Tougher sentences for hit and run drivers who cause death

The maximum penalty for failure to stop after an incident is points and a 6-month custodial sentence. Causing death by careless/dangerous driving is between 5-14 yrs. The sentence for failing to stop after a fatal collision must be increased.

This petition closed on 20 Jan 2021 with 104,324 signatures


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Recent Documents related to Tougher sentences for hit and run drivers who cause death

1. Tougher sentences for hit and run drivers who cause death
01/06/2020 - Petitions

Found: The maximum penalty for failure to stop after an incident is points and a 6-month custodial sentence. Causing

2. RoadPeace - written evidence
22/05/2019 - Inquiry: Road Safety - Transport Committee
- View source

Found: cut with alarming reductions in the number of driving offences detected. Law breaking and risk taking

3. Anonymous - written evidence
09/09/2019 - Inquiry: Road Safety - Transport Committee
- View source

Found: The key points of my submission are as follows:-          Legal consequences for causing death or serious

4. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill 2021: overarching documents
09/03/2021 - Home Office
- View source

Found: Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill Driving Offences Impact Assessment IA No: MoJ047/2019

5. Impact assessment: driving offences
10/12/2020 - Bill Documents

Found: Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill Driving Offences Impact Assessment IA No: MoJ047/2019

Latest Documents
Recent Speeches related to Tougher sentences for hit and run drivers who cause death

1. Road Traffic Offences: Fatal Collisions
15/11/2021 - Westminster Hall

1: and 575620, relating to road traffic offences for fatal collisions.It is a pleasure to see you in the Chair - Speech Link

2. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
08/11/2021 - Lords Chamber

1: milligrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres of urine,”. (5) In section 8(2) of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (choice - Speech Link
2: increases the risk of a driver’s involvement in a collision, by three times for collisions leading to injuries - Speech Link
3: involving drink-driving. Men are far more likely to have been drinking: 78% of male drivers were involved - Speech Link

3. Road Safety and the Legal Framework
20/11/2018 - Westminster Hall

1: highlighted a range of issues that lead to avoidable road death and serious injury, particularly to vulnerable road - Speech Link
2: that many employees in this country are put in a dangerous and vulnerable position because their employers - Speech Link

4. Cycling Fatalities: Ian Winterburn
21/12/2017 - Commons Chamber

1: injuring pedestrian Mrs Briggs in one of two such fatal accidents last year, yet any more cyclists have - Speech Link
2: versus dangerous driving and the different penalties involved. Indeed, I shall refer to the all-party parliamentary - Speech Link

5. Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Bill
13/12/2021 - Lords Chamber

1: 1988 (causing death by dangerous driving), or(b) an offence under section 3A of that Act (causing death - Speech Link
2: actions of a minority of selfish and uncaring drivers who simply do not understand or appreciate the - Speech Link

Latest Speeches
Recent Questions related to Tougher sentences for hit and run drivers who cause death
1. Dangerous Driving: Death
asked by: Charlotte Nichols
13/07/2021
... what options his Department has considered as part of its review of potential further options that might be used to respond such incidences.

2. Dangerous Driving: Death
asked by: Richard Holden
23/09/2021
... how many deaths by dangerous driving occurred in each of the last twenty years; and how many and what proportion of those divers (i) had and (ii) did not have a valid driving licence.

3. Dangerous Driving: Death
asked by: Matthew Offord
30/11/2021
... unlicensed or uninsured in (i) London and (ii) England in each of the last three years.

4. Dangerous Driving: Death
asked by: Chi Onwurah
20/01/2020
... how many children aged 16 or under have been killed by negligent drivers in each year for which figures are available.

Latest Questions

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Our sons, Matt aged 25 & Paul aged 23, were both killed on their motorbikes just 9 months apart. Both drivers fled the scene. We are not the only families to have suffered this tragedy or endure unjust sentencing. We at the Roads Injustice Project want the laws changed as we feel they are both outdated and unfair. Tougher sentences are needed for the life sentence we have to deal with every single day from the loss of our son's due to the actions of somebody else.


Petition Signatures over time

Government Response

Friday 28th August 2020

It is wholly irresponsible for drivers to fail to stop and report an incident. However, the offence of failing to stop should not be used to punish an offender for a serious, but not proven, offence.


We were very sorry to read of the deaths of Matt and Paul; our sympathies are with their families and friends.

Failure to stop and report offences are often referred to as “hit and run” but this is not an accurate reflection of the offence. The offence is designed to deal with the behaviour relating to the failure to stop, not to provide an alternative route to punish an offender for a more serious, but not proven, offence.

The vast majority of the 2,820 convictions in 2019 for failure to stop and report offences involve low level traffic incidents where, for example, a driver clips the wing mirror of another vehicle in a narrow street. This is reflected in current sentencing practice where by far the most common sentence for this offence is a fine. In a small number of cases the failure to stop or report may be related to an event which leads to the death or serious injury of another person. Where there is evidence that the driver caused harm, there is a range of offences for which the driver may be charged including causing death or serious injury from dangerous or careless driving and the courts will treat the failure to stop as a further and aggravating factor in the sentencing decision. Where the driver takes action to avoid detection this may amount to perverting the course of justice, an offence which carries a life sentence maximum.

Ministry of Justice


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