Emily Thornberry Portrait

Emily Thornberry

Labour - Islington South and Finsbury

Shadow Attorney General

(since November 2021)
1 APPG membership (as of 4 May 2022)
Sexual and Reproductive Health in the UK
2 Former APPG memberships
Rule of Law, Sexual and Reproductive Health
Shadow Secretary of State for International Trade
6th Apr 2020 - 29th Nov 2021
Shadow Foreign Secretary
27th Jun 2016 - 5th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union
20th Jul 2016 - 6th Oct 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for Defence
5th Jan 2016 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
18th Sep 2015 - 5th Jan 2016
Health and Social Care Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015
Shadow Attorney General
7th Oct 2011 - 20th Nov 2014
Shadow Minister (Health)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Energy and Climate Change)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Levelling Up, Housing and Communities Committee
23rd Oct 2006 - 2nd Nov 2009
Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee
23rd Oct 2006 - 2nd Nov 2009
Draft Constitutional Renewal Bill (Joint Committee)
1st May 2008 - 22nd Jul 2008
Environmental Audit Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 26th Mar 2007
Draft Legal Services Bill (Joint Committee)
15th May 2006 - 25th Jul 2006


Department Event
Thursday 26th May 2022
Attorney General
Oral questions - Main Chamber
Attorney General
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Thursday 7th July 2022
10:10
Attorney General
Oral questions - Main Chamber
7 Jul 2022, 10:10 a.m.
Attorney General
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 17th May 2022
Tackling Short-term and Long-term Cost of Living Increases
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 172 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 248 Noes - 310
Speeches
Thursday 24th March 2022
Oral Answers to Questions
At the heart of any legislation on economic crime is the basic principle that anybody who wants to make money …
Written Answers
Tuesday 17th May 2022
Treasury: Photographs and Video Recordings
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many photographers and video producers were employed by his Department in (a) …
Early Day Motions
Thursday 28th May 2015
MARRIAGE EQUALITY IN IRELAND
That this House congratulates the Republic of Ireland on becoming the first country in the world to endorse the call …
Bills
None available
Tweets
Monday 16th May 2022
16:58
MP Financial Interests
Monday 2nd March 2020
2. (b) Any other support not included in Category 2(a)
Name of donor: Lord Waheed Alli
Address of donor: private
Amount of donation or nature and value if donation in …
EDM signed
Monday 7th June 2021
Fire and rehire
That this House notes with alarm the growing number of employers who are dismissing and re-engaging staff on worse pay …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Emily Thornberry has voted in 360 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Emily Thornberry Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Elizabeth Truss (Conservative)
Minister for Women and Equalities
(46 debate interactions)
Greg Hands (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(20 debate interactions)
Dominic Raab (Conservative)
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
(9 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for International Trade
(104 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(2 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Trade Act 2021 - Government Bill
(10,667 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Emily Thornberry's debates

Islington South and Finsbury Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Islington South and Finsbury signature proportion
Petitions with most Islington South and Finsbury signatures
Emily Thornberry has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Emily Thornberry

20th May 2021
Emily Thornberry signed this EDM on Monday 7th June 2021

Fire and rehire

Tabled by: Grahame Morris (Labour - Easington)
That this House notes with alarm the growing number of employers who are dismissing and re-engaging staff on worse pay and terms and conditions, a practice commonly known as fire and rehire; agrees with the Government that such tactics represent an unacceptable abuse of power by rogue bosses, many of …
50 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 37
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Alliance: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
28th February 2018
Emily Thornberry signed this EDM on Tuesday 6th March 2018

SIMEON ANDREWS

Tabled by: Ian Mearns (Labour - Gateshead)
That this House is shocked and saddened by the sudden death of Simeon Andrews, whose advice and assistance has proved invaluable to so many Labour movement comrades and Parliamentary colleagues; pays tribute to his success in creating and co-ordinating several union parliamentary groups and cross-party groups; notes his earlier achievements …
55 signatures
(Most recent: 16 May 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 39
Scottish National Party: 7
Independent: 4
Plaid Cymru: 1
Conservative: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Emily Thornberry's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Emily Thornberry, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Emily Thornberry

Thursday 27th May 2021

Emily Thornberry has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Emily Thornberry has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Emily Thornberry has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


1734 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
12 Other Department Questions
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Prime Minister, what the total cost to the public purse was incurred from the ordering of vehicles on Downing Street's travel account for mini-cabs in each month of (a) 2019-20, (b) 2020-21 and (c) 2021-22.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to Clause 16 of the Elections Bill, what assessment he has made of the costs or savings of removing the prosecuting function of the Electoral Commission.

The Electoral Commission has to date never brought criminal prosecutions. The measures in the Elections Bill simply maintain the status quo.

The Elections Bill clarifies that the Electoral Commission should not bring criminal prosecutions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and provides that this should remain the responsibility of the Crown Prosecution Service and Public Prosecution Service Northern Ireland which are already experts in this domain. Having the Commission perform this function would risk wasting public money by duplicating the work of the prosecution authorities. We are committed instead to supporting the police and prosecution authorities as necessary to enforce electoral regulation proactively and effectively.

As a result, the Government does not anticipate that this measure will result in any impact on prosecution rates or any costs.

The Bill makes no changes to the Commission’s investigatory powers. The Electoral Commission will continue to have a wide range of investigatory and civil sanctioning powers available to it and, as is currently the case, it will continue to be able to refer matters to the police and the prosecution authorities.

More generally, the Government will invest an additional £80 million per year in the Crown Prosecution Service by 2025. This will allow for the recruitment of additional frontline staff to deal with all types of casework, including electoral offences.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what systems to ensure collaboration between the Crown Prosecution Service and Electoral Commission in prosecuting those who break electoral law relating to parties and campaigners (a) are currently in place and (b) will come in place when the Elections Bill comes into effect.

The Electoral Commission has to date never brought criminal prosecutions. The measures in the Elections Bill simply maintain the status quo.

The Elections Bill clarifies that the Electoral Commission should not bring criminal prosecutions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and provides that this should remain the responsibility of the Crown Prosecution Service and Public Prosecution Service Northern Ireland which are already experts in this domain. Having the Commission perform this function would risk wasting public money by duplicating the work of the prosecution authorities. We are committed instead to supporting the police and prosecution authorities as necessary to enforce electoral regulation proactively and effectively.

As a result, the Government does not anticipate that this measure will result in any impact on prosecution rates or any costs.

The Bill makes no changes to the Commission’s investigatory powers. The Electoral Commission will continue to have a wide range of investigatory and civil sanctioning powers available to it and, as is currently the case, it will continue to be able to refer matters to the police and the prosecution authorities.

More generally, the Government will invest an additional £80 million per year in the Crown Prosecution Service by 2025. This will allow for the recruitment of additional frontline staff to deal with all types of casework, including electoral offences.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to Clause 16 of the Elections Bill, whether the Electoral Commission will maintain its investigatory powers into the breaking of electoral law relating to parties and campaigners when the Bill comes into effect.

The Electoral Commission has to date never brought criminal prosecutions. The measures in the Elections Bill simply maintain the status quo.

The Elections Bill clarifies that the Electoral Commission should not bring criminal prosecutions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and provides that this should remain the responsibility of the Crown Prosecution Service and Public Prosecution Service Northern Ireland which are already experts in this domain. Having the Commission perform this function would risk wasting public money by duplicating the work of the prosecution authorities. We are committed instead to supporting the police and prosecution authorities as necessary to enforce electoral regulation proactively and effectively.

As a result, the Government does not anticipate that this measure will result in any impact on prosecution rates or any costs.

The Bill makes no changes to the Commission’s investigatory powers. The Electoral Commission will continue to have a wide range of investigatory and civil sanctioning powers available to it and, as is currently the case, it will continue to be able to refer matters to the police and the prosecution authorities.

More generally, the Government will invest an additional £80 million per year in the Crown Prosecution Service by 2025. This will allow for the recruitment of additional frontline staff to deal with all types of casework, including electoral offences.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, , what assessment she has made of the potential impact of (a) the proposed transfer of prosecutorial powers from the Electoral Commission and (b) reform of the Serious Fraud Office on the overall capacity of the (i) CPS and (ii) Government to conduct prosecutions against people charged with criminal acts.

The Electoral Commission has to date never brought criminal prosecutions. The measures in the Elections Bill simply maintain the status quo.

The Elections Bill clarifies that the Electoral Commission should not bring criminal prosecutions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and provides that this should remain the responsibility of the Crown Prosecution Service and Public Prosecution Service Northern Ireland which are already experts in this domain. Having the Commission perform this function would risk wasting public money by duplicating the work of the prosecution authorities. We are committed instead to supporting the police and prosecution authorities as necessary to enforce electoral regulation proactively and effectively.

As a result, the Government does not anticipate that this measure will result in any impact on prosecution rates or any costs.

The Bill makes no changes to the Commission’s investigatory powers. The Electoral Commission will continue to have a wide range of investigatory and civil sanctioning powers available to it and, as is currently the case, it will continue to be able to refer matters to the police and the prosecution authorities.

More generally, the Government will invest an additional £80 million per year in the Crown Prosecution Service by 2025. This will allow for the recruitment of additional frontline staff to deal with all types of casework, including electoral offences.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, , what assessment she has made of the potential effect of Clause 16 of the Elections Bill on the (a) prosecution and (b) conviction rates for breaking electoral law relating to parties and campaigners.

The Electoral Commission has to date never brought criminal prosecutions. The measures in the Elections Bill simply maintain the status quo.

The Elections Bill clarifies that the Electoral Commission should not bring criminal prosecutions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, and provides that this should remain the responsibility of the Crown Prosecution Service and Public Prosecution Service Northern Ireland which are already experts in this domain. Having the Commission perform this function would risk wasting public money by duplicating the work of the prosecution authorities. We are committed instead to supporting the police and prosecution authorities as necessary to enforce electoral regulation proactively and effectively.

As a result, the Government does not anticipate that this measure will result in any impact on prosecution rates or any costs.

The Bill makes no changes to the Commission’s investigatory powers. The Electoral Commission will continue to have a wide range of investigatory and civil sanctioning powers available to it and, as is currently the case, it will continue to be able to refer matters to the police and the prosecution authorities.

More generally, the Government will invest an additional £80 million per year in the Crown Prosecution Service by 2025. This will allow for the recruitment of additional frontline staff to deal with all types of casework, including electoral offences.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what services the Government Legal Department’s Litigation Group has provided to his Department since 1 January 2021.

Since 1 January 2021, Litigation Group has continued to provide litigation services to the majority of government departments, including the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, and executive agencies, as well as many non-departmental public bodies.

The Group’s work encompasses litigation in public and private law as well as supporting public inquiries and acting in Inquests. This has involved, amongst other things, attending in a wide range of courts, including Coroners’ Courts, the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Supreme Court. Our Employment and Commercial Groups similarly provide litigation services to the majority of government departments and have done so in the period in question.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what remuneration members of the Gender Equality Advisory Council will receive for the work they do on behalf of the UK’s G7 presidency.

Membership of the Gender Equality Advisory Council is voluntary and unpaid.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent progress the Government has made in implementing commitments made under the 2019 Biarritz Partnership for Gender Equality.

This Government is fully committed to fulfilling our obligations under international agreements, and remains steadfast in its commitment to advance gender equality and women and girls’ rights.

Our landmark Domestic Abuse Bill is on track to achieve Royal Assent by the end of April 2021 and represents our determination to tackle this abhorrent crime. We remain determined to better protect and support the victims of abuse and their children and bring perpetrators to justice.

Importantly, provision within this Bill brings us even closer to compliance with the Istanbul Convention and this Government’s commitment to ratifying it, as set out in the most recent annual report on progress towards ratification published by the Home Office in October 2020.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, when she plans to (a) announce a date, (b) confirm a programme and (c) issue invitations for the Government's international Safe To Be Me conference.

This Government is committed to delivering an international LGBT conference that will bring together governments from around the world, international civil society, businesses and Parliamentarians to address the safety of LGBT people at home and abroad.

Safe To Be Me: A Global Equality Conference was planned to take place in London between 27 and 29 May 2020.

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Conference had to be postponed. We are considering a variety of alternative options on how we can address this commitment in a way that is fit-for-purpose and safe for our delegates. We will be announcing the rescheduled dates shortly, followed by the programme and invitations in due course.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent progress the Government has made in contributing to the 2018 G7 Gender Equality Advisory Council’s recommendations (a) 18.1, (b) 28 and (c) 40.

Under the UK G7 Presidency, the Prime Minister has reconvened the Gender Equality Advisory Council (GEAC). I am delighted to act as Ministerial Lead working with the independent Council and building on the foundations laid by the Canadian and French G7 presidencies, and to champion the core principles of freedom, opportunity, individual humanity and dignity for women around the world.

The Government remains deeply committed to tackling global poverty and helping to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Despite the economic challenges we face, the UK will remain a major donor spending 0.5 per cent of GNI on Overseas Development Aid (ODA).

The Foreign Secretary’s Strategic Framework for UK ODA announced in the House on 26 November 2020 will see us focus on global challenges where the UK can make the most impact: on climate change and biodiversity; girls’ education; COVID and global health security; on open societies, conflict resolution, humanitarian crises and trade and economic development.

FCDO supports a range of programmes that promote the importance of data to inform policy-making and programme delivery focused on the needs of the most vulnerable. Having joined the Inclusive Data Charter last year, we will produce an Action Plan on improving the quality, quantity, financing, and availability of inclusive and disaggregated data, as well as the capacity and capability to produce and use it.

The Prime Minister has made absolutely clear our continued commitment to stand up for the right of every girl to 12 years of quality education. ODA spending is only one of our tools in achieving our ambitions; this year we will be co-hosting the Global Partnership for Education Replenishment with Kenya and using our G7 Presidency to rally the international community to step up support to girls’ education.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
11th May 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what proportion of total reported fraud cases have fallen under the remit of (a) the Serious Fraud Office and (b) other law enforcement agencies over the last twelve month period for which figures are available.

Neither of the Law Officers Department’s responsible for prosecuting fraud cases, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) and the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), hold data requested. Reported crime data is collated and held by the Home Office.

The SFO receives approximately 1,200 referrals of alleged criminality every year. These range in seriousness and come from a variety of sources, including the public, whistle-blowers and corporate referrals.

Every referral received is researched and/or assessed to help determine if it is a matter that the SFO should investigate.

The SFO only takes on only the most complex fraud and bribery cases. Should a referral not meet the reasonable suspicion threshold and the Director’s Statement of Principle, it may be referred to another law enforcement agency or discontinued.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th May 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what the estimated value of fraud reported to the Serious Fraud Office has been in each of the last ten years.

The Serious Fraud Office (SFO) does not hold the data on the estimated value of fraud reported to the Office over the last 10 years.

Referrals received by the SFO, whilst alleging crime, often do not provide an estimate of loss or actual loss reported. Identifying the true value of reported fraud requires investigation.

The SFO is committed to supporting the victims of fraud, bribery or corruption.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th May 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many reports of (a) serious or complex fraud, (b) bribery and (c) corruption, as defined within the remit of the Serious Fraud Office, there have been in each of the last ten years.

The SFO receives approximately 1,200 referrals of alleged criminality every year. These range in seriousness and come from a variety of sources, including the public, whistle-blowers and corporate referrals.

Every referral received is researched and/or assessed to help determine if it is a matter that the SFO should investigate.

The SFO only takes on only the most complex fraud and bribery cases. Should a referral not meet the reasonable suspicion threshold and the Director’s Statement of Principle, it may be referred to another law enforcement agency or discontinued.

The Serious Fraud Office does not hold data on reported fraud cases to other law enforcement agencies.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many CPS (a) staff and (b) prosecutors work in the Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate as of 19 April 2022; and how many of those staff work primarily on issues of (i) international justice and organised crime, (ii) special crime and counter terrorism and (ii) fraud.

In April 2022, The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) launched a new Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate (SEOCID) which brings together specialists in economic crime, organised crime, proceeds of crime and international to deliver justice, combat crime across borders and take money from criminals.

This combined team of specialists will continue to work closely with investigators to disrupt the emerging threats of organised criminal gangs using cyber technology to exploit people, businesses, and the Government. Victims of complex SEOCID cases are often based in multiple jurisdictions. The directorate will work to improve their experience by ensuring investigators and prosecutors work closely and have a joint victim and witness strategy from the outset.

Establishing the new Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate is part of the CPS Economic Crime Strategy 2025.

The number of staff and prosecutors can be found in the table below:

Department

Head Count

FTE

HC of Prosecutors

FTE of Prosecutors

SERIOUS ECONOMIC ORGANISED CRIME INTERNATIONAL (SEOCID)

394

372.38

186.00

177.65

SPECIAL CRIME AND COUNTER TERRORISM DIVISION

146

140.29

69.00

67.10

Grand Total

540

512.66

255.00

244.76

NB: The data has been extracted from the CPS Oracle HR database and is accurate at point of enquiry on 21 April 2022. Consequent changes to data input may mean that this data will change at some point in the future.

*The system reports data as at the last day of the month rather than the first or any date in-between therefore the table is presented to the nearest reportable date to the questions asked.

*FTE figures have been rounded

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of full time equivalent civil service staff employed by the Crown Prosecution Service was in each financial year between 2010-11 and 2021-22.

The number of staff employed by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) during the periods specified is available in the table below. The data provided includes all staff grades full time equivalent averaged across each year. During this period the CPS has undertaken continuous improvement and modernisation programmes to improve efficiency and effectiveness. These included digitalisation, development of a national resourcing model, standard operating practices, resource efficiency measures, smarter/remote working practices, and establishment of remote teams. As a national service for England and Wales, the consequence of these measures is that we now have the ability to shift work to where capacity resides which is both much more efficient, and also fairer on the workforce.

Financial Year

Average Full Time Equivalent Staff

2010/11

7797

2011/12

7214

2012/13

6894

2013/14

6341

2014/15

5939

2015/16

5541

2016/17

5468

2017/18

5517

2018/19

5493

2019/20

5577

2020/21

5943

2021/22

6406

NB: The data has been extracted from the CPS Oracle HR database and is accurate at point of enquiry on 21 April 2022. Consequent changes to data input may mean that this data will change at some point in the future.

*The system reports data as at the last day of the month rather than the first or any date in-between therefore the table is presented to the nearest reportable date to the questions asked.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of full time equivalent civil service staff employed in the Attorney General‘s Office was in each financial year between 2010-11 and 2021-22.

The average number of whole-time equivalent persons employed during each financial year (for which data is available) in the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and Government Legal Department (GLD) is as follows.

Attorney General’s Office:

Financial Year

Total

Permanent Staff

Others

Ministers

2010-11

(Data not held)*

2011-12

40

2012-13

44

40

2

2

2013-14

42

40

2

2014-15

40

38

2

2015-16

40

38

2

2016-17

40

38

2

2017-18

44

42

2

2018-19

46

39

5

2

2019-20

49

47

2

2020-21

50

46

2

2

Treasury Solicitor’s Office (from 2010-11 to 2014-15 inclusive) and Government Legal Department (from 2015-16 to 2020-21 inclusive):

Financial Year

Total

Permanent Staff

Others

2010-11

(Data not held)*

2011-12

987

2012-13

1,046

927

119

2013-14

1,283

1,090

193

2014-15

1,667

1,426

241

2015-16

1,838

1,663

175

2016-17

1,862

1,657

205

2017-18

2,157

1,905

252

2018-19

2,362

1,998

364

2019-20

2,519

2,196

323

2020-21

2,605

2,166

439

It is important to note that several legal advisory units from departments across the civil service were incorporated into the Treasury Solicitor’s Department (TSol) and GLD account for the majority of staffing increases in the years preceding and succeeding the name change from TSol to GLD on 1 April 2015.

* The earliest Annual Report available in which these figures are published, is for the 2012-13 financial year, which also included a total whole-time equivalent figure for TSol and AGO for 2011-12.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, with reference to the Public Sector Apprenticeships Target, how many apprentices were employed in (a) her office, (b) the Government Legal Department, and (c) the Crown Prosecution Service in the financial year 2021-22; and what proportion of the overall workforce did that represent in each case.

The Attorney General Office are working with the Government Legal Department and Crown Prosecution Service to finalise data on apprenticeships for 2021/22. Final figures are not yet available. The Cabinet Office, on behalf of the Civil Service, will be publishing a full breakdown of departmental performance on apprenticeships in the Autumn in line with previous years.

Data for all departments between 2017 and 2021 is available on gov.uk and shows the Attorney Generals departments recruited 278 apprentices, equivalent to 3.2% during 2020/21.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many CPS prosecutions there have been to date for the theft of goods by customers from retail and wholesale premises that took place in the financial years (a) 2017/18 and (b) 2020/21.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of prosecutions for thefts from retail or wholesale premises. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

While the CPS does not centrally collate data showing the number of people prosecuted for thefts from shops, data is available showing the number of offences of shop theft, charged by way of Section 1 of the Theft Act 1968, in which a prosecution commenced at magistrates’ courts. The table below provides this information for the years 2017-18 and 2020-21.

2017-2018

2020-2021

Theft Act 1968 {1(1) and 7} - Theft from shops

101,435

47,601

Data Source: CPS Case Management Information System

The figures relate to the number of offences and not the number of individual defendants. It may be the case that an individual defendant is charged with more than one offence. No data are held on the final outcome or if the charged offence was the substantive charge at finalisation.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many CPS prosecutions there have been as of 30 March 2022 for assaults and threats against shop workers and owners that took place in the financial years (a) 2017-18 and (b) 2020-21.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of prosecutions based on the occupation of complainants, including shopworkers who were assaulted or threatened. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
18th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, if she will publish the joint statement she signed with Ukraine’s Prosecutor General Iryna Venediktova on UK support in holding Russia accountable for the crimes that it is committing on Ukrainian soil.

The Memorandum of Cooperation signed by the Attorney General and the Ukrainian Prosecutor General was published on Gov.uk on the 13th of March 2022.

The Memorandum is available here.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, on what occasions officials in her Department met with Treasury ministers or officials between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy- près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

There have been no Ministerial-level meetings (either Minister-Minister or Minister-Officials) between the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy-près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

The AGO does not hold official records of any meetings at official level between AGO and HMT between the 1st of January 2017 and the 16th of March 2022.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, on what occasions the Solicitor General or his predecessors met with Treasury ministers or officials between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy- près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

There have been no Ministerial-level meetings (either Minister-Minister or Minister-Officials) between the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy-près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

The AGO does not hold official records of any meetings at official level between AGO and HMT between the 1st of January 2017 and the 16th of March 2022.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, on what occasions she or her predecessors met with Treasury ministers or officials between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy-près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

There have been no Ministerial-level meetings (either Minister-Minister or Minister-Officials) between the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) and Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) between 1 January 2017 and 16 March 2022 to discuss (a) cy-près schemes or (b) charitable contributions to reduce the national debt.

The AGO does not hold official records of any meetings at official level between AGO and HMT between the 1st of January 2017 and the 16th of March 2022.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, which of the Crown Prosecution Service's dedicated divisions for (a) international justice and organised crime, (b) special crime and counter terrorism and (c) specialist fraud will be responsible for prosecuting the new offences that will be established in the Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill.

In March 2021, the CPS launched its first ever Economic Crime Strategy to ensure we keep pace with the changing nature of crime. It is a high-level strategy which allows the flexibility to respond and adapt to new and emerging threats.

The CPS currently has a dedicated Specialist Fraud Division with specialist prosecutors to ensure it has the right skills and resources to prosecute complex economic crime cases, ranging from the prosecution of bankers and investment scams, to the prosecution of those who seek to defraud the taxpayer of millions of pounds.

With effect from the 1 April 2022, a new Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate will be launched, merging the Specialist Fraud Division and the International Justice and Organised Crime Division. This new directorate will provide more resilience and will be responsible for prosecuting the new offences established in the Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment she has made of (a) the current capacity available and (b) the additional resources required for the Crown Prosecution Service to prosecute the new offences that will be established in the Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill.

In March 2021, the CPS launched its first ever Economic Crime Strategy to ensure we keep pace with the changing nature of crime. It is a high-level strategy which allows the flexibility to respond and adapt to new and emerging threats.

The CPS currently has a dedicated Specialist Fraud Division with specialist prosecutors to ensure it has the right skills and resources to prosecute complex economic crime cases, ranging from the prosecution of bankers and investment scams, to the prosecution of those who seek to defraud the taxpayer of millions of pounds.

With effect from the 1 April 2022, a new Serious Economic, Organised Crime and International Directorate will be launched, merging the Specialist Fraud Division and the International Justice and Organised Crime Division. This new directorate will provide more resilience and will be responsible for prosecuting the new offences established in the Economic Crime (Transparency and Enforcement) Bill.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many offences have been recorded under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 in each year since 2015; and how many of those offences led to a (a) prosecution and (b) conviction.

Data on the number of offences recorded under the Modern Slavery Act 2015 is captured in police recorded crime data and this information is available from the Home Office. The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not hold recorded crime data and therefore it is not possible to say how many recorded offences subsequently resulted in a prosecution or conviction.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
1st Mar 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many of the 1,109 convictions for rape recorded in the year ending March 2021 related to offences committed (a) before the year ending March 2018, (b) within the year 2018-19, and (c) within the year 2019-20.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) does not maintain a central record of the date an offence was committed. This information could only be obtained by an examination of CPS case files, which would incur disproportionate cost.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many Deferred Prosecution Agreements the Serious Fraud Office signed between 25 April and 31 December 2013.

Between the 25th of April and the 31st of December 2013, no Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs) were signed by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), as DPAs were only introduced on 24th of February 2014, under the provisions of Schedule 17 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013. Since then, the SFO has entered into a total of 12 DPAs.

During the period of the 25th of April 2013 and the 13th of December 2013, 9 SFO led prosecutions resulted in a conviction. All of these were brought against individuals. There were no prosecutions brought against corporate entities during this period.

Detailed information regarding SFO prosecutions and DPAs can be found on their website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions led by the Serious Fraud Office led to convictions against (a) corporate entities and (b) individuals between 25 April and 31 December 2013.

Between the 25th of April and the 31st of December 2013, no Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs) were signed by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), as DPAs were only introduced on 24th of February 2014, under the provisions of Schedule 17 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013. Since then, the SFO has entered into a total of 12 DPAs.

During the period of the 25th of April 2013 and the 13th of December 2013, 9 SFO led prosecutions resulted in a conviction. All of these were brought against individuals. There were no prosecutions brought against corporate entities during this period.

Detailed information regarding SFO prosecutions and DPAs can be found on their website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many Deferred Prosecution Agreements the Serious Fraud Office signed in each year since 2010.

Since Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs) were introduced in 2014, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has signed a total of 12. The table below provides details of the number of DPAs signed each year since their introduction in 2014.

Year

2015

2016

2017

2019

2020

2021

Total

DPAs signed

1

1

2

2

3

3

12

Since 2010, 122 SFO led prosecutions have resulted in a conviction. The table below provides details of the number of prosecutions that led to a conviction in each year since 2010, and whether these relate to a corporate entity or an individual.

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

total

Corporate

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

8

Individuals

1

8

20

14

17

5

9

12

19

5

2

2

114

Total

2

8

20

14

18

6

10

13

20

5

2

4

122

In 2022, the SFO is taking forward 7 trials, involving 20 defendants charged against a total of 80 counts. The high volume of trials taking place this year is in part a result of trials not being able to go ahead during the pandemic.

Detailed information regarding SFO prosecutions and DPAs can be found on their website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutions led by the Serious Fraud Office led to convictions against (a) corporate entities and (b) individuals in each year since 2010.

Since Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs) were introduced in 2014, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has signed a total of 12. The table below provides details of the number of DPAs signed each year since their introduction in 2014.

Year

2015

2016

2017

2019

2020

2021

Total

DPAs signed

1

1

2

2

3

3

12

Since 2010, 122 SFO led prosecutions have resulted in a conviction. The table below provides details of the number of prosecutions that led to a conviction in each year since 2010, and whether these relate to a corporate entity or an individual.

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

total

Corporate

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

8

Individuals

1

8

20

14

17

5

9

12

19

5

2

2

114

Total

2

8

20

14

18

6

10

13

20

5

2

4

122

In 2022, the SFO is taking forward 7 trials, involving 20 defendants charged against a total of 80 counts. The high volume of trials taking place this year is in part a result of trials not being able to go ahead during the pandemic.

Detailed information regarding SFO prosecutions and DPAs can be found on their website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, on what dates each new investigation was opened by the Serious Fraud Office from 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2021; and whether each of those investigations (a) was into a corporate or an individual and (b) is ongoing or complete.

Over the five-year period of 2016 to 2021, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) opened almost 50 cases. The SFO proactively publishes information about its criminal investigations on its website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/our-cases/ whenever it is appropriate to do. This includes details on when the investigation was opened and whether it relates to individuals or a corporate body.

In order to protect the investigative process, it is not always possible - or even desirable - for the SFO to announce investigations prematurely. Because of the small number of live investigations that the SFO has open at any one time and the covert nature of many of them, disclosing a breakdown of numbers and the focus of each, could potentially compromise ongoing efforts.

The SFO investigates and prosecutes the most serious and complex cases of fraud, bribery, and corruption. The size and complexity of those cases, including the volume of victims and witnesses, means that it can take a number of years for a full investigation to be carried out.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, on what dates each new prosecution was brought forward by the Serious Fraud Office from 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2021; and for each of those prosecutions (a) whether the prosecution was into a corporate or an individual and (a) what the outcome was.

From the 1st of January 2016 to 31st of December 2021, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) has brought forward 103 prosecutions as a result of their criminal casework. The table below sets-out how many prosecutions were brought forward in each year, whether they relate to a corporate or an individual, and the final outcome. *

The cases investigated by the SFO are complex and it can take a number of years before any defendant(s) can be charged and a trial scheduled. Information relating to the exact date each investigation began is not readily available and providing this information would incur a disproportionate cost.

Corporate Individual
OutcomeOutcome
Yearguilty pleaDeferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA)DiscontinuedConviction after trialGuilty PleaAcquittedAwaiting TrialTotal
201611 799 27
201712111510131
2018 1115 8
2019 2 12229
202013 1418
202113 1 510
Total411220182622103

*We have used the term ‘brought forward’ to mean the date a charge was instigated against an individual or corporate.Detailed information regarding SFO prosecutions, including the date a charge was instigated can be found on their website: https://www.sfo.gov.uk/our-cases/

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, on what date each new Deferred Prosecution Agreement was signed by the Serious Fraud Office from 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2021.

From 1st of January 2016 to 31st of December 2021, the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) entered into a total of 11 Deferred Prosecution Agreements (DPAs). The table below provides details of the date each DPA was signed.

Case name

Date DPA was signed by the SFO

Sarclad Ltd

06/07/2016

Rolls Royce PLC

17/01/2017

Tesco PLC

10/04/2017

Serco

04/07/2019

Güralp Systems Ltd

22/10/2019

Airbus Group

31/01/2020

G4S

17/07/2020

Airline Services Limited

30/10/2020

Amec Foster Wheeler plc

01/07/2021

AB Ltd*

19/07/2021

CD Ltd*

19/07/2021

* reporting restrictions apply

Detailed information regarding the use of DPAs can be found on the SFO website:

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, with reference to transaction 232566 in the transparency data Complete transaction records 2021- 2022 25k and over November 2021, published on 9 February 2022, for what services EdenRed was awarded a £25,890 bonus payment by the Government Legal Department on 18 November 2021.

Edenred is the sole supplier of employee benefits and reward solutions under the Crown Commercial Service’s Employee Benefits Framework. Edenred supplies the Government Legal Department with both employee benefits and reward solutions, including childcare vouchers, a cycle to work scheme, payroll giving, employee discounts and reward and recognition bonuses. Edenred invoiced Government Legal Department £25,890 for providing reward and recognition bonuses to Government Legal Department, Attorney General’s Office and HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate employees during October 2021. Bonuses may take the form of paper vouchers, eGift Cards and Gift Cards.

334 bonuses of a value of between £30.00 and £100.00 were awarded to staff in October 2021, the average (mean) value of which was £73.79 and the most frequent (mode) value was £100.00. Employees receive the full value of the bonus and there is no additional cost for using the service.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Feb 2022
To ask the Attorney General, when she plans to publish her Department's transparency data for July, August, September and October 2021 which covers (a) complete transaction records for spends of £25,000 and over and (b) transparency GPC transactions for spends of over £500.

The material requested was published on the official government website on 13th December 2021.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
27th Jan 2022
To ask the Attorney General, when her Department plans to update the register of the outcome of cases reviewed under the Unduly Lenient Sentence Scheme with her decisions in relation to the cases listed under unique reference numbers 672, 785, 803 and 811.

The decisions on these cases will be published in the next round of updates.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Attorney General, how many staff the CPS employed (a) overall and (b) in the International Justice and Organised Crime Division, (c) in the Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division and (d) in the Specialist Fraud Division as of (i) 24 January 2022, (ii) 1 January 2022, (iii) 1 January 2021, (iv) 1 January 2020, (v) 1 January 2019, (vi) 1 January 2018, (vii) 1 January 2017, and (viii) 1 January 2016.

The Data set out in the table below shows CPS headcount (a) overall, (b) in the International Justice and Organised Crime Division, (c) in the Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division and (d) in the Specialist Fraud Division as close to those dates specified.

Year / CPS Overall Headcount

Team

CPS Prosecutor Headcount

31/12/2015* / 5922

ORGANISED CRIME

83

INTERNATIONAL

37

SPECIAL CRIME & COUNTER TERRORISM DIVISION

177

SPECIALIST FRAUD

224

31/12/2016* / 5954

ORGANISED CRIME

150

INTERNATIONAL

39

SPECIAL CRIME & COUNTER TERRORISM DIVISION

171

SPECIALIST FRAUD

210

31/12/2017* / 5989

INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE AND ORGANISED CRIME DIVISION

164

SPECIAL CRIME & COUNTER TERRORISM DIVISION

155

SPECIALIST FRAUD

221

31/12/2018* / 5946

INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE AND ORGANISED CRIME DIVISION

172

SPECIAL CRIME & COUNTER TERRORISM DIVISION

156

SPECIALIST FRAUD

207

31/12/2019* / 6066

INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE AND ORGANISED CRIME DIVISION

183

SPECIAL CRIME & COUNTER TERRORISM DIVISION

155

SPECIALIST FRAUD

180

31/12/2020* / 6594

INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE AND ORGANISED CRIME DIVISION

134

SPECIAL CRIME & COUNTER TERRORISM DIVISION

143

SPECIALIST FRAUD

182

31/12/2021* / 6888

INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE AND ORGANISED CRIME DIVISION

137

SPECIAL CRIME & COUNTER TERRORISM DIVISION

141

SPECIALIST FRAUD

167

NB: The CPS has undergone change to its team structures during the specified period. The International Justice and Organised Crime Division has been in existence since 2017. Therefore, staff headcount numbers for 2015 and 2016 relate to the previous structure in place at the time.

*The system reports data as at the last day of the month rather than the first or any date in-between therefore the table is presented to the nearest reportable date to the questions asked.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Jan 2022
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the Answer of 10 January 2021 to Question 98226 on Public Sector: Misconduct, on what date the Solicitor General's decision was communicated to (a) the family of Nicole Smallman and Bibaa Henry and (b) the officials responsible for publishing the outcome of unduly lenient sentence referrals.

The Solicitor General communicated his decision to officials on the morning of 24 December 2021. Where a referral is made to this office by a victim, their family or a Member of Parliament, the Law Officers communicate the outcome of their decision in writing. This case was referred by members of the public. Due to the volume of referrals received, we are unable to provide individual responses to members of the public. The outcomes of all decisions are communicated to the Crown Prosecution Service who in turn advise others concerned.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the Answer of 10 January 2021 to Question 98226 on Public Sector: Misconduct, what the average length of time is for decisions made on unduly lenient sentence referrals to be included in the regular updates of referral outcomes published by her Department.

There is no legal obligation to publish updates on the outcome of unduly lenient sentence referrals. The updates prepared by officials are checked manually and it is not always possible to meet the Attorney General’s aspiration for weekly editions, especially over the Christmas and New Year period. The Department does not hold information on the average length of time for updates

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the Answer of 10 January 2021 to Question 98226 on Public Sector: Misconduct, why the Solicitor General's decision was not included in her Department's updates on the outcome of unduly lenient sentence referrals published on (a) 29 December, (b) 4 January and (c) 5 January 2022.

There is no legal obligation to publish updates on the outcome of unduly lenient sentence referrals. The updates prepared by officials are checked manually and it is not always possible to meet the Attorney General’s aspiration for weekly editions, especially over the Christmas and New Year period. The Department does not hold information on the average length of time for updates

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
5th Jan 2022
To ask the Attorney General, at what time and on what date the Solicitor General informed officials of his decision not to refer to the Court of Appeal the two cases of misconduct in a public office listed under unique reference number 731 in the register of cases reviewed under the Unduly Lenient Sentence Scheme.

The Solicitor General communicated his decision to officials on the morning of 24 December 2021.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Attorney General, whether (a) she or (b) the Crown Prosecution Service have set a maximum limit on the number of criminal cases awaiting trial, to act as a target for capping and reducing the current backlog of cases.

Neither the Attorney General nor the Crown Prosecution Service set maximum limits for the amount of time a criminal case should await trial.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
14th Dec 2021
To ask the Attorney General, whether (a) she or (b) the Crown Prosecution Service have set a maximum limit on the amount of time criminal cases should await trial, to act as a target for capping and reducing the increase in waiting times.

Neither the Attorney General nor the Crown Prosecution Service set maximum limits for the number of criminal cases awaiting trial.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th Dec 2021
To ask the Attorney General, how many prosecutors were employed by the Crown Prosecution Service as of (a) 1 January 2017, (b) 1 January 2018, (c) 1 January 2019, (d) 1 January 2020, (e) 1 January 2021 and (f) 1 December 2021.

The number of prosecutors employed by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) are as follows:

Year***CPS Prosecutor Headcount
31/12/20162623
31/12/20172634
31/12/20182694
31/12/20192800
31/12/20203025
30/11/30213118

*The data has been extracted from the CPS Oracle HR database and is accurate at point of enquiry on 14th December 2021. Consequent changes to data input may mean that this data will change at some point in the future.

**The system reports data as at the last day of the month rather than the first therefore the table is presented to the nearest reportable date to the questions asked.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Attorney General, whether she plans to ensure full operational independence of the Government Legal Department in their assistance of the inquiry into the events in Downing Street on 18 December 2020 announced on 8 December 2021.

In my roles as chief legal adviser to the Government and sponsoring minister of the Government Legal Department (GLD), I oversee the provision of legal support by GLD to all of its client departments, including the Cabinet Office. When advising their clients, GLD lawyers provide advice in accordance with their professional duties and on behalf of the Treasury Solicitor, who is the head of the GLD. The Ministerial Code and Cabinet Manual set out the circumstances in which ministers and their policy officials consult the Law Officers on legal matters.

Suella Braverman
Attorney General
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Attorney General, whether she plans to oversee the Government Legal Department in their assistance of the inquiry into the events in Downing Street on 18 December 2020 announced on 8 December 2021.

In my roles as chief legal adviser to the Government and sponsoring minister of the Government Legal Department (GLD), I oversee the provision of legal support by GLD to all of its client departments, including the Cabinet Office. When advising their clients, GLD lawyers provide advice in accordance with their professional duties and on behalf of the Treasury Solicitor, who is the head of the GLD. The Ministerial Code and Cabinet Manual set out the circumstances in which ministers and their policy officials consult the Law Officers on legal matters.

Suella Braverman
Attorney General
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Attorney General, whether she has (a) been asked to provide or (b) provided advice to Government colleagues since 1 December 2021 regarding the compliance of their Departments' with measures under the (a) 5 November – 2 December 2020 national lockdown; and (b) the 2 December 2020 – 4 January 2021 tiered covid regulations.

By convention, whether the Law Officers have been asked to provide advice, and the contents of any such advice, is not disclosed outside Government.

The Convention protects the Law Officers’ ability as chief legal adviser to the Government to give full and frank legal advice and provides the fullest guarantee that government business will be conducted at all times in light of thorough and candid legal advice.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
9th Dec 2021
To ask the Attorney General, what advice she provided to Government colleagues regarding the compliance of their Departments with measures under the (a) 5 November – 2 December 2020 national lockdown; and (b) the 2 December 2020 – 4 January 2021 tiered covid regulations during the period of those restrictions.

By convention, whether the Law Officers have been asked to provide advice, and the contents of any such advice, is not disclosed outside Government.

The Convention protects the Law Officers’ ability as chief legal adviser to the Government to give full and frank legal advice and provides the fullest guarantee that government business will be conducted at all times in light of thorough and candid legal advice.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
10th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what total cost to the public purse was of vehicles ordered on Downing Street's travel account for mini-cabs in each month of (a) 2019-20, (b) 2020-21 and (c) 2021-22.

This information is not centrally held in the form requested, and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
10th May 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Answer of 27 April to Question 155612 on Senior Civil Servants: Free School Meals, when information from the finalised annual Senior Civil Service Database for 1 April 2022 will be available; and whether the response rates to questions relating to socioeconomic background in that database are expected to reach acceptable quality thresholds.

At this time we are unable to confirm when information on Free School Meals will be available from the April 2022 SCS Database, and whether declaration rates for broader SEB measures will reach acceptable quality thresholds.

The Cabinet Office continues to work with departments to increase response rates across socio-economic background measures.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total gross value added to the UK economy was from agriculture, forestry and fishing industries during the financial year (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22.

It has not proved possible to respond to the Rt hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
25th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people in the UK were employed in agriculture, forestry and fishing industries at the end of the financial year (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22.

It has not proved possible to respond to the Rt hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
22nd Apr 2022
To ask the Minister of the Cabinet Office, what the total gross value added to the UK economy was from semi-processed food industries during the financial year (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22.

It has not proved possible to respond to the Rt hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022, described their gender as (a) male and (b) female.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022, said that at the time they were aged 14, they had at least one parent working in (a) a higher managerial, administrative or professional occupation, (b) an intermediate occupation or (c) a routine or manual occupation.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 said that at the time they were aged 18 they had at least one parent who had obtained (a) a university degree or (b) qualifications below degree level as their highest educational qualification.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 said that at the time they were aged 18, they did not have a parent with formal educational qualifications.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 said they had attended (a) state-funded non-selective secondary school, (b) a state-funded secondary school selective on the basis of academic, faith or other grounds and (c) an independent secondary school.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 (a) do not have a university degree or (b) did not obtain their first degree at (i) Oxford or Cambridge University, (ii) a non-Oxbridge Russell Group university, (iii) a non-Russell Group UK university and (iv) a non-UK university.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 started their civil service career (a) before 1980, (b) between 1980-89, (c) between 1990-1999, (d) between 2000-2009 and (e) in 2010 or later.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 were aged (a) below 35 years old, (b) 35-44 years old, (c) 45-54 years old, (d) 55-64 years old and (e) in 2010 or later.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022, started their civil service career as members of the Civil Service Fast Stream.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all government Departments at the end of March 2022, described themselves as coming from a lower socio-economic background.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022, describe their ethnicity as (a) White, (b) Black, (c) Asian and (d) Mixed Race.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Senior Civil Service database maintained by his Department, what proportion of senior civil servants employed across all Government departments at the end of March 2022 said they had been eligible for free school meals during their school years.

The Declaration on Government Reform and the Civil Service Diversity and Inclusion Strategy, 2022-2025, commits the Government to drawing on talent from all backgrounds. Representation is increasing and whilst this trend is positive, we remain committed to improving representation across the broadest range of diversity across our workforce and in particular at our most senior grades.

To build on the progress made over recent years and target where improvement is still needed, the Government will take a holistic approach to SCS recruitment to identify and remove barriers to underrepresented groups entering and progressing in the SCS. There are a number of initiatives aimed at supporting colleagues to reach the Senior Civil Service from a diverse range of backgrounds including the Civil Service Fast Stream, Future Leaders Scheme and Senior Leaders Scheme.

Information on the diversity of the Senior Civil Service for 2022, sourced from the SCS Database, is not yet available. In responding to these PQs we have, therefore, used the latest available finalised annual SCS Database which is as at 1 April 2021.

All figures are a percentage of only those SCS that have made a positive declaration (i.e. they do not include prefer not to say, not known or not applicable responses in the denominator).

SCS by ethnicity, as at 1 April 2021

Ethnicity

Percentage of SCS (where ethnicity is known)

White

91.8%

Black

1.4%

Asian

4.2%

Mixed

1.8%

Other

0.8%

SCS by age, as at 1 April 2021

Age category

Percentage of SCS (where age is known)

Below 35

4.8%

35-44

34.1%

45-54

38.4%

55-64

21.5%

65+

1.1%

SCS by sex, as at 1 April 2021

The SCS Database currently only captures data on the sex of individuals. As at 1 April 2021, 47.3% of SCS members, where sex has been provided, were reported as women, with 52.7% reported as men. At present, data is not collected in the SCS database on gender.

Entry year to the Civil Service for SCS, as at 1 April 2021

Date of entry

Percentage of SCS (where entry date known)

Before 1980

1.1%

1980-89

11.9%

1990-99

16.9%

2000-2009

37.7%

2010 or later

32.4%

SCS who were members of the Fast Stream, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 20.4% of SCS members, where Fast Stream status has been provided, responded that they were successful in the Central Fast Stream selection process. This figure will also include members that were successful in applying to the Central Fast Stream after their initial entry to the Civil Service.

SCS holding university degrees, as of 1 April 2021

As at 1 April 2021, 11.2% of SCS, where degree status is known, did not have a university degree.

For those with a degree, where degree status and University is known:

  • 80.1% did not obtain their first degree at Oxford or Cambridge University,

  • 63.1% did not obtain their first degree at a non-oxbridge Russell Group university, and

  • 56.8% did not obtain their first degree at a non-Russell Group UK university, and

  • 98.0% did not obtain their first degree at a non-UK university.

SCS by socio-economic background, as of 1 April 2021

Response rates in the SCS Database to questions relating to Socio Economic Background are currently below acceptable quality thresholds. It is therefore not possible to provide data on SCS by :

  • Self-declared socio-economic background;

  • Formal educational qualification of parents;

  • Type of secondary school attended;

  • Parental occupation; and

  • Eligibility for free school meals.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reasons (a) Airbus A321 flight registration G-GBNI was re-painted in UK government livery and (b) Airbus A321 flight registration G-XATW had its UK government livery removed during their respective visits to Southend Airport from 29 March to 3 April and 3 to 12 April; and what costs to the public purse arose from making those changes.

G-GBNI was painted with the ‘Global UK’ livery and G-XATW had this livery removed during the visits to Southend Airport as part of a planned exchange of two identical airframes in line with contractual agreements/obligations.

HM Government has only leased one airframe and I can confirm that there was no extra cost to the taxpayer.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Minister of State (Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government efficiency)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the cost to the public purse has been as at 19 April 2022 in terms of (a) staff hours and (b) other resources committed to the leak enquiry being conducted into the source of reports of (a) the non-domiciled status of the wife of the Chancellor of the Exchequer published in the media on 6 April 2022, and (b) the Green Card status of the Chancellor of the Exchequer and his wife published in the media on 7 April 2022.

It is a long-established practice of Her Majesty's Government not to comment on whether a leak inquiry has been established, its conduct or outcome.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
18th Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Government Procurement Card data for November 2020, last updated on 25th November 2021, what items of office equipment were purchased from (a) Alexanders Appliances Direct Ltd for £645.60 on 12th November 2020, and (b) Currys Online for £1,258 on 26th November 2020.

Transaction (a) relates to the replacement of official catering equipment and was purchased on the 07/07/2020. The equipment was procured to replace a previous equipment that was over 10 years old and which originally had been purchased under the last Labour Government. It had reached the end of its working life.

Transaction (b) relates to a high-specification shredder and was purchased on the 30/09/2020. The shredder was procured for a high-security business unit whose work necessitates specific secure shredding equipment. Again, this was a replacement for a previous device.

Transactions purchased via a Government Procurement Card must be reconciled and approved by a line manager before being recorded fully on the Department’s General Ledger. This means some transactions can appear after the purchase date.



Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
10th Feb 2022
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which aspects of European social security law his Department is currently reviewing under the options for the amendment or removal of retained EU law under the Government's proposed Brexit Freedoms Bill.

The review of retained EU law, led by the Cabinet Office, is continuing. Officials are working to deliver the cross Whitehall review and are working closely with departments to assess a broad scope of retained EU law across all policy areas and the UK statute book.

At present, no conclusions have been made on what pieces of retained EU law will be amended under the proposed Bill.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Minister of State (Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government efficiency)
10th Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which aspects of European social security law the Minister of State for Brexit Opportunities and Government Efficiency is currently reviewing under the options for potential deregulation arising from the Government's Benefits of Brexit paper.

The review of retained EU law, led by the Cabinet Office, is continuing. Officials are working to deliver the cross Whitehall review and are working closely with departments to assess a broad scope of retained EU law across all policy areas and the UK statute book.

At present, no conclusions have been made on what pieces of retained EU law will be amended under the proposed Bill.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Minister of State (Minister for Brexit Opportunities and Government efficiency)
1st Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to answer Question 107502, tabled by the hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury on 18 January 2021.

I refer the Rt Hon Member to my response on 7 February 2022 to PQ107502.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
31st Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason the latest revised guidance for holders of national security clearance, published on 31 January 2022, has removed the previous requirements for clearance-holders (a) to create and contribute to a positive environment in which security is given appropriate priority, (b) to raise any concerns about individual or organisational practices that are in breach of security procedures and (c) to speak to local security teams, security controllers or line managers if the clearance-holder has concerns about a specific activity or individual.

The government recently established the Accreditation Check as a new level of National Security Vetting to improve security within the aviation industry. GOV.UK pages were updated to include this but an administrative error saw some information mistakenly removed. This was rectified as soon as the Cabinet Office became aware.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether any vehicles were ordered on Downing Street's mini-cab account to take Downing Street staff to their homes or other locations between 8pm and 4am on the night of 16 April 2021.

In line with travel policy guidance, one journey took place in relation to an overnight shift worker travelling from Whitehall, having undertaken their staff duties.

But otherwise, no such vehicles were ordered to take staff from Downing Street in this period.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether a Government procurement card was used by Downing Street staff to order deliveries of pizza with a value lower than £500 on the night of 16 April 2021.

No.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether a Government procurement card was used by staff of his Office to order deliveries of pizza with a value lower than £500 on the night of 16 April 2021.

No.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
24th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether any vehicles were ordered on his Office's mini-cab account to take Downing Street staff to their homes or other locations between 8pm and 4am on the night of 16 April 2021.

No.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
20th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether a Government procurement card was used by Downing Street staff to make purchases with a value lower than £500 from the Co-Op convenience store at 456-459 Strand on the night of 16 April 2021.

No.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the Cabinet Secretary plans to publish a financial statement covering the accounts of the Security and Intelligence Agencies in financial year 2020-21.

The financial statement covering the accounts of the Security and Intelligence Agencies in the financial year was laid in Parliament on 16 December 2021. The information was published on GOV.UK on 20 December 2021.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether public funds were used to purchase refrigerators for use on the Downing Street estate in the financial year 2020-21.

Downing Street is a working building, including catering facilities and offices for staff; as is common in workplaces including the House of Commons, refrigerators are provided for general staff use.

One refrigerator was purchased in the financial year for a Downing Street meeting room, and one to replace an existing refrigerator that had reached the end of its working operation.

Notwithstanding, I can confirm that no such public expenditure was accrued in relation to the matters considered in the investigations by the Second Permanent Secretary or connected with associated media reports on this matter.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether a Government procurement card was used by his staff to make purchases with a value lower than £500 from the Co-Op convenience store at 456-459 Strand on the night of 16 April 2021.

No.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what services the Government Legal Department’s Litigation Group has provided to his Department since 1 January 2021.

Since 1 January 2021, the Litigation Group has continued to provide litigation services to the majority of government departments, including Cabinet Office, and executive agencies, as well as many non-departmental public bodies.

The Group’s work encompasses litigation in public and private law and supports public inquiries and Inquests. This has involved, amongst other things, attending in a wide range of courts including Coroners’ Courts, the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Supreme Court. Our Employment and Commercial Groups similarly provide litigation services to the majority of government departments and have done so in the period in question.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment she has made of the effect of increased non-tariff barriers facing UK imports from the EU on (a) supply chains for UK manufacturers, and (b) the availability of imported goods in the weeks leading up to Christmas 2021.

The government is continuing to monitor global supply chain issues. The most recent ONS monthly UK trade in goods statistics can be found here. The ONS is clear that there are a number of factors beyond EU exit that are influencing global trading patterns, including the COVID-19 pandemic and global supply chain disruption. It remains too early to disaggregate the effects that EU exit has had on trade from these other factors.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the impact of the construction of additional border infrastructure on the functioning of UK ports in the weeks leading up to Christmas 2021.

Through the Port Infrastructure Fund, the Government has provided £200 million in grants to ports to build the infrastructure needed for both customs and biosecurity checks in 2022. We are confident that these projects are sufficiently advanced and operational to ensure the continued flow of trade in the run up to Christmas and beyond.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many people and organisations were signed up to receive email alerts from his Department's Brexit checker website as of 1 November 2021.

The Brexit Checker was launched in August 2019 and is designed to help users get personalised information on how Brexit may affect them and their business, and what actions they need to take to adapt to new rules. As of 1 November 2021, there were a total number of 346,770 unique email addresses signed up to receive updates via the Brexit Checker.

To meet changing user needs, which have shifted from general interest in rule changes (served by gov.uk/brexit and the Brexit Checker) to information on specific tasks and topics based on their situation, GDS has also developed Brexit “hub” pages for businesses, individuals, and families. These provide more targeted entry points for users to find relevant information on key business areas affected by Brexit.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which of his Ministers is responsible for implementing any policies relating to (a) the suspension of tariff preferences for EU goods, (b) retaliatory or rebalancing tariffs on EU goods, (c) the restriction of access to UK fishing waters for European vessels and (d) the suspension of obligations under the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement in the event of dispute settlement procedures being activated under the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

The Cabinet Office regularly publishes a list of ministerial responsibilities. The most recent update was published in November 2021 and can be found on GOV.UK.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to answer Questions 20306 and 20307, tabled by the hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury on 26 June 2021.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQ 20306 and PQ 20307 on 20 July 2021.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government has made or contributed to any administrative determinations in the Northern Ireland protocol joint committee that would bar New Zealand (a) sheepmeat and (b) beef products accessing Northern Ireland’s markets using the preferential access set out under the UK New Zealand-specific WTO tariff rate quota commitments.

The Government has not made or contributed to any administrative determinations in the Northern Ireland Joint Committee that would bar New Zealand exporters accessing Northern Ireland’s market’s using the preferential access set out under UK New Zealand specific WTO tariff rate quota commitment.

Any such impact on New Zealand sheep meat and beef product exporters is a direct result of the EU’s unilateral introduction of Regulation 2020/2170 on the application of Union tariff rate quotas (TRQs) and other import quotas, on 16 December 2020. If strictly applied, the Regulation would mean that importers of goods subject to any EU tariff rate quotas or other import quotas directly into Northern Ireland would be unable to access either EU or UK quotas, and would therefore need to pay a tariff.

The UK has underlined to the European Commission that this is a matter requiring urgent consideration as part of addressing issues with the operation of the Protocol, though there has not yet been any resolution found through the Joint Committee. The Government equally has set out its determination to address the issues faced by New Zealand exporters at a meeting of the WTO agriculture committee on 29 March, and we continue to engage with the New Zealand government as discussions proceed.

This is one of the elements of the Protocol we have been clear should be addressed as we seek to find a new balance in how it operates, as set out in our Command Paper published on 21 July (Northern Ireland Protocol: the way forward, CP502).

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2021 to Question 16052 on GREAT: Commonwealth, aside from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Malaysia, New Zealand and Singapore, which of the 47 other Commonwealth nations are not among the 145 countries where GREAT campaign activity has taken place.

The GREAT campaign is designed to be used in every country around the world, but to date there are a small number of countries where there has either not been sufficient HMG presence or opportunity to use the campaign. No country is out of scope for its use. The countries that have not yet used the campaign are:

  • Antigua and Barbuda

  • Bahamas

  • Belize

  • Dominica

  • Faroe Islands

  • Grenada

  • Kiribati

  • Liechtenstein

  • Maldives

  • Nauru

  • Nicaragua

  • Palestinian Authority

  • Papua New Guinea

  • St. Kitts and Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines

  • Sierra Leone

  • Tonga

  • Tuvalu

  • Vanuatu

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2021 to Question 16051, aside from Canada, Chile, Japan, Mexico, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam, which of the 60 other non-EU countries with which the UK has signed continuity trade agreements are not among the 145 countries where GREAT campaign activity has taken place.

The GREAT campaign is designed to be used in every country around the world, but to date there are a small number of countries where there has either not been sufficient HMG presence or opportunity to use the campaign. No country is out of scope for its use. The countries that have not yet used the campaign are:

  • Antigua and Barbuda

  • Bahamas

  • Belize

  • Dominica

  • Faroe Islands

  • Grenada

  • Kiribati

  • Liechtenstein

  • Maldives

  • Nauru

  • Nicaragua

  • Palestinian Authority

  • Papua New Guinea

  • St. Kitts and Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines

  • Sierra Leone

  • Tonga

  • Tuvalu

  • Vanuatu

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which of his Ministers is currently occupying (a) 1 Carlton Gardens, (b) the three flats in Admiralty House, (c) the Dorneywood estate and (d) the Chevening estate; and in each case, when the current occupants took up residence.

The official residences which are owned by the Government and currently available to Ministers are:

● Flats above 10 and 11 Downing Street, which are used by the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Prime Minister respectively;

● 1 Carlton Gardens, leased from the Crown Estate, is available as the official residence for the Foreign Secretary; and

● Hillsborough Castle and Stormont are available for Ministers in the Northern Ireland Office while on duty in Northern Ireland.

The Chequers, Dorneywood and Chevening estates are available to Ministers for both official and private use. None of these properties are owned by the Government, and are run by trustees.

Admiralty House is part of the Government estate, which includes rooms that could be used as residential accommodation. It is not in Ministerial use.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2021 to Question 16051, aside from Canada, Chile, Japan, Mexico, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam, which of the 60 other non-EU countries with which the UK has signed continuity trade agreements are not among the 145 countries where GREAT campaign activity has taken place.

The GREAT campaign is designed to be used in every country around the world, but to date there are a small number of countries where there has either not been sufficient HMG presence or opportunity to use the campaign. No country is out of scope for its use. The countries that have not yet used the campaign are:

  • Antigua and Barbuda

  • Bahamas

  • Belize

  • Dominica

  • Faroe Islands

  • Grenada

  • Kiribati

  • Liechtenstein

  • Maldives

  • Nauru

  • Nicaragua

  • Palestinian Authority

  • Papua New Guinea

  • St. Kitts and Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines

  • Sierra Leone

  • Tonga

  • Tuvalu

  • Vanuatu

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2021 to Question 16052, aside from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Malaysia, New Zealand and Singapore, which of the 47 other Commonwealth nations are not among the 145 countries where GREAT campaign activity has taken place.

The GREAT campaign is designed to be used in every country around the world, but to date there are a small number of countries where there has either not been sufficient HMG presence or opportunity to use the campaign. No country is out of scope for its use. The countries that have not yet used the campaign are:

  • Antigua and Barbuda

  • Bahamas

  • Belize

  • Dominica

  • Faroe Islands

  • Grenada

  • Kiribati

  • Liechtenstein

  • Maldives

  • Nauru

  • Nicaragua

  • Palestinian Authority

  • Papua New Guinea

  • St. Kitts and Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines

  • Sierra Leone

  • Tonga

  • Tuvalu

  • Vanuatu

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2021 to Question 12994, in which of the 11 members of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership is there currently insufficient diplomatic presence to support activity under the GREAT campaign.

GREAT campaign activity has taken place in all 11 member countries of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

GREAT is resourced in line with Government trade and investment priorities.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2021 to Question 12994, in which of the 53 other Commonwealth nations there is currently insufficient diplomatic presence to support activity under the GREAT campaign.

GREAT campaign activity has taken place in all 11 member countries of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

GREAT is resourced in line with Government trade and investment priorities.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2021 to Question 12994, in which of the 67 non-EU countries with which the UK has signed continuity trade agreements is there currently insufficient diplomatic presence to support activity under the GREAT campaign.

GREAT campaign activity has taken place in all 11 member countries of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

GREAT is resourced in line with Government trade and investment priorities.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which countries will not be among the 145 that will be targeted by his Department's refreshed GREAT campaign launched on 9 June 2021.

Since the GREAT campaign was first launched in 2012, the campaign has been extended to 145 countries. GREAT campaign activity is supported by a certain level of diplomatic presence in a country. No country is specifically out of scope for the campaign, there are countries where there is not sufficient presence to support campaign activity.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the details of any advance visit to India undertaken by Downing Street officials or advisers to prepare for the Prime Minister's scheduled visit on 26 April 2021, including (a) dates and length of the visit and (b) the number of officials involved.

I am responding on behalf of the Prime Minister’s Office. As has been the practice under successive administrations, a small team of officials went ahead to make arrangements for the visit and to discuss plans for the UK-India partnership. These took place in March, when COVID cases were much lower in India. COVID-secure procedures were followed at all times, including tests before, during and after. Although the official visit was subsequently postponed, £1 billion of new UK-India trade and investment was announced on 4 May that is expected to create more than 6,500 jobs.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, what assessment he has made of whether the UK-EU TCA contributed towards the levelling up agenda.

The Government is taking full advantage of the opportunities outside the EU to boost our economy, reduce burdens on business, and save taxpayers money, while upholding workers’ rights and welfare standards.

As part of the Queen’s Speech the Government outlined a series of bills in the legislative programme that will ensure we make the most of these opportunities.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement with the EU, which fully delivers on what the British public voted for, gives us the freedom to pursue policies that work for people across the UK to promote levelling up in education, skills, infrastructure and technology, while creating a greener and more outward-looking economy.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has received additional (a) staff, (b) budget and (c) other resources to enable the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost to provide support on the co-ordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues; and whether those resources were transferred from other Government departments.

The Prime Minister appointed Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office on 1 March 2021. Lord Frost works closely with colleagues across Government, including the Department for International Trade, to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from the trade deal with the EU, and the UK’s newly independent trade policy. Full details of Lord Frost’s responsibilities are outlined on Gov.uk.

The EU Secretariat, based in the Cabinet Office, has been established to provide direction and coordination of the UK’s relationship with the EU and its member states. This unit integrates officials from Taskforce Europe and the Transition Taskforce.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason the decision was taken to give responsibility to the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost for supporting the co-ordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues; and when that decision was taken.

The Prime Minister appointed Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office on 1 March 2021. Lord Frost works closely with colleagues across Government, including the Department for International Trade, to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from the trade deal with the EU, and the UK’s newly independent trade policy. Full details of Lord Frost’s responsibilities are outlined on Gov.uk.

The EU Secretariat, based in the Cabinet Office, has been established to provide direction and coordination of the UK’s relationship with the EU and its member states. This unit integrates officials from Taskforce Europe and the Transition Taskforce.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what support the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost provides to the Department for International Trade on the co-ordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues.

The Prime Minister appointed Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office on 1 March 2021. Lord Frost works closely with colleagues across Government, including the Department for International Trade, to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from the trade deal with the EU, and the UK’s newly independent trade policy. Full details of Lord Frost’s responsibilities are outlined on Gov.uk.

The EU Secretariat, based in the Cabinet Office, has been established to provide direction and coordination of the UK’s relationship with the EU and its member states. This unit integrates officials from Taskforce Europe and the Transition Taskforce.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which aspects of (a) trade policy and (b) ongoing trade negotiations require the co-ordination of cross-Government positions with the support of the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost.

The Prime Minister appointed Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office on 1 March 2021. Lord Frost works closely with colleagues across Government, including the Department for International Trade, to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from the trade deal with the EU, and the UK’s newly independent trade policy. Full details of Lord Frost’s responsibilities are outlined on Gov.uk.

The EU Secretariat, based in the Cabinet Office, has been established to provide direction and coordination of the UK’s relationship with the EU and its member states. This unit integrates officials from Taskforce Europe and the Transition Taskforce.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to review the (a) funding, (b) objectives and (c) targeting of the Government’s GREAT campaign.

As the Cabinet Office has now assumed responsibility for the GREAT campaign there will be a review of the funding, objectives and targeting of the GREAT campaign.

The GREAT campaign has been very successful at promoting the UK abroad since 2012 and is formally governed via a Programme Board of ministers from relevant government departments, plus officials from departments which fund the campaign. The Board meets quarterly and agrees to budget the campaign’s priorities, strategic direction, budget allocations and ensures value for money on behalf of the taxpayer.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, what assessment she has made of whether the UK-EU TCA helped to level up the UK; and how her Department made that assessment.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what his Department's policy is on how few individuals or companies must be responsible for the aggregate total of outward foreign direct investment for that total to not be subject to disclosure on data protection grounds.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what his Department's policy is on how few individuals or companies must be responsible for the aggregate total of inward foreign direct investment for that total to not be subject to disclosure on data protection grounds.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what the stock of inward foreign direct investment in the UK was from (a) Cameroon, (b) Colombia, (c) Israel, (d) Mexico and (e) Venezuela in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what the stock of outward foreign direct investment from the UK was in (a) Cameroon, (b) Egypt, (c) Iraq, (d) Libya and (e) Yemen in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the combined stock of foreign direct investment in the UK from members of the Gulf Cooperation Council was in each calendar year since 2015.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Minister is responsible for the (a) administration of and public communication around the UK's new trading relationship with the European Union and (b) discussions with UK and European stakeholders about proposed improvements in that relationship.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement covers a wide range of areas and is the responsibility of various departments. Details of ministerial meetings with external organisations are published on gov.uk.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to publish a comprehensive and independently-verified economic impact assessment for the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

This is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quota. Businesses will be able to continue to trade smoothly, selling to their customers in the EU, and people will be able to continue to buy goods from Europe tariff-free, protecting consumer prices.

The agreement provides for streamlined customs arrangements, including recognising our respective trusted trade schemes, to support the smooth flow of goods at the border and to reduce administrative costs for traders. This deal also enables us to introduce our own modern subsidy system so that we can better support businesses to grow and thrive, in a way that best suits the interests of UK industries.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what forecasts the Government has made for the growth in (a) UK exports of goods to the EU and (b) EU exports of goods to the UK in the 15-year period after the start of the implementation of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement relative to a baseline of no such agreement being in place after 31 December 2020.

This is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quota. Businesses will be able to continue to trade smoothly, selling to their customers in the EU, and people will be able to continue to buy goods from Europe tariff-free, protecting consumer prices.

The agreement provides for streamlined customs arrangements, including recognising our respective trusted trade schemes, to support the smooth flow of goods at the border and to reduce administrative costs for traders. This deal also enables us to introduce our own modern subsidy system so that we can better support businesses to grow and thrive, in a way that best suits the interests of UK industries.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what forecasts the Government has made for the growth in (a) UK exports of services to the EU and (b) EU exports of services to the UK in the 15-year period after the start of the implementation of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement relative to a baseline of no such agreement being in place after 31 December 2020.

This is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quota. Businesses will be able to continue to trade smoothly, selling to their customers in the EU, and people will be able to continue to buy goods from Europe tariff-free, protecting consumer prices.

The agreement provides for streamlined customs arrangements, including recognising our respective trusted trade schemes, to support the smooth flow of goods at the border and to reduce administrative costs for traders. This deal also enables us to introduce our own modern subsidy system so that we can better support businesses to grow and thrive, in a way that best suits the interests of UK industries.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what forecasts the Government has made for the growth in (a) UK GDP and (b) EU GDP in the 15-year period after the start of the implementation of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement relative to a baseline of no such agreement being in place after 31 December 2020.

This is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quota. Businesses will be able to continue to trade smoothly, selling to their customers in the EU, and people will be able to continue to buy goods from Europe tariff-free, protecting consumer prices.

The agreement provides for streamlined customs arrangements, including recognising our respective trusted trade schemes, to support the smooth flow of goods at the border and to reduce administrative costs for traders. This deal also enables us to introduce our own modern subsidy system so that we can better support businesses to grow and thrive, in a way that best suits the interests of UK industries.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the new procurement provisions in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the (a) level of market access for UK companies providing contracted services in the EU and (b) profitability of UK companies providing contracted services in the EU.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement provides UK companies supplying contracted services to public authorities in the EU with export opportunities. The Agreement will allow UK companies to compete fairly for these contracted services in the EU. Details of the Agreement are available on gov.uk.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which of her Department's dedicated (a) telephone helpline and (b) email service individuals and companies should use in the event that they have problems and questions arising from the end of the transition period which cannot be answered from the resources available on www.gov.uk/transition; and what hours those services will be fully staffed and operational from 28 December 2020 to 4 January 2021 inclusive.

The transition period has now ended. As your question acknowledges, the latest guidance for businesses and citizens is available on gov.uk/transition.

This information is supplemented by departmental helplines and forums where businesses can access more detailed and specific guidance.

For questions relating to the Northern Ireland Protocol, specific information is available from the Trader Support Service and the Movement Assistance Scheme.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has allocated for advertising on digital channels as part of the information campaign on preparations for the end of the transition period, launched on 13 July 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 121394 and 33512.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has allocated for radio advertising as part of the information campaign on preparations for the end of the transition period, launched on 13 July 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 121394 and 33512.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has allocated for TV advertising as part of the information campaign on preparations for the end of the transition period, launched on 13 July 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 121394 and 33512.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has allocated for advertising in print media as part of the information campaign on preparations for the end of the transition period, launched on 13 July 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 121394 and 33512.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has promoted any external communications for traders on the updated rules of origin between the UK and Japan taking effect after the transition period.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 119201 and 119202.

The Government is ensuring that businesses and traders are ready for the end of the transition period through an intense programme of communication and engagement, including the national public information campaign launched in July.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has promoted any external communications for traders on updated rules of origin arising from continuity trade agreements taking effect after the transition period.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 119201 and 119202.

The Government is ensuring that businesses and traders are ready for the end of the transition period through an intense programme of communication and engagement, including the national public information campaign launched in July.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent representations he has received from representatives of UK businesses on the effect on the UK’s balance of payments of the UK's ongoing negotiations with the EU.

Ministers and officials talk to representatives of the public and private sectors on a regular basis including regarding negotiations with the EU. Details of ministerial meetings with external organisations are published on gov.uk.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to the Baltic States.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to Syria.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to Russia.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to NATO.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to Ukraine.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will summarise the four options being examined by Ofgem to reduce wholesale prices for gas and electricity; and when he expects decisions on the lead options to be announced and implemented.

Ofgem, as the independent regulator of the GB gas and electricity markets, continues to examine ways to reduce the impact of the recent unprecedented rise in wholesale gas prices on energy consumers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish its next set of spending transparency data.

BEIS published the latest set of departmental spending transparency data (October, November and December 2021) on 22 April.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has received a copy of the report commissioned by Ofgem from Oliver Wyman Ltd on the potential impact, costs, risks, legal implications and timing of four options to reduce wholesale prices for gas and electricity.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, does not record receipt of reports submitted by external organisations.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has had discussions with Ofgem on a report it commissioned from Oliver Wyman Ltd on the potential impact, costs, risks, legal implications and timing of four options to reduce wholesale prices for gas and electricity.

My rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy has regular discussions with Ofgem’s CEO on a range of issues relating to the impact of high global gas prices, including wholesale energy markets. Ofgem, as the independent regulator of Great Britain’s gas and electricity markets, continues to examine ways to reduce the impact of the recent unprecedented rise in wholesale gas prices on energy consumers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what services the Government Legal Department’s Litigation Group has provided to his Department since 1 January 2021.

Since 1 January 2021, Litigation Group has continued to provide litigation services to the majority of government departments, including Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, and executive agencies, as well as many non-departmental public bodies.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of potential shortages of carbon dioxide over winter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers and industrial users on those potential shortages.

Carbon dioxide is an essential component of our national economy. Carbon dioxide suppliers have agreed to pay CF Fertilisers a price for the carbon dioxide that it produces, which will enable the company to continue operating while global gas prices remain high, and therefore will ensure that UK businesses have access to a sustainable supply of carbon dioxide. The Government continues to monitor market developments and is examining the options for the market to improve resilience in the provision of essential supplies - such as carbon dioxide - in the longer term.

Throughout summer 2021, and during the most recent disruption to the domestic supply of carbon dioxide, the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs has been engaging with industries across the food supply chain, including pigs and poultry processors, as well as food and drinks manufacturers. Through this engagement, we are able to monitor the industry mitigations needed and can collect evidence to inform policy recommendations, as well as deepening our understanding of sectors’ readiness for the winter.

Devolved Administrations have also been consulted to monitor the effects of the disruptions and assess the preparedness of the industry for the winter months.

Lee Rowley
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of potential retail shortages of household tissue and toilet paper over winter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers and retailers on those potential shortages.

The Government recognises that as the global economy has rebounded from the pandemic, we have seen pressures placed on supply chains across sectors. We have taken quick and decisive action to ease these pressures where required including establishing a Supply Chain Advisory Group and Industry Taskforce, which provides a link between business and government to identify causes of supply chain issues and pre-empt future issues. Industry attendees are drawn from a range of sectors including the British Retail Consortium. Additionally, the Department engages at both Ministerial and official level on a range of issues affecting the retail sector including the availability of goods.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of potential shortages of building equipment and supplies over winter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers and the construction sector on those potential shortages.

At present, demand for building materials is outstripping supply due to a complex set of global issues. The sector is collectively working hard to maximise production, but is experiencing difficulties in keeping pace with demand due to issues including: global shipping congestion; delays at ports; lack and increasing price of containers; increasing costs; challenges recruiting into the industry, and; increasing energy prices.

The Government recognises the impact this situation is having on many smaller building firms and is working closely with the Construction Leadership Council (CLC)’s Product Availability Group to stress that the industry must work collaboratively during this challenging period, and to emphasise the importance of good forward-planning, as well as clear communication within the industry.

Lee Rowley
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of potential retail shortages of household cleaning products over winter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers and retailers on those potential shortages.

The Government recognises that as the global economy has rebounded from the pandemic, we have seen pressures placed on supply chains across sectors. We have taken quick and decisive action to ease these pressures where required including establishing a Supply Chain Advisory Group and Industry Taskforce, which provides a link between business and government to identify causes of supply chain issues and pre-empt future issues. Industry attendees are drawn from a range of sectors including the British Retail Consortium. Additionally, the Department engages at both Ministerial and official level on a range of issues affecting the retail sector including the availability of goods.

The causes of goods shortages can arise from a complex variety of reasons including stockpiling by consumers. Products generally remain in good supply. Retailers have highly resilient supply chains, as evidenced throughout the pandemic, and we have established ways of working with industry.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of potential retail shortages of household batteries overwinter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers and retailers on those shortages.

The Government recognises that as the global economy has rebounded from the pandemic, we have seen pressures placed on supply chains across sectors. We have taken quick and decisive action to ease these pressures where required including establishing a Supply Chain Advisory Group and Industry Taskforce, which provides a link between business and government to identify causes of supply chain issues and pre-empt future issues. Industry attendees are drawn from a range of sectors including the British Retail Consortium. Additionally, the Department engages at both Ministerial and official level on a range of issues affecting the retail sector including the availability of goods.

The causes of goods shortages can arise from a complex variety of reasons including stockpiling by consumers. Products generally remain in good supply. Retailers have highly resilient supply chains, as evidenced throughout the pandemic, and we have established ways of working with industry.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of potential shortages of liquefied gas over winter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers, retailers and industrial users on those potential shortages.

The Government remains confident that Great Britain’s energy security will be maintained thanks to the diversity of our supply sources and the existing market mechanism.

The Government works closely with Ofgem, National Grid Gas and other key industry organisations to monitor gas supply and demand. LNG trade flows are determined by commercial agreements between buyers and sellers and price signals. Great Britain has one of the largest LNG import infrastructures in Europe and the GB gas market is one of the most liquid in the world, providing security through diversity of supply. National Grid’s Gas Winter Outlook, which models supply and demand for upcoming winter, notes in its security of supply test that the supply margin is expected to be more than sufficient.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the news release published by the Government on 15 October 2021, entitled, Prime Minister's Ten Point Plan kickstarts green investment boom, if he will publish a breakdown of the 56,000 jobs referenced in that release by (a) location, (b) sector and (c) project.

Around 56,000 high-quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, and heat & buildings.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many of the 56,000 jobs referenced in the news release published by the Government on 15 October 2021, entitled, Prime Minister's Ten Point Plan kickstarts green investment boom, are (a) existing jobs retained between 18 November 2020 and 15 October 2021 and (b) existing jobs forecast to be retained between 15 October 2021 and 18 November 2030.

Around 56,000 high-quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat & buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many of the 56,000 jobs referenced in the news release published by the Government on 15 October 2021, entitled Prime Minister's Ten Point Plan kickstarts green investment boom, are (a) new jobs created between 18 November 2020 and 15 October 2021 and (b) new jobs forecast to be created between 15 October 2021 and 18 November 2030.

Around 56,000 high-quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat & buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been and (b) will be retained as a result of (a) UK private investment, (b) Government investment and (c) inward investment in the Government’s strategy to develop greener buildings between November 2020 and November 2030.

Around 56,00 high quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat and buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been and (b) will be created as a result of (a) UK private investment, (b) Government investment and (c) inward investment in the Government’s strategy to develop greener buildings between November 2020 and November 2030.

Around 56,00 high quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat and buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been or (b) will be retained as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (iii) inward investment as part of the Government’s plans to accelerate the shift to zero emissions vehicles between November 2020 and November 2030.

The automotive sector is an important part of the Government’s plans for green growth, levelling up across our country and driving emissions to net zero by 2050.

The Government is committed to growing the 149,000 jobs in the automotive sector across the UK. Accelerating the transition to zero emission vehicles is estimated to support around 40,000 new jobs by 2030.

As part of the Government’s Net Zero Strategy, we are allocating a further £350 million for the Automotive Transformation Fund, as part of our £1 billion commitment to build an internationally competitive electric vehicle supply chain including gigafactories. This is in addition to the £500m of funding announced as part of the 10 Point Plan.

Recent investment announcements by Nissan, Stellantis and Ford will support thousands of highly skilled, green jobs in the UK, and many more across the supply chain.

Lee Rowley
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been or (b) will be created as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (iii) inward investment as part of the Government’s plans to accelerate the shift to zero emissions vehicles between November 2020 and November 2030.

The automotive sector is an important part of the Government’s plans for green growth, levelling up across our country and driving emissions to net zero by 2050.

The Government is committed to growing the 149,000 jobs in the automotive sector across the UK. Accelerating the transition to zero emission vehicles is estimated to support around 40,000 new jobs by 2030.

As part of the Government’s Net Zero Strategy, we are allocating a further £350 million for the Automotive Transformation Fund, as part of our £1 billion commitment to build an internationally competitive electric vehicle supply chain including gigafactories. This is in addition to the £500m of funding announced as part of the 10 Point Plan.

Recent investment announcements by Nissan, Stellantis and Ford will support thousands of highly skilled, green jobs in the UK, and many more across the supply chain.

Lee Rowley
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been and (b) will be retained as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (iii) inward investment as part of the Government's plans to advance offshore wind between November 2020 and November 2030.

Investment by the Government as part of plans to Build Back Greener by making the UK a world leader in wind energy, including support for manufacturing infrastructure, is directly supporting the retention of green jobs in the UK. Smulders Projects UK, Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy and JDR Cables have recently announced major investments in the UK offshore wind sector that will safeguard jobs.

The offshore wind sector currently employs around 7,200 people and supports a similar number of indirect jobs. Government schemes supporting renewables deployment in the UK, such as Contracts for Difference, and Offshore Wind Manufacturing Investment Support Scheme, support investment and employment in the sector. This could support around 30,000 jobs by 2030.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been or (b) will be created as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (iii) inward investment as part of the Government’s plans to develop greener buildings between November 2020 and November 2030.

Around 56,00 high quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat and buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been and (b) will be created as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (ii) inward investment as part of the Government's plans to advance offshore wind between November 2020 and November 2030.

Through Government support, electricity generated from offshore wind has increased from less than 1% in 2010 to 13% in 2020.

This has made the UK a world leader in wind energy, including support for manufacturing infrastructure, is directly supporting the creation of green jobs in the UK. Just this year six manufacturers have already announced major investments in the UK offshore wind sector , supported by Government investment schemes, and delivering up to 3,600 jobs by 2030.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure the full disclosure of Ultimate Beneficial Owner status for all UK-registered businesses.

In June 2016, the People with Significant Control (PSC) register and regulations were introduced with the aim of delivering greater transparency around the ownership of UK corporate entities. Over 99% of entities have complied with their PSC filing requirements. The register is widely used, has a positive economic effect and contributes to the fight against the abuse of corporate structures.

Between 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2021, 210 criminal proceedings were issued against companies and directors in connection with failure to comply with PSC requirements. 119 directors and 91 companies have been convicted.

In October 2019, BEIS published a statutory post-implementation review of the PSC regulations which stressed the importance of ensuring the reliability of the PSC register information. With that in mind, the Government has made clear that it will legislate when Parliamentary time allows to require identity verification of PSCs a part of a broader programme targeted at further improving corporate transparency.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with his Cabinet colleagues on the involvement of any UK-registered entities in the Beirut port explosion on 4 August 2020.

The UK Government’s Insolvency Service has undertaken enquiries into a UK registered company with linkages to the Beirut port explosion and, where appropriate, has engaged with the Lebanese authorities. Matters surrounding the explosion remain the subject of ongoing investigation in the Lebanon and it would not be appropriate for me to comment further, nor to address specific questions on the matter, pending the outcome of any actions by the authorities there.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to take additional steps to ensure full transparency of any UK-registered entities linked to the Beirut port explosion on 4 August 2020.

The UK Government’s Insolvency Service has undertaken enquiries into a UK registered company with linkages to the Beirut port explosion and, where appropriate, has engaged with the Lebanese authorities. Matters surrounding the explosion remain the subject of ongoing investigation in the Lebanon and it would not be appropriate for me to comment further, nor to address specific questions on the matter, pending the outcome of any actions by the authorities there.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much revenue the Insolvency Service has collected in bankruptcy fees from leaseholders in high-rise private residential properties with defective cladding in each financial year since 2017-18.

The Insolvency Service reports income from the fees charged on the insolvency cases it handles, in its annual report and accounts. However it does not hold the information to calculate the amount of fees collected in any bankruptcies of leaseholders in a high-rise residential property with defective cladding.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the effect of the proposed five-year increase in postal rates to the US on the profitability of UK SME exporters.

International postage rates are agreed through the Universal Postal Union (UPU), a specialised body of the United Nations. The postal operator that sends an item to another country remunerates the destination postal operator for processing and delivering the item. The costs the receiving postal operator can claim are agreed on a multilateral basis.

In September 2019, the UPU agreed to reform the remuneration rates to reflect the true cost of delivery. Member countries unanimously agreed on a proposal that committed most members to pay the same rates for bulky letters and small packets, effective from January 2020. In addition, countries meeting certain conditions, would be able to self-declare their rates from 1 July 2020. The US is the only country that currently meets these conditions.

In the negotiations on the reforms to the remuneration rates, the UK sought to minimise the impact on our citizens and businesses, ensure the continued flow of trade and maintain the integrity of the international postal system.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to discuss the US's self-determined postage rates with the new US administration.

International postage rates are agreed through the Universal Postal Union (UPU), a specialised body of the United Nations. The postal operator that sends an item to another country remunerates the destination postal operator for processing and delivering the item. The costs the receiving postal operator can claim are agreed on a multilateral basis.

In September 2019, the UPU agreed to reform the remuneration rates to reflect the true cost of delivery. Member countries unanimously agreed on a proposal that committed most members to pay the same rates for bulky letters and small packets, effective from January 2020. In addition, countries meeting certain conditions, would be able to self-declare their rates from 1 July 2020. The US is the only country that currently meets these conditions.

In the negotiations on the reforms to the remuneration rates, the UK sought to minimise the impact on our citizens and businesses, ensure the continued flow of trade and maintain the integrity of the international postal system.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the effect of the increased postal rates to the US on the profitability of UK SME exporters.

International postage rates are agreed through the Universal Postal Union (UPU), a specialised body of the United Nations. The postal operator that sends an item to another country remunerates the destination postal operator for processing and delivering the item. The costs the receiving postal operator can claim are agreed on a multilateral basis.

In September 2019, the UPU agreed to reform the remuneration rates to reflect the true cost of delivery. Member countries unanimously agreed on a proposal that committed most members to pay the same rates for bulky letters and small packets, effective from January 2020. In addition, countries meeting certain conditions, would be able to self-declare their rates from 1 July 2020. The US is the only country that currently meets these conditions.

In the negotiations on the reforms to the remuneration rates, the UK sought to minimise the impact on our citizens and businesses, ensure the continued flow of trade and maintain the integrity of the international postal system.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with his US counterpart on that country's recently increased self-determined postage rates for UK exporters.

International postage rates are agreed through the Universal Postal Union (UPU), a specialised body of the United Nations. The postal operator that sends an item to another country remunerates the destination postal operator for processing and delivering the item. The costs the receiving postal operator can claim are agreed on a multilateral basis.

In September 2019, the UPU agreed to reform the remuneration rates to reflect the true cost of delivery. Member countries unanimously agreed on a proposal that committed most members to pay the same rates for bulky letters and small packets, effective from January 2020. In addition, countries meeting certain conditions, would be able to self-declare their rates from 1 July 2020. The US is the only country that currently meets these conditions.

In the negotiations on the reforms to the remuneration rates, the UK sought to minimise the impact on our citizens and businesses, ensure the continued flow of trade and maintain the integrity of the international postal system.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of provision for immediate mutual recognition of professional qualifications in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the ability for services exporters to operate in the EU.

Within the Trade and Cooperation Agreement, the UK and EU have agreed a framework under which both parties may agree arrangements on the recognition of professional qualifications (such as mutual recognition agreements) covering the UK and all 27 EU Member States. Once an arrangement is adopted under the TCA, UK professionals will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition of their professional qualifications, helping them to provide services within EU Member States.

While frameworks like this are conventional practice in free trade agreements, the Government successfully negotiated improvements to the EU’s original mutual recognition of professional qualification proposals. We have streamlined the process by which regulatory and professional authorities make recommendations to the Partnership Council, and we have opened further possibilities for the types of arrangements which can be adopted by the Council. This could result in more arrangements being agreed at a faster pace.

Over the coming years, professionals will be able to take advantage of any profession-specific EU-wide arrangement agreed under the FTA framework. As of 1 January 2021, UK-qualified professionals who wish to supply services in the EU should seek recognition of their qualifications according to the local laws and regulations of individual Member States.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the absence of a full mutual recognition agreement in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the profitability of UK exporters excluded from the agreement’s sectoral annexes.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement sets out wide-ranging provisions on Technical Barriers to Trade that will support exporters, including a core chapter and five sectoral annexes. These contain specific provisions which support the profitability of exporters.

Throughout negotiations, agreeing a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) across as many sectors as possible was a priority for the UK. MRAs remain a useful tool, and we will continue to seek them in negotiations with other partners where this would be beneficial.

The Government has already taken additional steps to reduce disruption to business. As set out in our guidance, to allow businesses time to adjust, relevant CE marked goods that meet EU requirements (where these continue to match UK requirements) can continue to be placed on the GB market until 1 January 2022 in most cases.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the exceptions from market access included within the annexes of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the (a) ability for UK service exporters to do business in the EU, (b) profitability of UK service exporters and (c) administrative costs UK services exporters face conforming to different regulations across EU member states.

The UK’s published approach to negotiations aimed to achieve a transparent schedule of reservations based on the UK and EU’s best offer to date with improved commitments in areas of key interest, and the deal reflects this. The UK and EU have agreed provisions on trade in services and investment in line with our respective Free Trade Agreements with Japan, but with some additional benefits for both sides.

The agreement guarantees that UK investors and service suppliers will be able to access the EU’s markets and will not be subject to discriminatory barriers to trade. It includes gold-standard rules on services and investment liberalisation.

The deal requires that member states clearly set out where they intend to restrict this commitment so that UK businesses have absolute clarity about establishment requirements, and these restrictions are set out in the annexes of reservations to the agreement. The agreement as a whole secures continued market access across a broad range of key sectors, including professional and business services, and significantly exceeds what is available under World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules.

Many exceptions are already applied within the Single Market, so do not represent new barriers for UK businesses. New requirements could include having to be EU/EEA national or resident to provide a service, and restrictions vary according to each individual Member State and sector. UK businesses providing services to the EU should check the national regulations of the country in which they do business in to understand how best to operate.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the provisions on short-term travel for UK service exporters in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the ability for service providers to do business in the EU.

The UK-EU Trade & Co-operation Agreement (TCA) contains provisions on the entry and temporary stay of natural persons for business purposes (Mode IV), similar to the EU’s best precedent reached with Canada and Japan, with some improvements.

We have always been clear that Freedom of Movement between the UK and the EU will end after the Transition Period. This means changes, such as visas and work permits, for some of our service exporters; the Government has been helping UK businesses to get ready for this. However, the TCA we negotiated reflects the importance we know businesses place on cross-border mobility.

The Mode IV commitments we secured provide certainty and clarity for those who travel to another country temporarily to do business. These include reciprocal measures for: short-term business visitors; business visitors for establishment purposes; intra-company transferees; and those providing services under contract, whether as an employee or a self-employed professional.

These commitments guarantee market access to key economic sectors, and ease some burdens on business travellers, such as: removing the need for work permits for some short-term trips, and reducing the number of economic needs tests a country could impose to block access to exporters. They also ensure that the UK and EU Member States have transparent visa application processes, clear signposting on rules for business travellers, and a minimum standard for how business travellers and service providers should be treated when working abroad through non-discrimination clauses.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff and at what grades are operating his Department’s business support (a) email enquiry service and (b) telephone enquiry service via the 0207 215 5000 helpline; and what hours those services will be fully staffed and operational from 28 December 2020 to 4 January 2021 inclusive.

The Departmental Enquiry Service (The Enquiry Unit - 0207 215 5000) is staffed by 1 x Senior Executive Officer, 1 x Executive Officer and 4 x Administrative Officers. The Unit was fully operational on 29th, 30th and 31st December and provided an email service on 1st, 2nd and 3rd January. The Unit has been fully operational from 4th January onwards. The Enquiry Unit is resourced appropriately to handle incoming enquiries to the Department

In addition to the Department’s Enquiry Unit, BEIS also delivers a Business Support Helpline (0800 098 1098) for individuals and businesses to access signposting and guidance. This resource was increased to handle an anticipated higher number of contacts over the period, including queries relating to the end of the Transition Period.

The Business Support Helpline was open every day from Monday 28th December to Saturday 2nd January 2021, closed Sunday 3rd January.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department's policies of overseas investors seeking to buy large stakes in UK businesses in the event that the UK enters a recession as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

As we take steps to jumpstart our economy and get on the road to recovery from Covid-19, investment from abroad could provide a much-needed boost to companies right across Britain. But we must not be blind to the risks it could pose to businesses that are right at the heart of our battle against the virus and vital for our subsequent recovery.

That is why on 22 June, this Government laid secondary legislation to amend the Enterprise Act 2002, thereby strengthening the Government’s powers to intervene in certain investments made into the UK. The Government can now intervene on public interest grounds in order to maintain the UK’s capability to combat and mitigate the effects of public health emergencies. Further, subject to Parliament’s approval of a draft statutory instrument, the Government will be shortly be able to intervene in smaller mergers in three of the most national security sensitive sectors: artificial intelligence, cryptographic authentication and advanced materials.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the contract tendered by her Department on 31 March 2022 with procurement reference 102915, what recent assessment she has made of the (a) level and (b) adequacy of knowledge and understanding of (i) civil servants and (ii) Government Ministers relating to harmful misinformation and disinformation online.

The contract opportunity is a re-tender of an existing contract for misinformation and disinformation monitoring and analysis services to support the Counter Disinformation Unit, which brings together capabilities and expertise from across Government to provide a comprehensive picture of the scope, scale, and reach of misinformation and disinformation.

Ministers and officials work closely with a range of partners with different expertise, including social media platforms, academia, civil society organisations, and commercial partners to ensure a whole society approach to tackling the evolving threat of disinformation and misinformation online.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will publish the full Statement of Requirements for which her department tendered a contract on 31st March under procurement reference 102915, regarding the monitoring and analysis of potentially harmful misinformation and disinformation online.

The contract opportunity is a re-tender of an existing contract for misinformation and disinformation monitoring and analysis services to support the Counter Disinformation Unit to provide a comprehensive picture of the scope, scale, and reach of misinformation and disinformation.

The contract has been published in accordance with relevant transparency requirements pursuant to the Public Contracts Regulations (2015) and is currently live. Given the sensitive nature of the contract opportunity relates in part to national security, a statement of requirement is only available upon signing a non-disclosure agreement.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, DCMS Annual Report and Accounts 2020-21, published on 16 December 2021, HC 758, if she will make an assessment of the consistency of that Department's higher level of fraud risk appetite during the covid-19 pandemic with the Government's zero-tolerance approach to all internal fraud.

DCMS and our arms-length bodies have a zero-tolerance approach to any incidents of fraud.

We have robust due diligence and grant monitoring processes to ensure that government funding is used for the purposes intended.

Due to the unique circumstances of COVID-19, DCMS agreed to accept a higher tolerance to fraud risk due to the demand for urgent delivery of relief schemes. This was agreed, subject to a number of mitigations including, in particular, investment in our remedial or post-event scrutiny, with Post Event Assurance (PEA) workstreams embedded in COVID-19 relief packages.

DCMS identified immaterial amounts of fraud in 2020-21 (equivalent to 0.03% of its total budget) which is well within the Department's risk tolerance and average tolerance levels for fraud and error across Central Government (0.5 - 5%). The 2020-21 results of our high-risk COVID-19 packages have been shared with the Public Accounts Committee, at the recall session on 4 November 2021. These findings were tested by the National Audit Office as part of their audit of our year-end accounts. The NAO were satisfied and gave an unqualified opinion on our 2020-21 Accounts.

We are currently reviewing our fraud risk appetite and plan to revert to pre-COVID-19 fraud tolerance levels for the financial year 2022-23.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will publish the legal analysis and advice provided by DLA Piper UK LLP on data protection law and practice in support of the International Data Transfer Regime under the terms of contract reference 102274.

This specific legal analysis relates to ongoing and future policy development and can therefore not be published at this time, but will be made available in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will publish the statement of requirements set out by her Department in contract reference 102274 and tendered to DLA Piper UK LLP.

The statement of requirements for this contract relates to ongoing and future policy developments and therefore cannot be published at this moment in time. It will be made available in due course.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, when she plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury of 8 December 2021.

A response was issued on 10 January 2022 under the case reference MC2021/20897.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which of the collations of service records maintained by the National Archives covers personnel from (a) officer ranks and (b) other ranks from the Caribbean Regiment serving in the British Army at the end of the Second World War.

The Ministry of Defence is transferring historic service personnel records to The National Archives over a 6-year period. The majority of military service personnel records transferred to The National Archives to date cover a period before the creation of the Caribbean Regiment in 1944 although collation 11005 does include earlier records of service personnel from the Caribbean who served in the British Army, including between the First and Second World Wars.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the Government procurement exercise reference TNA406, published on 11 November 2021, who has been responsible for deciding which of the collations of service records maintained by the National Archives should be selected as priorities for digitisation, licensing and publication.

The National Archives and the Ministry of Defence are in the first year of a 6-year project to transfer almost 10 million service personnel records to The National Archives. The National Archives has chosen to focus first on the transfer of records that cover Army ‘other ranks’ and overseas regiments. This approach is based on factors including the age-profile and physical presentation of these records. Over 99% of the records that will be transferred during year 1 will go forward for digitisation, licensing and publication.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which of the collations of service records maintained by the National Archives covers personnel from (a) officer ranks and (b) other ranks from the British Indian Army serving in the British Army at the end of the Second World War.

The British Indian Army was administered by the India Office and its historic records are held by the British Library. Although The National Archives does not hold service records relating to personnel from the British Indian Army, it does hold some records relating to casualties and decorations (TNA Series WO 429, WO 430, WO 432, WO 433).

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which of the collations of service records maintained by the National Archives covers personnel from (a) officer ranks and (b) other ranks from the East Africa Force serving in the British Army at the end of the Second World War.

The National Archives and the Ministry of Defence are in the first year of a 6-year project to transfer almost 10 million service personnel records to The National Archives. Collations of service records that include personnel from the East Africa Force serving in the British Army at the end of the Second World War have not yet been transferred to The National Archives.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, if she will publish a 10-year equivalent for the estimates of trade impacts set out in Section 3 Paragraph 71 for ease of comparison with the 10-year estimates of net direct monetised benefit set out in Section 1 Paragraph 4.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, if she will publish a five-year equivalent for the estimates of net direct monetised benefit set out in Section 1 Paragraph 4 for ease of comparison with the five-year estimates of trade impacts set out in Section 3 Paragraph 71.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, whether the compliance costs set out in Section 1 Paragraph 4 are the same as those set out in Section 3 Paragraph 71.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, what assessment she has made of the compatibility of the estimates set out (a) Section 1 Paragraph 4 and (b) Section 3 Paragraph 71; and if she will provide reasons for the differences between those estimates.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, whether the estimate of £1.04 billion for the net direct monetised benefit of the proposals over 10 years in Section 1, Paragraph 4 takes into account the (a) additional compliance costs and (b) loss of trade in the event that EU data adequacy status is removed.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, what data her Department used to estimate the number of businesses affected by compliance costs in the table in Section 2 Paragraph 57.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, what assessment her Department has made of whether the proposed changes in data regulation will have a net positive impact on UK trade if EU data adequacy status is (a) maintained and (b) removed.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, for what reasons her Department is unable to provide a quantitative estimate in cash or percentage terms of the expected change in trade from the proposed changes in data regulation.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, whether the estimate of £1.45 billion for the net direct monetised benefit of the proposals over 10 years in Section 1 Paragraph.4 takes into account of the (a) change in the level of additional compliance costs and (b) retention of trade if EU data adequacy status is maintained.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the compliance costs incurred by UK firms operating within the EU of operating under divergent UK and EU data regimes.

On 10 September, the government launched a consultation on reforms to create a new, ambitious, pro-growth and innovation-friendly data protection regime that underpins the trustworthy use of data for an even better UK data rights regime.

Our proposals offer improvements within the current framework, while maintaining the UK's worldwide reputation for high data protection standards and securing public trust. The reforms presented for consultation deliberately build on the key elements of the current UK General Data Protection Regulation (UK GDPR), such as its data processing principles, its data rights for citizens, and its mechanisms for supervision and enforcement.

Furthermore, one of the principles guiding the government's approach is that organisations that comply with the UK’s current regime should still be largely compliant with our future regime, except for only a small number of new requirements.

An initial analysis of the expected impacts of these reforms has been published on which the government is also seeking views during the 10-week consultation period.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether any future data adequacy deals will allow for the free flow of data to any country or territory in which UK citizens' data will be offered weaker protections than those currently in UK law.

Data adequacy is about ensuring the high standards of data protection under the UK GDPR are not undermined when personal data is transferred to a third country. UK data adequacy assessments consider the overall effect of a third country’s data protection laws, their implementation, enforcement, and supervision. Our assessments also take into account how data can be transferred from that country to other destinations.

Adequacy does not require identical laws and practices. The UK will be pragmatic in its assessments and will recognise how partners around the world protect data to high standards and share the same values as the UK but do so through different means.

Work is ongoing and while we have announced priorities and make good progress, we cannot prejudge the outcomes of the technical adequacy assessment work.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of whether the data regimes of (a) the United States, (b) Australia, (c) the Republic of Korea, (d) the Dubai International Financial Centre, (e) Colombia and (f) Singapore provide equivalent protection to that of the UK.

Data adequacy is about ensuring the high standards of data protection under the UK GDPR are not undermined when personal data is transferred to a third country. UK data adequacy assessments consider the overall effect of a third country’s data protection laws, their implementation, enforcement, and supervision. Our assessments also take into account how data can be transferred from that country to other destinations.

Adequacy does not require identical laws and practices. The UK will be pragmatic in its assessments and will recognise how partners around the world protect data to high standards and share the same values as the UK but do so through different means.

Work is ongoing and while we have announced priorities and make good progress, we cannot prejudge the outcomes of the technical adequacy assessment work.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the UK's future data adequacy decisions will prohibit the onward transfer of data to countries with lower standards of data protection than the UK.

Data adequacy is about ensuring the high standards of data protection under the UK GDPR are not undermined when personal data is transferred to a third country. UK data adequacy assessments consider the overall effect of a third country’s data protection laws, their implementation, enforcement, and supervision. Our assessments also take into account how data can be transferred from that country to other destinations.

Adequacy does not require identical laws and practices. The UK will be pragmatic in its assessments and will recognise how partners around the world protect data to high standards and share the same values as the UK but do so through different means.

Work is ongoing and while we have announced priorities and make good progress, we cannot prejudge the outcomes of the technical adequacy assessment work.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the UK's future data adequacy decisions will require specific assurances on UK citizens’ data from partner countries.

Data adequacy is about ensuring the high standards of data protection under the UK GDPR are not undermined when personal data is transferred to a third country. UK data adequacy assessments consider the overall effect of a third country’s data protection laws, their implementation, enforcement, and supervision. Our assessments also take into account how data can be transferred from that country to other destinations.

Adequacy does not require identical laws and practices. The UK will be pragmatic in its assessments and will recognise how partners around the world protect data to high standards and share the same values as the UK but do so through different means.

Work is ongoing and while we have announced priorities and make good progress, we cannot prejudge the outcomes of the technical adequacy assessment work.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of plans announced on 26 August 2021 to change the UK's data regime on the continuation of the UK’s EU data adequacy status.

The UK regained autonomy over its domestic data protection laws on 1st January 2021. Exact alignment to EU law is not a requirement for EU data adequacy. Indeed, the thirteen EU ‘adequate’ countries, from Israel to New Zealand, each have data protection laws that are different to the EU’s.

The UK can reshape its approach to regulation and seize opportunities with its new regulatory freedoms, helping to drive growth, innovation and competition across the country. The first step in delivering on that objective is the consultation that was announced on 26 August, which went live on 10 September.

In doing so, the UK intends to maintain its high standards of data protection and ensure that the UK data regime continues to be based on public trust in the responsible use of data. We will continue to engage with EU counterparts, as appropriate, on these issues.

12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what processes the Government has in place to (a) monitor the level of protections afforded to UK citizens’ data by Japan and (b) respond to evidence of lower protections in that country than are accepted in the UK.

The UK has preserved the effect of the EU’s adequacy assessment of Japan’s data protection regime on a transitional basis, recognising that Japan offers adequate protection levels for UK citizens’ personal data. This allows personal data to flow freely between the UK and Japan on the basis of strong data protection guarantees.

UK legislation commits the Secretary of State to periodically review decisions taken in respect of the adequacy of other countries, to assess whether they continue to provide an adequate level of personal data protection. Should the Secretary of State consider Japan to no longer provide an adequate level of personal data protection, the Secretary of State could revoke or amend the adequacy decision.

12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential (a) merits and (b) disadvantages of recognising the APEC-CBPR as equivalent to the UK’s data protection laws.

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Cross-Border Privacy Rules system (APEC CBPR) facilitates personal data flows among nine APEC members. As the UK is not an APEC member it cannot join the CBPR system, but we acknowledge the potential benefits this system provides as a baseline for data protection in the region.

UK GDPR provides for a range of personal data international transfer mechanisms including standard contractual clauses, binding corporate rules, codes of conduct and certification. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is considering the operation of international frameworks, including the APEC CBPR system. This includes an assessment of similarities and differences between these models and the framework set out in UK GDPR and will inform any future assessment on the merits and disadvantages of pursuing interoperability with the CBPR system.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the UK’s commitments under the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement on enacting future online harms legislation.

This Government is committed to making the UK the safest place in the world to be online and the best place to start and grow a digital business. We stand by our online harms commitment and nothing agreed in trade deals will affect that. The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement does not impact the government’s ability to enact legislation to tackle online harms.

In December we published the full government response to the Online Harms White Paper, which set out the expectations on companies to keep their users safe online. The Online Safety Bill, which will give effect to the regulatory framework set out in the full government response, will be ready this year.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how the data provisions of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement affect the data protections UK citizens are afforded if they are employed by a company based in Japan.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) does not affect existing data protection standards in the UK or Japan. Further, the UK has preserved on a transitional basis the effect of the EU’s adequacy assessment of Japan’s data protection regime, which recognises that Japan offers an adequate level of data protection. This allows personal data to flow freely between the two economies on the basis of strong data protection guarantees.

The data provisions in CEPA do not affect the scope of the UK GDPR or the Data Protection Act 2018. If a Japanese company is processing employees’ personal data in the context of an establishment in the UK, or otherwise meets the requirements of the territorial scope provisions of the UK GDPR, then the UK GPDR and Data Protection Act 2018 will apply to the processing.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the long-term compatibility of UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement data rules and the draft data adequacy decision taken by the EU with respect to the UK.

The European Commission published draft adequacy decisions for the UK on 19 February 2021. These decisions follow a thorough assessment of the UK’s legislation and regulatory framework for personal data.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) is compatible with these decisions because CEPA’s provisions do not affect the data protection standards set out in the UK GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018, including those concerning the cross border transfer of personal data.

The UK recognises the importance of data protection to enable trading partners to build trust through transparent treatment of personal data and to ensure that data is able to flow in an uninterrupted manner.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether UK citizens enjoy individual rights to reasonable explanation and reasonable inferences on how their data is used under the exemptions of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) obliges both parties to adopt or maintain a legal framework that provides for the protection of the personal information of the users of electronic commerce, which includes publishing information on protections as well as ways that individuals can pursue remedies and businesses can comply with legal requirements.

CEPA does not change existing protection for UK citizens’ personal data, as set out in the UK GDPR and the Data Protection Act 2018, including the right to be informed about the collection and use of their personal data

The most relevant exemption for data protection - in the cross-border transfer of information article (Article 8.84) in the CEPA - allows the UK to adopt measures restricting data flows to achieve a legitimate public policy objective, such as personal data protection, provided the conditions attached to the use of the exemption are satisfied.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement, (a) whether UK citizens’ data has the same protections from onward transfer as EU data and (b) how UK citizens data protection will be enforced.

UK citizens will enjoy the same protections for their personal data as they did before the agreement. Nothing in the UK-Japan Comprehensive Partnership Agreement (CEPA) changes the current position in relation to onward transfers of UK personal data from Japan. Transfers of personal data from the UK to Japan are governed by the preserved effect of the EU’s adequacy decision for Japan. This recognises that the Japanese data regime has appropriate protections in place when personal data is transferred from Japan to other countries, including enforcement mechanisms.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if UK citizens’ data could be transferred under the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement from Japan to third countries with lower levels of data protection.

Transfers of personal data from the UK to third countries are regulated under the UK GDPR and the Data Protection Act 2018, not free trade agreements.

The UK-Japan CEPA does not change the current position in relation to onward transfers of UK personal data from Japan. Transfers of personal data from the UK to Japan are governed by the preserved effect of the EU’s adequacy decision for Japan. This recognises that the Japanese data regime provides appropriate protections when personal data is transferred from Japan to third countries.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans he has to trigger UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement public policy exemptions if UK citizens’ data was to be transferred to third countries with lower levels of protection under the agreement.

The UK is preserving the effect of the EU's adequacy decision for Japan on a transitional basis because robust protections are in place for the international transfer of personal data. The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) does not change this position in relation to onward transfers of UK personal data from Japan.

The CEPA article on cross-border flows (8.84.2) states that exceptions to the flow of data can be made to achieve “legitimate public policy objectives”. This means that if justified, either party could take action to restrict data flows.

CEPA addresses data flows between the UK and Japan and not onward transfers to other jurisdictions.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of a potential ban on arbitrary or unjustifiable restrictions on data flows within the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement and the UK’s GDPR regime.

We are confident the UK GDPR is compliant with the terms of the legitimate public policy exception in the cross-border flows article (8.84) of the UK-Japan CEPA. The UK GDPR requirements are not arbitrary nor unjustifiably discriminatory, and ensure a high standard of protection for personal data transferred outside the UK.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether UK citizens’ data is afforded the same degree of protection in Japan under the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement as EU data is under the Japan-EU Free Trade Agreement.

The EU-Japan agreement does not include data provisions. There is simply a review clause in the free flow of data article that commits the parties to assess the need for the inclusion of provisions on the free flow of data in the agreement within 3 years.

UK citizens’ data protection rights are not impacted by the agreement with Japan and UK data protection standards will not change as a result of the agreement. The UK data protection regime - enshrined in the Data Protection Act 2018 and UK GDPR - will continue to apply.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the source code, software and algorithm provisions of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement on the Government’s right to regulate new technologies.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership includes a provision that ensures UK businesses will not be forced to share their software’s source code, or algorithms expressed in that source code, as a condition of entering the Japanese market. This provides protection for UK company trade secrets and allows companies to retain any competitive advantage that their source code provides.

The agreement does not prohibit all regulatory intervention in respect of new technologies and is designed with future-proofing in mind. The permissible interventions include setting standards, supplier selection, reviewing coding procedures, inspecting underlying data-sets, and prose explanations as to how an algorithm reached a decision.

In designing the exceptions to the source code provision, the UK and Japan have taken a technology and regulator neutral approach. We are convinced that this approach is best to ensure the provision and the exceptions meet both the current and future needs of UK regulators.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of (a) the likelihood of the EU granting a positive data adequacy decision, (b) the likelihood of a positive data adequacy decision being made within the next six months and (c) the effect on UK industry in the event that a positive adequacy decision is not taken before the end of transitional measures.

(a) The UK has been in formal talks with the European Commission since March 2020 to secure data adequacy decisions under both the General Data Protection Regulation and the Law Enforcement Directive. The EU’s adequacy assessments ascertain whether UK data protection standards are ‘essentially equivalent’ to the EU’s. Given we have an existing data protection framework that is equivalent to the EU’s, we see no reason why the UK should not be awarded adequacy.

(b) The EU left insufficient time to adopt data adequacy decisions before the end of the transition period. We have therefore agreed with the EU a time-limited ‘bridging mechanism’ which will allow personal data to continue to flow as it does now whilst EU adequacy decisions for the UK are adopted. In practice, we do not expect the bridging mechanism to be in place for more than 4 months, which is when the bridge is envisioned to expire, but there is scope to extend it to 6 months if required. As stated above, given the UK has an existing data protection framework that is equivalent to the EU’s, we see no reason why the UK should not be awarded adequacy in this timeframe.

(c) In the event that positive adequacy decisions are not ratified before the end of the bridging mechanism, businesses would be able to use alternative legal mechanisms to continue to transfer personal data from the EU to the UK. Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) are the most common legal safeguard and will be the relevant mitigation for most organisations. As a sensible precaution, before and during the bridging mechanism, businesses should consider putting in place alternative transfer mechanisms to safeguard against any interruption to the free flow of EU to UK personal data.

6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what services the Government Legal Department’s Litigation Group has provided to his Department since 1 January 2021.

Since 1 January 2021, Litigation Group has continued to provide litigation services to the majority of government departments, including the Department for Education, and executive agencies, as well as many non-departmental public bodies.

The Group’s work encompasses litigation in public and private law as well as supporting public inquiries and acting in inquests. This has involved, amongst other things, attending in a wide range of courts (including Coroners’ Courts), the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Supreme Court.

GLD’s Employment and Commercial Groups similarly provide litigation services to the majority of government departments and have done so in the period in question.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what methodology his Department uses to evaluate the contribution of higher education-related exports to the UK economy.

The department publishes annual experimental statistics on UK revenue from education related exports and transnational education activity.

The latest release, published in December 2020, estimated total UK revenue from education related exports and transnational activity in 2018 to be £23.3 billion, of which £16 billion (69%) of the total value came from higher education activity.

The statistical release, along with the technical note detailing the methodology and data sources used can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uk-revenue-from-education-related-exports-and-transnational-education-activity-2018.

Through the government’s International Education Strategy, and the 2021 update to the Strategy, we have committed to providing a clearer picture of Education Exports data. The department continues to work closely with the Department for International Trade on this matter and as set out in the 2021 Update, a roadmap is being developed focusing on short/medium/long-term steps to improve data. The update can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/international-education-strategy-2021-update/international-education-strategy-2021-update-supporting-recovery-driving-growth.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the Government last conducted an evaluation of international higher education students’ contribution to the UK economy.

The department publishes annual experimental statistics on UK revenue from education related exports and transnational education activity.

The latest release, published in December 2020, estimated total UK revenue from education related exports and transnational activity in 2018 to be £23.3 billion, of which £16 billion (69%) of the total value came from higher education activity.

The statistical release, along with the technical note detailing the methodology and data sources used can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uk-revenue-from-education-related-exports-and-transnational-education-activity-2018.

Through the government’s International Education Strategy, and the 2021 update to the Strategy, we have committed to providing a clearer picture of Education Exports data. The department continues to work closely with the Department for International Trade on this matter and as set out in the 2021 Update, a roadmap is being developed focusing on short/medium/long-term steps to improve data. The update can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/international-education-strategy-2021-update/international-education-strategy-2021-update-supporting-recovery-driving-growth.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions have taken place between UK and EU representatives on the effect of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on export opportunities for the UK EdTech sector in Europe.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement guarantees that UK investors and service suppliers will be able to access the EU’s markets and will not be subject to discriminatory barriers to trade. The agreement includes gold standard rules on services and investment liberalisation.

The Department is engaging with education exporters to help the sector understand and adapt to these new trading conditions, including those within the EdTech sector.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Drinking Water Inspectorate’s contract reference 298893/1045616, which research organisation has been awarded the contract; what the contract’s agreed value is; and when the resulting study is due to be submitted to the Inspectorate.

The Invitation to Tender closed on 17 March 2022 and is currently being evaluated by the technical evaluators. We received six bids and the consensus meeting is due to take place on 28 March 2022. As usual, any resulting contract will be redacted/published in Contracts Finder in due course, within the permissible 30 day period.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what services the Government Legal Department’s Litigation Group has provided to his Department since 1 January 2021.

Since 1 January 2021, Litigation Group has continued to provide litigation services to the majority of Government departments, including Defra, and executive agencies, as well as many non-departmental public bodies.

The Group’s work encompasses litigation in public and private law as well as supporting public inquiries and acting in Inquests. This has involved, amongst other things, attending in a wide range of courts, including Coroners’ Courts, the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Supreme Court. Our Employment and Commercial Groups similarly provide litigation services to the majority of Government departments and have done so in the period in question.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what funding his Department has allocated from 2021-22 to 2024-25 to support the development of the UK onion industry.

While no specific provision for the onion sector has been allocated from 2021-22 to 2024-25, sources of funding available to the onion industry between now and 2024-25 could include the three funds available under the Farming Innovation Programme, the forthcoming Farming Investment Fund, and existing Fruit and Vegetable Producer Organisations under the Fruit and Vegetable Aid Scheme.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of potential shortages of fertiliser products over winter 2021-22, and what discussions he has had with suppliers and the agricultural sector on those potential shortages.

We are aware that due to the increase in cost of natural gas across the globe, which is a key input for the production of ammonium nitrate-based fertiliser products, the cost of production of these fertiliser types has increased significantly. This has also increased the cost of other alternative fertiliser types. This is an issue affecting Europe and the global market with fertiliser companies halting production due to high input costs. However, the recent deal announced with industry and CF Fertilisers will help to alleviate the pressure on the domestic market.

Defra has been in regular contact with industry including the NFU and fertiliser producers and importers, and we have frequent contact with the key sector representative body for fertilisers, the Agricultural Industries Confederation (AIC). The situation and impact on farmers in particular and industry more widely is being monitored closely.

Alternatives to ammonium nitrate do exist and farmers will be looking closely at these options and how best they can be utilised. Support from producers of these products on how best to use them and to get the best nutrient uptake for crop has been offered.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of number of annual sanitary and phytosanitary checks in all forms that will be conducted for (a) exports from Great Britain to the EU and (b) imports from Great Britain to the EU once full border controls have been implemented.

Full import controls on GB exports to the EU have been in operation by the EU since 1 January 2021. The number of export health certificates being issued will not change as a result of our own implementation of border checks on EU imports into GB.

Estimates of the total number of export health certificates required following the end of the transition period indicated that up to 300k additional certificates would be needed for GB-EU trade, and up to 480k per annum when GB-NI and GB-Rest of World Trade were included. The EU determines how many physical checks it needs to conduct with minimum levels set out in the Official Controls Regulation. Regulated imports and exports are subject to 100% documentary checks.

We estimate, based on our own analysis of customs data, that 4 million to 5.9 million consignments of sanitary and phytosanitary commodities will be imported annually from the EU. These are divided between 1.3 million to 2.5 million consignments of products of animal origin, and 2.7 million to 3.4 million consignments of plants and plant products. Each individual consignment will require certification. A minimum 1% of all low-risk imports will be physically checked with higher percentages for commodities that present a greater biosecurity risk.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of potential retail shortages of (a) soft drinks, (b) bottled water and (c) alcoholic beverages over winter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers and retailers on those potential shortages.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain, as demonstrated throughout the Covid-19 response. It is well equipped to deal with situations with the potential to cause disruption. Our high degree of food security is built on access to a range of sources, including robust domestic supply chains, as well as imports through stable export routes

Defra has well established ways of working with the industry and across Government to monitor risks that may arise. This includes extensive, regular and ongoing engagement with manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers in preparedness for, and response to, issues with the potential to cause disruption across different product groups in food supply chains.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of potential retail shortages of baked goods and baking ingredients over winter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers and retailers on those potential shortages.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain, as demonstrated throughout the Covid-19 response. It is well equipped to deal with situations with the potential to cause disruption. Our high degree of food security is built on access to a range of sources, including robust domestic supply chains, as well as imports through stable export routes

Defra has well established ways of working with the industry and across Government to monitor risks that may arise. This includes extensive, regular and ongoing engagement with manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers in preparedness for, and response to, issues with the potential to cause disruption across different product groups in food supply chains.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of potential retail shortages of ready meals over winter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers and retailers on those potential shortages.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain, as demonstrated throughout the Covid-19 response. It is well equipped to deal with situations with the potential to cause disruption. Our high degree of food security is built on access to a range of sources, including robust domestic supply chains, as well as imports through stable export routes

Defra has well established ways of working with the industry and across Government to monitor risks that may arise. This includes extensive, regular and ongoing engagement with manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers in preparedness for, and response to, issues with the potential to cause disruption across different product groups in food supply chains.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of potential retail shortages of (a) semi-processed and (b) processed meat products over winter 2021-22; and what discussions he has had with suppliers and retailers on those potential shortages.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain, as demonstrated throughout the Covid-19 response. It is well equipped to deal with situations with the potential to cause disruption. Our high degree of food security is built on access to a range of sources, including robust domestic supply chains, as well as imports through stable export routes

Defra has well established ways of working with the industry and across Government to monitor risks that may arise. This includes extensive, regular and ongoing engagement with manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers in preparedness for, and response to, issues with the potential to cause disruption across different product groups in food supply chains.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been or (b) will be retained as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (c) inward investment as part of the Government’s plans to protect the natural environment between November 2020 and November 2030.

The Government's Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution is mobilising significant investment in protecting the natural environment in England over the coming years. This will create and retain a range of green jobs while safeguarding our cherished landscapes and restoring habitats for wildlife in order to combat biodiversity loss and adapt to climate change.

As part of this, the £80 million Green Recovery Challenge Fund (GRCF) has already attracted £17.6 million in match funding across 159 projects and will create and retain around 2,500 jobs. The Government's £5.2 billion flood defence investment programme will create approximately 2,000 jobs over the duration of the programme (April 2021 - March 2027) with private sector delivery partners involved in flood defence scheme design and construction.

The England Trees Action Plan committed to treble tree planting rates in England by the end of this Parliament, supported by over £500m from the Nature for Climate Fund. In the recently launched Net Zero Strategy, the Government has also announced that it will boost the Nature for Climate fund with a further £124 million of new money, ensuring total spend of more than £750 million by 2025 on peat restoration, woodland creation and management – above and beyond what was promised in the manifesto. This funding, along with increased private investment, will help to support up to 1,900 jobs by 2024 and 2,000 jobs by 2030 in new woodland creation, harvesting and restocking. It will also support additional jobs in tourism, seed supply and local farming.

The England Peat Action Plan includes a commitment to invest over £50 million of the Nature for Climate Fund to restore approximately 35,000ha of peatland by 2025, which will create or retain approximately 600 jobs.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been or (b) will be created as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (iii) inward investment as part of the Government’s plans to protect the natural environment between November 2020 and November 2030.

The Government's Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution is mobilising significant investment in protecting the natural environment in England over the coming years. This will create and retain a range of green jobs while safeguarding our cherished landscapes and restoring habitats for wildlife in order to combat biodiversity loss and adapt to climate change.

As part of this, the £80 million Green Recovery Challenge Fund (GRCF) has already attracted £17.6 million in match funding across 159 projects and will create and retain around 2,500 jobs. The Government's £5.2 billion flood defence investment programme will create approximately 2,000 jobs over the duration of the programme (April 2021 - March 2027) with private sector delivery partners involved in flood defence scheme design and construction.

The England Trees Action Plan committed to treble tree planting rates in England by the end of this Parliament, supported by over £500m from the Nature for Climate Fund. In the recently launched Net Zero Strategy, the Government has also announced that it will boost the Nature for Climate fund with a further £124 million of new money, ensuring total spend of more than £750 million by 2025 on peat restoration, woodland creation and management – above and beyond what was promised in the manifesto. This funding, along with increased private investment, will help to support up to 1,900 jobs by 2024 and 2,000 jobs by 2030 in new woodland creation, harvesting and restocking. It will also support additional jobs in tourism, seed supply and local farming.

The England Peat Action Plan includes a commitment to invest over £50 million of the Nature for Climate Fund to restore approximately 35,000ha of peatland by 2025, which will create or retain approximately 600 jobs.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many UK exporters have faced sanitary and phytosanitary checks exporting to countries in the EU since 1 January 2021.

The EU introduced sanitary and phytosanitary controls on all exports from Great Britain (GB) to the EU on 1 January 2021. Since then, all animal and animal product exports must have an appropriate export health certificate (EHC) and plants and plant products require a phytosanitary certificate (PC).

Each commodity type in a consignment will require a minimum of one EHC but in some cases, mixed load consignments or packages may require multiple EHCs. Physical checks conducted by the EU are not notified to the UK and therefore we are unable to confirm how many exporters have faced checks at EU border control posts. Minimum percentages for specific checks are set out in the Official Controls Regulation for both the EU and the UK to comply with.

Since 1 January, 1,533 GB plant exporters have applied for 28,904 PCs (this figure include plants moving to Northern Ireland).

Likewise, there have been 159,000 EHCs issued for animal and animal products commodities exported to EU member states from approximately 1,300 businesses.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many goods exported to countries in the European Union from the UK have faced sanitary and phytosanitary checks since 1 January 2021.

The EU introduced sanitary and phytosanitary controls on all exports from Great Britain (GB) to the EU on 1 January 2021. Since then, all animal and animal product exports must have an appropriate export health certificate (EHC) and plants and plant products require a phytosanitary certificate (PC).

Each commodity type in a consignment will require a minimum of one EHC but in some cases, mixed load consignments or packages may require multiple EHCs. Physical checks conducted by the EU are not notified to the UK and therefore we are unable to confirm how many exporters have faced checks at EU border control posts. Minimum percentages for specific checks are set out in the Official Controls Regulation for both the EU and the UK to comply with.

Since 1 January, 1,533 GB plant exporters have applied for 28,904 PCs (this figure include plants moving to Northern Ireland).

Likewise, there have been 159,000 EHCs issued for animal and animal products commodities exported to EU member states from approximately 1,300 businesses.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many EU exporters have faced sanitary and phytosanitary checks exporting to the UK since 1 January 2021.

The UK is introducing sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) import controls in a phased manner, supporting businesses as they come through the pandemic and ensuring that we do not disrupt food supply. From 1 January 2022, high-priority plants and plant products and live animals will be subjected to full import controls with checks taking place at destination. We will be introducing pre-notification requirements for all other regulated SPS goods from 1 January 2022 and full import controls from July 2022 onwards.

We cannot break down individual business numbers easily. Approximately 1,400 businesses registered for pre-notification and the following checks have been conducted:

73,401 consignments of regulated plants and plant products have been imported to the UK from the EU: 59,210 (80.67%) were subjected to SPS documentary checks of which 48 failed (0.07%).

49,822 were subject to identity checks (67.88%) of which 12 failed (0.02%).

11,310 faced physical SPS checks (15.41%) and 22 failed such checks (0.03%).

9796 consignments of live animals were imported into the UK from the EU. All were subject to documentary checks and 2122 (22%) were subjected to physical inspection.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many goods exported from the EU to the UK have faced sanitary and phytosanitary checks since 1 January 2021.

The UK is introducing sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) import controls in a phased manner, supporting businesses as they come through the pandemic and ensuring that we do not disrupt food supply. From 1 January 2022, high-priority plants and plant products and live animals will be subjected to full import controls with checks taking place at destination. We will be introducing pre-notification requirements for all other regulated SPS goods from 1 January 2022 and full import controls from July 2022 onwards.

We cannot break down individual business numbers easily. Approximately 1,400 businesses registered for pre-notification and the following checks have been conducted:

73,401 consignments of regulated plants and plant products have been imported to the UK from the EU: 59,210 (80.67%) were subjected to SPS documentary checks of which 48 failed (0.07%).

49,822 were subject to identity checks (67.88%) of which 12 failed (0.02%).

11,310 faced physical SPS checks (15.41%) and 22 failed such checks (0.03%).

9796 consignments of live animals were imported into the UK from the EU. All were subject to documentary checks and 2122 (22%) were subjected to physical inspection.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether egg-based products produced from farms where laying hens are caged in stocking density as low as 550sq cm per hen falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether egg-based products from farms where laying hens are subject to the trimming of their beaks with a hot blade falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether egg-based products from farms where laying hens are confined in barren battery cages falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether pork produced on farms that keep pregnant pigs confined in sow stalls falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether pork produced on farms that carry out the castration of pigs up to the age of 21 days without pain relief falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether sheep meat produced on farms that carry out the castration of lambs up to the age of six months without pain relief falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether beef produced on farms that carry out the surgical removal of ovaries from cows without pain relief falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether beef produced on farms that carry out the dehorning of cattle without pain relief falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether meat produced from livestock transported over land for up to 48 hours without rest falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether sheep meat produced on farms that carry out the mulesing of lambs falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what advice the Government has provided to UK importers and exporters of (a) raw mink fur skins and (b) related items under customs commodity code 430110 on (i) the potential risks to human and animal health posed by that trade and (ii) steps that can be taken to mitigate those risks since March 2021.

The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) has recently concluded that there is insufficient evidence to consider raw mink fur skins as safe for international trade because of the SARS-CoV-2 risk. Further evidence is needed to improve our understanding of any other risks to human or animal health potentially posed by international trade in contaminated pelts or fur. The UK has been closely involved in these discussions.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has established that no specific authorisations have been issued for the import of untreated furs from third countries into the UK in the last two years. This view is supported by analysis of data from the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS), which is used to notify enforcement authorities about imports of live animals, animal products and high-risk food and feed not of animal origin into Great Britain. No Export Health Certificates have been issued by the domestic authorities for raw mink skins and APHA data also show no evidence of any UK export of this commodity.

The UK's approach to biosecurity is internationally recognised for delivering the highest standards of protection from pests, diseases, and invasive non-native species. This begins with the vital process of horizon scanning to detect potential risks, it includes robust measures to prevent and detect incursions as well as a capacity to respond effectively to contain or eradicate outbreaks that may occur. This is underpinned by world-class scientific capabilities and collaboration internationally and across Government through key links with industry, stakeholder organisations and the wider public.

Safeguard measures under the OIE code may be put in place to ban the import of goods because of a new or emerging disease threat. Although such measures have not been introduced domestically to date, we continue to monitor developments and to consider our response should we receive any applications to import raw mink fur.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what research the Government has (a) commissioned and (b) received to better understand the potential risks to human and animal health posed by international trade in pelts of fur contaminated with covid-19 since March 2021.

The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) has recently concluded that there is insufficient evidence to consider raw mink fur skins as safe for international trade because of the SARS-CoV-2 risk. Further evidence is needed to improve our understanding of any other risks to human or animal health potentially posed by international trade in contaminated pelts or fur. The UK has been closely involved in these discussions.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has established that no specific authorisations have been issued for the import of untreated furs from third countries into the UK in the last two years. This view is supported by analysis of data from the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS), which is used to notify enforcement authorities about imports of live animals, animal products and high-risk food and feed not of animal origin into Great Britain. No Export Health Certificates have been issued by the domestic authorities for raw mink skins and APHA data also show no evidence of any UK export of this commodity.

The UK's approach to biosecurity is internationally recognised for delivering the highest standards of protection from pests, diseases, and invasive non-native species. This begins with the vital process of horizon scanning to detect potential risks, it includes robust measures to prevent and detect incursions as well as a capacity to respond effectively to contain or eradicate outbreaks that may occur. This is underpinned by world-class scientific capabilities and collaboration internationally and across Government through key links with industry, stakeholder organisations and the wider public.

Safeguard measures under the OIE code may be put in place to ban the import of goods because of a new or emerging disease threat. Although such measures have not been introduced domestically to date, we continue to monitor developments and to consider our response should we receive any applications to import raw mink fur.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken since March 2021 to mitigate the potential risks involved in the (a) import to and (b) export from the UK of raw mink furskins and related items under customs commodity code 430110.

The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) has recently concluded that there is insufficient evidence to consider raw mink fur skins as safe for international trade because of the SARS-CoV-2 risk. Further evidence is needed to improve our understanding of any other risks to human or animal health potentially posed by international trade in contaminated pelts or fur. The UK has been closely involved in these discussions.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has established that no specific authorisations have been issued for the import of untreated furs from third countries into the UK in the last two years. This view is supported by analysis of data from the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS), which is used to notify enforcement authorities about imports of live animals, animal products and high-risk food and feed not of animal origin into Great Britain. No Export Health Certificates have been issued by the domestic authorities for raw mink skins and APHA data also show no evidence of any UK export of this commodity.

The UK's approach to biosecurity is internationally recognised for delivering the highest standards of protection from pests, diseases, and invasive non-native species. This begins with the vital process of horizon scanning to detect potential risks, it includes robust measures to prevent and detect incursions as well as a capacity to respond effectively to contain or eradicate outbreaks that may occur. This is underpinned by world-class scientific capabilities and collaboration internationally and across Government through key links with industry, stakeholder organisations and the wider public.

Safeguard measures under the OIE code may be put in place to ban the import of goods because of a new or emerging disease threat. Although such measures have not been introduced domestically to date, we continue to monitor developments and to consider our response should we receive any applications to import raw mink fur.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the safety of raw mink furskins and related items under customs code 430110 as commodities for (a) import to or (b) export from the UK.

The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) has recently concluded that there is insufficient evidence to consider raw mink fur skins as safe for international trade because of the SARS-CoV-2 risk. Further evidence is needed to improve our understanding of any other risks to human or animal health potentially posed by international trade in contaminated pelts or fur. The UK has been closely involved in these discussions.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has established that no specific authorisations have been issued for the import of untreated furs from third countries into the UK in the last two years. This view is supported by analysis of data from the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS), which is used to notify enforcement authorities about imports of live animals, animal products and high-risk food and feed not of animal origin into Great Britain. No Export Health Certificates have been issued by the domestic authorities for raw mink skins and APHA data also show no evidence of any UK export of this commodity.

The UK's approach to biosecurity is internationally recognised for delivering the highest standards of protection from pests, diseases, and invasive non-native species. This begins with the vital process of horizon scanning to detect potential risks, it includes robust measures to prevent and detect incursions as well as a capacity to respond effectively to contain or eradicate outbreaks that may occur. This is underpinned by world-class scientific capabilities and collaboration internationally and across Government through key links with industry, stakeholder organisations and the wider public.

Safeguard measures under the OIE code may be put in place to ban the import of goods because of a new or emerging disease threat. Although such measures have not been introduced domestically to date, we continue to monitor developments and to consider our response should we receive any applications to import raw mink fur.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, on what date officials in his Department provided the Department for International Trade with the completed technical documents translated into Japanese necessary to apply for the UK's new geographical indications, as part of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

Following the contract award on 2 December 2020, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) provided the geographical indications technical documents to Acuity translations with a view to work commencing on 23 December 2020. Defra received all the completed translations of the geographical indication technical documents on 1 February 2021 and provided the Department for International Trade with these documents on 13 April 2021 as requested following discussion with Japanese counterparts.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, on what date Acuity Translations provided his officials with the completed technical documents translated into Japanese necessary to apply for the UK's new geographical indications, as part of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

Following the contract award on 2 December 2020, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) provided the geographical indications technical documents to Acuity translations with a view to work commencing on 23 December 2020. Defra received all the completed translations of the geographical indication technical documents on 1 February 2021 and provided the Department for International Trade with these documents on 13 April 2021 as requested following discussion with Japanese counterparts.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, on what date officials in his Department provided Acuity Translations with the completed English technical documents for translation into Japanese necessary to apply for the UK's new geographical indications, as part of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

Following the contract award on 2 December 2020, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) provided the geographical indications technical documents to Acuity translations with a view to work commencing on 23 December 2020. Defra received all the completed translations of the geographical indication technical documents on 1 February 2021 and provided the Department for International Trade with these documents on 13 April 2021 as requested following discussion with Japanese counterparts.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of how much domestic sales of fur contributed to the UK economy in 2019-20.

HMRC data for 2019 indicates approximate values of £52,911,000 gross imports, £32,713,000 gross exports, and £20,198,000 net imports. This covers raw furskins, tanned or dressed furskins, and articles of apparel, clothing accessories and other furskin articles.

2019

4301 Raw furskins

Imports

Value (£)

£962,216

4301 Raw furskins

Exports

Value (£)

£536,654

4301 Raw furskins

Net Imports

Value (£)

£425,562

4302 Tanned or dressed furskins

Imports

Value (£)

£7,773,470

4302 Tanned or dressed furskins

Exports

Value (£)

£7,012,555

4302 Tanned or dressed furskins

Net Imports

Value (£)

£760,915

4303 Articles of apparel, clothing accessories and other furskin articles

Imports

Value (£)

£44,174,922

4303 Articles of apparel, clothing accessories and other furskin articles

Exports

Value (£)

£25,163,877

4303 Articles of apparel, clothing accessories and other furskin articles

Net Imports

Value (£)

£19,011,045

TOTALS

Imports

Value (£)

£52,910,608

TOTALS

Exports

Value (£)

£32,713,086

TOTALS

Net Imports

Value (£)

£20,197,522

Sourced from https://www.uktradeinfo.com/trade-data/ots-custom-table/

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, what assessment he has made of the effect of the frequency of sanitary and phytosanitary checks on the profitability of UK food, drink and live animal exporters.

The UK has secured its top priorities on sanitary and phytosanitary measures: autonomy for our domestic regime, protection of our biosecurity and proportionate risk-based controls. The agreement allows the UK and the EU to cooperate on avoiding unnecessary sanitary and phytosanitary barriers to trade in agri-food goods, including potential reductions in the frequency of import checks, where justified.

The EU and UK being geographically close, and close as trading partners, have a number of common pathogen risks, a similar health status and biosecurity aims. We should focus resources on checks that support us both to address any risks. We will seek to reduce checks safely through the regular dialogue both sides have committed to in the agreement. Over time, this will help to reduce any burden on businesses. Taken alongside other elements of the TCA such as zero tariffs and zero quota, this represents a good outcome for the UK's agri-food industry. We have also agreed to exchange information and expertise on animal welfare, particularly relating to transportation and slaughter of food-producing animals, and other issues.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of Rules of Origin requirements on (a) the UK tobacco industry and (b) finished tobacco products imported into the UK from the EU from 1 January 2021, to support negotiations on the UK-EU Free Trade Agreement.

In the event of a Free Trade Agreement with the EU, as with all Free Trade Agreements and all products, the Rules of Origin for finished tobacco products would be specific to that agreement. The exact rules will be discussed and decided through the negotiations, which, in this case, are still ongoing. The UK and EU have held substantial discussions on Rules of Origin and Defra has supported these conversations.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether an Organic Equivalence Arrangement will be in place with Japan before the end of the transition period.

Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) wrote to Defra on 19 December 2019 to confirm that Japan would continue to recognise UK organic products imported into Japan from the point at which the UK withdrew from the European Union. This recognition is effective for two years until 31 January 2022.

We have already confirmed that we will continue to recognise Japan’s organic products as we do now. We plan to write to MAFF shortly to confirm the legislation that will be in place in the UK at the end of the transition period and to confirm the import processes that they will need to follow to continue to export organic products to the UK.

Japan has also requested to audit the UK organic system in 2021. Defra have suggested some dates and we will continue to engage with MAFF over the coming months.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress the Government is making on negotiations to a secure an Organic Equivalence Arrangement with Japan.

Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) wrote to Defra on 19 December 2019 to confirm that Japan would continue to recognise UK organic products imported into Japan from the point at which the UK withdrew from the European Union. This recognition is effective for two years until 31 January 2022.

We have already confirmed that we will continue to recognise Japan’s organic products as we do now. We plan to write to MAFF shortly to confirm the legislation that will be in place in the UK at the end of the transition period and to confirm the import processes that they will need to follow to continue to export organic products to the UK.

Japan has also requested to audit the UK organic system in 2021. Defra have suggested some dates and we will continue to engage with MAFF over the coming months.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to review the current rules on the import of fur and fur products after the end of the transition period for the UK’s departure from the EU.

I refer the hon Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Totnes on 30 June 2020, PQ UIN 62631.

[www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2020-06-22/62631]

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on UK businesses of imposing a total ban on the import of fur and fur products.

I refer the hon Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Totnes on 30 June 2020, PQ UIN 62631.

[www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2020-06-22/62631]

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when her Department last held discussions with its international counterparts on tackling the illegal trade in wildlife and endangered species.

The UK plays a leading role in driving the global response to eradicate illegal wildlife trade and regularly holds discussions with its international counterparts.

In 2018, the UK convened the largest ever global Illegal Wildlife Trade conference at which 65 countries signed up to the London Declaration, committing to take urgent, coordinated action against illegal wildlife trade.

Since then, the UK has raised the importance of tackling illegal wildlife trade to protect biodiversity and endangered species with other countries during regular bilaterals and during meetings under international agreements such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government has taken to assist states in the Global South to tackle (a) poaching and (b) wildlife crime.

The UK Government is at the forefront of international efforts to protect endangered wildlife from poaching and illegal trade. We are investing over £36 million between 2014 and 2021 to support practical action in developing countries, including our counter-poaching Task Force in Africa, 75 projects so far funded from our Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, and through the International Consortium on Combatting Wildlife Crime. We are also contributing £250 million to the Global Environment Facility between 2018 and 2022 which, amongst other things, supports the world’s biggest fund for tackling illegal wildlife trade, the Global Wildlife Programme.

A further £30 million will be invested in tackling poaching and wildlife crime between 2021 and 2024 as part of the £220 million International Biodiversity Fund recently announced by the Prime Minister.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the challenges associated with the equitable and efficient international supply and distribution of a vaccine for covid-19.

On 27 June, the PM told Global Citizen’s international summit that world leaders have a moral duty to ensure that vaccines, treatments and tests are truly available to all. We are working with international partners, including industry, to agree collaborative approaches to supporting vaccine development, manufacturing scale-up and future distribution to meet both domestic and international needs.

The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), to which we have provided £250 million this year, is committed to ensuring that appropriate vaccines are available to populations when and where they are needed, regardless of a country's ability to pay. CEPI selects vaccines for its portfolio based on their potential for success, rapid development and scalability. CEPI negotiates global access requirements as part of its funding agreements.

Through the COVAX partnership, under the Access to Covid Tools (ACT)-Accelerator, CEPI, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and the World Health Organization are working together to ensure that the vaccines are affordable and available equitably. As part of this, Gavi’s Advance Market Commitment (AMC) will incentivise vaccine manufacturers to produce sufficient quantities of eventual COVID-19 vaccines and to ensure access for LMICs. The UK has contributed £48 million to the AMC.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of deforestation in the Amazon on trends in the level of malaria throughout the world.

Whilst DFID has not carried out an assessment on a relationship between malaria and Amazonian deforestation, we are at the forefront of international efforts on both issues. On malaria we are the second largest country donor, including our announcement in June 2019 to contribute up to £1.4 billion to the Sixth Replenishment of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and this Government has committed to lead efforts towards ending the malaria epidemic. DFID also tackles illegal logging and promotes the sustainable trade in timber, working with companies to eliminate deforestation from supply chains.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what representations he has made to the OECD Development Co-operation Directorate on changes to the Development Assistance Committee criteria.

The UK continues to make representations regarding Development Assistance Committee criteria for Official Development Assistance (ODA).

The ODA rules enable a broad range of activities to be defined as ODA. They need to continue to evolve as development challenges change and to deliver the Sustainable Development Goals.

Since 2012 the UK has led the way in modernising the rules, securing reforms. We continue to keep scope for improvements under review and actively push for reforms when we consider the rules are out of date.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what support he has offered to the Philippine Government for evacuations within the Cavite province.

DFID and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office are closely monitoring the Taal volcano eruption. The Philippine Government is evacuating affected areas and has not requested assistance. The UK Government continues to liaise closely with the Philippine authorities and stands ready to assist should a request be made.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what support he has provided to the (a) Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo and (b) World Health Organisation to tackle the measles outbreak in that country.

The UK is a longstanding donor to the health sector in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, improving health services, including capacity to tackle disease outbreaks. The UK remains deeply concerned by the ongoing Measles outbreak. We are providing support to the Democratic Republic of the Congo government response through United Nations agencies and Global Alliance for Vaccines (GAVI).

The UK has ensured a £3.2 million emergency allocation from the UN Humanitarian Fund, mostly going to the World Health Organisation for measles vaccinations and treatment. DFID is the largest contributor to the Humanitarian Fund. As a key core funder of GAVI, the UK is also supporting ongoing immunisation work nationwide, including for measles.

We are continuing to follow progress with the response together with partners, keeping resource requirements to end the outbreak under review.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, further to the Answer of 18 May 2021 to Question 147, whether she plans to correct her Department’s declaration of ministerial travel published on 7 May 2021 to reflect the cost to the public purse of her predecessor’s accommodation, subsistence and other expenses excluding travel when visiting Singapore and Vietnam in December 2020.

The declaration will be updated in the next 30 days.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 18 May 2021 to Question 146, on Trade Agreements: Japan, whether she plans to correct her Department’s declaration of ministerial travel published on 7 May 2021 to reflect the accurate cost to the public purse of her predecessor’s subsistence and other expenses excluding travel when visiting Japan in October 2020.

The declaration will be updated in the next 30 days.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 6 April 2022 to Question 149195, on Department for International Trade: Aviation, and her Department’s declaration of ministerial travel published on 21 October 2021, whether the total cost to the public purse of her predecessor’s accommodation, meals and other expenses, excluding travel, when visiting Israel in June 2021 was £989.39; and who paid for any costs incurred above that amount.

Transparency returns include the best information available to the department at the time of publication. On some visits, accommodation, transport and other services are provided by Embassies or host governments. Information on the costs of these services is not centrally held.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 6 April 2022 to Question 149194, on Department for International Trade: Aviation, and her Department’s declaration of ministerial travel published on 21 October 2021, whether the total cost to the public purse of her predecessor’s accommodation, meals and other expenses, excluding travel, when visiting the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia in April 2021 was £259.87; and who paid for any costs incurred above that amount.

Transparency returns include the best information available to the department at the time of publication. On some visits, accommodation, transport and other services are provided by Embassies or host governments. Information on the costs of these services is not centrally held.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the answer of 6 April 2022 to Question 149193, on Department for International Trade: Aviation, and her Department’s declaration of ministerial travel published on 15 July 2021, whether the total cost to the public purse of her predecessor’s accommodation, meals and other expenses, excluding travel, when visiting India in February 2021 was £509.65; and who paid for any costs incurred above that amount.

Transparency returns include the best information available to the department at the time of publication. On some visits, accommodation, transport and other services are provided by Embassies or host governments. Information on the costs of these services is not centrally held.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 6 April 2022 to Question 149190, on Department for International Trade: Aviation, and her Department’s declaration of ministerial travel published on 23 January 2020, whether the total cost to the public purse of her predecessor’s accommodation, meals and other expenses, excluding travel, when visiting New Zealand, Australia, Japan in September 2019 was £0.00; and who paid for any costs incurred above that amount.

Transparency returns include the best information available to the department at the time of publication. On some visits, accommodation, transport and other services are provided by Embassies or host governments. Information on the costs of these services is not centrally held.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 6 April to Question 149189 and her Department’s declaration of ministerial travel published on 23 January 2020, (a) whether the total cost to the public purse of her predecessor’s accommodation, meals and other expenses excluding travel when visiting Washington DC in August 2019 was £0.00; and (b) who paid for any costs incurred above that amount.

Transparency returns include the best information available to the department at the time of publication. On some visits, accommodation, transport and other services are provided by Embassies or host governments. Information on the costs of these services is not centrally held.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 6 April 2022 to Question 149191 and her Department’s declaration of ministerial travel published on 23 January 2020, whether the total cost to the public purse of her predecessor’s accommodation, meals and other expenses excluding travel when visiting New York in September 2019 was £3.00; and who paid for any costs incurred above that amount.

There was a typo in my answer of 6 April. The correct cost of the flight was £5,575.72. The department’s transparency return published in January 2020 included flight costs only.

Transparency returns include the best information available to the department at the time of publication. On some visits, accommodation, transport and other services are provided by Embassies or host governments. Information on the costs of these services is not centrally held.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if payments under the contract agreed by his Department for the provision of the Export Support Services Contact Centre have been made on an available hours basis or a productive hours basis from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022.

Payments made under the contract for the Provision of Export Support Services Contact Centre have been made on an available hour basis for the period 01 October 2021 to 31 March 2022.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many callers to the Export Support Services Contact Centre took part in customer satisfaction surveys in each month from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022; and what proportion of those callers said that they were satisfied with (a) the overall service they received and (b) how their call was handled.

During Quarter 4 (October to December) 2021, 28% of users responded to the Helpline’s Customer Satisfaction survey. Of these, 88% said they were satisfied with the professionalism of the call handler, and 79% said they were satisfied with the overall service. During Quarter 1 (January to March) 2022, 30% of users responded to the survey. Of these, 90% said they were satisfied with the professionalism of the call handler, and 82% said they were satisfied with the overall service.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what proportion of calls answered by the Export Support Services Contact Centre resulted in an agent (a) resolving the caller’s query using her Department’s scripts and knowledge bank or (b) raising a Complex Query form and referring the caller to her Department’s Digital Enquiry Team in each month from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022.

In October, 5% of customers were referred to the digital enquiry team, 24% in November, 39% in December, 32% in January, 51% in February and 61% in March. This increase reflects a change in the operating model and, for February and March, is because the majority of Russia and Ukraine enquiries were referred on.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what proportion of calls received by the Export Support Services Contact Centre inside its core operating hours were answered within 30 seconds from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022.

The proportion of calls, received by the Export Support Service helpline during operating hours, which were answered within 30 seconds from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022 was 93%.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many calls were received by the Export Support Services Contract Centre in (a) February 2022 and (b) March 2022 relating to imports and exports affected by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and subsequent restrictions and sanctions imposed on trade with Russia and Belarus.

Between 22 February and 31 March 2022 there were 1,660 calls relating to imports and exports affected by the Russian invasion of Ukraine and subsequent sanctions imposed on Russia and Belarus.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many callers to the Export Support Services Contact Centre made complaints in each month from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022; and what proportion of those complaints were resolved within five working days.

From 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022 the contact centre received 4 complaints all received in March 2022. These were resolved within 5 working days.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many calls were received by the Export Support Services Contact Centre inside its core operating hours in each month from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022.

Between 1 October 2021 and 31 March, the Export Support Service Helpline received 4,845 calls. (October 606, November 636, December 456, January 612, February 589, March 1,946). 98% of these were received in the Helpline’s core operating hours.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the estimated average agent utilisation rate has been during core operating hours for the Export Services Contact Centre in each month from 1 October 2021 to 31 March 2022.

The ESS helpline was launched 1 October to support business – availability, quality, speed and cost of service all matter. Calls are answered quickly; 93% within 30 seconds, 59% of enquiries are dealt with in a single call, and users report an 89% satisfaction rate. The Department has optimised the service since launch; reducing costs by 18% and adding new services. The utilisation rate fluctuates by the hour. Average weekly rates range from 18%, peaking at 57% in March 2022. Average monthly rates since launch are 8% (October), 6% (November), 6% (December), 8% (January), 7% (February), and 32% (March). Having very high utilisation rates (for example, above 85%) will almost certainly impact service quality with longer waiting time and reduced satisfaction rates.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much departmental expenditure she has allocated over the next four years for the costs of implementing the UK's trade agreements with (a) Australia and (b) New Zealand.

The Department has begun preparing for implementation of the Australia and New Zealand Free Trade Agreements. This is a cross-government effort, with teams considering pre-entry into force legislative and domestic preparations, and implementation post entry into force.

DIT has allocated £46.3m in 2022-23, £48.3m in 2023-24 and £48.5m in 2024-25 for the negotiation and implementation of free trade agreements, however, it is not possible to identify funding solely for the implementation of the UKs trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand. The Department has no allocated funding for 2025-26.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2022 to Question 107507, whether the published £4,873.51 cost of her predecessor’s visit to India from 4th to 10th February 2021 included (a) first class or (b) business class air tickets; and what the stand-alone cost of those tickets were.

The stand-alone cost of tickets was £4,363.86. This comprised a return business class ticket from London to Delhi.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2022 to Question 107507, whether the published £6,936.99 cost of her predecessor’s visit to the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia from 18th to 20th April 2021 included (a) first class or (b) business class air tickets; and what the stand-alone cost of those tickets were.

The stand-alone cost of tickets was £6,677.12. This comprised a return business class ticket from London to Abu Dhabi, returning Riyadh to London (£6,490.12), plus an economy ticket for a short haul flight from Dubai to Riyadh (£187.00).

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2022 to Question 107507, whether the published £2,898.61 cost of her predecessor’s visit to Israel from 28th June to 1st July 2021 included (a) first class or (b) business class air tickets; and what the stand-alone cost of those tickets were.

The stand-alone cost of tickets was £1,909.22. This comprised a return business class ticket from London to Tel Aviv.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2022 to Question 107507 on Department for International Trade: Aviation, whether the published £5,066.02 cost of her predecessor’s visit to the United States from 6 to 10 August 2019 included (a) first class or (b) business class air tickets; and what the stand-alone cost of those tickets were.

The stand-alone cost of tickets was £5,066.02. This comprised a return business class flight from London to Washington.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the answer of 28 January 2022 to Question 107507, whether the published £5,575.72 cost of her predecessor’s visit to the United States from 21st to 23rd September 2019 included (a) first class or (b) business class air tickets; and what the stand-alone cost of those tickets were.

The stand-alone cost of tickets was £5,572.72. This comprised a return business class flight from London to New York.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2022 to Question 107507, whether the published £13,614.22 cost of her predecessor’s visit to New Zealand, Australia and Japan from 14th to 20th September 2019 included (a) first class or (b) business class air tickets; and what the stand-alone cost of those tickets were.

The standalone cost of tickets was £13,614.22. This comprised several flights. Long haul flights (London to New Zealand; Australia to Japan; and Japan to London) were booked at business class. Short haul flights (between Australia and New Zealand, and within Australia) were booked at economy class.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
29th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2022 to Question 107507, whether the published £3,007.87 cost of her predecessor’s visit to the United States from 1st to 4th August 2020 included (a) first class or (b) business class air tickets; and what the stand-alone cost of those tickets were.

The stand-alone cost of tickets was £2,733.75. This comprised a business class return flight from London to Washington.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the (a) legal and (b) financial implications if an individual or company in the Russian Federation with outstanding debts guaranteed under UK Export Finance's buyer credit or supplier credit financing schemes is placed under sanctions by the (i) United Kingdom, (ii) European Union or (ii) United States.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) is keeping the current situation under close review.

UKEF follows rigorous recovery processes, but is not able to disclose further detail as doing so may compromise our commercial position. UKEF has recovered the cost of every claim against it since 1991 on a portfolio basis and has returned just over £2 billion to the Treasury.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 7 March 2022 to Question 131131, what latest assessment she has made of the ability of UK exporters to complete the delivery of contracts to buyers in the Russian Federation in those outstanding cases where their contract bonds are underwritten by UK Export Finance.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) is closely monitoring the impact of the current situation on transactions that it has supported in the Russian Federation.

UKEF follows robust due diligence processes before providing support for any transaction, including appropriate assessment of attendant risks. UKEF charges a risk-based premium to companies for its support, and has a robust recovery process in place to protect the taxpayer and offset potential losses.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
4th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2022 to Question 131130, on UK Export Finance: Russia, how much of the remaining exposure relates to the underwriting of credit for (a) VEB Leasing, (b) JSC Lebedinsky or (c) SUEK; and which providers of credit UK Export Finance will be liable for the unpaid debts in the event that any of those buyers default on their loans.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) does not release details of outstanding exposure on individual transactions for reasons of commercial sensitivity. UKEF follows robust due diligence processes before providing support for any transaction.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to inward investment from the Russian Federation, what total number of inward investment projects supported by her Department were delivered in each financial year from 2014-15 to 2020-21.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) has data for foreign direct investments (FDI) that originated in Russia with DIT support for the financial years 2018/19, 2019/20 and 2020/21 - see attached.


Prior to this, DIT has not published data relating specifically to Russia in its breakdown of origin.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much of the £171,099,381.84 maximum liability for UK Export Finance arising between 2014-15 and 2020-21 from the underwriting of credit for buyers located in the Russian Federation is still at stake as of the end of February 2022.

UK Export Finance’s remaining exposure from the underwriting of credit for buyers located in the Russian Federation between 2014-15 and 2020-21 as at 31 January 2022 (the latest date for which complete figures are available) was £49,970,667.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many of the 9 UK staff and 60 local staff employed to promote her Department’s export and investment objectives in Eastern Europe and Central Asia as of 31 March 2021 were based in the Russian Federation.

As of 31 March 2021, the Department for International Trade (DIT) had a total of 16 staff based in the Russian Federation.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the names of institutions headquartered in the Russian Federation that were approved to provide credit underwritten by UK Export Finance for exports to the Russian Federation as of the end of 2020-21.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) has not approved any financial institutions in the Russian Federation to provide credit underwritten by UKEF.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many new export projects have been supported by UK Export Finance in the Russian Federation since the start of 2021-22; and what the total maximum liability for UK Export Finance is arising from that support.

During the current financial year to date up to 28 February 2022 (the latest date for which complete figures are currently available), UK Export Finance provided short term trade finance support to three UK companies in support of exports to three buyers in the Russian Federation. The total current exposure for these transactions is £145,000.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much of the £3,426,277.44 maximum liability for UK Export Finance arising between 2014-15 and 2020-21 from the underwriting of working capital for exports to the Russian Federation is still at stake as of the end of February 2022.

UK Export Finance’s remaining exposure for support to exporters who were exporting to the Russian Federation between 2014-15 and 2020-21 as at 28 February 2022 (the latest date for which complete figures are available) are as shown in the table below.

Underwriting of contract bonds

Provision of insurance

Underwriting of working capital

£809,075

£0

£0

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much of the £6,968,303 maximum liability for UK Export Finance arising between 2014-15 and 2020-21 from the provision of insurance for exports to the Russian Federation is still at stake as of the end of February 2022.

UK Export Finance’s remaining exposure for support to exporters who were exporting to the Russian Federation between 2014-15 and 2020-21 as at 28 February 2022 (the latest date for which complete figures are available) are as shown in the table below.

Underwriting of contract bonds

Provision of insurance

Underwriting of working capital

£809,075

£0

£0

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much of the £1,860,018 maximum liability for UK Export Finance arising between 2014-15 and 2020-21 from the underwriting of contract bonds for exports to the Russian Federation is still at stake as of the end of February 2022.

UK Export Finance’s remaining exposure for support to exporters who were exporting to the Russian Federation between 2014-15 and 2020-21 as at 28 February 2022 (the latest date for which complete figures are available) are as shown in the table below.

Underwriting of contract bonds

Provision of insurance

Underwriting of working capital

£809,075

£0

£0

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to exports to the Russian Federation, what total value of export wins were achieved by her Department in each financial year from 2014-15 to 2020-21.

The Department does not publish this level of information. Only the overall annual value of export wins is published. Taking more granular cuts of the data increases its risk of being disclosive.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what Care on Location restrictions UK Export Finance is operating with respect to requests for cover on exports to the Russian Federation; and when those restrictions were last updated.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) is currently reviewing all of its cover provisions to support exporters engaged in exporting to the Russian Federation. Under UKEF’s current care on location stipulations for the Russian Federation, in place since at least June 2020, no support is given for transactions in disputed territories.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
28th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much of the £7,623,339.97 maximum liability for UK Export Finance arising from the underwriting of credit for Joy Global (UK) Ltd in 2019-20 on the export of mining equipment to SUEK OJSC is still at stake as of the end of February 2022.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) does not release details of outstanding exposure on individual transactions for reasons of commercial sensitivity.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
19th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the (a) dates and (b) outbound destinations for each occasion when (i) she or (ii) her predecessor travelled in (A) economy class, (B) business class, and (C) first class when using commercial flights to travel overseas on official business in (1) 2019, (2) 2020, and (3) 2021.

All flights and costs for travel are published in transparency returns on a quarterly basis.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
10th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the (a) dates and (b) outbound destinations for each occasion when (i) she and (ii) her predecessor made use of the VIP suites at Heathrow Airport in (A) 2019, (B) 2020 and (C) 2021.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade has never used the VIP suites at Heathrow Airport. Her predecessor also did not use them during her time as Secretary of State for International Trade.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she intends to answer Questions 80249, 80250, 80251, 80252 and 80253.

Questions 80249, 80250, 80251, 80252 and 80253 were answered by my Rt Hon Friend, the Member for Portsmouth North, on 8th December.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what services the Government Legal Department’s Litigation Group has provided to her Department since 1 January 2021.

Since 1st January 2021, the Litigation Group has continued to provide services to the majority of government departments, including the Department for International Trade and ‘UK Export Finance’, executive agencies, and many non-departmental public bodies.

The Group’s work encompasses litigation in public and private law as well as supporting public inquiries and acting in Inquests. This has involved, amongst other work, attending in a wide range of courts, including the Coroners’ Courts, the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal, the Royal Courts of Justice and the Supreme Court. Their Employment and Commercial Groups similarly provide litigation services to the majority of government departments and have done so in the period in question.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason the figure of 175 published in her Department’s Annual Report and Accounts 2019/20 on 16 July 2020 for the number of market access barriers fully or partly resolved in financial year 2019-20 is different to the revised figure of 181 published in Market Access Barrier Statistics: financial year 2020-21 on 25 November 2021 for the same figure.

Barriers reported refers to the number of cases identified as being registered on the Digital Market Access Service (DMAS) over a given time period, based on the data at the point of extraction. DMAS is an operational database used by government officials to assist in the removal of market access barriers.

As such, entries on DMAS are subject to ongoing revision to reflect activity and regular system administration updates are made to make sure the database is kept accurate. This can involve archiving cases established to be duplicates or identified not to be market access barriers after further investigation. This means that an extract taken from the live database on different occasions covering the same time period can return different figures.

Figures published in the Department for International Trade (DIT) Annual Report and Accounts (ARA) 2019-20 on the number of market access resolved barriers in that financial year were based on the number of barriers reported and resolved within the year. For the DIT ARA 2020-21, this measure was changed to include barriers resolved regardless of when they were reported.

This makes sure the full range of resolution activity is measured, rather than only barrier resolutions soon after identification and reflects that, for some barriers, resolution will take longer because of the complexities involved.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason the figure of 1,238 published in her Department’s Annual Report and Accounts 2019/20 on 16 July 2020 for the number of market access barriers reported to the Digital Market Access Service in financial year 2019-20 is different to the figure of 1,099 published in Market Access Barrier Statistics: financial year 2020-21 on 25 November 2021 for the same figure.

Barriers reported refers to the number of cases identified as being registered on the Digital Market Access Service (DMAS) over a given time period, based on the data at the point of extraction. DMAS is an operational database used by government officials to assist in the removal of market access barriers.

As such, entries on DMAS are subject to ongoing revision to reflect activity and regular system administration updates are made to make sure the database is kept accurate. This can involve archiving cases established to be duplicates or identified not to be market access barriers after further investigation. This means that an extract taken from the live database on different occasions covering the same time period can return different figures.

Figures published in the Department for International Trade (DIT) Annual Report and Accounts (ARA) 2019-20 on the number of market access resolved barriers in that financial year were based on the number of barriers reported and resolved within the year. For the DIT ARA 2020-21, this measure was changed to include barriers resolved regardless of when they were reported.

This makes sure the full range of resolution activity is measured, rather than only barrier resolutions soon after identification and reflects that, for some barriers, resolution will take longer because of the complexities involved.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many of the market access barriers fully or partly resolved by her Department between 1 April 2019 and 31 March 2020 were reported to the Government’s Digital Market Access Service (a) between those two dates or (b) prior to 1 April 2019.

133 of the barriers fully or partially resolved in the financial year 2020-21 were reported to the Digital Market Access Service (DMAS) during the year. 84 of the market access barriers marked as fully or partially resolved in the year were reported to DMAS in a previous year.

161 of the barriers fully or partially resolved in the financial year 2019-20 were reported to DMAS during the year. 20 of the market access barriers marked as fully or partially resolved in the year were reported to DMAS in a previous year.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many of the 217 market access barriers fully or partly resolved in financial year 2020-21 were reported to the Government’s Digital Market Access Service prior to 1 April 2020.

133 of the barriers fully or partially resolved in the financial year 2020-21 were reported to the Digital Market Access Service (DMAS) during the year. 84 of the market access barriers marked as fully or partially resolved in the year were reported to DMAS in a previous year.

161 of the barriers fully or partially resolved in the financial year 2019-20 were reported to DMAS during the year. 20 of the market access barriers marked as fully or partially resolved in the year were reported to DMAS in a previous year.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
26th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many of the 787 market access barriers reported to the Government’s Digital Market Access Service between 1 April 2020 and 31 March 2021 were (a) fully resolved or (b) partly resolved within that same period.

133 of the barriers fully or partially resolved in the financial year 2020-21 were reported to the Digital Market Access Service (DMAS) during the year. 84 of the market access barriers marked as fully or partially resolved in the year were reported to DMAS in a previous year.

161 of the barriers fully or partially resolved in the financial year 2019-20 were reported to DMAS during the year. 20 of the market access barriers marked as fully or partially resolved in the year were reported to DMAS in a previous year.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the announcement on 22 September 2021 of an end to the ban on the export of UK lamb to the United States, when she plans to update her Department’s list of market access barriers to that effect.

We are pleased that US Department of Agriculture is looking to remove the import restrictions for ‘sheepmeat’. This will be a major milestone in the process of restoring access to the American market. It will be followed by further steps, including agreeing specific SPS and certifications conditions and requirements with Food Safety Inspection Service in the US; and domestic preparations, such as audits of British production establishments. We look forward to supporting the resumption of exports once this is finalised.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 25 November 2021 to Question 78372, on Teesside Freeport: Switzerland, when and through which forums were changes to the rules of origin provisions in the UK-Switzerland FTA agreed.

The United Kingdom-Switzerland Joint Trade Committee updated the Rules of Origin protocol through a Joint Committee Decision on 16th July 2021. The changes have been provisionally applied since 1st September 2021, whilst the United Kingdom and Switzerland undergo parliamentary procedures to bring the amendment into force.

The changes reflect the revision of the rules between Switzerland and the EU as part of the updates to the Regional Convention on Pan-Euro-Mediterranean (PEM) Preferential Rules of Origin that Switzerland are subject to. They provide modernised rules of origin provisions, including removing the duty drawback prohibition on all products other than textiles, as is the case in the revised PEM rules of origin.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 25 November 2021 to Question 78372, Teesside Freeport: Switzerland, which products that were previously subject to duty drawback prohibitions under the UK-Switzerland FTA are now not subject to those terms.

The United Kingdom-Switzerland Joint Trade Committee updated the Rules of Origin protocol through a Joint Committee Decision on 16th July 2021. The changes have been provisionally applied since 1st September 2021, whilst the United Kingdom and Switzerland undergo parliamentary procedures to bring the amendment into force.

The changes reflect the revision of the rules between Switzerland and the EU as part of the updates to the Regional Convention on Pan-Euro-Mediterranean (PEM) Preferential Rules of Origin that Switzerland are subject to. They provide modernised rules of origin provisions, including removing the duty drawback prohibition on all products other than textiles, as is the case in the revised PEM rules of origin.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many of the market access barriers logged on the Government’s Digital Market Access Service system as of 1 November 2021 relate to access to markets within the European Union.

My department publishes statistics about trade barriers in its annual reports and has recently released further statistics showing that we resolved 217 trade barriers across 74 countries in 2020-21, up 20% from 2019-20. Statistics for April 2021 onwards will be released in the 2021-22 Annual Report.

These barriers include regulatory, legislative and administrative measures imposed by other countries that restrict the flow of goods and services. In addition, we set up a new helpline and online service in October – the Export Support Service – where businesses can access advice and support when exporting to Europe.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
25th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many of the market access barriers resolved by her Department in (a) 2020-21 and (b) 2021-22 up to 1 November 2021 have related to access to markets within the European Union.

My department publishes statistics about trade barriers in its annual reports and has recently released further statistics showing that we resolved 217 trade barriers across 74 countries in 2020-21, up 20% from 2019-20. Statistics for April 2021 onwards will be released in the 2021-22 Annual Report.

These barriers include regulatory, legislative and administrative measures imposed by other countries that restrict the flow of goods and services. In addition, we set up a new helpline and online service in October – the Export Support Service – where businesses can access advice and support when exporting to Europe.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which of the income thresholds referred to in Footnote 5 of her departmental strategy paper, Made in Britain, Sold to the World, published on 17 November 2021, were used to define the global middle class in Chart 2.

Each assessment references the sources used.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what income thresholds were used to define the global middle class in the Board of Trade's report Global Britain, Local Jobs, published on 10 March 2021.

Each assessment references the sources used.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what income thresholds were used to define the (a) global and (b) Indian middle class in her departmental information note on a Free Trade Agreement between the United Kingdom and India, published on 25 May 2021.

Each assessment references the sources used.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what income thresholds were used to define the global middle class in her departmental report Global Trade Outlook, published on 13 September 2021.

Each assessment references the sources used.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what income thresholds were used to define the global middle class in her departmental paper UK Accession to CPTPP: The UK’s Strategic Approach, published on 22 June 2021.

Each assessment references the sources used.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if manufacturers in the Teesside Freeport making tariff-free imports of raw materials can utilise the tariff reductions agreed in the UK-Mexico Trade Continuity Agreement when exporting their finished products to Mexico.

In certain cases, businesses will need to choose between the duty drawback or the preferential rates. This is the case for UK-Mexico Trade Continuity Agreement.

The UK has plans to renegotiate its agreement with Mexico and will carefully assess its position on such restrictions.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether manufacturers in the Teesside Freeport making tariff-free imports of raw materials can utilise the tariff reductions agreed in the UK-Israel Trade and Partnership Agreement when exporting their finished products to Israel.

In certain cases, businesses will need to choose between the duty drawback or the preferential rates. This is the case for UK-Israel Trade and Partnership Agreement.

The UK-Israel relationship is already strong and growing and we are planning to start work on upgrading our trade agreement next year.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if manufacturers in the Teesside Freeport making tariff-free imports of raw materials can utilise the tariff reductions agreed in the UK-Singapore Free Trade Agreement when exporting their finished products to Singapore.

In certain cases, businesses will need to choose between the duty drawback or the preferential rates.

However, in the case of the UK-Singapore Free Trade Agreement, traders would not be affected by this in practice because Singapore applies a zero Most Favoured Nation (MFN) rate to most tariff lines.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if manufacturers in the Teesside Freeport making tariff-free imports of raw materials can utilise the tariff reductions agreed in the UK-Canada Trade Continuity Agreement when exporting their finished products to Canada.

In certain cases, businesses will need to choose between the duty drawback or the preferential rates. This is the case for the UK-Canada Trade Continuity Agreement.

The UK has plans to renegotiate its agreement with Canada and will carefully assess its position on such restrictions.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether manufacturers in the Teesside Freeport making tariff-free imports of raw materials can utilise the tariff reductions agreed in the UK-Switzerland Trade Agreement when exporting their finished products to Switzerland.

There are currently prohibitions to duty drawback in the UK-Switzerland free trade agreement. Such restrictions can mean that exporters may not be able to make use of certain freeport advantages while also using the Free Trade Agreements for their exports.

The UK and Switzerland have just updated their rules of origin provisions, meaning that duty drawback restrictions now apply only to a limited number of products in the textile and apparel sector.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether Healthcare UK has provided export-promotion or business services to (a) Randox, (b) Seek Group and (c) PepTCell Ltd since January 2019.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 18 November to Question UIN: 74914.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
17th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to her Department’s export plan published on 17 November 2021, what 10 UK (a) goods and (b) services referred to in that strategy does she project will be at the greatest increased demand in the period 2022-50 as a result of the growth in the global middle classes.

There is a clear positive relationship between the size of the middle class overseas and demand for exports from the UK’s sectors of comparative advantage (as set out on pages 32 and 34 of the Department for International Trade’s Global Trade Outlook published in September 2021). Among the UK’s sectors of specialism, demand for: life sciences; financial services; business services; intellectual property, recreation and media; travel services; aerospace and other transport; construction; and digital services are all projected to grow faster than the global average in the years ahead.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many full time equivalent individuals have been hired to work for UK Export Finance as (a) interim managers, (b) specialist contractors and (c) temporary members of staff through the public sector resourcing framework managed by Alexander Mann Solutions Ltd in financial years (i) 2018-19, (ii) 2019-20, (iii) 2020-21 and (iv) 2021-22 up to the end of October 2021.

Using the public resourcing sector framework managed by Alexander Mann Solutions Ltd, UK Export Finance hired:

Financial year

Interim managers*

Specialist contractors*

Temporary staff*

2018/19

4

2

8

2019/20

7

10

6

2020/21

9

11

8

2021/22

8

10

4

*The numbers quoted are full time equivalents

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how many Perkbox points were awarded to contact centre staff in recognition of their performance against the contract’s requirements between 1 October and 12 November 2021.

This information is not available to the Department for publication.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, if she will publish (a) the written contents of the knowledge bank used by contact centre staff to assist callers and (b) all prepared scripts and prompts used by staff to handle calls, as of 12 November 2021.

All the information used is already publicly available.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what public expenditure was allocated for the hiring of (a) interim managers, (b) specialist contractors and (c) temporary members of staff by UK Export Finance through the public sector resourcing framework managed by Alexander Mann Solutions Ltd in financial years (i) 2018-19, (ii) 2019-20, (iii) 2020-21, and (iv) 2021-22 up to the end of October 2021.

UKEF has allocated budget for the hiring of (a) interim managers, (b) specialist contractors and (c) temporary members. However, it should be noted that UKEF has not allocated a budget specifically to the public sector resourcing framework, which is managed by Alexander Mann Solutions Ltd.

The table below shows UKEF’s total off-payroll staff costs, including those relating to UKEF’s engagement via Alexander Mann Solutions Ltd.

Financial year

(a) Interim managers

(b) Specialist contractors

(c) Temporary staff

2018/19

£675,168

£1,647,676

£64,008

2019/20

£689,532

£796,051

£141,192

2020/21

£1,342,236

£838,958

£148,836

2021/22 (up to end of Oct 21)

£975,294

£682,955

£70,780

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
16th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, under the terms of the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, on what date her Department is due to receive the first profit and audit transparency reports from the supplier; and if she will publish a copy of those reports upon their receipt.

HGS UK Ltd is committed to providing a transparency report to the Department for International Trade. The report will not be published as it will contain commercially sensitive information.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, under the terms of the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how much funding from the public purse is currently allocated each month for the provision of webinars by the Institute of Export and International Trade to Export Support Service teams.

We cannot specify the funding for these activities because it is contained within the overall value of the contract.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, under the terms of the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how much funding from the public purse was allocated for the training of Export Support Service teams by the Institute of Export and International Trade between 26 August and 12 November 2021.

We cannot specify the funding for these activities because it is contained within the overall value of the contract.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, under the terms of the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how many full time equivalent individuals were employed in the roles, or equivalent roles, of (a) team leaders, (b) back office agents, (c) advanced agents, (d) intermediate agents and (e) entry-level agents as of 12 November 2021.

The Export Support Service Contact Centre is delivered by 24 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) UK based call handling agents, who are managed by 2 FTE Team Leaders.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's letter of agreement with Film London/British Film Commission of 5 October 2021, what elements of production support Film London/British Film Commission have been contracted to provide; and what indicators have been agreed to measure their performance against the contract requirements.

The British Film Commission (BFC) is the national organisation responsible for maximising and supporting inward investment screen production. The UK was among the first countries in the world to realise the growth potential of High-End TV (HETV). This contract is a continuation of a long-term agreement between the Department for International Trade (DIT) and BFC, for the BFC to promote HETV inward investment and offer production support, that has delivered a strong track record of success in attracting such productions to the UK.

As with all DIT funding agreements, there is a robust evaluation framework in place against which the BFC’s performance will be assessed.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's letter of agreement with Film London/British Film Commission of 5 October 2021, what elements of business development Film London/British Film Commission have been contracted to provide; and what indicators have been agreed to measure their performance against the contract requirements.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 18th November to Question UIN: 74916.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, when she plans to activate a webchat function for exporters seeking assistance online.

The Department has not yet exercised these options.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, when she plans to activate the facility for agents to book telephone appointments for callers with government specialists.

The Department has not yet exercised these options.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, when she plans to activate a smart queue jumping service for certain callers; and which callers will have access to that service.

The Department has not yet exercised these options.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how many calls were received by the contact centre between 1 October and 12 November 2021 outside core operating hours.

People who call outside of core operating hours are referred to the Digital Enquiry Service. 24 calls were received outside core operating hours by the contact centre between 1 October and 12 November 2021. This data comes from management information supplied by the helpline and has had basic quality assurance checks.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how many calls were received by the contact centre between 1 October and 12 November 2021 inside core operating hours; and what proportion of those calls were (a) answered and (b) answered within 30 seconds.

926 helpline enquiries were received by the Export Support Services Contact Centre between 1 October and 12 November 2021. 99% of all calls were answered within 30 seconds. This data comes from management information supplied by the helpline and has had basic quality assurance checks.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, what proportion of calls received between 1 October and 12 November 2021 were transferred to another relevant stakeholder; and what proportion of those calls were transferred within 10 minutes.

We do not currently transfer calls. Businesses are provided with either online guidance or the details of relevant Government helplines to call.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the full list of private-sector companies and organisations for which Healthcare UK has provided (a) consultancy, (b) training, (c) export promotions services and (d) trade show support.

It is not the policy of the Department for International Trade to release information into the public domain on companies to which it has provided export support. To do so, we would need the explicit permission of those organisations.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, under the terms of the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how much funding from the public purse is currently allocated each month for the payment of retainer fees to (a) Shanker Singham, (b) Lars Karlsson and (c) Kevin Franklin.

The Department of International Trade has not currently allocated any retainer fees for the provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, under the terms of the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how many of the full time equivalent individuals employed to handle calls to the contact centre have the ability to communicate orally in Welsh, and at what grades they are employed, as of 12 November 2021.

As of 12 November 2021, the Export Support Service Contact Centre employs two UK based full-time Welsh speaking call handlers.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, what proportion of calls answered between 1 October and 12 November 2021 resulted in an agent (a) resolving the caller’s query using her Department’s scripts and knowledge bank, (b) transferring the caller to another government helpline or website or (c) raising a Complex Query form and referring the caller to her Department’s Digital Enquiry Team.

92% of enquiries have been resolved using the Knowledge Bank or by referring to another government department helpline between 1st October and 12 November 2021. The helpline has referred 8% of total enquiries to the Department for International Trade’s Digital Enquiry Service during the same period. This data comes from management information supplied by the helpline and has had basic quality assurance checks.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how many callers took part in customer satisfaction surveys between 1 October and 12 November 2021; and what proportion said they were satisfied with (a) the overall service and (b) how their call was handled.

As this is a new service, we are currently working with the supplier on customer satisfaction metrics and data.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how many callers to the contact centre made complaints between 1 October and 12 November 2021; and what proportion of those complaints were resolved within five working days.

We have not received any formal complaints.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the contract agreed by her Department on 26 August 2021 for provision of an Export Support Services Contact Centre, how many callers to the contact centre made requests for information between 1 October and 12 November 2021; and what proportion of those requests were actioned within one working day.

All callers to the Export Support Service Contact Centre are provided with relevant information to answer their query either during the call or via an email following the call. Complex queries are referred to the Digital Enquiry Service immediately following the call.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the £40 million contract for the provision of a General Aerospace Legal Panel, put out to tender by her Department on 5 November 2021, is reserved for UK companies only.

The General Aerospace Legal Panel is not reserved to UK companies only.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's procurement exercise for the General Aerospace Legal Panel, reference 260167/1011745, if she will publish the business case for the expenditure of £40 million on the provision of a General Aerospace Legal Panel.

The purpose of the General Aerospace Legal Panel is to procure a panel of law firms to provide specialist legal advice and representation to UK Export Finance (UKEF), primarily in relation to when it provides ‘financing’ support to exporters in the aviation sector. The cost of such legal advice provided by the panel firm is typically met by the borrower rather than UKEF. The contract value advertised is the maximum value that can be spent through the framework during its four year term through subsequent call-off contracts and not the value of any committed spend.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the full specification for the General Aerospace Legal Panel tender notice.

The full specification, Invitation To Tender and terms and conditions of the General Aerospace Legal Panel have been published on the Contracts Finder notice.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to contract reference 287415/1012191, published on 9 November 2021, for what reason her Department required a courier service for a four day period from City Sprint UK Ltd.

The City Sprint UK Ltd courier service has provided the collection and delivery of building related goods between the Department for International Trade properties on an ad-hoc basis. This includes items such as documents, parcels and mail.

The services have been received between April 2021 and October 2021. Due to systems limitations the duration is incorrectly reported as 4 days and we are seeking to correct this.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the exposure of UK (a) investors, (b) exporters, (c) finance companies and (d) export finance to (i) unpaid debts and (ii) loan defaults arising from liquidity shortages in the Chinese economy.

The Department for International Trade, alongside other government departments, closely monitors trends and events in the Chinese economy and maintains close contact with British companies with trade and investment interests in China, supporting them as necessary. The United Kingdom’s financial regulators have ensured the financial system is resilient. It is for British companies to assess what changes in China’s economic conditions, and Chinese policy changes, mean for them.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) actively monitors its portfolio. As of 31 October 2021, UKEF’s exposure in China was around £200m, mainly related to supporting exports in the airline sector. UKEF has not had any issues around unpaid debts or defaults with its exposure in China.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the implications of liquidity shortages in the Chinese economy for outward investment in China by UK (a) investors, (b) businesses and (c) finance companies.

The Department for International Trade, alongside other government departments, closely monitors trends and events in the Chinese economy and maintains close contact with British companies with trade and investment interests in China, supporting them as necessary. The United Kingdom’s financial regulators have ensured the financial system is resilient. It is for British companies to assess what changes in China’s economic conditions, and Chinese policy changes, mean for them.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) actively monitors its portfolio. As of 31 October 2021, UKEF’s exposure in China was around £200m, mainly related to supporting exports in the airline sector. UKEF has not had any issues around unpaid debts or defaults with its exposure in China.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the implications of liquidity shortages in the Chinese economy for UK businesses that are heavily reliant on exports of goods and services to China.

The Department for International Trade, alongside other government departments, closely monitors trends and events in the Chinese economy and maintains close contact with British companies with trade and investment interests in China, supporting them as necessary. The United Kingdom’s financial regulators have ensured the financial system is resilient. It is for British companies to assess what changes in China’s economic conditions, and Chinese policy changes, mean for them.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) actively monitors its portfolio. As of 31 October 2021, UKEF’s exposure in China was around £200m, mainly related to supporting exports in the airline sector. UKEF has not had any issues around unpaid debts or defaults with its exposure in China.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
9th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the implications of liquidity shortages in the Chinese economy for UK (a) businesses and (b) infrastructure projects that are heavily reliant on Chinese inward investment.

The Department for International Trade, alongside other government departments, closely monitors trends and events in the Chinese economy and maintains close contact with British companies with trade and investment interests in China, supporting them as necessary. The United Kingdom’s financial regulators have ensured the financial system is resilient. It is for British companies to assess what changes in China’s economic conditions, and Chinese policy changes, mean for them.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) actively monitors its portfolio. As of 31 October 2021, UKEF’s exposure in China was around £200m, mainly related to supporting exports in the airline sector. UKEF has not had any issues around unpaid debts or defaults with its exposure in China.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the modelling set out in the UK-Australia FTA strategic approach, published on 17 July 2020, what forecast her Department has made of the effect of the UK-Australia trade agreement on total economic output in Northern Ireland.

Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published prior to scrutiny by Parliament. This will present the results of economic impacts of the agreement, including on UK sectoral output and employment and the potential implications for the UK nations and English regions.

In June 2020 the government published a scoping assessment, which provided a preliminary assessment of the potential long run impacts of an agreement with Australia. This contained potential implications for UK nations and English regions and is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uks-approach-to-negotiating-a-free-trade-agreement-with-australia.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the internal review of trade modelling announced by her Department on 1 July 2020, when the results of that review were reported to Ministers; what steps she has taken as a result of that review; and if she will publish the report and recommendations provided by the review team.

The Modelling Review Expert Panel (which is external to the Department for International Trade (DIT)) has concluded their review. DIT is currently reviewing their recommendations and will provide an update on this review in due course.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what changes she plans to make to the methodology set out in the UK-New Zealand FTA strategic approach, published on 17 July 2020, for calculating the (a) total, (b) regional and (c) sectoral impact of the UK-New Zealand trade agreement; and for what reasons those changes will be made.

The government is committed to a transparent approach to its new free trade agreements and will publish an independently scrutinised impact assessment when treaty text is laid in parliament.

As part of the process towards producing all of its analysis, the Department for International Trade constantly reviews and improves its methodologies to ensure they are as robust and accurate as possible and reflects best global practice. The methodology underlying our analysis and the rationale for methodological changes will be described in full in our published impact assessments.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what changes she plans to make to the methodology set out in the UK-Australia FTA strategic approach, published on 17 July 2020, for calculating the (a) total, (b) regional and (c) sectoral impact of the UK-Australia trade agreement; and for what reasons those changes may be made.

The government is committed to a transparent approach to its new free trade agreements and will publish an independently scrutinised impact assessment when treaty text is laid in parliament.

As part of the process towards producing all of its analysis, the Department for International Trade constantly reviews and improves its methodologies to ensure they are as robust and accurate as possible and reflects best global practice. The methodology underlying our analysis and the rationale for methodological changes will be described in full in our published impact assessments.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the full methodology her Department used to assess the impact of free trade agreements on as of (a) 17 July 2020, (b) 23 October 2020, (c) 15 June 2021 (d) 20 October 2021 and (e) 5 November 2021.

The methodology used to assess the impact of our free trade agreements is described in full in each of our published analyses.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the meeting of the Joint Committee for UK-Palestinian Authority Trade and Cooperation held on 22 September 2021 discussed the implications of the UK-Palestine trade agreement for the tariff treatment of goods manufactured in UK freeports.

It did not.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason a courier service from Revisecatch Ltd was required by her Department for the collection and delivery of test kits between 12 and 20 October 2021; and how many kits the Revisecatch Ltd courier service handled on behalf of her Department over the duration of that contract.

On 19 October 2021 the Department for International Trade (DIT) hosted a Global Investment Summit (GIS) bringing together global capital and UK investment opportunities. The GIS saw the announcement of 18 deals by companies from 10 countries worth £9.7bn (£9,654,000,000), creating over 30,000 jobs. This was on top of the £5.8bn already committed for sustainable projects since the launch of the Ten Point Plan.

To ensure the smooth and safe running of the event DIT contracted a courier service from Revisecatch Ltd (trading as eCourier) to deliver 261 Covid-19 test kits to delegates around London and the South East, as well as to collect them and deliver them for laboratory processing, between 13 and 17 October 2021.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to her Department's letter of appointment to LSE Enterprise, dated 1 October 2021, regarding research on the theme of Trade and Investment Measurement, what recent external research she has commissioned covering the theme of open markets and global prosperity.

The Department for International Trade commissioned a contract with LSE Enterprise on Trade and Investment Measurement on 1st October 2021. The contract details are publicly available here https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder. No projects have been commissioned through this contract to date.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to her Department's letter of appointment to LSE Enterprise, dated 1 October 2021, regarding research on the theme of Trade and Investment Measurement, what recent external research she has commissioned covering the theme of business attitudes and public perceptions.

I refer the hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury to the answer I gave on 4 November, UIN: 67108.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
1st Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's letter of appointment to LSE Enterprise, dated 1 October 2021, regarding research on the theme of Trade and Investment Measurement, what recent external research she has commissioned covering the theme of export and investment.

I refer the hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury to the answer I gave on 4 November, UIN: 67108.

Mike Freer
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason her attendance at a dinner on 13 June 2021 at the residence of the Australian High Commissioner, also attended by Mr Lynton Crosby and Mr Isaac Levido, is not included in the April to June 2021 release of her Department's transparency data on ministerial gifts, hospitality, travel and meetings.

Departments are not required to include meetings with foreign governments, or attendance at diplomatic functions hosted by foreign governments, in transparency returns.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the dinner she attended at the residence of the Australian High Commissioner on 13 June 2021, whether (a) a departmental official attended those discussions and (b) an official record of those discussions was sent to her Department as soon as possible after the event.

Officials were not present at the event. A record of discussions was sent within 24 hours.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
25th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether Government business was discussed at the dinner she attended at the residence of the Australian High Commissioner on 13 June 2021 attended by Mr Lynton Crosby and Mr Isaac Levido.

Some government business was discussed during the course of the event.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's spend control data for January 2021 to June 2021, published on 21 October 2021, for what reasons her Department incurred expenditure of £112,000,000 on Contingent/Interim Labour and Associated Services, reference number CAMS137.

The publication in question relates to a business case submitted for assurance under the Cabinet Office spend control process. The Department has not incurred any spend to date on the proposed services.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which representatives of the Mubadala Investment Company she met on 19 April 2021; and whether she discussed with those representatives proposals announced the previous night for the creation of a European Super League.

The former Secretary of State for International Trade, Liz Truss met with Khaldoon al Mubarak (Chief Executive Officer of Mubadala), Waleed Al Mokarrib Al Muhairi (Deputy CEO of Mubadala), and Matthew Hurn (Chief Financial Officer, Alternative Investments and Infrastructure at Mubadala) on 19th April 2021.

There were no discussions of any proposals for a European Super League.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's spend control data for January 2021 to June 2021, published on 21 October 2021, if she will publish a breakdown of the £10,700,000 spent on UK Investment Support Services, reference number CAMS425.

The departmental spend control data published on 21 October confirms amounts approved through the Cabinet Office Controls approval process, rather than actual expenditure. The monthly breakdown of actual expenditure on the Department for International Trade’s contract with Ernst & Young for the provision of investment support services can be found in transparency data on the Department’s spending over £25,000 here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dit-spending-over-25000-january-2021.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 20 October to Question 56292, on what date her Department received notification from the Japanese authorities informing them of the completion of domestic procedures required to designate the seven names listed as having protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The Government of Japan informed the Department of International Trade on 23 December 2020 that domestic procedures were complete for the protection of the seven geographical indications listed in the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the statistics release published on her Department’s website on 14 October 2021, entitled Net zero related inward investment in the UK: 18 November 2020 to 24 September 2021, if she will publish a breakdown by (a) location, (b) sector and (c) project of the 2,296 jobs referenced in that release.

Due to the commercial sensitivities, the figures released on 14th October 2021 were published in aggregate form. There were 46 individual investments included in the publication and, if they were broken down by characteristics such as location or sector, the small numbers would risk disclosure of the commercial sensitivity.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what purpose her Department incurred expenditure of £1,308.13 at the 5 Hertford Street Private Members Club on 17 June 2021.

This was an event hosted by Department for International Trade Secretary of State Liz Truss for the US Trade Representative, Katherine Tai, as part of wider discussions around trade.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what purposes her Department incurred the following items of expenditure on services from the UK Visas and Immigration Agency, (a) £1,199 on 2 June 2020, (b) £2,199 on 3 December 2020, (c) £1,476 on 15 June 2021 and (d) £1,199 on 21 June 2021.

These expenses are for Tier 2 sponsorship application and visa payments for members of staff joining the department from overseas.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the terms of (a) Article III of GATT, (b) The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement and (c) the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement on Trans-Pacific Partnership allow HM Treasury to apply lower excise duties to UK manufactured alcoholic beverages than are applied to the equivalent alcoholic beverages imported from one of the other contracting parties to those agreements.

The UK champions rules-based multilateral trade at the WTO. The National Treatment rule under GATT Article III sets out the principle that imported products should not be subject to higher internal taxes than similar domestic products. The UK-EU TCA and CPTPP agreements reiterate this GATT Article III commitment on National Treatment. Measures such as setting excise duties on alcoholic beverages are consistent with the UK’s WTO rights and obligations, including GATT Article III commitments.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which UK meat products are currently (a) designated as having full geographical indication status in Japan, or (b) awaiting the completion of domestic procedures in Japan prior to the designation of protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which UK fish and shellfish products are currently (a) designated as having full geographical indication status in Japan, or (b) awaiting the completion of domestic procedures in Japan prior to the designation of protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA, for which (a) agricultural products, and (b) alcoholic beverages the Government has to date received notifications from the Japanese authorities informing them of the completion of domestic procedures required to designate those items as having protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 of that agreement.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which UK alcoholic beverages are currently (a) designated as having full geographical indication status in Japan, or (b) awaiting the completion of domestic procedures in Japan prior to the designation of protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which UK cheese products are currently (a) designated as having full geographical indication status in Japan, or (b) awaiting the completion of domestic procedures in Japan prior to the designation of protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Strategic Export Controls: Country Pivot Report 1 January 2020 - 31 December 2020 published in July 2021, which (a) companies, (b) individuals and (c) others were end user or users of machine gun components for which Colombia-specific OIELs were issued.

In 2020, one such Open Individual Export Licence was granted, for specific use by the Brazilian Navy in the maintenance and repair of their fleet while in port in Colombia.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has commissioned legal advice under her Department's contracts with (a) TLT LLP, (b) McDermott Will & Emery LLP or (c) Borden Ladner Gervais LLP on the potential effect of the (i) health and social care levy and (ii) increase in dividend tax rates announced on the 7 September 2021 on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has commissioned legal advice under her Department's contracts with (a) TLT LLP, (b) McDermott Will & Emery LLP or (c) Borden Ladner Gervais LLP on the potential effect of (i) the review of the Gambling Act 2005 and (ii) any changes to gambling legislation that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has commissioned legal advice under her Department's contracts with (a) TLT LLP, (b) McDermott Will & Emery LLP or (c) Borden Ladner Gervais LLP on the potential effect of the Government’s review of football governance, ownership and financial sustainability and any policies that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has commissioned legal advice under her Department's contracts with (a) TLT LLP, (b) McDermott Will & Emery LLP or (c) Borden Ladner Gervais LLP on the potential effect of the Government's proposals to ban online adverts for foods high in fat, sugar and salt on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to respond to Question 44264 on the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership: Pitcairn Islands, tabled on 7 September 2021 by the Rt. hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury.

Question 44264 was answered on 22nd September.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the timetable will be for the review of the Trade Remedies Authority, committed to in May 2021; and what the terms of reference are for that review.

The Department for International Trade is working closely with the Trade Remedies Authority to make sure the review is concluded as soon as possible, in accordance with the Written Ministerial Statement of 30th June.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has held discussions with her Australian counterpart on the implications for the agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, of the proposals set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

HM Government has negotiated an unprecedented animal welfare chapter in the Anglo-Australian Trade Deal that includes a non-regression clause and cooperation commitments. Nothing in the agreement will prevent the United Kingdom from amending or introducing any new labelling requirements for products to be sold here.

This deal will not compromise our animal welfare standards and does not create new permissions for imports from Australia. All agri-food imports imported into the United Kingdom under existing or future free trade agreements will, as now, must comply with our import requirements.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what legal advice she has (a) sought and (b) received on the compatibility of sections (a) 1.1, (b) 1.2, (c) 1.7 and (d) 1.8 of her agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, with the proposals set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

We will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare, and food standards.

All goods coming into the United Kingdom must meet our relevant domestic rules. Legal protections for food standards and import requirements remain in place, including through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and our other EU Exit legislation. This provides a firm basis for maintaining the same high level of protection for both domestic and imported products.

The responses to the call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the implications for her agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, of the proposals set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

We will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare, and food standards.

All goods coming into the United Kingdom must meet our relevant domestic rules. Legal protections for food standards and import requirements remain in place, including through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and our other EU Exit legislation. This provides a firm basis for maintaining the same high level of protection for both domestic and imported products.

The responses to the call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether agricultural imports on which tariffs will be reduced as part of the agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, will be required to meet the baseline UK welfare regulations set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

We will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare, and food standards.

All goods coming into the United Kingdom must meet our relevant domestic rules. Legal protections for food standards and import requirements remain in place, including through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and our other EU Exit legislation. This provides a firm basis for maintaining the same high level of protection for both domestic and imported products.

The responses to the call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether any of the agricultural imports on which tariffs are proposed to be reduced as part of the agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, meet the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

We will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare, and food standards.

All goods coming into the United Kingdom must meet our relevant domestic rules. Legal protections for food standards and import requirements remain in place, including through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and our other EU Exit legislation. This provides a firm basis for maintaining the same high level of protection for both domestic and imported products.

The responses to the call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate she has made of the effect on long-term trends in imports of UK legal services in (a) cash and (b) percentage terms of the (i) free trade agreement with (A) Australia, (B) New Zealand and (C) Japan and (ii) UK's accession to the CPTPP.

Legal services are crucial to the UK economy, contributing £29.2 billion (1.6%) to the UK’s gross value added (GVA) in 2020. The published assessments for these agreements assess the potential long-term impact on GVA for all business services, however they do not include a breakdown of the potential impact on legal services imports.

To support UK success in this sector, the Department for International Trade is seeking ambitious commitments in its Free Trade Agreements on cross-border trade in services, investment, mobility, and digital trade. This will reduce trade barriers, providing certainty and transparency for UK businesses, including legal services suppliers.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to publish the objectives and scoping assessments for (a) new free trade agreements with (i) India, (ii) the Mercosur countries and (iii) the Gulf Cooperation Council countries and (b) enhanced free trade agreement