Adam Holloway

Conservative - Gravesham

Science and Technology Committee (Commons)
16th Oct 2017 - 22nd Jan 2018
Science and Technology Committee
16th Oct 2017 - 22nd Jan 2018
Foreign Affairs Sub-Committee
5th Jan 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Foreign Affairs Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 19th Dec 2016
Public Administration Committee
12th May 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Defence Committee
5th Nov 2012 - 3rd Nov 2014
Defence Committee
6th Feb 2006 - 2nd Nov 2010


Select Committee Meeting
Monday 13th December 2021
16:20
Home Affairs Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Investigation and prosecution of rape
13 Dec 2021, 4:20 p.m.
At 4.30pm: Oral evidence
Max Hill QC - Director of Public Prosecutions at Crown Prosecution Service
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 15th December 2021
09:30
Division Votes
Tuesday 7th December 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 289 Conservative No votes vs 15 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 251 Noes - 296
Speeches
Thursday 22nd July 2021
Personal Statements

I wish to apologise to the House. Yesterday, the Committee on Standards adjudged that I and four other MPs were …

Written Answers
Tuesday 7th December 2021
General Practitioners
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) are required to monitor …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 4th October 2021
1. Employment and earnings
1 September 2021, received £75. Hours: approx. 30 mins. (Registered 24 September 2021)
EDM signed
Thursday 11th April 2019
Exiting the European Union
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (Exit Day) (Amendment) …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Adam Holloway has voted in 321 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

27 Apr 2021 - Delegated Legislation - View Vote Context
Adam Holloway voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Conservative No votes vs 222 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 89
View All Adam Holloway Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Keir Starmer (Labour)
Leader of Her Majesty's Official Opposition
(6 debate interactions)
Nigel Evans (Conservative)
(5 debate interactions)
Tonia Antoniazzi (Labour)
(4 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(15 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(4 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Adam Holloway's debates

Gravesham Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Undocumented Migrants are suffering in silence, with no access to adequate Financial support, or any help. The Government should grant an urgent Amnesty of 5years to those with no criminal record so that they could live their lives as normal human beings and pay tax to help the UK economy.

There should be a public inquiry into Government contracts granted during Covid-19. Many contracts have been granted without full and open procurement processes. A public inquiry would be able to ascertain whether contracts had been procured fairly and represent value for money for tax payers.

The Government must make a public statement on the #kissanprotests & press freedoms.

India is the worlds largest democracy & democratic engagement and freedom of the press are fundamental rights and a positive step towards creating a India that works for all.


Latest EDMs signed by Adam Holloway

11th April 2019
Adam Holloway signed this EDM on Thursday 11th April 2019

Exiting the European Union

Tabled by: William Cash (Conservative - Stone)
That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, praying that the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 (Exit Day) (Amendment) (No. 2) Regulations 2019 (S.I., 2019, No. 859), dated 11 April 2019, a copy of which was laid before this House on 11 April 2019, be annulled.
82 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Apr 2019)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 73
Democratic Unionist Party: 7
Independent: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
30th October 2017
Adam Holloway signed this EDM on Monday 30th October 2017

75th ANNIVERSARY OF THE SEIZURE OF ENIGMA DOCUMENTS FROM THE U-559

Tabled by: Julian Lewis (Conservative - New Forest East)
That this House salutes the extraordinary courage of the three crew members of HMS Petard who, on 30 October 1942, boarded the sinking German submarine U-559 in circumstances of extreme peril; recognises that the Enigma material they retrieved proved vital in saving countless Allied ships and lives; deeply regrets that …
68 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Jan 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 27
Conservative: 19
Scottish National Party: 12
Liberal Democrat: 4
Independent: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
The Independent Group for Change: 1
View All Adam Holloway's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Adam Holloway, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Adam Holloway has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Adam Holloway has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Adam Holloway has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Adam Holloway has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


66 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, when the appointment of an Assessor to enquire into complaints made against the Royal Peculiar of Westminster Abbey by the congregation of St Margaret's Church will be made.

As a Royal Peculiar, Westminster Abbey does not come under the responsibilities of the Church Commissioners. Accordingly, the most appropriate person to deal with this enquiry is Mr Richard Tilbrook, the Prime Minister's Appointments Secretary at the Cabinet Office.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions there have been of British citizens who returned to the UK from north-eastern Syria since March 2019.

The CPS has a strong record of bringing successful prosecutions in terrorism cases and works extremely closely with Counter Terrorism policing and partners to help build strong cases.

The CPS does not collate or publish data on categories of offender such as British citizens who have returned to the UK. However, latest figures from the Home Office for all types of terrorism cases show that in the year ending 30 June 2020, 49 persons were tried for terrorism-related offences, resulting in 45 convictions.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether weddings will be restricted to places of worship, public buildings and outdoor settings that are already open at Steps 2 and 3 of the Roadmap.

At Step 2, which will be no earlier than 12 April, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are permitted for up to 15 people in COVID-19 Secure venues that are permitted to open or where a broader exemption applies. Receptions can take place with up to 15 people in the form of a sit-down meal and in any COVID-19 Secure outdoor venue that is permitted to open. Such receptions must not take place in people’s private gardens or public outdoor spaces.

At Step 3, which will be no earlier than 17 May, weddings and civil partnership ceremonies are permitted for up to 30 people in COVID-19 Secure venues that are permitted to open. Receptions can also proceed with up to 30 people in a COVID-19 Secure indoor venue, or outdoors.

Further information on the venues where weddings and civil partnership ceremonies may take place can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships/covid-19-guidance-for-small-marriages-and-civil-partnerships.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether funding from the Cultural Capital Fund will be allocated to Gravesham.

As of Friday 11 December, £1bn has been allocated from the Culture Recovery Fund so far. Within that Gravesham have received the following to date:

  • Arts Council England recovery grant of £108,635 to Nocturnal Touring and Rooting Productions

  • Heritage Stimulus Fund award of £97,928 to Church of England, Northfleet, St Botolph

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to assess external students for 2021 public examinations, including students sitting resits, in the event that they are studying independently with no oversight from teachers.

In light of the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, the Government considers that exams cannot be held in a way which is fair. We have therefore announced that GCSE, AS and A level exams will not go ahead this summer as planned.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, has asked the Chief Regulator at Ofqual to find a clear and accessible route for private candidates, and those not in school this year, to be assessed and receive a grade. To ensure our approach is developed with the sector, the Department and Ofqual have now concluded a 2-week consultation on how to fairly award all pupils a grade that supports them to progress to the next stage of their lives, including consulting specifically on four different approaches for private candidates to receive a grade.

The Department has consulted on the following options: for private candidates to complete the papers set by the exam boards for use in schools and colleges, for private candidates to work with a school or college willing to assess the standard at which they are performing, using the same type of evidence the school and college is considering for its students, and for the exam boards to run normal exams for private candidates to take in the summer or autumn of 2021.

​We are working at pace to provide further clarity to the sector and will publish the results of the consultation by the end of February.

The Department and Ofqual have strongly encouraged all our stakeholders, including private candidates and their parents, to respond to the consultation. The Department will continue to engage with a range of relevant stakeholders when developing plans for our policy on GCSE, AS and A level assessments in 2021, as will the exams regulator Ofqual.

10th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress has been made on the IOT Wave 2 competition; and for which areas applications were submitted.

The Institutes of Technology Wave 2 competition was launched on 8 October 2020. It is open to parts of the country without an Institute of Technology. Applicants had until 14 December to submit their proposals. We expect to conclude Stage 1 of the Competition in Spring 2021 and shortly thereafter launch Stage 2. We are aiming to announce successful proposals in Summer 2021.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether in-person one-on-one tuition in a residential setting with appropriate personal protective equipment is permitted in an area with Tier 3 covid-19 restrictions for pupils with additional needs for whom online lessons are not possible.

One-to-one tuition for children that is not provided by a school, such as a private tutor working in a residential setting (i.e. their own home, or their pupils’ homes), would typically be considered to be an out-of-school setting.

As of 2 December 2020, out-of-school settings, including providers of one-on-one tuition, have been able to open for both indoor and outdoor provision in all local restriction tiers, for all children, including those with additional needs. We have updated our guidance for providers of after-school and holiday clubs and other out-of-school settings on the measures they should put in place to ensure they are operating as safely as possible: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak/protective-measures-for-out-of-school-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak#educational-visits-and-trips. Providers offering one-to-one tuition should ensure they are implementing these protective measures to reduce the risk of infection and transmission of the virus. Additionally, if a private tutor normally offers provision in their own home, or pupils’ homes, they should also follow the guidance on?working safely in other people’s homes during the COVID-19 outbreak: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/homes.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he plans to reimburse schools for covid-19 related expenditure in the 2020-21 academic year.

Getting all children and young people back into school for the new academic year has been a national priority. To support schools with this they have continued to receive their core funding allocations throughout the COVID-19 outbreak. Following last year’s Spending Round, school budgets are rising by £2.6 billion in 2020-21, £4.8 billion in 2021-22 and £7.1 billion in 2022-23, compared to 2019-20. On average, schools are attracting 4.2% more per pupil in 2020-21 compared to 2019-20. As stated in our guidance, schools should use these existing resources when making arrangements for this term: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

The Department is aware that all pupils, regardless of their background, have been affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. We are providing schools with the resources and tools to address lost education so that all pupils may make up lost ground. Our £1 billion COVID-19 catch-up package is providing additional funding in the 2020/21 academic year so that schools can support pupils who have been negatively affected by the COVID-19 outbreak: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/billion-pound-covid-catch-up-plan-to-tackle-impact-of-lost-teaching-time.

16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the Government plans to produce before the end of the autumn 2020 term transparent and standard contingency assessment plans and processes for GCSEs and A levels in the event that the 2021 examinations may not be safely or fairly held.

Examinations and assessments are the best and fairest way of judging pupils’ performance. My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State has confirmed that next year’s GCSE, AS level, and A level examination series will go ahead.

The Department is working with Ofqual and engaging widely with the education sector to identify any risks to examinations at a national, local, and individual student level, and to consider measures needed to address any potential disruption. For example, if a pupil is unable to sit examinations due to illness or self isolation, or if schools are affected by a local outbreak during the examination season resulting in examination centres not being able to open. Further details will be published later in the autumn.

6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown academic tutors are permitted to teach their pupils in the pupil's home on a one to one basis, where the (a) age, (b) special educational needs of the child or (c) other factors mean that online lessons are not possible.

As outlined in the guidance for education and childcare settings on New National Restrictions from 5 November 2020, out-of-school activities such as private tuition may continue to operate during the period of national restrictions. The guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/education-and-childcare-settings-new-national-restrictions-from-5-november-2020#ooss. Providers of these activities, regardless of the age of the children they are caring for, should ensure they are only being accessed for face-to-face provision by parents if their primary purpose is registered childcare, or where they are providing other activities for children, where it is reasonably necessary to enable parents to work or search for work, or to undertake training or education.

Out-of-school activities that are primarily used by home educating parents as part of their arrangements for their child to receive a suitable full-time education (which could include, for example, academic tutors) may also continue to operate face-to-face for the duration of the national restrictions.

Where a child has special educational needs or disabilities or there are other factors which mean that online lessons are not reasonably possible, providers are permitted to offer face-to-face provision in pupils’ homes, where it is necessary for them to continue to work.

Tutors that continue to operate face-to-face during this period should continue to undertake risk assessments and implement the system of controls set out in the guidance regarding protective measures for holiday clubs and after-school clubs, and other out-of-school clubs for children during the COVID-19 outbreak. The guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protective-measures-for-holiday-or-after-school-clubs-and-other-out-of-school-settings-for-children-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak/protective-measures-for-out-of-school-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak. Providers operating out of other people’s homes should also implement the guidance on working safely in other people’s homes, available at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19/homes.

All other out of school activities, not being primarily used by parents for these purposes and that can offer remote education, should close for face-to-face provision for the duration of the national restrictions. This will minimise the amount of mixing between different groups of people and therefore reduce the risk of infection and transmission of COVID-19.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many disadvantaged pupils in Gravesham have been provided with technological support by the Government during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department for Education has delivered over 200,000 laptops and tablets to children and young people who would not otherwise have access, as part of over £100 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care.

The devices were an injection of support to help local authorities and academy trusts to provide access to education and social care during the COVID-19 lockdown period. Local authorities and trusts were responsible for distributing the devices and are best placed to know which children and young people need access to a device.

Devices are owned by the local authority, trust or school who can loan unused devices to children and young people who need them most, and who may face disruption to face-to-face education in the event of future local COVID-19 restrictions.

As of 27 August, over 220,000 laptops and tablets and over 50,000 4G wireless routers had been delivered to local authorities and academy trusts. This information split by local authorities and trusts can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/laptops-tablets-and-4g-wireless-routers-progress-data.

This includes 4,000 devices delivered to Kent County Council for children with a social worker, care leavers and disadvantaged year 10 pupils and four devices to Mayfield Grammar in Gravesend.

The Department is now supplementing this support by making available additional devices in the event of face-to-face schooling being disrupted as a result of local COVID-19 restrictions or local lockdowns, and children become reliant on remote education.

This scheme is intended to enable schools to support disadvantaged children in years 3 to 11 who cannot afford their own devices. Schools will also be able to order devices for disadvantaged children across all year groups who are shielding as a result of official advice, all year groups who attend hospital schools and those completing their Key Stage 4 at a further education college.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding has been allocated to schools in Gravesham for (a) online tuition and (b) teaching materials.

Schools in Gravesham are receiving an extra £5.4 million in 2020-21 through the national funding formula. This is equivalent to an increase of 4.6% in per pupil funding and takes total funding for 2020-21 for schools in Gravesham to over £77.7 million.

Schools in Gravesham will also benefit from the catch-up package to support schools to make up for lost teaching time. This £1 billion package is on top of the £2.6 billion increase this year in school budgets, announced last year as part of a £14 billion three-year funding settlement.

Schools are free to choose how they spend this to support their pupils, including on online tuition and teaching materials, and we trust head teachers to spend their budgets in a way that achieves the best outcomes.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department plans to take to reduce the gap in educational provision between state and private schools in Kent after the covid-19 outbreak.

We recognise that all children and young people have had their education disrupted as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. It is our ambition, shared by schools, to ensure that all pupils have the chance to make up for this lost education - ensuring that everyone can reach their potential in the long term.

We appreciate that this ambition will be challenging for schools to deliver. That is why we are introducing a ‘Catch Up Premium’ worth a total of £650 million. This will be available to all state-funded mainstream and special schools, and alternative provision. Our expectation is that this funding will be spent on supporting children and young people to catch up after a period of disruption to their education. Alongside this universal offer, we have also announced a new £350 million National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged pupils. This will increase access to high quality tuition for disadvantaged and vulnerable children and young people, helping to accelerate their academic progress and tackling the attainment gap between them and their peers.

To support state schools to provide education online while they were closed to the majority of pupils, the Government committed over £100 million to boost access to remote education. This includes providing laptops and tablets and internet access for those who need it most, ensuring every school that wants it has access to free, expert technical support to get set up on Google for Education or Microsoft’s Office 365 Education, and offering peer support from schools and colleges leading the way with the use of education technology.

The Department also supported sector-led initiatives such as the Oak National Academy. This new enterprise was created by 40 teachers from schools across England and produced at least 180 hours of online lessons per week. There were at least four hours of lessons per day for secondary, and at least three hours for primary. By 12 July, 4.7 million unique users had accessed the Oak National Academy website and 16.1 million lessons had been viewed. Additionally, the BBC developed resources for families as part of a comprehensive new education package, which is now available on TV, BBC iPlayer and online at BBC Bitesize.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how Ofsted visits to schools from September 2020 to January 2021 will differ from formal inspections; and what potential effect that will have on Ofsted's ability to (a) target failing schools (b) tackle any inadequacies in remote learning provision.

These are matters for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to my hon. Friend directly and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what powers Ofsted will have after undertaking visits to schools in the period September 2020 to January 2021 to enforce standards in remote learning.

These are matters for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector, Amanda Spielman. I have asked her to write to my hon. Friend directly and a copy of her reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has made an assessment of the adequacy of wholly paper-based tuition in meeting the (a) education and (b) emotional needs of pupils during the covid-19 outbreak.

As part of national social distancing measures to limit the spread of COVID-19, we had to limit the numbers of children and young people attending schools, colleges, and nurseries. That is why, between 20 March and 1 June, education and childcare settings were open only to priority groups.

During the period of partial school closures, schools did a huge amount to deliver remote education to pupils remaining at home. The Department has supported sector-led initiatives such as Oak National Academy, a new organisation created by 40 teachers from schools across England. The Department has made £4.84 million available for Oak National Academy both for the summer term of the academic year 2019-20, and then for the 2020-21 academic year to provide video lessons for reception up to year 11. This will include specialist content for pupils with special educational needs and disability. The Oak National Academy will remain a free optional resource for 2020-21, as remote education may need to be an essential component in the delivery of the school curriculum for some pupils alongside classroom teaching, or in the case of a local lockdown. The Department is currently considering approaches to evaluating the Oak National Academy's effectiveness.

The Department published a comprehensive range of advice and guidance to support schools, including a list of high-quality online resources, which was assessed with support from some of the country’s leading educational experts. The guidance also included examples of how schools can support pupils without internet access by, for example, providing physical work packs, which can be seen here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/remote-education-practice-for-schools-during-coronavirus-covid-19, and here: https://www.gov.uk/government/case-studies/providing-physical-work-packs-for-pupils-with-limited-or-no-internet-connection.

In addition to the departmental guidance and the work ofthe Oak National Academy, the BBC developed resources for families as part of a comprehensive new education package. This service was available during the period of partial school closures on television, BBC iPlayer and online at BBC Bitesize. Pupils without internet access were able to access the BBC’s education content via the red button.

In June, the Government announced a £1 billon support package to ensure that schools can help all children and young people make up for the lost teaching time. The package consists of two elements: a universal catch up premium for schools of £650 million to help make up for lost teaching time, and a new £350 million National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged pupils and students.

The Department has already invested over £100 million to support remote education, including the delivery of over 220,000 laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children who would not otherwise have access. We are now supplementing this support by making available additional devices in the event face-to-face schooling is disrupted as a result of COVID-19 outbreaks or local lockdowns, and children become reliant on remote education.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of education provided to school pupils during the period of school closures during the covid-19 outbreak.

As part of national social distancing measures to limit the spread of COVID-19, we had to limit the numbers of children and young people attending schools, colleges, and nurseries. That is why, between 20 March and 1 June, education and childcare settings were open only to priority groups.

During the period of partial school closures, schools did a huge amount to deliver remote education to pupils remaining at home. The Department has supported sector-led initiatives such as Oak National Academy, a new organisation created by 40 teachers from schools across England. The Department has made £4.84 million available for Oak National Academy both for the summer term of the academic year 2019-20, and then for the 2020-21 academic year to provide video lessons for reception up to year 11. This will include specialist content for pupils with special educational needs and disability. The Oak National Academy will remain a free optional resource for 2020-21, as remote education may need to be an essential component in the delivery of the school curriculum for some pupils alongside classroom teaching, or in the case of a local lockdown. The Department is currently considering approaches to evaluating the Oak National Academy's effectiveness.

The Department published a comprehensive range of advice and guidance to support schools, including a list of high-quality online resources, which was assessed with support from some of the country’s leading educational experts. The guidance also included examples of how schools can support pupils without internet access by, for example, providing physical work packs, which can be seen here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/remote-education-practice-for-schools-during-coronavirus-covid-19, and here: https://www.gov.uk/government/case-studies/providing-physical-work-packs-for-pupils-with-limited-or-no-internet-connection.

In addition to the departmental guidance and the work ofthe Oak National Academy, the BBC developed resources for families as part of a comprehensive new education package. This service was available during the period of partial school closures on television, BBC iPlayer and online at BBC Bitesize. Pupils without internet access were able to access the BBC’s education content via the red button.

In June, the Government announced a £1 billon support package to ensure that schools can help all children and young people make up for the lost teaching time. The package consists of two elements: a universal catch up premium for schools of £650 million to help make up for lost teaching time, and a new £350 million National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged pupils and students.

The Department has already invested over £100 million to support remote education, including the delivery of over 220,000 laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children who would not otherwise have access. We are now supplementing this support by making available additional devices in the event face-to-face schooling is disrupted as a result of COVID-19 outbreaks or local lockdowns, and children become reliant on remote education.

22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the quality of education that pupils received (a) online and (b) on paper while schools have been closed during the covid-19 outbreak.

As part of national social distancing measures to limit the spread of COVID-19, we had to limit the numbers of children and young people attending schools, colleges, and nurseries. That is why, between 20 March and 1 June, education and childcare settings were open only to priority groups.

During the period of partial school closures, schools did a huge amount to deliver remote education to pupils remaining at home. The Department has supported sector-led initiatives such as Oak National Academy, a new organisation created by 40 teachers from schools across England. The Department has made £4.84 million available for Oak National Academy both for the summer term of the academic year 2019-20, and then for the 2020-21 academic year to provide video lessons for reception up to year 11. This will include specialist content for pupils with special educational needs and disability. The Oak National Academy will remain a free optional resource for 2020-21, as remote education may need to be an essential component in the delivery of the school curriculum for some pupils alongside classroom teaching, or in the case of a local lockdown. The Department is currently considering approaches to evaluating the Oak National Academy's effectiveness.

The Department published a comprehensive range of advice and guidance to support schools, including a list of high-quality online resources, which was assessed with support from some of the country’s leading educational experts. The guidance also included examples of how schools can support pupils without internet access by, for example, providing physical work packs, which can be seen here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/remote-education-practice-for-schools-during-coronavirus-covid-19, and here: https://www.gov.uk/government/case-studies/providing-physical-work-packs-for-pupils-with-limited-or-no-internet-connection.

In addition to the departmental guidance and the work ofthe Oak National Academy, the BBC developed resources for families as part of a comprehensive new education package. This service was available during the period of partial school closures on television, BBC iPlayer and online at BBC Bitesize. Pupils without internet access were able to access the BBC’s education content via the red button.

In June, the Government announced a £1 billon support package to ensure that schools can help all children and young people make up for the lost teaching time. The package consists of two elements: a universal catch up premium for schools of £650 million to help make up for lost teaching time, and a new £350 million National Tutoring Programme for disadvantaged pupils and students.

The Department has already invested over £100 million to support remote education, including the delivery of over 220,000 laptops and tablets for disadvantaged children who would not otherwise have access. We are now supplementing this support by making available additional devices in the event face-to-face schooling is disrupted as a result of COVID-19 outbreaks or local lockdowns, and children become reliant on remote education.

21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken to coordinate (a) Police and Crime commissioners, (b) the Environment Agency and (c) local police forces to ensure that they are adequately responding to fly-tipping.

Defra is committed to working with partners to stamp out the menace of fly-tipping wherever we can. Our 2018 Resources and Waste Strategy set out our strategic approach to tackling waste crime, including fly-tipping. Our focus is on enabling local action by providing a clear legal framework of rights, responsibilities and powers and setting national standards.

Local authorities and the Environment Agency are encouraged to work in partnership with national and local police bodies in carrying out their enforcement functions against fly-tipping. Defra are working with a wide range of interested parties through the National Fly-Tipping Prevention Group (NFTPG) to raise awareness of fly-tipping and to develop a fly-tipping toolkit. Members of the NFTPG include local authorities, the National Police Chiefs Council and the Environment Agency. The toolkit will support partnership working, intelligence sharing, dealing with fly-tipping associated with unauthorised encampments and the use of technology to report fly-tipping.

In the Environment Bill, we are bringing forward measures to go further, giving agencies and authorities enhanced powers of entry and access to evidence to strengthen their ability to tackle waste crime, and enhancing our ability to track waste and to crack down on rogue operators.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the details available to farmers on the Sustainable Farming Incentive.

Last November, we published our Agricultural Transition Plan setting out all our future environmental land management schemes, starting with the Sustainable Farming Incentive.

We set out what we intend to achieve by 2028 and how we will help farmers manage the move away from Direct Payments over a seven-year transition period to give everyone time to plan and adjust.

In March of this year, we launched the pilot of the Sustainable Farming Incentive. This was so that we could test, at scale, the future scheme in real-world scenarios, with a wide range of farmers and land managers. Our goal is to collaborate with farmers and land managers to design and deliver a scheme that works best for them.

We are currently undertaking user research and surveys on these pilot applicants with a view to informing and improving the scheme. From this we will learn how farmers and land managers have fared in understanding the information presented to them.

In June, we published a progress update of the Agricultural Transition Plan. Here, we gave further details of the early rollout of the Sustainable Farming Incentive scheme and what it will pay for. We also set out clear guidance on the scheme’s eligibility criteria and how farmers can be rewarded for their environmentally sustainable actions when it opens in 2022.

We will be publishing more information about the Sustainable Farming Incentive in November, including confirmation of the standard payment rates.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what comparative assessment he has made of the support available to farmers (a) under environmental land management schemes and (b) in the countries with which the Government is pursuing free trade deals.

We are undertaking an assessment of our proposed reforms to the agricultural industry as they are developed, including the impact of our future schemes that reward environmental land management. It is our intention to publish a comprehensive assessment in due course.

The Government also produces and publishes analysis for each new free trade agreement it pursues and is committed to publishing a full impact assessment following the conclusion of negotiations prior to implementation of an agreement.

The OECD publishes an annual agricultural policy monitoring and evaluation report which contains estimates of support to agriculture. One metric of particular interest from that publication is the ‘producer support estimate’ (PSE) as a percentage of receipts. As an example, it shows that for the UK the PSE is approximately 20% of receipts compared with 1% in New Zealand and 2% in Australia.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of whether the delivery timeline of environmental land management schemes will ensure timely access to new payments for farmers moving on from old payments.

The first Sustainable Farming Incentive (SFI) pilot agreements will start this year. Then, next year we will start to rollout core elements of the SFI, expanding those elements until we have the full offer available in 2024/2025. Importantly, we are running Countryside Stewardship and the SFI in parallel, and both are open to new and existing scheme agreement holders, though we will not fund the same action twice.

The final round of Countryside Stewardship will open in 2023, with agreements starting on 1 January 2024. We plan to start a phased rollout of the Local Nature Recovery scheme from 2023. We will be launching at least ten Landscape Recovery projects between 2022 and 2024. This makes us confident that the full environmental land management offer will be on tap before the end of the transition period.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to publish the impact assessments of the UK-Australia Free Trade Agreement in Principle.

A full impact assessment will be published following the conclusion of negotiations, prior to scrutiny by Parliament.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
28th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to respond to Questions 41751 and 41752 tabled by the hon. Member for Gravesham on 3 September 2021; and for what reason his answers to those questions have been delayed.

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) are required to monitor the number and proportion of GP appointments in their commissioning area which are being delivered face to face.

There is currently no target for the proportion of appointments in general practice which must be delivered face to face. However, practices should respect preferences for in person appointments unless there are good clinical reasons.

Commissioners use information collected locally alongside data gathered from other sources, such as the Quality and Outcomes Framework, to plan and improve general practitioner (GP) services. NHS Digital publishes GP appointment data, from planned activity recorded in GP appointment book systems, which includes face to face appointments at clinical commissioning group level. As set out in ‘Our plan for improving access for patients and supporting general practice’, NHS Digital is working to publish activity and waiting time data at individual practice level as soon as possible. This will include the proportions of appointment by different professions and by different appointment modality.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
3rd Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether there is a target for the proportion of GP patient appointments which are delivered face to face.

There is currently no target for the proportion of appointments in general practice which must be delivered face to face. However, practices should respect preferences for in person appointments unless there are good clinical reasons.

Commissioners use information collected locally alongside data gathered from other sources, such as the Quality and Outcomes Framework, to plan and improve general practitioner (GP) services. NHS Digital publishes GP appointment data, from planned activity recorded in GP appointment book systems, which includes face to face appointments at clinical commissioning group level. As set out in ‘Our plan for improving access for patients and supporting general practice’, NHS Digital is working to publish activity and waiting time data at individual practice level as soon as possible. This will include the proportions of appointment by different professions and by different appointment modality.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the risk that routine requests by NHS vaccination centres for NHS and National Insurance numbers may make people who are in the UK illegally less likely to engage with the covid-19 vaccination programme.

No such assessment has been made.

However, a National Health Service (NHS) number or national insurance number is not needed to make a booking for a COVID-19 vaccine or when attending a vaccination appointment.

As vaccination against COVID-19 is offered to every eligible adult living in the United Kingdom free of charge, regardless of their immigration status. No immigration checks are needed to receive a COVID-19 vaccination and the NHS is not required to report undocumented migrants to the Home Office.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made any special arrangements to encourage people living illegally in the UK to receive covid-19 vaccinations in recognition that those people will not have NHS or national insurance numbers and may be fearful of engaging with the covid-19 vaccination programme.

Vaccination against COVID-19 is offered to every adult living in the United Kingdom free of charge, regardless of immigration status. Entitlement to free National Health Service treatment is generally based on ordinary residence in the UK. A person who can show they have taken up ordinary residence in the UK can access all NHS services immediately, including COVID-19 vaccinations, based on clinical need. No immigration checks are needed to receive these services and the NHS is not required to report undocumented migrants to the Home Office.

An NHS number is not needed to make a booking for a COVID-19 vaccine or when attending a vaccination appointment. If individuals are registered with a general practitioner (GP), their GP will contact them in due course. If they are not registered with a GP, NHS regional teams, will contact unregistered people to ensure they are offered the vaccine. The Enhanced Service Specification: COVID-19 vaccination programme 2020/21 enables practices working within their Primary Care Network groupings from shared vaccination sites to vaccinate unregistered patients provided they are eligible.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the covid-19 vaccine status of (a) people who die within 28 days of a positive covid-19 test and (b) new covid-19 infections.

Public Health England (PHE) monitors the number of people who have been admitted to hospital and died from COVID-19 who have received one or two doses of the vaccine and will publish this data in due course. This includes the number of new cases of COVID-19 infection following vaccination.

PHE has not made a specific assessment of the potential effect of publishing information on the COVID-19 vaccine status of people who die within 28 days of a positive COVID-19 test and new COVID-19 infections on rates of vaccine uptake.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will allocate funding to reimburse medical companies that import medical equipment necessary for the treatment by the NHS of patients with covid-19 for the increased costs of shipping that equipment from North America, Europe and Asia to the UK to meet the needs of the NHS.

The Government has announced a range of measures to assist industry and companies are able to draw on this unprecedented package of economic measures. These measures have been designed to ensure that companies of any size, including airports, airlines and the wider supply chain, receive the help they need to get through this difficult time.

The Government recognises that air freight plays an important role in supply chains and the importance that essential goods can continue to be brought into and out of the United Kingdom without disruption. COVID-19 presents unique risks to the movement of goods.

Because of this, the Department for Transport is working with different sectors to help ensure that essential goods can continue to be transported into the UK. This includes working closely with the aviation sector to support it to ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, continue freight and maintain vital connectivity.

The Department of Health and Social Care is working closely with the Department for Transport, other Government Departments and industry to feed into this ongoing work as well as monitor the impact of COVID-19 on medical supply chains and manage identified risks. For example, the Department of Health and Social Care has mobilised an Express Freight Service to support the continuity of supply of medicines and medical products and ensure the continued prioritisation of critical products.

This is complemented by the current work of the Civil Aviation Authority and the Competition and Markets Authority. The Civil Aviation Authority oversees and regulates all aspects of civil aviation in the United Kingdom and is engaging airlines and airports to provide flexibility within the regulatory framework to help manage and mitigate COVID-19 impacts where appropriate. The Competition and Markets Authority, which has launched a COVID-19 pandemic taskforce to identify harmful pricing practices is advising the Government on the means of ensuring markets operate as well as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if the Government will (a) reimburse companies' increased air freight costs and (b) vary NHS (i) tenders and (ii) framework to cover the uplift in transport costs for products supplied to the NHS for the treatment of covid-19 patients.

The Government has announced a range of measures to assist industry and companies are able to draw on this unprecedented package of economic measures. These measures have been designed to ensure that companies of any size, including airports, airlines and the wider supply chain, receive the help they need to get through this difficult time.

The Government recognises that air freight plays an important role in supply chains and the importance that essential goods can continue to be brought into and out of the United Kingdom without disruption. COVID-19 presents unique risks to the movement of goods.

Because of this, the Department for Transport is working with different sectors to help ensure that essential goods can continue to be transported into the UK. This includes working closely with the aviation sector to support it to ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, continue freight and maintain vital connectivity.

The Department of Health and Social Care is working closely with the Department for Transport, other Government Departments and industry to feed into this ongoing work as well as monitor the impact of COVID-19 on medical supply chains and manage identified risks. For example, the Department of Health and Social Care has mobilised an Express Freight Service to support the continuity of supply of medicines and medical products and ensure the continued prioritisation of critical products.

This is complemented by the current work of the Civil Aviation Authority and the Competition and Markets Authority. The Civil Aviation Authority oversees and regulates all aspects of civil aviation in the United Kingdom and is engaging airlines and airports to provide flexibility within the regulatory framework to help manage and mitigate COVID-19 impacts where appropriate. The Competition and Markets Authority, which has launched a COVID-19 pandemic taskforce to identify harmful pricing practices is advising the Government on the means of ensuring markets operate as well as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has taken steps to reduce the increase in fees charged by airfreight carriers to medical companies that supply equipment for the NHS to treat covid-19 patients.

The Government has announced a range of measures to assist industry and companies are able to draw on this unprecedented package of economic measures. These measures have been designed to ensure that companies of any size, including airports, airlines and the wider supply chain, receive the help they need to get through this difficult time.

The Government recognises that air freight plays an important role in supply chains and the importance that essential goods can continue to be brought into and out of the United Kingdom without disruption. COVID-19 presents unique risks to the movement of goods.

Because of this, the Department for Transport is working with different sectors to help ensure that essential goods can continue to be transported into the UK. This includes working closely with the aviation sector to support it to ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, continue freight and maintain vital connectivity.

The Department of Health and Social Care is working closely with the Department for Transport, other Government Departments and industry to feed into this ongoing work as well as monitor the impact of COVID-19 on medical supply chains and manage identified risks. For example, the Department of Health and Social Care has mobilised an Express Freight Service to support the continuity of supply of medicines and medical products and ensure the continued prioritisation of critical products.

This is complemented by the current work of the Civil Aviation Authority and the Competition and Markets Authority. The Civil Aviation Authority oversees and regulates all aspects of civil aviation in the United Kingdom and is engaging airlines and airports to provide flexibility within the regulatory framework to help manage and mitigate COVID-19 impacts where appropriate. The Competition and Markets Authority, which has launched a COVID-19 pandemic taskforce to identify harmful pricing practices is advising the Government on the means of ensuring markets operate as well as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the effect of increased air freight fees on the operation of medical companies importing goods at fixed product prices.

The Government has announced a range of measures to assist industry and companies are able to draw on this unprecedented package of economic measures. These measures have been designed to ensure that companies of any size, including airports, airlines and the wider supply chain, receive the help they need to get through this difficult time.

The Government recognises that air freight plays an important role in supply chains and the importance that essential goods can continue to be brought into and out of the United Kingdom without disruption. COVID-19 presents unique risks to the movement of goods.

Because of this, the Department for Transport is working with different sectors to help ensure that essential goods can continue to be transported into the UK. This includes working closely with the aviation sector to support it to ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, continue freight and maintain vital connectivity.

The Department of Health and Social Care is working closely with the Department for Transport, other Government Departments and industry to feed into this ongoing work as well as monitor the impact of COVID-19 on medical supply chains and manage identified risks. For example, the Department of Health and Social Care has mobilised an Express Freight Service to support the continuity of supply of medicines and medical products and ensure the continued prioritisation of critical products.

This is complemented by the current work of the Civil Aviation Authority and the Competition and Markets Authority. The Civil Aviation Authority oversees and regulates all aspects of civil aviation in the United Kingdom and is engaging airlines and airports to provide flexibility within the regulatory framework to help manage and mitigate COVID-19 impacts where appropriate. The Competition and Markets Authority, which has launched a COVID-19 pandemic taskforce to identify harmful pricing practices is advising the Government on the means of ensuring markets operate as well as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has had discussions with the Department for Transport on increasing the number of air freight transport routes in operation to minimise delays to the import of medical supplies.

The Government has announced a range of measures to assist industry and companies are able to draw on this unprecedented package of economic measures. These measures have been designed to ensure that companies of any size, including airports, airlines and the wider supply chain, receive the help they need to get through this difficult time.

The Government recognises that air freight plays an important role in supply chains and the importance that essential goods can continue to be brought into and out of the United Kingdom without disruption. COVID-19 presents unique risks to the movement of goods.

Because of this, the Department for Transport is working with different sectors to help ensure that essential goods can continue to be transported into the UK. This includes working closely with the aviation sector to support it to ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, continue freight and maintain vital connectivity.

The Department of Health and Social Care is working closely with the Department for Transport, other Government Departments and industry to feed into this ongoing work as well as monitor the impact of COVID-19 on medical supply chains and manage identified risks. For example, the Department of Health and Social Care has mobilised an Express Freight Service to support the continuity of supply of medicines and medical products and ensure the continued prioritisation of critical products.

This is complemented by the current work of the Civil Aviation Authority and the Competition and Markets Authority. The Civil Aviation Authority oversees and regulates all aspects of civil aviation in the United Kingdom and is engaging airlines and airports to provide flexibility within the regulatory framework to help manage and mitigate COVID-19 impacts where appropriate. The Competition and Markets Authority, which has launched a COVID-19 pandemic taskforce to identify harmful pricing practices is advising the Government on the means of ensuring markets operate as well as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government is working with air freight companies to prioritise the supply of medical equipment for the treatment of covid-19 patients at an appropriate cost.

The Government has announced a range of measures to assist industry and companies are able to draw on this unprecedented package of economic measures. These measures have been designed to ensure that companies of any size, including airports, airlines and the wider supply chain, receive the help they need to get through this difficult time.

The Government recognises that air freight plays an important role in supply chains and the importance that essential goods can continue to be brought into and out of the United Kingdom without disruption. COVID-19 presents unique risks to the movement of goods.

Because of this, the Department for Transport is working with different sectors to help ensure that essential goods can continue to be transported into the UK. This includes working closely with the aviation sector to support it to ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, continue freight and maintain vital connectivity.

The Department of Health and Social Care is working closely with the Department for Transport, other Government Departments and industry to feed into this ongoing work as well as monitor the impact of COVID-19 on medical supply chains and manage identified risks. For example, the Department of Health and Social Care has mobilised an Express Freight Service to support the continuity of supply of medicines and medical products and ensure the continued prioritisation of critical products.

This is complemented by the current work of the Civil Aviation Authority and the Competition and Markets Authority. The Civil Aviation Authority oversees and regulates all aspects of civil aviation in the United Kingdom and is engaging airlines and airports to provide flexibility within the regulatory framework to help manage and mitigate COVID-19 impacts where appropriate. The Competition and Markets Authority, which has launched a COVID-19 pandemic taskforce to identify harmful pricing practices is advising the Government on the means of ensuring markets operate as well as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implication for his policies of the petition presented to the Prime Minister in January 2020 by the International Appeal to stop 5G on Earth and in Space.

The Department of Health and Social Care through Public Health England (PHE), provides advice on 5G safety. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport leads on 5G policies. The overall exposure to radio waves from the introduction of 5G is expected to remain low relative to international guidelines and there should be no consequences for public health. PHE continues to review the evidence to support their advice; which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mobile-phone-base-stations-radio-waves-and-health

Recent Ofcom measured emission levels from 5G-enabled mobile phone base stations remain at small fractions of the guideline level. Ofcom are consulting on a proposed legal requirement for compliance with the international guidelines for public exposure.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that public health policy on the effects of the 5G network is based on up-to-date information; and what plans he has to review the guidelines of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection on exposure to visible and infrared radiation.

Public Health England (PHE) advises the Department on all aspects of public health, including the effects of the 5G network.

PHE scientific experts keep up-to-date with the latest published evidence and carry out their own research. PHE’s research is published in the academic literature and available to expert groups performing comprehensive evidence reviews. Links to recent reviews can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/mobile-phone-base-stations-radio-waves-and-health/mobile-phone-base-stations-radio-waves-and-health

A revision of the current International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines on exposure to visible and infrared radiation is underway. PHE will consider the new guidelines when published and provide relevant advice.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many (a) adult, (b) child, (c) male and (d) female British citizens have been given consular assistance to get home from Turkey having escaped detention in north-eastern Syria.

We do not comment on individual cases. Each request for consular assistance is considered on a case-by-case basis and the support we can offer is tailored to the individual circumstances. All British nationals who return to the UK from north-eastern Syria should expect to be investigated and, where there is evidence that a crime has been committed, prosecuted. Decisions on prosecutions are taken independently by the police and Crown Prosecution Service on a case-by-case basis.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether HMRC has received reports of people receiving incorrect advice from advisers on settlement of the loan charge; and if he will reopen the settlement process for the people affected.

HMRC do not hold data on reports from individual taxpayers who may feel they have received incorrect advice from advisers about their settlements. A core principle of the tax system is that an individual is responsible for their own tax affairs. The actions of a third party adviser are not normally considered to be an exceptional circumstance beyond the control of the taxpayer.

HMRC are continuing settlement discussions with a relatively small number of taxpayers who were prevented from meeting the 30 September deadline by exceptional circumstances beyond their control, such as recent hospitalisation.

The criteria HMRC consider for continuing settlement discussions beyond the 30 September deadline are:

  • The taxpayer had actively engaged in the settlement process until the occurrence of a factor;
  • The factor is entirely outside the control of the taxpayer,
  • The factor prevented the taxpayer from settling by 30 September; and
  • Absent the factor, the taxpayer would have been able to settle by 30 September, and
  • The taxpayer is able, and agrees, to settle within a defined period of no more than 3 months after the 30 September.
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what circumstances are included for HMRC to extend the settlement window for people subject to the Loan Charge after 30 September 2020.

HMRC do not hold data on reports from individual taxpayers who may feel they have received incorrect advice from advisers about their settlements. A core principle of the tax system is that an individual is responsible for their own tax affairs. The actions of a third party adviser are not normally considered to be an exceptional circumstance beyond the control of the taxpayer.

HMRC are continuing settlement discussions with a relatively small number of taxpayers who were prevented from meeting the 30 September deadline by exceptional circumstances beyond their control, such as recent hospitalisation.

The criteria HMRC consider for continuing settlement discussions beyond the 30 September deadline are:

  • The taxpayer had actively engaged in the settlement process until the occurrence of a factor;
  • The factor is entirely outside the control of the taxpayer,
  • The factor prevented the taxpayer from settling by 30 September; and
  • Absent the factor, the taxpayer would have been able to settle by 30 September, and
  • The taxpayer is able, and agrees, to settle within a defined period of no more than 3 months after the 30 September.
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the food and drink sector's proposal for a covid recovery visa scheme.

The Points Based System already provides for a range of roles in the food and drink sector, including roles such as Butchers, subject to the rules and requirements of the system being met, including on salary.

Beyond the Points Based Systems, employers can recruit those with general work rights including the millions of people who have been granted status under the EU Settlement Scheme, those who have arrived via our settlement route for British National (Overseas) normally resident in Hong Kong and their households, those who have arrived via a family visa and those in the UK under our Youth Mobility Schemes. They have full access to the UK labour market and are free to work in the UK and can undertake any role.

But recognising the extraordinary circumstances facing businesses currently, Government is providing visas as a time-limited, temporary measure for the food sector until longer term measures to improve the supply of skills domestically. start to have an impact. This includes visas for up to:

• 4,700 HGV food drivers who will be able to arrive from late October and leave by 28 February 2022 and;

• 5,500 poultry workers will arrive from late October and stay up until 31 December 2021.

However we must see long-term solutions delivered by employers through improved testing and hiring, with better pay and working conditions, as immigration routes do not provide a guarantee of being able to recruit in a competitive global market for skilled workers.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many TPIMS are in force for British citizen returnees from Syria.

The number of people on TPIMs is published quarterly by the Home Secretary. The Home Office does not comment on the background or circumstances of individual TPIM notices.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many British citizens have returned home since March 2019.

Around 900 people have travelled from the UK to engage with the conflict in Syria and Iraq, against the advice of the Foreign Office. Of these, approximately 20% have been killed in the conflict and around 40% have returned to the UK.

We can confirm that in the last 12 months there have been a small number of British children who have left Syria and returned to the UK via third countries.

The Government’s priority is the safety and security of the people who live here. All of those who have returned, have been investigated and the majority have been assessed to pose no, or a low security risk.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) British citizens and (b) British citizens who had their citizenship revoked are known to have escaped from detention in camps or prisons in northeast Syria since Baghouz fell in March 2019.

The safety and security of Internally Displaced Persons camps and detention centres in northeast Syria is the responsibility of the detaining authority.

The UK’s aim is to see that justice and accountability are achieved for all parties and that those who have committed crimes in the name of Daesh are prosecuted for their crimes, in a manner consistent with relevant domestic and international standards.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Home Office, what counter UAV technology is available to close protection details assigned to travelling Government (a) VVIPs and (b) foreign missions.

It is our long-standing policy not to provide detailed information on the security arrangements for protected individuals. To do so could compromise the integrity of those arrangements and affect the security of the individuals concerned.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether there are resourced contingency plans to counter the threat of the use of unmanned aerial vehicles by terrorist groups within the UK.

The Home Office and Police are working jointly to build a new national counter-drones capability, which will give the police the technology, resource and training required to effectively tackle the illegal use of drones.

There is no single means of protecting the UK from malicious drones use, which is why the Home Office, via the UK Counter-unmanned Aircraft Strategy has committed to developing a layered approach to counter malicious drone use. This layered approach includes: improved public understanding of safe drone operation; requiring drones over a certain size to be registered; requiring commercial drone pilots to be licenced, with full risk assessments in place for any companies operating commercial drones.

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of whether the UK regulatory framework is sufficient to facilitate fast and effective use of counter UAV technology by the Government.

To ensure police have the powers required to effectively tackle drone misuse by authorising the use of counter UAV technology, The Home Office have been supporting the Department for Transport as they lead in developing and introducing the Air Traffic Management and Unmanned Aircraft (ATMUA) Bill. The ATMUA Bill gives Police, Senior Prison Officers and Civil Nuclear Constabulary the ability to authorise the use of counter UAV technology to protect the public and Critical National Infrastructure sites.

The ATMUA Bill will develop new norms of safe drone use while enabling an effective operational response to drone misuse.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans the Government has to bring forward legislative proposals to make it harder for migrants who are in the UK illegally to make an asylum claim.

The UK has a long and proud history of providing protection to those who need it, in accordance with our international obligations.

The Prime Minister has been clear that we will address the rigidities in our laws that make this country a target for those who would exploit vulnerable people in this way. We will also take advantage of leaving the EU by changing the Dublin regulation on returns.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many part-time volunteer major generals there are in the Army Reserve as of September 2021; and how many there are planned to be after the implementation of the Integrated Review.

Trained FR20 Reserves of Paid Rank Major General, as at 1 July 2021:

RankTotal
Major General5

Notes/ Caveats:

1. The Trained FR20 population in the table consists of Group A Army Reserves, some Sponsored Reserves and those personnel serving on FTRS contracts who were previously Army Reservists.

2. The figure above includes Major Generals that contribute towards the previously defined FR20 population and excludes those personnel who do not. E.g., those Reservists on service complaint panels and the Governor of Edinburgh Castle.

3. Figures are as at 1 July 2021 in line with the protocols for release of personnel statistics.

Detailed plans for the future structure of the Army are still being refined. There will be announcements made on our intent for both the regular and reserve force in due course.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many officers there are of rank major general or higher in the Regular Army as of September 2021; and how many there are planned to be after the implementation of the Integrated Review.

Trade Trained Regulars of Paid Rank Major General and above, as at 1 July 2021

RankTotal
General4
Liutenant Genertal16
Major General45
Total65

Notes/ Caveats:

1. These figures are for the Trade Trained Regular Army only and therefore exclude Gurkhas, Full Time Reserve Service, Mobilised Reserves, Army Reserve and all other Reserves, but includes those personnel that have transferred from GURTAM to UKTAP.

2. Figures are as at 1 July 2021 in line with the protocols for release of personnel statistics.

Detailed plans for the future structure of the Army are still being refined. There will be announcements made on our intent for both the regular and reserve force in due course.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many members of the (a) Army (Regular) and (b) Army Reserve were awarded a State honour by (i) date of award, (ii) rank of recipient and (iii) type of award in each of the last five years.

Please find attached tables outlining State honours awarded to Armed Forces Regular and Reserves personnel.

All information on the table provided is consistent with notifications for honours published in the London Gazette at the time of release.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many members of the (a) he Royal Navy (Regular and (b) Maritime Reserve (Royal Navy Reserve and Royal Marine Reserve) were awarded a State honour by (i) date of award, (ii) rank of recipient and (iii) type of award in each of the last five years.

Please find attached tables outlining State honours awarded to Armed Forces Regular and Reserves personnel.

All information on the table provided is consistent with notifications for honours published in the London Gazette at the time of release.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many members of the (a) Royal Air Force (Regular) and (b) Royal Auxiliary Air Force (Reserve) were awarded a State honour broken down by (i) date of award, (ii) rank of recipient and (iii) type of award in each of the last five years.

Please find attached tables outlining State honours awarded to Armed Forces Regular and Reserves personnel.

All information on the table provided is consistent with notifications for honours published in the London Gazette at the time of release.

Leo Docherty
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (jointly with the Ministry of Defence)
2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many scientific and technical civil servants were employed by his Department in (a) 2020 and (b) 2010.

The number of Civil Servants employed by the Ministry of Defence in the scientific and technical field in 2010 and 2020 are as follows:

2010

5,202

2020

5,404*

Where available, these figures include personnel in delegated Arm’s Length Bodies - Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL), UK Hydrographic Office (UKHO), Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) and the Defence Electronics and Components Agency (DECA).

*Excluding DE&S for which figures are not available.

2nd Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civil servants were employed in financial posts in his Department in (a) 2020 and (b) 2010.

The number of Civil Servants employed by the Ministry of Defence in the finance field in 2010 and 2020 are as follows:

2010

3,391

2020

1,752*

Where available, these figures include personnel in delegated Arm’s Length Bodies - Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL), UK Hydrographic Office (UKHO), Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S) and the Defence Electronics and Components Agency (DECA).

* Excluding DE&S for which figures are unavailable.

11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what comparative assessment he has made of the cost efficiency of the (a) Reserve Forces and Cadets Association and (b) Defence Infrastructure Organisation working on small projects.

At this time, no comparison of the cost efficiency of these organisations working on small projects has been undertaken.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what information his Department holds on the skills available free of charge to the Reserve Forces and Cadets' Association through its active volunteer membership.

We greatly value the contribution of the Reserve Forces and Cadets' Association's volunteer membership in support of the Reserve Forces and the Cadet organisations. Their continued contribution of their own free time to support our Armed Forces and affiliated youth organisations is laudable, and we hold them in the highest regard.

We do not currently hold any information on the skills, qualifications or experience of volunteer members outside of the Armed Forces. We recognise that our volunteers bring a wealth of experience and different ways of working, whilst concurrently being a fully integrated and integral part of our tri-service community and youth organisations.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that membership of the Reserve Forces and Cadets Association continues to serve (a) reserves and cadets and (b) wider defence policy.

We greatly value the contribution of the Reserve Forces and Cadet Associations (RFCA) to Defence and we continue to engage with their volunteer membership. This is achieved through Ministerial and senior military attendance at events such as the Council of RFCAs' annual briefing, and the Annual General Meetings held by Associations. Such engagement ensures that we maintain links at the appropriate level of seniority, and I am confident that the Ministry of efenceD will maintain its current excellent relationship with the RFCAs long into the future.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will place in the Library copies of correspondence between Baroness Goldie and Lord De Mauley that followed the debate on Reserve Forces and Cadets’ Associations of 27 January 2020, Official Report, column 1304.

I will write to hon. Member shortly.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reason the new standard method for assessing local housing need uses a house price to workplace-based earnings ratio rather than a house price to residence-based earnings ratio.

The consultation on changes to the current planning system set out the elements we want to balance when determining local housing need, including meeting our target of building 300,000 homes, tackling affordability challenges in the places people most want to live, regenerating brownfield sites, and renewing and levelling up our towns and cities.

The affordability adjustment used in the proposed standard method is based on the median house price to workplace-based earnings ratio, published annually by the Office for National Statistics. The house price to workplace-based earnings ratio compares the median salary earned in a local authority against the median house price in that same authority area. We have consulted on each element of the indicative formula, including affordability, and are considering carefully how they work together to achieve an appropriate distribution.

The proposals were out for consultation until 1 October 2020. Following consideration of the consultation responses received, the Government will publish a response.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what comparative assessment he has made of the effect of using a (a) house price to workplace-based earnings ratio and (b) house price to residence-based earnings ratio on the assessed local housing need of towns where people commute to work in nearby cities.

The consultation on changes to the current planning system set out the elements we want to balance when determining local housing need, including meeting our target of building 300,000 homes, tackling affordability challenges in the places people most want to live, regenerating brownfield sites, and renewing and levelling up our towns and cities.

The affordability adjustment used in the proposed standard method is based on the median house price to workplace-based earnings ratio, published annually by the Office for National Statistics. The house price to workplace-based earnings ratio compares the median salary earned in a local authority against the median house price in that same authority area. We have consulted on each element of the indicative formula, including affordability, and are considering carefully how they work together to achieve an appropriate distribution.

The proposals were out for consultation until 1 October 2020. Following consideration of the consultation responses received, the Government will publish a response.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how the drop off rate between permissions and completions will be calculated in the new standard method for assessing local housing need as part of the Government's proposed changes to the current planning system.

We committed to reviewing the current formula for local housing need at this year’s budget and the proposals were out for consultation from 6 August until 1 October 2020.

Not all homes that are planned for are built, and the consultation noted that there is a drop off rate between permissions and completions. As part of the Planning for the Future consultation, we confirmed we will explore further options to support faster build out, as we develop our proposals for the new planning system.

Following consideration of the consultation responses received, the Government will publish a response. The response will set out any decisions and any associated proposed implementation.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)