems.

The Social Housing Green Paper recognises many landlords play a role that goes beyond their key responsibilities, which includes providing guidance to vital services such as mental health services. Through the Green Paper, we are seeking to gather evidence on the impact of the important role that many social landlords are playing.

Social housing and more widely, supported housing, provides a vital service for vulnerable people, including people with mental health issues. Safeguarding provision and supply of appropriate supported accommodation is a priority for my department and we will continue to provide capital grant funding to promote new supply of supported housing.

Our recent announcement confirming funding for all supported housing will stay in Housing Benefit, will also give confidence to the sector to continue to invest in new supply. We are also reviewing oversight arrangements for all supported housing. As a Government, we are investing record levels in mental health, spending £11.98 billion in 2017/18.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much money has been allocated for the establishment of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

We continue to work on the design of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) and decisions on the operation and allocation of the Fund will be made as part of the 2019 Spending Review.

6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the performance of Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs); and if he will publish a ranking of LEPs against that assessment.

Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEP) are a valued part of the local institutional framework and play an important role in delivering our ambition for growth in all parts of England. This Government has provided £12 billion through the Local Growth Fund to deliver over 1000 projects across the country.

We have a robust process for monitoring LEP performance. This is based on engagement with local teams who provide LEPs with day to day support, quarterly LEP monitoring returns relating to their Growth Deal projects, and an annual performance review. These processes lead to an agreed set of actions and next steps to ensure that LEPs continue to perform at their best.

Through our LEP Review we will continue to strengthen LEPs, so that they continue to drive sustainable private sector-led growth and job creation.

26th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of organisations with charitable status that will be affected by changes in business rates to be introduced from April 2017 in (a) East Lancashire and (b) the UK.

The Department is not able to estimate the effect of changes to business rates on organisations with charitable status because it does not hold information about which properties have charitable status. Eligibility for charitable rate relief is determined by local authorities.

Marcus Jones
Vice Chamberlain (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
26th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the number of public houses that will be affected by the planned changes in business rates from April 2017 in (a) East Lancashire and (b) the UK.

At revaluation, the government adjusts the value of business rates to reflect changes in the property market. An estimated three quarters of businesses will see no change or a fall in their bills from 1 April thanks to the business rates revaluation and reforms to Small Business Rate Relief. 600,000 businesses are set to pay no business rates at all. A £3.6 billion transitional relief scheme will provide support for the minority who do face an increase. It is not possible to estimate these figures for individual councils because it is for local authorities to assess eligibility for Small Business Rate Relief.

Marcus Jones
Vice Chamberlain (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
20th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many enforcements under the Housing Health and Safety Rating System have been made as a result of category 1 hazards relating to (a) gas safety and (b) electrical safety in each local authority in each of the last five years.

This information is not held centrally.

Overall the quality of privately rented housing has improved rapidly over the past decade. Surveys show that 84% of private renters are satisfied with their accommodation. A small number of rogue or criminal landlords knowingly rent out unsafe and substandard accommodation. We have introduced measures in the Housing and Planning Bill to crack down on these landlords so that they either improve the service they provide or leave the sector. Proposals include a database of rogue landlords and property agents, introducing banning orders for serious or repeat offenders, a tougher fit and proper person test, extending Rent Repayment Orders and introducing civil penalties of up to £30,000.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
20th Feb 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, when he intends to reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Hyndburn dated 14 October 2014 on Hyndburn Homes.

A reply was sent to the hon. Member on 25 February 2015, a copy of which is attached.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
13th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the average time taken to grant access for housing associations to properties to undertake statutory gas safety checks.

My Department has made no estimate of the average time taken to grant access to properties, or of the costs involved, for housing associations to undertake statutory gas safety checks or the costs involved .

One of the standard conditions of rented tenancy agreements is to allow reasonable access, following advance notice, for gas servicing and safety checks.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
13th Oct 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what estimate he has made of the costs to housing associations of implementing the legal power to enter a property to undertake a statutory gas safety check.

My Department has made no estimate of the average time taken to grant access to properties, or of the costs involved, for housing associations to undertake statutory gas safety checks or the costs involved .

One of the standard conditions of rented tenancy agreements is to allow reasonable access, following advance notice, for gas servicing and safety checks.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
29th Aug 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many (a) full-time, (b) part-time, (c) self-employed, (d) casual, (e) fixed-term or contract, (f) apprenticeship and (g) commission-only workers there are in each local authority in Lancashire.

The Department does not collate or hold any detailed informaton relating to individual local authorities' workforces.

The Office for National Statistics collates workforce information from local authorites as part of its quarterly public sector employment survey. These statistics are available on the Local Government Association website at http://www.local.gov.uk/local-government-intelligence/-/journal_content/56/10180/2991184/ARTICLE.

29th Aug 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what recent steps he has taken to encourage the ownership and management of park homes on a cooperative model.

Park home sites can be jointly owned by home owners and run on a co-operative model. We have not taken steps to promote this. Our priority has been to tackle poor management practices in the sector which is why we have implemented the Mobile Homes Act 2013, which significantly increases the rights of home owners and provides them with better protection.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
19th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what changes have been made to the Preserved Right to Buy since May 2010; and what consultation processes have accompanied such changes.

Helping people to achieve their home ownership aspirations is a central part of the Government's housing strategy. This is why the Government reinvigorated the Right to Buy and, by extension, the Preserved Right to Buy, increasing the maximum cash caps to £75,000 in April 2012. At the same time, the Government committed to keeping the discounts under review to ensure they remain effective.

To reflect the unique nature of the housing market in London, the maximum cash cap for London was increased to £100,000 in March 2013. As part of keeping the discounts under review, the Government is currently legislating to increase annually the maximum cash cap by the Consumer Price Index, and to bring the maximum percentage discount available for houses up, from 60 per cent to 70 per cent, to the same level as that available for flats. We are also legislating, via the Deregulation Bill, to decrease the qualifying eligibility period from five years to three years, bringing it in line with the policy's original intentions.

My Department consulted widely on changes to the Right to Buy prior to the reinvigoration of the scheme in April 2012. We have held roundtable meetings with key partners, such as the National Housing Federation, the Local Government Association and individual local authorities, on the further changes outlined above.

19th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many homes have been sold to date through the Preserved Right to Buy; what steps his Department takes to ensure such homes can be replaced; and how many homes sold under Preserved Right to Buy have been replaced to date.

This Government wants to ensure that as many social tenants as possible are helped to achieve their home ownership aspirations. The Preserved Right to Buy ensures that social tenants who were living in their homes at the time of a stock transfer maintain their important right to home ownership. Figures for Preserved Right to Buy sales are collected by the Department on an annual basis. In the first year of the reinvigorated scheme (2012-13), there were 2,458 Preserved Right to Buy sales. Sales data for previous years (table 648) can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-social-housing-sales

As housing associations are independent organisations, and stock transfer agreements are private commercial contracts, we do not mandate what they do with receipts they receive from Preserved Right to Buy sales. It is the Department's expectation that these receipts should be used to help fund new homes for affordable rent, and we would encourage housing associations to work in partnership with local authorities, and use other sources of cross-subsidy, to help achieve this.

For future stock transfers, my Department has recently published a Stock Transfer Manual which sets out our intention to require that, for transfers completing after 30 September 2014, net proceeds from Preserved Right to Buy sales are, within three years, used to fund new affordable housing at no greater subsidy cost than under the main affordable homes programme.

19th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to monitor the effect of the Preserved Right to Buy on the number of affordable homes.

This Government wants to ensure that as many social tenants as possible are helped to achieve their home ownership aspirations. The Preserved Right to Buy ensures that social tenants who were living in their homes at the time of a stock transfer maintain their important right to home ownership. Figures for Preserved Right to Buy sales are collected by the Department on an annual basis. In the first year of the reinvigorated scheme (2012-13), there were 2,458 Preserved Right to Buy sales. Sales data for previous years (table 648) can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-social-housing-sales

As housing associations are independent organisations, and stock transfer agreements are private commercial contracts, we do not mandate what they do with receipts they receive from Preserved Right to Buy sales. It is the Department's expectation that these receipts should be used to help fund new homes for affordable rent, and we would encourage housing associations to work in partnership with local authorities, and use other sources of cross-subsidy, to help achieve this.

For future stock transfers, my Department has recently published a Stock Transfer Manual which sets out our intention to require that, for transfers completing after 30 September 2014, net proceeds from Preserved Right to Buy sales are, within three years, used to fund new affordable housing at no greater subsidy cost than under the main affordable homes programme.

12th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what research his Department has (a) conducted or (b) commissioned on recent trends in homelessness among people under the age of 35 years.

This Government is continuing to work hard to support vulnerable homeless people get their lives back on track.

We commissioned Homeless Link to undertake studies on Youth Homelessness in 2010-11, 2011-12 and 2012-13. All three reports are available at: www.homeless.org.uk/youth-homelessness.

Tackling youth homelessness is a priority for this Government and on 10 June I announced a package of £65 million funding from across Whitehall to tackle homelessness, with youth homelessness a central part of the programmes. The package includes:

· £41.5 million which will be shared between the Homelessness Change Programme to provide tailored temporary hostel accommodation for rough sleepers to get them off the streets and transform their lives through health, training and education facilities and Platform for Life - a low rent shared accommodation programme for low needs homeless young people so they have a stable platform for work and study;

· £15 million for the Fair Chance Fund which aims to improve the accommodation, employment and training outcomes for vulnerable homeless 18- 25 year olds;

· £8 million Help for Single Homeless Fundthat will improve council services for single people facing the prospect of homelessness and;

· over £580,000 to extend the Homelessness Gold Standard scheme which helps councils to improve frontline housing services for homeless families and single people.

This is in addition to the £470 million this Government has invested over the spending review period to tackle and prevent homelessness, and work we are already supporting to look at how local services for young people at risk of homelessness can be better joined up, to develop the skills needed to help homeless people into employment and to help single homeless people find accommodation in the private rented sector.

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many proposals have been made by local authorities under the Sustainable Communities Act 2007 in each year since that Act has been in force; and how many such proposals his Department has adopted.

[Holding Reply: Thursday 27 March 2014]

In July 2009, 100 local authorities submitted proposals to the Selector, the Local Government Association. In December 2009, the Selector presented a short-list of 199 proposals, containing over 300 separate requests to the Government. Details of these proposals, the 39 actions this Government said it would take in response and an update on these actions that was published in July last year can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sustainable-communities-act-2007-decisions-on-local-councils-proposals-to-improve-local-areas

Five local authorities submitted proposals in 2011. We carefully considered all the proposals and took forward two firm proposals. One local authority has submitted a proposal this year. It is under consideration.

The Government extended the power to submit proposals under the Act to town and parish councils in October last year. Since then five town and parish councils have submitted proposals, which are under consideration.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will make an assessment of the effect of (a) court closures and (b) the reduction of funding for legal aid on trends in the level of access to justice.

The closure of a court is subject to public consultation and a decision to close is not taken lightly. In every case, the Lord Chancellor will only agree to close a court when satisfied that effective access to justice can be maintained.

Every person should have access to legal advice when they need it – that’s why the Legal Aid Agency keeps availability under constant review and takes urgent action whenever it has concerns. There are enough solicitors and barristers for criminal legal aid-funded cases across England and Wales and the Civil Legal Advice Telephone Service, offers legal services in a range of issues to those who need it.

We are investing £5m in innovative new technologies to help people access legal support wherever they are in England and Wales.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many custodial sentences were given to first-time offenders in England and Wales in each year since 2008.

The number of custodial sentences given to first time offenders in England and Wales is available in the document “Offending History Data Tool: First Time Entrants Statistics” at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2017

This data covers the latest available calendar year figures (i.e. the 12 months ending December 2007 to the 12 months ending December 2017)

17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will publish the number of suicides recorded by the Coroners Office in each district in each of the last 10 years.

The Ministry of Justice collects annual data, from each coroner area, on the number of inquest conclusions recorded which are available at:

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/706047/coroners-statistics-2017-csvs.zip.

These include conclusions of suicide and drug/alcohol deaths but do not distinguish between drug and alcohol deaths. We do not collect data on the type of drugs involved in the death.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many deaths attributed to the use of recreational drugs have been recorded by the Coroners Office in each district over the last 10 years.

The Ministry of Justice collects annual data, from each coroner area, on the number of inquest conclusions recorded which are available at:

www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/706047/coroners-statistics-2017-csvs.zip.

These include conclusions of suicide and drug/alcohol deaths but do not distinguish between drug and alcohol deaths. We do not collect data on the type of drugs involved in the death.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to meet staff representatives of the National Probation Service to discuss their pay and conditions.

There are no plans at present to meet with staff representatives of the National Probation Service, but we recognise the significant role that probation officers play within the criminal justice system, implementing the orders of the courts, rehabilitating offenders and protecting the public.

Since the creation of the National Probation Service in June 2014, officials from HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) have held regular and lengthy discussions with the National Association for Probation Officers (NAPO) (the trade union for probation officers), Unison and GMB SCOOP over pay and working conditions.

There have also been constructive and exploratory talks on pay reform.

We are working to progress a case, consistent with the Government’s overall approach to public sector pay, which can be agreed with Ministerial colleagues at HM Treasury at the earliest opportunity.

13th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many coroner's offices have been subject to mergers in each year since 2010.

Since 2010 there have been 23 mergers of coroner areas in England and Wales, reducing the overall number from 116 to 92 coroner areas.

It is the Chief Coroner’s aim, which the Government supports, to move, over time, to around 75 coroner areas, each having between 3,000 and 5,000 deaths reported annually. The aimn of this change is to promote consistency and generate efficiencies for local authorities, which fund coroner services.

The Ministry of Justice does not have operational responsibility for the coroner services and does not hold information about the number of coroner’s offices that have closed.

4th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people who (a) were given a non-custodial sentence and (b) were given their first custodial sentence in each year from 2004 had previously had (i) no criminal convictions, (ii) one criminal conviction, (iii) two criminal convictions, (iv) three criminal convictions, (v) four criminal convictions, (vi) five to 10 criminal convictions, (vii) 11 to 20 criminal convictions, (viii) 21 to 30 criminal convictions, (ix) 31 to 40 criminal convictions, (x) 41 to 50 criminal convictions, (xi) 51 to 75, (xii) 76 to 100 criminal convictions and (xiii) more than 100 criminal convictions.

Since 2010, crime has continued to fall and fewer individuals are entering the criminal justice system for the first time. But we have a persistent hardcore of offenders being recycled round and round the criminal justice system, as these figures bear out.

This Government is committed to tackling re-offending rates. We have reformed sentences, so that they combine both punishment and requirements that are effective at preventing further offending. We have legislated so that all community orders must now have a punitive element, and, from 2015, every offender leaving prison spends at least 12 months under supervision, where currently around 50,000 are released each year with no statutory support. We are transforming rehabilitation, by bringing together the best of the public, private and voluntary sectors, and only rewarding them when they actually do reduce reoffending.

Sentencing in individual cases is a matter for our independent judiciary, taking account of the circumstances of the case and the maximum penalty for the offence. A court may only impose a community order or a custodial sentence where the offence is imprisonable. The overwhelming majority of repeat offenders have previously received a number of custodial sentences but the large majority of previous convictions identified in the table below resulted in a fine as they were for summary non-motoring offences.

The number of offenders who were given a non-custodial sentence in each year since 2004, broken down by their number of previous convictions, is given in Table 1. It is important to note that these figures are based only on those offences recorded on the Police National Computer (PNC) by an English or Welsh police force, including the British Transport Police, and include a number of offences for which the maximum sentence available to the court is a fine. It should also be noted that these figures are based on counting the number of separate occasions on which offenders were sentenced in each year and some offenders will therefore be represented several times in the figures.

Table 2 provides a similar breakdown for those offenders who received their first custodial sentence in each year. Again, the figures are drawn from the PNC and will include a number of offences for which the maximum sentence available to the court is a fine. A large proportion of each offender's criminal history is therefore likely to include some offences for which it is not possible to receive a custodial sentence. Of those offenders who had between 76 and 100 previous convictions between the 12 months ending September 2004 and the 12 months ending September 2013, 84% of the disposals for their previous convictions were fines. This increases to 96% when you look at the offenders who had over 100 previous convictions. It should also be noted that these figures are based on counting the number of separate occasions on which offenders were sentenced in each year and some offenders could therefore be represented several times in the figures.

The number of offenders who have received at least one previous conviction, or indeed multiple previous convictions, before receiving their first custodial sentence has decreased under this Government.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when he plans to Answer question number 191341, submitted by the hon. Member for Hyndburn on 10 March 2014 for Answer on 13 March 2014.

It has not been possible to obtain the information required to respond to question 191341 from the hon Member forHyndburn. I will write to the hon Member shortly. I apologise for the delay in responding to these questions.

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people who (a) were given a non-custodial sentence and (b) were given their first custodial sentence in each year from 2004 had previously had (i) no criminal convictions, (ii) one criminal conviction, (iii) two criminal convictions, (iv) three criminal convictions, (v) four criminal convictions, (vi) five to 10 criminal convictions, (vii) 11 to 20 criminal convictions, (viii) 21 to 30 criminal convictions, (ix) 31 to 40 criminal convictions, (x) 41 to 50 criminal convictions, (xi) 51 to 75 criminal convictions, (xii) 76 to 100 criminal convictions and (xiii) more than 100 criminal convictions.

It has not been possible to obtain this information. I will write to the Honourable member in due course.