Emily Thornberry Portrait

Emily Thornberry

Labour - Islington South and Finsbury

Shadow Secretary of State for International Trade

(since April 2020)
1 APPG membership (as of 6 Oct 2021)
Sexual and Reproductive Health in the UK
2 Former APPG memberships
Rule of Law, Sexual and Reproductive Health
Shadow Foreign Secretary
27th Jun 2016 - 5th Apr 2020
Shadow Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union
20th Jul 2016 - 6th Oct 2016
Shadow Secretary of State for Defence
5th Jan 2016 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
18th Sep 2015 - 5th Jan 2016
Health and Social Care Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 26th Oct 2015
Shadow Attorney General
7th Oct 2011 - 20th Nov 2014
Shadow Minister (Health)
8th Oct 2010 - 7th Oct 2011
Shadow Minister (Energy and Climate Change)
12th May 2010 - 8th Oct 2010
Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee
23rd Oct 2006 - 2nd Nov 2009
Draft Constitutional Renewal Bill (Joint Committee)
1st May 2008 - 22nd Jul 2008
Environmental Audit Committee
12th Jul 2005 - 26th Mar 2007
Draft Legal Services Bill (Joint Committee)
15th May 2006 - 25th Jul 2006


Department Event
Thursday 2nd December 2021
09:30
Department for International Trade
Oral questions - Main Chamber
2 Dec 2021, 9:30 a.m.
International Trade (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 26th October 2021
Judicial Review and Courts Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 165 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 321 Noes - 220
Speeches
Thursday 21st October 2021
Covid-19: Government Response

Can you advise me how best to deal with the stress levels created by this morning’s timetable? I do not …

Written Answers
Wednesday 27th October 2021
Department for Transport: Jaguar Land Rover
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how the seven vehicles procured by his Department from Jaguar Land Rover …
Early Day Motions
Thursday 28th May 2015
MARRIAGE EQUALITY IN IRELAND
That this House congratulates the Republic of Ireland on becoming the first country in the world to endorse the call …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 2nd March 2020
2. (b) Any other support not included in Category 2(a)
Name of donor: Lord Waheed Alli
Address of donor: private
Amount of donation or nature and value if donation in …
EDM signed
Monday 7th June 2021
Fire and rehire
That this House notes with alarm the growing number of employers who are dismissing and re-engaging staff on worse pay …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Emily Thornberry has voted in 241 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Emily Thornberry Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Elizabeth Truss (Conservative)
Minister for Women and Equalities
(45 debate interactions)
Greg Hands (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(22 debate interactions)
Dominic Raab (Conservative)
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
(12 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for International Trade
(101 debate contributions)
Attorney General
(2 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(2 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Trade Act 2021 - Government Bill
(6,743 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Emily Thornberry's debates

Islington South and Finsbury Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Islington South and Finsbury signature proportion
Petitions with most Islington South and Finsbury signatures
Emily Thornberry has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Emily Thornberry

20th May 2021
Emily Thornberry signed this EDM on Monday 7th June 2021

Fire and rehire

Tabled by: Grahame Morris (Labour - Easington)
That this House notes with alarm the growing number of employers who are dismissing and re-engaging staff on worse pay and terms and conditions, a practice commonly known as fire and rehire; agrees with the Government that such tactics represent an unacceptable abuse of power by rogue bosses, many of …
50 signatures
(Most recent: 21 Oct 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 37
Independent: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Alba Party: 2
Liberal Democrat: 2
Alliance: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
28th February 2018
Emily Thornberry signed this EDM on Tuesday 6th March 2018

SIMEON ANDREWS

Tabled by: Ian Mearns (Labour - Gateshead)
That this House is shocked and saddened by the sudden death of Simeon Andrews, whose advice and assistance has proved invaluable to so many Labour movement comrades and Parliamentary colleagues; pays tribute to his success in creating and co-ordinating several union parliamentary groups and cross-party groups; notes his earlier achievements …
55 signatures
(Most recent: 16 May 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 39
Scottish National Party: 7
Independent: 4
Plaid Cymru: 1
Conservative: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
Green Party: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Emily Thornberry's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Emily Thornberry, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


2 Urgent Questions tabled by Emily Thornberry

Emily Thornberry has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Emily Thornberry has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Emily Thornberry has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


1266 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4 Other Department Questions
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what remuneration members of the Gender Equality Advisory Council will receive for the work they do on behalf of the UK’s G7 presidency.

Membership of the Gender Equality Advisory Council is voluntary and unpaid.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent progress the Government has made in implementing commitments made under the 2019 Biarritz Partnership for Gender Equality.

This Government is fully committed to fulfilling our obligations under international agreements, and remains steadfast in its commitment to advance gender equality and women and girls’ rights.

Our landmark Domestic Abuse Bill is on track to achieve Royal Assent by the end of April 2021 and represents our determination to tackle this abhorrent crime. We remain determined to better protect and support the victims of abuse and their children and bring perpetrators to justice.

Importantly, provision within this Bill brings us even closer to compliance with the Istanbul Convention and this Government’s commitment to ratifying it, as set out in the most recent annual report on progress towards ratification published by the Home Office in October 2020.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, when she plans to (a) announce a date, (b) confirm a programme and (c) issue invitations for the Government's international Safe To Be Me conference.

This Government is committed to delivering an international LGBT conference that will bring together governments from around the world, international civil society, businesses and Parliamentarians to address the safety of LGBT people at home and abroad.

Safe To Be Me: A Global Equality Conference was planned to take place in London between 27 and 29 May 2020.

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the Conference had to be postponed. We are considering a variety of alternative options on how we can address this commitment in a way that is fit-for-purpose and safe for our delegates. We will be announcing the rescheduled dates shortly, followed by the programme and invitations in due course.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what recent progress the Government has made in contributing to the 2018 G7 Gender Equality Advisory Council’s recommendations (a) 18.1, (b) 28 and (c) 40.

Under the UK G7 Presidency, the Prime Minister has reconvened the Gender Equality Advisory Council (GEAC). I am delighted to act as Ministerial Lead working with the independent Council and building on the foundations laid by the Canadian and French G7 presidencies, and to champion the core principles of freedom, opportunity, individual humanity and dignity for women around the world.

The Government remains deeply committed to tackling global poverty and helping to achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Despite the economic challenges we face, the UK will remain a major donor spending 0.5 per cent of GNI on Overseas Development Aid (ODA).

The Foreign Secretary’s Strategic Framework for UK ODA announced in the House on 26 November 2020 will see us focus on global challenges where the UK can make the most impact: on climate change and biodiversity; girls’ education; COVID and global health security; on open societies, conflict resolution, humanitarian crises and trade and economic development.

FCDO supports a range of programmes that promote the importance of data to inform policy-making and programme delivery focused on the needs of the most vulnerable. Having joined the Inclusive Data Charter last year, we will produce an Action Plan on improving the quality, quantity, financing, and availability of inclusive and disaggregated data, as well as the capacity and capability to produce and use it.

The Prime Minister has made absolutely clear our continued commitment to stand up for the right of every girl to 12 years of quality education. ODA spending is only one of our tools in achieving our ambitions; this year we will be co-hosting the Global Partnership for Education Replenishment with Kenya and using our G7 Presidency to rally the international community to step up support to girls’ education.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to answer Questions 20306 and 20307, tabled by the hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury on 26 June 2021.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQ 20306 and PQ 20307 on 20 July 2021.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Government has made or contributed to any administrative determinations in the Northern Ireland protocol joint committee that would bar New Zealand (a) sheepmeat and (b) beef products accessing Northern Ireland’s markets using the preferential access set out under the UK New Zealand-specific WTO tariff rate quota commitments.

The Government has not made or contributed to any administrative determinations in the Northern Ireland Joint Committee that would bar New Zealand exporters accessing Northern Ireland’s market’s using the preferential access set out under UK New Zealand specific WTO tariff rate quota commitment.

Any such impact on New Zealand sheep meat and beef product exporters is a direct result of the EU’s unilateral introduction of Regulation 2020/2170 on the application of Union tariff rate quotas (TRQs) and other import quotas, on 16 December 2020. If strictly applied, the Regulation would mean that importers of goods subject to any EU tariff rate quotas or other import quotas directly into Northern Ireland would be unable to access either EU or UK quotas, and would therefore need to pay a tariff.

The UK has underlined to the European Commission that this is a matter requiring urgent consideration as part of addressing issues with the operation of the Protocol, though there has not yet been any resolution found through the Joint Committee. The Government equally has set out its determination to address the issues faced by New Zealand exporters at a meeting of the WTO agriculture committee on 29 March, and we continue to engage with the New Zealand government as discussions proceed.

This is one of the elements of the Protocol we have been clear should be addressed as we seek to find a new balance in how it operates, as set out in our Command Paper published on 21 July (Northern Ireland Protocol: the way forward, CP502).

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2021 to Question 16052 on GREAT: Commonwealth, aside from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Malaysia, New Zealand and Singapore, which of the 47 other Commonwealth nations are not among the 145 countries where GREAT campaign activity has taken place.

The GREAT campaign is designed to be used in every country around the world, but to date there are a small number of countries where there has either not been sufficient HMG presence or opportunity to use the campaign. No country is out of scope for its use. The countries that have not yet used the campaign are:

  • Antigua and Barbuda

  • Bahamas

  • Belize

  • Dominica

  • Faroe Islands

  • Grenada

  • Kiribati

  • Liechtenstein

  • Maldives

  • Nauru

  • Nicaragua

  • Palestinian Authority

  • Papua New Guinea

  • St. Kitts and Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines

  • Sierra Leone

  • Tonga

  • Tuvalu

  • Vanuatu

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jul 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2021 to Question 16051, aside from Canada, Chile, Japan, Mexico, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam, which of the 60 other non-EU countries with which the UK has signed continuity trade agreements are not among the 145 countries where GREAT campaign activity has taken place.

The GREAT campaign is designed to be used in every country around the world, but to date there are a small number of countries where there has either not been sufficient HMG presence or opportunity to use the campaign. No country is out of scope for its use. The countries that have not yet used the campaign are:

  • Antigua and Barbuda

  • Bahamas

  • Belize

  • Dominica

  • Faroe Islands

  • Grenada

  • Kiribati

  • Liechtenstein

  • Maldives

  • Nauru

  • Nicaragua

  • Palestinian Authority

  • Papua New Guinea

  • St. Kitts and Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines

  • Sierra Leone

  • Tonga

  • Tuvalu

  • Vanuatu

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which of his Ministers is currently occupying (a) 1 Carlton Gardens, (b) the three flats in Admiralty House, (c) the Dorneywood estate and (d) the Chevening estate; and in each case, when the current occupants took up residence.

The official residences which are owned by the Government and currently available to Ministers are:

● Flats above 10 and 11 Downing Street, which are used by the Chancellor of the Exchequer and the Prime Minister respectively;

● 1 Carlton Gardens, leased from the Crown Estate, is available as the official residence for the Foreign Secretary; and

● Hillsborough Castle and Stormont are available for Ministers in the Northern Ireland Office while on duty in Northern Ireland.

The Chequers, Dorneywood and Chevening estates are available to Ministers for both official and private use. None of these properties are owned by the Government, and are run by trustees.

Admiralty House is part of the Government estate, which includes rooms that could be used as residential accommodation. It is not in Ministerial use.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2021 to Question 16052, aside from Australia, Brunei, Canada, Malaysia, New Zealand and Singapore, which of the 47 other Commonwealth nations are not among the 145 countries where GREAT campaign activity has taken place.

The GREAT campaign is designed to be used in every country around the world, but to date there are a small number of countries where there has either not been sufficient HMG presence or opportunity to use the campaign. No country is out of scope for its use. The countries that have not yet used the campaign are:

  • Antigua and Barbuda

  • Bahamas

  • Belize

  • Dominica

  • Faroe Islands

  • Grenada

  • Kiribati

  • Liechtenstein

  • Maldives

  • Nauru

  • Nicaragua

  • Palestinian Authority

  • Papua New Guinea

  • St. Kitts and Nevis

  • Saint Lucia

  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines

  • Sierra Leone

  • Tonga

  • Tuvalu

  • Vanuatu

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2021 to Question 12994, in which of the 11 members of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership is there currently insufficient diplomatic presence to support activity under the GREAT campaign.

GREAT campaign activity has taken place in all 11 member countries of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

GREAT is resourced in line with Government trade and investment priorities.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2021 to Question 12994, in which of the 53 other Commonwealth nations there is currently insufficient diplomatic presence to support activity under the GREAT campaign.

GREAT campaign activity has taken place in all 11 member countries of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

GREAT is resourced in line with Government trade and investment priorities.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 June 2021 to Question 12994, in which of the 67 non-EU countries with which the UK has signed continuity trade agreements is there currently insufficient diplomatic presence to support activity under the GREAT campaign.

GREAT campaign activity has taken place in all 11 member countries of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

GREAT is resourced in line with Government trade and investment priorities.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which countries will not be among the 145 that will be targeted by his Department's refreshed GREAT campaign launched on 9 June 2021.

Since the GREAT campaign was first launched in 2012, the campaign has been extended to 145 countries. GREAT campaign activity is supported by a certain level of diplomatic presence in a country. No country is specifically out of scope for the campaign, there are countries where there is not sufficient presence to support campaign activity.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
17th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the details of any advance visit to India undertaken by Downing Street officials or advisers to prepare for the Prime Minister's scheduled visit on 26 April 2021, including (a) dates and length of the visit and (b) the number of officials involved.

I am responding on behalf of the Prime Minister’s Office. As has been the practice under successive administrations, a small team of officials went ahead to make arrangements for the visit and to discuss plans for the UK-India partnership. These took place in March, when COVID cases were much lower in India. COVID-secure procedures were followed at all times, including tests before, during and after. Although the official visit was subsequently postponed, £1 billion of new UK-India trade and investment was announced on 4 May that is expected to create more than 6,500 jobs.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th May 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, what assessment he has made of whether the UK-EU TCA contributed towards the levelling up agenda.

The Government is taking full advantage of the opportunities outside the EU to boost our economy, reduce burdens on business, and save taxpayers money, while upholding workers’ rights and welfare standards.

As part of the Queen’s Speech the Government outlined a series of bills in the legislative programme that will ensure we make the most of these opportunities.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement with the EU, which fully delivers on what the British public voted for, gives us the freedom to pursue policies that work for people across the UK to promote levelling up in education, skills, infrastructure and technology, while creating a greener and more outward-looking economy.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has received additional (a) staff, (b) budget and (c) other resources to enable the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost to provide support on the co-ordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues; and whether those resources were transferred from other Government departments.

The Prime Minister appointed Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office on 1 March 2021. Lord Frost works closely with colleagues across Government, including the Department for International Trade, to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from the trade deal with the EU, and the UK’s newly independent trade policy. Full details of Lord Frost’s responsibilities are outlined on Gov.uk.

The EU Secretariat, based in the Cabinet Office, has been established to provide direction and coordination of the UK’s relationship with the EU and its member states. This unit integrates officials from Taskforce Europe and the Transition Taskforce.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason the decision was taken to give responsibility to the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost for supporting the co-ordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues; and when that decision was taken.

The Prime Minister appointed Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office on 1 March 2021. Lord Frost works closely with colleagues across Government, including the Department for International Trade, to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from the trade deal with the EU, and the UK’s newly independent trade policy. Full details of Lord Frost’s responsibilities are outlined on Gov.uk.

The EU Secretariat, based in the Cabinet Office, has been established to provide direction and coordination of the UK’s relationship with the EU and its member states. This unit integrates officials from Taskforce Europe and the Transition Taskforce.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what support the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost provides to the Department for International Trade on the co-ordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues.

The Prime Minister appointed Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office on 1 March 2021. Lord Frost works closely with colleagues across Government, including the Department for International Trade, to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from the trade deal with the EU, and the UK’s newly independent trade policy. Full details of Lord Frost’s responsibilities are outlined on Gov.uk.

The EU Secretariat, based in the Cabinet Office, has been established to provide direction and coordination of the UK’s relationship with the EU and its member states. This unit integrates officials from Taskforce Europe and the Transition Taskforce.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which aspects of (a) trade policy and (b) ongoing trade negotiations require the co-ordination of cross-Government positions with the support of the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost.

The Prime Minister appointed Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office on 1 March 2021. Lord Frost works closely with colleagues across Government, including the Department for International Trade, to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from the trade deal with the EU, and the UK’s newly independent trade policy. Full details of Lord Frost’s responsibilities are outlined on Gov.uk.

The EU Secretariat, based in the Cabinet Office, has been established to provide direction and coordination of the UK’s relationship with the EU and its member states. This unit integrates officials from Taskforce Europe and the Transition Taskforce.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to review the (a) funding, (b) objectives and (c) targeting of the Government’s GREAT campaign.

As the Cabinet Office has now assumed responsibility for the GREAT campaign there will be a review of the funding, objectives and targeting of the GREAT campaign.

The GREAT campaign has been very successful at promoting the UK abroad since 2012 and is formally governed via a Programme Board of ministers from relevant government departments, plus officials from departments which fund the campaign. The Board meets quarterly and agrees to budget the campaign’s priorities, strategic direction, budget allocations and ensures value for money on behalf of the taxpayer.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, what assessment she has made of whether the UK-EU TCA helped to level up the UK; and how her Department made that assessment.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what his Department's policy is on how few individuals or companies must be responsible for the aggregate total of outward foreign direct investment for that total to not be subject to disclosure on data protection grounds.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what his Department's policy is on how few individuals or companies must be responsible for the aggregate total of inward foreign direct investment for that total to not be subject to disclosure on data protection grounds.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what the stock of inward foreign direct investment in the UK was from (a) Cameroon, (b) Colombia, (c) Israel, (d) Mexico and (e) Venezuela in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office and the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, what the stock of outward foreign direct investment from the UK was in (a) Cameroon, (b) Egypt, (c) Iraq, (d) Libya and (e) Yemen in each of the last five years.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the combined stock of foreign direct investment in the UK from members of the Gulf Cooperation Council was in each calendar year since 2015.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority. I have, therefore, asked the Authority to respond.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which Minister is responsible for the (a) administration of and public communication around the UK's new trading relationship with the European Union and (b) discussions with UK and European stakeholders about proposed improvements in that relationship.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement covers a wide range of areas and is the responsibility of various departments. Details of ministerial meetings with external organisations are published on gov.uk.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to publish a comprehensive and independently-verified economic impact assessment for the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement.

This is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quota. Businesses will be able to continue to trade smoothly, selling to their customers in the EU, and people will be able to continue to buy goods from Europe tariff-free, protecting consumer prices.

The agreement provides for streamlined customs arrangements, including recognising our respective trusted trade schemes, to support the smooth flow of goods at the border and to reduce administrative costs for traders. This deal also enables us to introduce our own modern subsidy system so that we can better support businesses to grow and thrive, in a way that best suits the interests of UK industries.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what forecasts the Government has made for the growth in (a) UK exports of goods to the EU and (b) EU exports of goods to the UK in the 15-year period after the start of the implementation of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement relative to a baseline of no such agreement being in place after 31 December 2020.

This is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quota. Businesses will be able to continue to trade smoothly, selling to their customers in the EU, and people will be able to continue to buy goods from Europe tariff-free, protecting consumer prices.

The agreement provides for streamlined customs arrangements, including recognising our respective trusted trade schemes, to support the smooth flow of goods at the border and to reduce administrative costs for traders. This deal also enables us to introduce our own modern subsidy system so that we can better support businesses to grow and thrive, in a way that best suits the interests of UK industries.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what forecasts the Government has made for the growth in (a) UK exports of services to the EU and (b) EU exports of services to the UK in the 15-year period after the start of the implementation of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement relative to a baseline of no such agreement being in place after 31 December 2020.

This is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quota. Businesses will be able to continue to trade smoothly, selling to their customers in the EU, and people will be able to continue to buy goods from Europe tariff-free, protecting consumer prices.

The agreement provides for streamlined customs arrangements, including recognising our respective trusted trade schemes, to support the smooth flow of goods at the border and to reduce administrative costs for traders. This deal also enables us to introduce our own modern subsidy system so that we can better support businesses to grow and thrive, in a way that best suits the interests of UK industries.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what forecasts the Government has made for the growth in (a) UK GDP and (b) EU GDP in the 15-year period after the start of the implementation of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement relative to a baseline of no such agreement being in place after 31 December 2020.

This is the first free trade agreement the EU has ever reached based on zero tariffs and zero quota. Businesses will be able to continue to trade smoothly, selling to their customers in the EU, and people will be able to continue to buy goods from Europe tariff-free, protecting consumer prices.

The agreement provides for streamlined customs arrangements, including recognising our respective trusted trade schemes, to support the smooth flow of goods at the border and to reduce administrative costs for traders. This deal also enables us to introduce our own modern subsidy system so that we can better support businesses to grow and thrive, in a way that best suits the interests of UK industries.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the new procurement provisions in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the (a) level of market access for UK companies providing contracted services in the EU and (b) profitability of UK companies providing contracted services in the EU.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement provides UK companies supplying contracted services to public authorities in the EU with export opportunities. The Agreement will allow UK companies to compete fairly for these contracted services in the EU. Details of the Agreement are available on gov.uk.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, which of her Department's dedicated (a) telephone helpline and (b) email service individuals and companies should use in the event that they have problems and questions arising from the end of the transition period which cannot be answered from the resources available on www.gov.uk/transition; and what hours those services will be fully staffed and operational from 28 December 2020 to 4 January 2021 inclusive.

The transition period has now ended. As your question acknowledges, the latest guidance for businesses and citizens is available on gov.uk/transition.

This information is supplemented by departmental helplines and forums where businesses can access more detailed and specific guidance.

For questions relating to the Northern Ireland Protocol, specific information is available from the Trader Support Service and the Movement Assistance Scheme.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has allocated for advertising on digital channels as part of the information campaign on preparations for the end of the transition period, launched on 13 July 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 121394 and 33512.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has allocated for radio advertising as part of the information campaign on preparations for the end of the transition period, launched on 13 July 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 121394 and 33512.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has allocated for TV advertising as part of the information campaign on preparations for the end of the transition period, launched on 13 July 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 121394 and 33512.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how much funding his Department has allocated for advertising in print media as part of the information campaign on preparations for the end of the transition period, launched on 13 July 2020.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 121394 and 33512.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has promoted any external communications for traders on the updated rules of origin between the UK and Japan taking effect after the transition period.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 119201 and 119202.

The Government is ensuring that businesses and traders are ready for the end of the transition period through an intense programme of communication and engagement, including the national public information campaign launched in July.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has promoted any external communications for traders on updated rules of origin arising from continuity trade agreements taking effect after the transition period.

I refer the hon. Member to the answers given to PQs 119201 and 119202.

The Government is ensuring that businesses and traders are ready for the end of the transition period through an intense programme of communication and engagement, including the national public information campaign launched in July.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent representations he has received from representatives of UK businesses on the effect on the UK’s balance of payments of the UK's ongoing negotiations with the EU.

Ministers and officials talk to representatives of the public and private sectors on a regular basis including regarding negotiations with the EU. Details of ministerial meetings with external organisations are published on gov.uk.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to the Baltic States.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to Syria.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to Russia.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to NATO.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether members of 10 Downing Street staff with Developed Vetting security clearance are permitted to see unredacted Top Secret-classified material produced by his Department in relation to Ukraine.

10 Downing Street is an integral part of Cabinet Office.

Full details on the Government’s vetting policy can be found via the HMG Personnel Security Controls published in May 2018.

As has been the practice of successive administrations, details of which employees have access to what material are confidential.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the news release published by the Government on 15 October 2021, entitled, Prime Minister's Ten Point Plan kickstarts green investment boom, if he will publish a breakdown of the 56,000 jobs referenced in that release by (a) location, (b) sector and (c) project.

Around 56,000 high-quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, and heat & buildings.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many of the 56,000 jobs referenced in the news release published by the Government on 15 October 2021, entitled, Prime Minister's Ten Point Plan kickstarts green investment boom, are (a) existing jobs retained between 18 November 2020 and 15 October 2021 and (b) existing jobs forecast to be retained between 15 October 2021 and 18 November 2030.

Around 56,000 high-quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat & buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many of the 56,000 jobs referenced in the news release published by the Government on 15 October 2021, entitled Prime Minister's Ten Point Plan kickstarts green investment boom, are (a) new jobs created between 18 November 2020 and 15 October 2021 and (b) new jobs forecast to be created between 15 October 2021 and 18 November 2030.

Around 56,000 high-quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat & buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been and (b) will be retained as a result of (a) UK private investment, (b) Government investment and (c) inward investment in the Government’s strategy to develop greener buildings between November 2020 and November 2030.

Around 56,00 high quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat and buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been and (b) will be created as a result of (a) UK private investment, (b) Government investment and (c) inward investment in the Government’s strategy to develop greener buildings between November 2020 and November 2030.

Around 56,00 high quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat and buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been or (b) will be created as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (iii) inward investment as part of the Government’s plans to accelerate the shift to zero emissions vehicles between November 2020 and November 2030.

The automotive sector is an important part of the Government’s plans for green growth, levelling up across our country and driving emissions to net zero by 2050.

The Government is committed to growing the 149,000 jobs in the automotive sector across the UK. Accelerating the transition to zero emission vehicles is estimated to support around 40,000 new jobs by 2030.

As part of the Government’s Net Zero Strategy, we are allocating a further £350 million for the Automotive Transformation Fund, as part of our £1 billion commitment to build an internationally competitive electric vehicle supply chain including gigafactories. This is in addition to the £500m of funding announced as part of the 10 Point Plan.

Recent investment announcements by Nissan, Stellantis and Ford will support thousands of highly skilled, green jobs in the UK, and many more across the supply chain.

Lee Rowley
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been and (b) will be retained as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (iii) inward investment as part of the Government's plans to advance offshore wind between November 2020 and November 2030.

Investment by the Government as part of plans to Build Back Greener by making the UK a world leader in wind energy, including support for manufacturing infrastructure, is directly supporting the retention of green jobs in the UK. Smulders Projects UK, Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy and JDR Cables have recently announced major investments in the UK offshore wind sector that will safeguard jobs.

The offshore wind sector currently employs around 7,200 people and supports a similar number of indirect jobs. Government schemes supporting renewables deployment in the UK, such as Contracts for Difference, and Offshore Wind Manufacturing Investment Support Scheme, support investment and employment in the sector. This could support around 30,000 jobs by 2030.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been or (b) will be created as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (iii) inward investment as part of the Government’s plans to develop greener buildings between November 2020 and November 2030.

Around 56,00 high quality green jobs have been secured and created across the UK since November 2020.

The policies and proposals announced in the Net Zero Strategy could also support up to 440,000 jobs in 2030 across power, fuel supply and hydrogen, industry, heat and buildings, transport, and natural resources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure the full disclosure of Ultimate Beneficial Owner status for all UK-registered businesses.

In June 2016, the People with Significant Control (PSC) register and regulations were introduced with the aim of delivering greater transparency around the ownership of UK corporate entities. Over 99% of entities have complied with their PSC filing requirements. The register is widely used, has a positive economic effect and contributes to the fight against the abuse of corporate structures.

Between 1 April 2019 to 31 March 2021, 210 criminal proceedings were issued against companies and directors in connection with failure to comply with PSC requirements. 119 directors and 91 companies have been convicted.

In October 2019, BEIS published a statutory post-implementation review of the PSC regulations which stressed the importance of ensuring the reliability of the PSC register information. With that in mind, the Government has made clear that it will legislate when Parliamentary time allows to require identity verification of PSCs a part of a broader programme targeted at further improving corporate transparency.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with his Cabinet colleagues on the involvement of any UK-registered entities in the Beirut port explosion on 4 August 2020.

The UK Government’s Insolvency Service has undertaken enquiries into a UK registered company with linkages to the Beirut port explosion and, where appropriate, has engaged with the Lebanese authorities. Matters surrounding the explosion remain the subject of ongoing investigation in the Lebanon and it would not be appropriate for me to comment further, nor to address specific questions on the matter, pending the outcome of any actions by the authorities there.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he plans to take additional steps to ensure full transparency of any UK-registered entities linked to the Beirut port explosion on 4 August 2020.

The UK Government’s Insolvency Service has undertaken enquiries into a UK registered company with linkages to the Beirut port explosion and, where appropriate, has engaged with the Lebanese authorities. Matters surrounding the explosion remain the subject of ongoing investigation in the Lebanon and it would not be appropriate for me to comment further, nor to address specific questions on the matter, pending the outcome of any actions by the authorities there.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much revenue the Insolvency Service has collected in bankruptcy fees from leaseholders in high-rise private residential properties with defective cladding in each financial year since 2017-18.

The Insolvency Service reports income from the fees charged on the insolvency cases it handles, in its annual report and accounts. However it does not hold the information to calculate the amount of fees collected in any bankruptcies of leaseholders in a high-rise residential property with defective cladding.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the effect of the proposed five-year increase in postal rates to the US on the profitability of UK SME exporters.

International postage rates are agreed through the Universal Postal Union (UPU), a specialised body of the United Nations. The postal operator that sends an item to another country remunerates the destination postal operator for processing and delivering the item. The costs the receiving postal operator can claim are agreed on a multilateral basis.

In September 2019, the UPU agreed to reform the remuneration rates to reflect the true cost of delivery. Member countries unanimously agreed on a proposal that committed most members to pay the same rates for bulky letters and small packets, effective from January 2020. In addition, countries meeting certain conditions, would be able to self-declare their rates from 1 July 2020. The US is the only country that currently meets these conditions.

In the negotiations on the reforms to the remuneration rates, the UK sought to minimise the impact on our citizens and businesses, ensure the continued flow of trade and maintain the integrity of the international postal system.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to discuss the US's self-determined postage rates with the new US administration.

International postage rates are agreed through the Universal Postal Union (UPU), a specialised body of the United Nations. The postal operator that sends an item to another country remunerates the destination postal operator for processing and delivering the item. The costs the receiving postal operator can claim are agreed on a multilateral basis.

In September 2019, the UPU agreed to reform the remuneration rates to reflect the true cost of delivery. Member countries unanimously agreed on a proposal that committed most members to pay the same rates for bulky letters and small packets, effective from January 2020. In addition, countries meeting certain conditions, would be able to self-declare their rates from 1 July 2020. The US is the only country that currently meets these conditions.

In the negotiations on the reforms to the remuneration rates, the UK sought to minimise the impact on our citizens and businesses, ensure the continued flow of trade and maintain the integrity of the international postal system.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what estimate his Department has made of the effect of the increased postal rates to the US on the profitability of UK SME exporters.

International postage rates are agreed through the Universal Postal Union (UPU), a specialised body of the United Nations. The postal operator that sends an item to another country remunerates the destination postal operator for processing and delivering the item. The costs the receiving postal operator can claim are agreed on a multilateral basis.

In September 2019, the UPU agreed to reform the remuneration rates to reflect the true cost of delivery. Member countries unanimously agreed on a proposal that committed most members to pay the same rates for bulky letters and small packets, effective from January 2020. In addition, countries meeting certain conditions, would be able to self-declare their rates from 1 July 2020. The US is the only country that currently meets these conditions.

In the negotiations on the reforms to the remuneration rates, the UK sought to minimise the impact on our citizens and businesses, ensure the continued flow of trade and maintain the integrity of the international postal system.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what discussions he has had with his US counterpart on that country's recently increased self-determined postage rates for UK exporters.

International postage rates are agreed through the Universal Postal Union (UPU), a specialised body of the United Nations. The postal operator that sends an item to another country remunerates the destination postal operator for processing and delivering the item. The costs the receiving postal operator can claim are agreed on a multilateral basis.

In September 2019, the UPU agreed to reform the remuneration rates to reflect the true cost of delivery. Member countries unanimously agreed on a proposal that committed most members to pay the same rates for bulky letters and small packets, effective from January 2020. In addition, countries meeting certain conditions, would be able to self-declare their rates from 1 July 2020. The US is the only country that currently meets these conditions.

In the negotiations on the reforms to the remuneration rates, the UK sought to minimise the impact on our citizens and businesses, ensure the continued flow of trade and maintain the integrity of the international postal system.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of provision for immediate mutual recognition of professional qualifications in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the ability for services exporters to operate in the EU.

Within the Trade and Cooperation Agreement, the UK and EU have agreed a framework under which both parties may agree arrangements on the recognition of professional qualifications (such as mutual recognition agreements) covering the UK and all 27 EU Member States. Once an arrangement is adopted under the TCA, UK professionals will be able to use the terms outlined in the arrangement to secure recognition of their professional qualifications, helping them to provide services within EU Member States.

While frameworks like this are conventional practice in free trade agreements, the Government successfully negotiated improvements to the EU’s original mutual recognition of professional qualification proposals. We have streamlined the process by which regulatory and professional authorities make recommendations to the Partnership Council, and we have opened further possibilities for the types of arrangements which can be adopted by the Council. This could result in more arrangements being agreed at a faster pace.

Over the coming years, professionals will be able to take advantage of any profession-specific EU-wide arrangement agreed under the FTA framework. As of 1 January 2021, UK-qualified professionals who wish to supply services in the EU should seek recognition of their qualifications according to the local laws and regulations of individual Member States.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the absence of a full mutual recognition agreement in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the profitability of UK exporters excluded from the agreement’s sectoral annexes.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement sets out wide-ranging provisions on Technical Barriers to Trade that will support exporters, including a core chapter and five sectoral annexes. These contain specific provisions which support the profitability of exporters.

Throughout negotiations, agreeing a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) across as many sectors as possible was a priority for the UK. MRAs remain a useful tool, and we will continue to seek them in negotiations with other partners where this would be beneficial.

The Government has already taken additional steps to reduce disruption to business. As set out in our guidance, to allow businesses time to adjust, relevant CE marked goods that meet EU requirements (where these continue to match UK requirements) can continue to be placed on the GB market until 1 January 2022 in most cases.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the exceptions from market access included within the annexes of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the (a) ability for UK service exporters to do business in the EU, (b) profitability of UK service exporters and (c) administrative costs UK services exporters face conforming to different regulations across EU member states.

The UK’s published approach to negotiations aimed to achieve a transparent schedule of reservations based on the UK and EU’s best offer to date with improved commitments in areas of key interest, and the deal reflects this. The UK and EU have agreed provisions on trade in services and investment in line with our respective Free Trade Agreements with Japan, but with some additional benefits for both sides.

The agreement guarantees that UK investors and service suppliers will be able to access the EU’s markets and will not be subject to discriminatory barriers to trade. It includes gold-standard rules on services and investment liberalisation.

The deal requires that member states clearly set out where they intend to restrict this commitment so that UK businesses have absolute clarity about establishment requirements, and these restrictions are set out in the annexes of reservations to the agreement. The agreement as a whole secures continued market access across a broad range of key sectors, including professional and business services, and significantly exceeds what is available under World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules.

Many exceptions are already applied within the Single Market, so do not represent new barriers for UK businesses. New requirements could include having to be EU/EEA national or resident to provide a service, and restrictions vary according to each individual Member State and sector. UK businesses providing services to the EU should check the national regulations of the country in which they do business in to understand how best to operate.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of the provisions on short-term travel for UK service exporters in the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on the ability for service providers to do business in the EU.

The UK-EU Trade & Co-operation Agreement (TCA) contains provisions on the entry and temporary stay of natural persons for business purposes (Mode IV), similar to the EU’s best precedent reached with Canada and Japan, with some improvements.

We have always been clear that Freedom of Movement between the UK and the EU will end after the Transition Period. This means changes, such as visas and work permits, for some of our service exporters; the Government has been helping UK businesses to get ready for this. However, the TCA we negotiated reflects the importance we know businesses place on cross-border mobility.

The Mode IV commitments we secured provide certainty and clarity for those who travel to another country temporarily to do business. These include reciprocal measures for: short-term business visitors; business visitors for establishment purposes; intra-company transferees; and those providing services under contract, whether as an employee or a self-employed professional.

These commitments guarantee market access to key economic sectors, and ease some burdens on business travellers, such as: removing the need for work permits for some short-term trips, and reducing the number of economic needs tests a country could impose to block access to exporters. They also ensure that the UK and EU Member States have transparent visa application processes, clear signposting on rules for business travellers, and a minimum standard for how business travellers and service providers should be treated when working abroad through non-discrimination clauses.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many staff and at what grades are operating his Department’s business support (a) email enquiry service and (b) telephone enquiry service via the 0207 215 5000 helpline; and what hours those services will be fully staffed and operational from 28 December 2020 to 4 January 2021 inclusive.

The Departmental Enquiry Service (The Enquiry Unit - 0207 215 5000) is staffed by 1 x Senior Executive Officer, 1 x Executive Officer and 4 x Administrative Officers. The Unit was fully operational on 29th, 30th and 31st December and provided an email service on 1st, 2nd and 3rd January. The Unit has been fully operational from 4th January onwards. The Enquiry Unit is resourced appropriately to handle incoming enquiries to the Department

In addition to the Department’s Enquiry Unit, BEIS also delivers a Business Support Helpline (0800 098 1098) for individuals and businesses to access signposting and guidance. This resource was increased to handle an anticipated higher number of contacts over the period, including queries relating to the end of the Transition Period.

The Business Support Helpline was open every day from Monday 28th December to Saturday 2nd January 2021, closed Sunday 3rd January.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department's policies of overseas investors seeking to buy large stakes in UK businesses in the event that the UK enters a recession as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

As we take steps to jumpstart our economy and get on the road to recovery from Covid-19, investment from abroad could provide a much-needed boost to companies right across Britain. But we must not be blind to the risks it could pose to businesses that are right at the heart of our battle against the virus and vital for our subsequent recovery.

That is why on 22 June, this Government laid secondary legislation to amend the Enterprise Act 2002, thereby strengthening the Government’s powers to intervene in certain investments made into the UK. The Government can now intervene on public interest grounds in order to maintain the UK’s capability to combat and mitigate the effects of public health emergencies. Further, subject to Parliament’s approval of a draft statutory instrument, the Government will be shortly be able to intervene in smaller mergers in three of the most national security sensitive sectors: artificial intelligence, cryptographic authentication and advanced materials.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, if she will publish a 10-year equivalent for the estimates of trade impacts set out in Section 3 Paragraph 71 for ease of comparison with the 10-year estimates of net direct monetised benefit set out in Section 1 Paragraph 4.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, if she will publish a five-year equivalent for the estimates of net direct monetised benefit set out in Section 1 Paragraph 4 for ease of comparison with the five-year estimates of trade impacts set out in Section 3 Paragraph 71.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, whether the compliance costs set out in Section 1 Paragraph 4 are the same as those set out in Section 3 Paragraph 71.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, what assessment she has made of the compatibility of the estimates set out (a) Section 1 Paragraph 4 and (b) Section 3 Paragraph 71; and if she will provide reasons for the differences between those estimates.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, whether the estimate of £1.04 billion for the net direct monetised benefit of the proposals over 10 years in Section 1, Paragraph 4 takes into account the (a) additional compliance costs and (b) loss of trade in the event that EU data adequacy status is removed.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, what assessment her Department has made of whether the proposed changes in data regulation will have a net positive impact on UK trade if EU data adequacy status is (a) maintained and (b) removed.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, for what reasons her Department is unable to provide a quantitative estimate in cash or percentage terms of the expected change in trade from the proposed changes in data regulation.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to her Department’s report, Data: A New Direction - Analysis of Expected Impact, published on 10 September 2021, whether the estimate of £1.45 billion for the net direct monetised benefit of the proposals over 10 years in Section 1 Paragraph.4 takes into account of the (a) change in the level of additional compliance costs and (b) retention of trade if EU data adequacy status is maintained.

The methodology and data used to develop the analysis is described in the report. It accounts for the variation in compliance costs across different scenarios with respect to the UK's EU adequacy decisions.

As set out in the report, this analysis is open to consultation. We are seeking further information at this stage in order to robustly quantify these impacts, including on trade, as we build a more detailed impact assessment. The Government would welcome responses to the consultation on this topic.

Julia Lopez
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the compliance costs incurred by UK firms operating within the EU of operating under divergent UK and EU data regimes.

On 10 September, the government launched a consultation on reforms to create a new, ambitious, pro-growth and innovation-friendly data protection regime that underpins the trustworthy use of data for an even better UK data rights regime.

Our proposals offer improvements within the current framework, while maintaining the UK's worldwide reputation for high data protection standards and securing public trust. The reforms presented for consultation deliberately build on the key elements of the current UK General Data Protection Regulation (UK GDPR), such as its data processing principles, its data rights for citizens, and its mechanisms for supervision and enforcement.

Furthermore, one of the principles guiding the government's approach is that organisations that comply with the UK’s current regime should still be largely compliant with our future regime, except for only a small number of new requirements.

An initial analysis of the expected impacts of these reforms has been published on which the government is also seeking views during the 10-week consultation period.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether any future data adequacy deals will allow for the free flow of data to any country or territory in which UK citizens' data will be offered weaker protections than those currently in UK law.

Data adequacy is about ensuring the high standards of data protection under the UK GDPR are not undermined when personal data is transferred to a third country. UK data adequacy assessments consider the overall effect of a third country’s data protection laws, their implementation, enforcement, and supervision. Our assessments also take into account how data can be transferred from that country to other destinations.

Adequacy does not require identical laws and practices. The UK will be pragmatic in its assessments and will recognise how partners around the world protect data to high standards and share the same values as the UK but do so through different means.

Work is ongoing and while we have announced priorities and make good progress, we cannot prejudge the outcomes of the technical adequacy assessment work.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of whether the data regimes of (a) the United States, (b) Australia, (c) the Republic of Korea, (d) the Dubai International Financial Centre, (e) Colombia and (f) Singapore provide equivalent protection to that of the UK.

Data adequacy is about ensuring the high standards of data protection under the UK GDPR are not undermined when personal data is transferred to a third country. UK data adequacy assessments consider the overall effect of a third country’s data protection laws, their implementation, enforcement, and supervision. Our assessments also take into account how data can be transferred from that country to other destinations.

Adequacy does not require identical laws and practices. The UK will be pragmatic in its assessments and will recognise how partners around the world protect data to high standards and share the same values as the UK but do so through different means.

Work is ongoing and while we have announced priorities and make good progress, we cannot prejudge the outcomes of the technical adequacy assessment work.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the UK's future data adequacy decisions will prohibit the onward transfer of data to countries with lower standards of data protection than the UK.

Data adequacy is about ensuring the high standards of data protection under the UK GDPR are not undermined when personal data is transferred to a third country. UK data adequacy assessments consider the overall effect of a third country’s data protection laws, their implementation, enforcement, and supervision. Our assessments also take into account how data can be transferred from that country to other destinations.

Adequacy does not require identical laws and practices. The UK will be pragmatic in its assessments and will recognise how partners around the world protect data to high standards and share the same values as the UK but do so through different means.

Work is ongoing and while we have announced priorities and make good progress, we cannot prejudge the outcomes of the technical adequacy assessment work.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether the UK's future data adequacy decisions will require specific assurances on UK citizens’ data from partner countries.

Data adequacy is about ensuring the high standards of data protection under the UK GDPR are not undermined when personal data is transferred to a third country. UK data adequacy assessments consider the overall effect of a third country’s data protection laws, their implementation, enforcement, and supervision. Our assessments also take into account how data can be transferred from that country to other destinations.

Adequacy does not require identical laws and practices. The UK will be pragmatic in its assessments and will recognise how partners around the world protect data to high standards and share the same values as the UK but do so through different means.

Work is ongoing and while we have announced priorities and make good progress, we cannot prejudge the outcomes of the technical adequacy assessment work.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of plans announced on 26 August 2021 to change the UK's data regime on the continuation of the UK’s EU data adequacy status.

The UK regained autonomy over its domestic data protection laws on 1st January 2021. Exact alignment to EU law is not a requirement for EU data adequacy. Indeed, the thirteen EU ‘adequate’ countries, from Israel to New Zealand, each have data protection laws that are different to the EU’s.

The UK can reshape its approach to regulation and seize opportunities with its new regulatory freedoms, helping to drive growth, innovation and competition across the country. The first step in delivering on that objective is the consultation that was announced on 26 August, which went live on 10 September.

In doing so, the UK intends to maintain its high standards of data protection and ensure that the UK data regime continues to be based on public trust in the responsible use of data. We will continue to engage with EU counterparts, as appropriate, on these issues.

12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what processes the Government has in place to (a) monitor the level of protections afforded to UK citizens’ data by Japan and (b) respond to evidence of lower protections in that country than are accepted in the UK.

The UK has preserved the effect of the EU’s adequacy assessment of Japan’s data protection regime on a transitional basis, recognising that Japan offers adequate protection levels for UK citizens’ personal data. This allows personal data to flow freely between the UK and Japan on the basis of strong data protection guarantees.

UK legislation commits the Secretary of State to periodically review decisions taken in respect of the adequacy of other countries, to assess whether they continue to provide an adequate level of personal data protection. Should the Secretary of State consider Japan to no longer provide an adequate level of personal data protection, the Secretary of State could revoke or amend the adequacy decision.

12th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential (a) merits and (b) disadvantages of recognising the APEC-CBPR as equivalent to the UK’s data protection laws.

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Cross-Border Privacy Rules system (APEC CBPR) facilitates personal data flows among nine APEC members. As the UK is not an APEC member it cannot join the CBPR system, but we acknowledge the potential benefits this system provides as a baseline for data protection in the region.

UK GDPR provides for a range of personal data international transfer mechanisms including standard contractual clauses, binding corporate rules, codes of conduct and certification. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is considering the operation of international frameworks, including the APEC CBPR system. This includes an assessment of similarities and differences between these models and the framework set out in UK GDPR and will inform any future assessment on the merits and disadvantages of pursuing interoperability with the CBPR system.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the UK’s commitments under the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement on enacting future online harms legislation.

This Government is committed to making the UK the safest place in the world to be online and the best place to start and grow a digital business. We stand by our online harms commitment and nothing agreed in trade deals will affect that. The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement does not impact the government’s ability to enact legislation to tackle online harms.

In December we published the full government response to the Online Harms White Paper, which set out the expectations on companies to keep their users safe online. The Online Safety Bill, which will give effect to the regulatory framework set out in the full government response, will be ready this year.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how the data provisions of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement affect the data protections UK citizens are afforded if they are employed by a company based in Japan.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) does not affect existing data protection standards in the UK or Japan. Further, the UK has preserved on a transitional basis the effect of the EU’s adequacy assessment of Japan’s data protection regime, which recognises that Japan offers an adequate level of data protection. This allows personal data to flow freely between the two economies on the basis of strong data protection guarantees.

The data provisions in CEPA do not affect the scope of the UK GDPR or the Data Protection Act 2018. If a Japanese company is processing employees’ personal data in the context of an establishment in the UK, or otherwise meets the requirements of the territorial scope provisions of the UK GDPR, then the UK GPDR and Data Protection Act 2018 will apply to the processing.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the long-term compatibility of UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement data rules and the draft data adequacy decision taken by the EU with respect to the UK.

The European Commission published draft adequacy decisions for the UK on 19 February 2021. These decisions follow a thorough assessment of the UK’s legislation and regulatory framework for personal data.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) is compatible with these decisions because CEPA’s provisions do not affect the data protection standards set out in the UK GDPR and Data Protection Act 2018, including those concerning the cross border transfer of personal data.

The UK recognises the importance of data protection to enable trading partners to build trust through transparent treatment of personal data and to ensure that data is able to flow in an uninterrupted manner.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether UK citizens enjoy individual rights to reasonable explanation and reasonable inferences on how their data is used under the exemptions of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) obliges both parties to adopt or maintain a legal framework that provides for the protection of the personal information of the users of electronic commerce, which includes publishing information on protections as well as ways that individuals can pursue remedies and businesses can comply with legal requirements.

CEPA does not change existing protection for UK citizens’ personal data, as set out in the UK GDPR and the Data Protection Act 2018, including the right to be informed about the collection and use of their personal data

The most relevant exemption for data protection - in the cross-border transfer of information article (Article 8.84) in the CEPA - allows the UK to adopt measures restricting data flows to achieve a legitimate public policy objective, such as personal data protection, provided the conditions attached to the use of the exemption are satisfied.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement, (a) whether UK citizens’ data has the same protections from onward transfer as EU data and (b) how UK citizens data protection will be enforced.

UK citizens will enjoy the same protections for their personal data as they did before the agreement. Nothing in the UK-Japan Comprehensive Partnership Agreement (CEPA) changes the current position in relation to onward transfers of UK personal data from Japan. Transfers of personal data from the UK to Japan are governed by the preserved effect of the EU’s adequacy decision for Japan. This recognises that the Japanese data regime has appropriate protections in place when personal data is transferred from Japan to other countries, including enforcement mechanisms.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if UK citizens’ data could be transferred under the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement from Japan to third countries with lower levels of data protection.

Transfers of personal data from the UK to third countries are regulated under the UK GDPR and the Data Protection Act 2018, not free trade agreements.

The UK-Japan CEPA does not change the current position in relation to onward transfers of UK personal data from Japan. Transfers of personal data from the UK to Japan are governed by the preserved effect of the EU’s adequacy decision for Japan. This recognises that the Japanese data regime provides appropriate protections when personal data is transferred from Japan to third countries.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans he has to trigger UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement public policy exemptions if UK citizens’ data was to be transferred to third countries with lower levels of protection under the agreement.

The UK is preserving the effect of the EU's adequacy decision for Japan on a transitional basis because robust protections are in place for the international transfer of personal data. The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) does not change this position in relation to onward transfers of UK personal data from Japan.

The CEPA article on cross-border flows (8.84.2) states that exceptions to the flow of data can be made to achieve “legitimate public policy objectives”. This means that if justified, either party could take action to restrict data flows.

CEPA addresses data flows between the UK and Japan and not onward transfers to other jurisdictions.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of a potential ban on arbitrary or unjustifiable restrictions on data flows within the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement and the UK’s GDPR regime.

We are confident the UK GDPR is compliant with the terms of the legitimate public policy exception in the cross-border flows article (8.84) of the UK-Japan CEPA. The UK GDPR requirements are not arbitrary nor unjustifiably discriminatory, and ensure a high standard of protection for personal data transferred outside the UK.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether UK citizens’ data is afforded the same degree of protection in Japan under the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement as EU data is under the Japan-EU Free Trade Agreement.

The EU-Japan agreement does not include data provisions. There is simply a review clause in the free flow of data article that commits the parties to assess the need for the inclusion of provisions on the free flow of data in the agreement within 3 years.

UK citizens’ data protection rights are not impacted by the agreement with Japan and UK data protection standards will not change as a result of the agreement. The UK data protection regime - enshrined in the Data Protection Act 2018 and UK GDPR - will continue to apply.

9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the source code, software and algorithm provisions of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement on the Government’s right to regulate new technologies.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership includes a provision that ensures UK businesses will not be forced to share their software’s source code, or algorithms expressed in that source code, as a condition of entering the Japanese market. This provides protection for UK company trade secrets and allows companies to retain any competitive advantage that their source code provides.

The agreement does not prohibit all regulatory intervention in respect of new technologies and is designed with future-proofing in mind. The permissible interventions include setting standards, supplier selection, reviewing coding procedures, inspecting underlying data-sets, and prose explanations as to how an algorithm reached a decision.

In designing the exceptions to the source code provision, the UK and Japan have taken a technology and regulator neutral approach. We are convinced that this approach is best to ensure the provision and the exceptions meet both the current and future needs of UK regulators.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of (a) the likelihood of the EU granting a positive data adequacy decision, (b) the likelihood of a positive data adequacy decision being made within the next six months and (c) the effect on UK industry in the event that a positive adequacy decision is not taken before the end of transitional measures.

(a) The UK has been in formal talks with the European Commission since March 2020 to secure data adequacy decisions under both the General Data Protection Regulation and the Law Enforcement Directive. The EU’s adequacy assessments ascertain whether UK data protection standards are ‘essentially equivalent’ to the EU’s. Given we have an existing data protection framework that is equivalent to the EU’s, we see no reason why the UK should not be awarded adequacy.

(b) The EU left insufficient time to adopt data adequacy decisions before the end of the transition period. We have therefore agreed with the EU a time-limited ‘bridging mechanism’ which will allow personal data to continue to flow as it does now whilst EU adequacy decisions for the UK are adopted. In practice, we do not expect the bridging mechanism to be in place for more than 4 months, which is when the bridge is envisioned to expire, but there is scope to extend it to 6 months if required. As stated above, given the UK has an existing data protection framework that is equivalent to the EU’s, we see no reason why the UK should not be awarded adequacy in this timeframe.

(c) In the event that positive adequacy decisions are not ratified before the end of the bridging mechanism, businesses would be able to use alternative legal mechanisms to continue to transfer personal data from the EU to the UK. Standard Contractual Clauses (SCCs) are the most common legal safeguard and will be the relevant mitigation for most organisations. As a sensible precaution, before and during the bridging mechanism, businesses should consider putting in place alternative transfer mechanisms to safeguard against any interruption to the free flow of EU to UK personal data.

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what methodology his Department uses to evaluate the contribution of higher education-related exports to the UK economy.

The department publishes annual experimental statistics on UK revenue from education related exports and transnational education activity.

The latest release, published in December 2020, estimated total UK revenue from education related exports and transnational activity in 2018 to be £23.3 billion, of which £16 billion (69%) of the total value came from higher education activity.

The statistical release, along with the technical note detailing the methodology and data sources used can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uk-revenue-from-education-related-exports-and-transnational-education-activity-2018.

Through the government’s International Education Strategy, and the 2021 update to the Strategy, we have committed to providing a clearer picture of Education Exports data. The department continues to work closely with the Department for International Trade on this matter and as set out in the 2021 Update, a roadmap is being developed focusing on short/medium/long-term steps to improve data. The update can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/international-education-strategy-2021-update/international-education-strategy-2021-update-supporting-recovery-driving-growth.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the Government last conducted an evaluation of international higher education students’ contribution to the UK economy.

The department publishes annual experimental statistics on UK revenue from education related exports and transnational education activity.

The latest release, published in December 2020, estimated total UK revenue from education related exports and transnational activity in 2018 to be £23.3 billion, of which £16 billion (69%) of the total value came from higher education activity.

The statistical release, along with the technical note detailing the methodology and data sources used can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/uk-revenue-from-education-related-exports-and-transnational-education-activity-2018.

Through the government’s International Education Strategy, and the 2021 update to the Strategy, we have committed to providing a clearer picture of Education Exports data. The department continues to work closely with the Department for International Trade on this matter and as set out in the 2021 Update, a roadmap is being developed focusing on short/medium/long-term steps to improve data. The update can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/international-education-strategy-2021-update/international-education-strategy-2021-update-supporting-recovery-driving-growth.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions have taken place between UK and EU representatives on the effect of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement on export opportunities for the UK EdTech sector in Europe.

The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement guarantees that UK investors and service suppliers will be able to access the EU’s markets and will not be subject to discriminatory barriers to trade. The agreement includes gold standard rules on services and investment liberalisation.

The Department is engaging with education exporters to help the sector understand and adapt to these new trading conditions, including those within the EdTech sector.

18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been or (b) will be retained as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (c) inward investment as part of the Government’s plans to protect the natural environment between November 2020 and November 2030.

The Government's Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution is mobilising significant investment in protecting the natural environment in England over the coming years. This will create and retain a range of green jobs while safeguarding our cherished landscapes and restoring habitats for wildlife in order to combat biodiversity loss and adapt to climate change.

As part of this, the £80 million Green Recovery Challenge Fund (GRCF) has already attracted £17.6 million in match funding across 159 projects and will create and retain around 2,500 jobs. The Government's £5.2 billion flood defence investment programme will create approximately 2,000 jobs over the duration of the programme (April 2021 - March 2027) with private sector delivery partners involved in flood defence scheme design and construction.

The England Trees Action Plan committed to treble tree planting rates in England by the end of this Parliament, supported by over £500m from the Nature for Climate Fund. In the recently launched Net Zero Strategy, the Government has also announced that it will boost the Nature for Climate fund with a further £124 million of new money, ensuring total spend of more than £750 million by 2025 on peat restoration, woodland creation and management – above and beyond what was promised in the manifesto. This funding, along with increased private investment, will help to support up to 1,900 jobs by 2024 and 2,000 jobs by 2030 in new woodland creation, harvesting and restocking. It will also support additional jobs in tourism, seed supply and local farming.

The England Peat Action Plan includes a commitment to invest over £50 million of the Nature for Climate Fund to restore approximately 35,000ha of peatland by 2025, which will create or retain approximately 600 jobs.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that (a) have been or (b) will be created as a result of (i) UK private, (ii) Government and (iii) inward investment as part of the Government’s plans to protect the natural environment between November 2020 and November 2030.

The Government's Ten Point Plan for a Green Industrial Revolution is mobilising significant investment in protecting the natural environment in England over the coming years. This will create and retain a range of green jobs while safeguarding our cherished landscapes and restoring habitats for wildlife in order to combat biodiversity loss and adapt to climate change.

As part of this, the £80 million Green Recovery Challenge Fund (GRCF) has already attracted £17.6 million in match funding across 159 projects and will create and retain around 2,500 jobs. The Government's £5.2 billion flood defence investment programme will create approximately 2,000 jobs over the duration of the programme (April 2021 - March 2027) with private sector delivery partners involved in flood defence scheme design and construction.

The England Trees Action Plan committed to treble tree planting rates in England by the end of this Parliament, supported by over £500m from the Nature for Climate Fund. In the recently launched Net Zero Strategy, the Government has also announced that it will boost the Nature for Climate fund with a further £124 million of new money, ensuring total spend of more than £750 million by 2025 on peat restoration, woodland creation and management – above and beyond what was promised in the manifesto. This funding, along with increased private investment, will help to support up to 1,900 jobs by 2024 and 2,000 jobs by 2030 in new woodland creation, harvesting and restocking. It will also support additional jobs in tourism, seed supply and local farming.

The England Peat Action Plan includes a commitment to invest over £50 million of the Nature for Climate Fund to restore approximately 35,000ha of peatland by 2025, which will create or retain approximately 600 jobs.

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether egg-based products produced from farms where laying hens are caged in stocking density as low as 550sq cm per hen falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether egg-based products from farms where laying hens are subject to the trimming of their beaks with a hot blade falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether egg-based products from farms where laying hens are confined in barren battery cages falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether pork produced on farms that carry out the castration of pigs up to the age of 21 days without pain relief falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether sheep meat produced on farms that carry out the castration of lambs up to the age of six months without pain relief falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether beef produced on farms that carry out the surgical removal of ovaries from cows without pain relief falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether beef produced on farms that carry out the dehorning of cattle without pain relief falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether meat produced from livestock transported over land for up to 48 hours without rest falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether sheep meat produced on farms that carry out the mulesing of lambs falls under the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s call for evidence on Labelling for animal welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

UK legislation sets out high standards for animal welfare. This includes the 2006 Animal Welfare Act, the 2007 Welfare of Farmed Animal Regulations, the 2007 Mutilations (Permitted Procedures) Regulations, and the 2015 Welfare at the Time of Killing regulations, as well as the retained EU Regulation 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport. Animal welfare is a fully devolved matter and comparable legislation exists in Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

The Government launched a call for evidence on 13 September to assess the impacts of different types of labelling reforms for animal welfare. For the purpose of this call for evidence, 'imports of lower welfare' is defined as 'the subset of imports that do not meet baseline UK welfare regulations', including, but not limited to, the regulations mentioned above.

Any future label requirements would need to be underpinned by a set of agreed welfare standards, referring to how these meet, exceed, or fall below baseline UK welfare regulations and international standards. The development of such welfare standards would be informed by the responses to this call for evidence and further stakeholder engagement.

The responses to this call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling. This will feed into the Government’s wider work on food labelling to ensure that consumers can have confidence in the food they buy and to facilitate the trade of quality British food at home and abroad.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what advice the Government has provided to UK importers and exporters of (a) raw mink fur skins and (b) related items under customs commodity code 430110 on (i) the potential risks to human and animal health posed by that trade and (ii) steps that can be taken to mitigate those risks since March 2021.

The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) has recently concluded that there is insufficient evidence to consider raw mink fur skins as safe for international trade because of the SARS-CoV-2 risk. Further evidence is needed to improve our understanding of any other risks to human or animal health potentially posed by international trade in contaminated pelts or fur. The UK has been closely involved in these discussions.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has established that no specific authorisations have been issued for the import of untreated furs from third countries into the UK in the last two years. This view is supported by analysis of data from the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS), which is used to notify enforcement authorities about imports of live animals, animal products and high-risk food and feed not of animal origin into Great Britain. No Export Health Certificates have been issued by the domestic authorities for raw mink skins and APHA data also show no evidence of any UK export of this commodity.

The UK's approach to biosecurity is internationally recognised for delivering the highest standards of protection from pests, diseases, and invasive non-native species. This begins with the vital process of horizon scanning to detect potential risks, it includes robust measures to prevent and detect incursions as well as a capacity to respond effectively to contain or eradicate outbreaks that may occur. This is underpinned by world-class scientific capabilities and collaboration internationally and across Government through key links with industry, stakeholder organisations and the wider public.

Safeguard measures under the OIE code may be put in place to ban the import of goods because of a new or emerging disease threat. Although such measures have not been introduced domestically to date, we continue to monitor developments and to consider our response should we receive any applications to import raw mink fur.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what research the Government has (a) commissioned and (b) received to better understand the potential risks to human and animal health posed by international trade in pelts of fur contaminated with covid-19 since March 2021.

The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) has recently concluded that there is insufficient evidence to consider raw mink fur skins as safe for international trade because of the SARS-CoV-2 risk. Further evidence is needed to improve our understanding of any other risks to human or animal health potentially posed by international trade in contaminated pelts or fur. The UK has been closely involved in these discussions.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has established that no specific authorisations have been issued for the import of untreated furs from third countries into the UK in the last two years. This view is supported by analysis of data from the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS), which is used to notify enforcement authorities about imports of live animals, animal products and high-risk food and feed not of animal origin into Great Britain. No Export Health Certificates have been issued by the domestic authorities for raw mink skins and APHA data also show no evidence of any UK export of this commodity.

The UK's approach to biosecurity is internationally recognised for delivering the highest standards of protection from pests, diseases, and invasive non-native species. This begins with the vital process of horizon scanning to detect potential risks, it includes robust measures to prevent and detect incursions as well as a capacity to respond effectively to contain or eradicate outbreaks that may occur. This is underpinned by world-class scientific capabilities and collaboration internationally and across Government through key links with industry, stakeholder organisations and the wider public.

Safeguard measures under the OIE code may be put in place to ban the import of goods because of a new or emerging disease threat. Although such measures have not been introduced domestically to date, we continue to monitor developments and to consider our response should we receive any applications to import raw mink fur.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken since March 2021 to mitigate the potential risks involved in the (a) import to and (b) export from the UK of raw mink furskins and related items under customs commodity code 430110.

The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) has recently concluded that there is insufficient evidence to consider raw mink fur skins as safe for international trade because of the SARS-CoV-2 risk. Further evidence is needed to improve our understanding of any other risks to human or animal health potentially posed by international trade in contaminated pelts or fur. The UK has been closely involved in these discussions.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has established that no specific authorisations have been issued for the import of untreated furs from third countries into the UK in the last two years. This view is supported by analysis of data from the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS), which is used to notify enforcement authorities about imports of live animals, animal products and high-risk food and feed not of animal origin into Great Britain. No Export Health Certificates have been issued by the domestic authorities for raw mink skins and APHA data also show no evidence of any UK export of this commodity.

The UK's approach to biosecurity is internationally recognised for delivering the highest standards of protection from pests, diseases, and invasive non-native species. This begins with the vital process of horizon scanning to detect potential risks, it includes robust measures to prevent and detect incursions as well as a capacity to respond effectively to contain or eradicate outbreaks that may occur. This is underpinned by world-class scientific capabilities and collaboration internationally and across Government through key links with industry, stakeholder organisations and the wider public.

Safeguard measures under the OIE code may be put in place to ban the import of goods because of a new or emerging disease threat. Although such measures have not been introduced domestically to date, we continue to monitor developments and to consider our response should we receive any applications to import raw mink fur.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment she has made of the safety of raw mink furskins and related items under customs code 430110 as commodities for (a) import to or (b) export from the UK.

The World Animal Health Organisation (OIE) has recently concluded that there is insufficient evidence to consider raw mink fur skins as safe for international trade because of the SARS-CoV-2 risk. Further evidence is needed to improve our understanding of any other risks to human or animal health potentially posed by international trade in contaminated pelts or fur. The UK has been closely involved in these discussions.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has established that no specific authorisations have been issued for the import of untreated furs from third countries into the UK in the last two years. This view is supported by analysis of data from the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS), which is used to notify enforcement authorities about imports of live animals, animal products and high-risk food and feed not of animal origin into Great Britain. No Export Health Certificates have been issued by the domestic authorities for raw mink skins and APHA data also show no evidence of any UK export of this commodity.

The UK's approach to biosecurity is internationally recognised for delivering the highest standards of protection from pests, diseases, and invasive non-native species. This begins with the vital process of horizon scanning to detect potential risks, it includes robust measures to prevent and detect incursions as well as a capacity to respond effectively to contain or eradicate outbreaks that may occur. This is underpinned by world-class scientific capabilities and collaboration internationally and across Government through key links with industry, stakeholder organisations and the wider public.

Safeguard measures under the OIE code may be put in place to ban the import of goods because of a new or emerging disease threat. Although such measures have not been introduced domestically to date, we continue to monitor developments and to consider our response should we receive any applications to import raw mink fur.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, on what date officials in his Department provided the Department for International Trade with the completed technical documents translated into Japanese necessary to apply for the UK's new geographical indications, as part of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

Following the contract award on 2 December 2020, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) provided the geographical indications technical documents to Acuity translations with a view to work commencing on 23 December 2020. Defra received all the completed translations of the geographical indication technical documents on 1 February 2021 and provided the Department for International Trade with these documents on 13 April 2021 as requested following discussion with Japanese counterparts.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, on what date Acuity Translations provided his officials with the completed technical documents translated into Japanese necessary to apply for the UK's new geographical indications, as part of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

Following the contract award on 2 December 2020, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) provided the geographical indications technical documents to Acuity translations with a view to work commencing on 23 December 2020. Defra received all the completed translations of the geographical indication technical documents on 1 February 2021 and provided the Department for International Trade with these documents on 13 April 2021 as requested following discussion with Japanese counterparts.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, on what date officials in his Department provided Acuity Translations with the completed English technical documents for translation into Japanese necessary to apply for the UK's new geographical indications, as part of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

Following the contract award on 2 December 2020, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) provided the geographical indications technical documents to Acuity translations with a view to work commencing on 23 December 2020. Defra received all the completed translations of the geographical indication technical documents on 1 February 2021 and provided the Department for International Trade with these documents on 13 April 2021 as requested following discussion with Japanese counterparts.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of how much domestic sales of fur contributed to the UK economy in 2019-20.

HMRC data for 2019 indicates approximate values of £52,911,000 gross imports, £32,713,000 gross exports, and £20,198,000 net imports. This covers raw furskins, tanned or dressed furskins, and articles of apparel, clothing accessories and other furskin articles.

2019

4301 Raw furskins

Imports

Value (£)

£962,216

4301 Raw furskins

Exports

Value (£)

£536,654

4301 Raw furskins

Net Imports

Value (£)

£425,562

4302 Tanned or dressed furskins

Imports

Value (£)

£7,773,470

4302 Tanned or dressed furskins

Exports

Value (£)

£7,012,555

4302 Tanned or dressed furskins

Net Imports

Value (£)

£760,915

4303 Articles of apparel, clothing accessories and other furskin articles

Imports

Value (£)

£44,174,922

4303 Articles of apparel, clothing accessories and other furskin articles

Exports

Value (£)

£25,163,877

4303 Articles of apparel, clothing accessories and other furskin articles

Net Imports

Value (£)

£19,011,045

TOTALS

Imports

Value (£)

£52,910,608

TOTALS

Exports

Value (£)

£32,713,086

TOTALS

Net Imports

Value (£)

£20,197,522

Sourced from https://www.uktradeinfo.com/trade-data/ots-custom-table/

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement, what assessment he has made of the effect of the frequency of sanitary and phytosanitary checks on the profitability of UK food, drink and live animal exporters.

The UK has secured its top priorities on sanitary and phytosanitary measures: autonomy for our domestic regime, protection of our biosecurity and proportionate risk-based controls. The agreement allows the UK and the EU to cooperate on avoiding unnecessary sanitary and phytosanitary barriers to trade in agri-food goods, including potential reductions in the frequency of import checks, where justified.

The EU and UK being geographically close, and close as trading partners, have a number of common pathogen risks, a similar health status and biosecurity aims. We should focus resources on checks that support us both to address any risks. We will seek to reduce checks safely through the regular dialogue both sides have committed to in the agreement. Over time, this will help to reduce any burden on businesses. Taken alongside other elements of the TCA such as zero tariffs and zero quota, this represents a good outcome for the UK's agri-food industry. We have also agreed to exchange information and expertise on animal welfare, particularly relating to transportation and slaughter of food-producing animals, and other issues.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of Rules of Origin requirements on (a) the UK tobacco industry and (b) finished tobacco products imported into the UK from the EU from 1 January 2021, to support negotiations on the UK-EU Free Trade Agreement.

In the event of a Free Trade Agreement with the EU, as with all Free Trade Agreements and all products, the Rules of Origin for finished tobacco products would be specific to that agreement. The exact rules will be discussed and decided through the negotiations, which, in this case, are still ongoing. The UK and EU have held substantial discussions on Rules of Origin and Defra has supported these conversations.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether an Organic Equivalence Arrangement will be in place with Japan before the end of the transition period.

Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) wrote to Defra on 19 December 2019 to confirm that Japan would continue to recognise UK organic products imported into Japan from the point at which the UK withdrew from the European Union. This recognition is effective for two years until 31 January 2022.

We have already confirmed that we will continue to recognise Japan’s organic products as we do now. We plan to write to MAFF shortly to confirm the legislation that will be in place in the UK at the end of the transition period and to confirm the import processes that they will need to follow to continue to export organic products to the UK.

Japan has also requested to audit the UK organic system in 2021. Defra have suggested some dates and we will continue to engage with MAFF over the coming months.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress the Government is making on negotiations to a secure an Organic Equivalence Arrangement with Japan.

Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) wrote to Defra on 19 December 2019 to confirm that Japan would continue to recognise UK organic products imported into Japan from the point at which the UK withdrew from the European Union. This recognition is effective for two years until 31 January 2022.

We have already confirmed that we will continue to recognise Japan’s organic products as we do now. We plan to write to MAFF shortly to confirm the legislation that will be in place in the UK at the end of the transition period and to confirm the import processes that they will need to follow to continue to export organic products to the UK.

Japan has also requested to audit the UK organic system in 2021. Defra have suggested some dates and we will continue to engage with MAFF over the coming months.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to review the current rules on the import of fur and fur products after the end of the transition period for the UK’s departure from the EU.

I refer the hon Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Totnes on 30 June 2020, PQ UIN 62631.

[www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2020-06-22/62631]

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on UK businesses of imposing a total ban on the import of fur and fur products.

I refer the hon Member to the answer given to the hon. Member for Totnes on 30 June 2020, PQ UIN 62631.

[www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2020-06-22/62631]

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when her Department last held discussions with its international counterparts on tackling the illegal trade in wildlife and endangered species.

The UK plays a leading role in driving the global response to eradicate illegal wildlife trade and regularly holds discussions with its international counterparts.

In 2018, the UK convened the largest ever global Illegal Wildlife Trade conference at which 65 countries signed up to the London Declaration, committing to take urgent, coordinated action against illegal wildlife trade.

Since then, the UK has raised the importance of tackling illegal wildlife trade to protect biodiversity and endangered species with other countries during regular bilaterals and during meetings under international agreements such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government has taken to assist states in the Global South to tackle (a) poaching and (b) wildlife crime.

The UK Government is at the forefront of international efforts to protect endangered wildlife from poaching and illegal trade. We are investing over £36 million between 2014 and 2021 to support practical action in developing countries, including our counter-poaching Task Force in Africa, 75 projects so far funded from our Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, and through the International Consortium on Combatting Wildlife Crime. We are also contributing £250 million to the Global Environment Facility between 2018 and 2022 which, amongst other things, supports the world’s biggest fund for tackling illegal wildlife trade, the Global Wildlife Programme.

A further £30 million will be invested in tackling poaching and wildlife crime between 2021 and 2024 as part of the £220 million International Biodiversity Fund recently announced by the Prime Minister.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the challenges associated with the equitable and efficient international supply and distribution of a vaccine for covid-19.

On 27 June, the PM told Global Citizen’s international summit that world leaders have a moral duty to ensure that vaccines, treatments and tests are truly available to all. We are working with international partners, including industry, to agree collaborative approaches to supporting vaccine development, manufacturing scale-up and future distribution to meet both domestic and international needs.

The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), to which we have provided £250 million this year, is committed to ensuring that appropriate vaccines are available to populations when and where they are needed, regardless of a country's ability to pay. CEPI selects vaccines for its portfolio based on their potential for success, rapid development and scalability. CEPI negotiates global access requirements as part of its funding agreements.

Through the COVAX partnership, under the Access to Covid Tools (ACT)-Accelerator, CEPI, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and the World Health Organization are working together to ensure that the vaccines are affordable and available equitably. As part of this, Gavi’s Advance Market Commitment (AMC) will incentivise vaccine manufacturers to produce sufficient quantities of eventual COVID-19 vaccines and to ensure access for LMICs. The UK has contributed £48 million to the AMC.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of deforestation in the Amazon on trends in the level of malaria throughout the world.

Whilst DFID has not carried out an assessment on a relationship between malaria and Amazonian deforestation, we are at the forefront of international efforts on both issues. On malaria we are the second largest country donor, including our announcement in June 2019 to contribute up to £1.4 billion to the Sixth Replenishment of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, and this Government has committed to lead efforts towards ending the malaria epidemic. DFID also tackles illegal logging and promotes the sustainable trade in timber, working with companies to eliminate deforestation from supply chains.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what representations he has made to the OECD Development Co-operation Directorate on changes to the Development Assistance Committee criteria.

The UK continues to make representations regarding Development Assistance Committee criteria for Official Development Assistance (ODA).

The ODA rules enable a broad range of activities to be defined as ODA. They need to continue to evolve as development challenges change and to deliver the Sustainable Development Goals.

Since 2012 the UK has led the way in modernising the rules, securing reforms. We continue to keep scope for improvements under review and actively push for reforms when we consider the rules are out of date.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what support he has offered to the Philippine Government for evacuations within the Cavite province.

DFID and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office are closely monitoring the Taal volcano eruption. The Philippine Government is evacuating affected areas and has not requested assistance. The UK Government continues to liaise closely with the Philippine authorities and stands ready to assist should a request be made.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what support he has provided to the (a) Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo and (b) World Health Organisation to tackle the measles outbreak in that country.

The UK is a longstanding donor to the health sector in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, improving health services, including capacity to tackle disease outbreaks. The UK remains deeply concerned by the ongoing Measles outbreak. We are providing support to the Democratic Republic of the Congo government response through United Nations agencies and Global Alliance for Vaccines (GAVI).

The UK has ensured a £3.2 million emergency allocation from the UN Humanitarian Fund, mostly going to the World Health Organisation for measles vaccinations and treatment. DFID is the largest contributor to the Humanitarian Fund. As a key core funder of GAVI, the UK is also supporting ongoing immunisation work nationwide, including for measles.

We are continuing to follow progress with the response together with partners, keeping resource requirements to end the outbreak under review.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
21st Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's spend control data for January 2021 to June 2021, published on 21 October 2021, for what reasons her Department incurred expenditure of £112,000,000 on Contingent/Interim Labour and Associated Services, reference number CAMS137.

The publication in question relates to a business case submitted for assurance under the Cabinet Office spend control process. The Department has not incurred any spend to date on the proposed services.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which representatives of the Mubadala Investment Company she met on 19 April 2021; and whether she discussed with those representatives proposals announced the previous night for the creation of a European Super League.

The former Secretary of State for International Trade, Liz Truss met with Khaldoon al Mubarak (Chief Executive Officer of Mubadala), Waleed Al Mokarrib Al Muhairi (Deputy CEO of Mubadala), and Matthew Hurn (Chief Financial Officer, Alternative Investments and Infrastructure at Mubadala) on 19th April 2021.

There were no discussions of any proposals for a European Super League.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
21st Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's spend control data for January 2021 to June 2021, published on 21 October 2021, if she will publish a breakdown of the £10,700,000 spent on UK Investment Support Services, reference number CAMS425.

The departmental spend control data published on 21 October confirms amounts approved through the Cabinet Office Controls approval process, rather than actual expenditure. The monthly breakdown of actual expenditure on the Department for International Trade’s contract with Ernst & Young for the provision of investment support services can be found in transparency data on the Department’s spending over £25,000 here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/dit-spending-over-25000-january-2021.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 20 October to Question 56292, on what date her Department received notification from the Japanese authorities informing them of the completion of domestic procedures required to designate the seven names listed as having protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The Government of Japan informed the Department of International Trade on 23 December 2020 that domestic procedures were complete for the protection of the seven geographical indications listed in the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the statistics release published on her Department’s website on 14 October 2021, entitled Net zero related inward investment in the UK: 18 November 2020 to 24 September 2021, if she will publish a breakdown by (a) location, (b) sector and (c) project of the 2,296 jobs referenced in that release.

Due to the commercial sensitivities, the figures released on 14th October 2021 were published in aggregate form. There were 46 individual investments included in the publication and, if they were broken down by characteristics such as location or sector, the small numbers would risk disclosure of the commercial sensitivity.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what purposes her Department incurred the following items of expenditure on services from the UK Visas and Immigration Agency, (a) £1,199 on 2 June 2020, (b) £2,199 on 3 December 2020, (c) £1,476 on 15 June 2021 and (d) £1,199 on 21 June 2021.

These expenses are for Tier 2 sponsorship application and visa payments for members of staff joining the department from overseas.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the terms of (a) Article III of GATT, (b) The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement and (c) the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement on Trans-Pacific Partnership allow HM Treasury to apply lower excise duties to UK manufactured alcoholic beverages than are applied to the equivalent alcoholic beverages imported from one of the other contracting parties to those agreements.

The UK champions rules-based multilateral trade at the WTO. The National Treatment rule under GATT Article III sets out the principle that imported products should not be subject to higher internal taxes than similar domestic products. The UK-EU TCA and CPTPP agreements reiterate this GATT Article III commitment on National Treatment. Measures such as setting excise duties on alcoholic beverages are consistent with the UK’s WTO rights and obligations, including GATT Article III commitments.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which UK meat products are currently (a) designated as having full geographical indication status in Japan, or (b) awaiting the completion of domestic procedures in Japan prior to the designation of protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which UK fish and shellfish products are currently (a) designated as having full geographical indication status in Japan, or (b) awaiting the completion of domestic procedures in Japan prior to the designation of protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA, for which (a) agricultural products, and (b) alcoholic beverages the Government has to date received notifications from the Japanese authorities informing them of the completion of domestic procedures required to designate those items as having protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 of that agreement.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which UK alcoholic beverages are currently (a) designated as having full geographical indication status in Japan, or (b) awaiting the completion of domestic procedures in Japan prior to the designation of protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which UK cheese products are currently (a) designated as having full geographical indication status in Japan, or (b) awaiting the completion of domestic procedures in Japan prior to the designation of protected geographical indication status, in accordance with Chapter 14, Section B, Sub-Section 3 and Footnote 2 of Annex 14-B of the UK-Japan CEPA.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) currently secures the protection of the following UK Geographical Indications (GIs) in Japan: Stilton White Cheese, Stilton Blue Cheese, West Country Farmhouse Cheddar Cheese, Scottish Farmed Salmon, Irish Whiskey/Whisky, Irish Cream, Scotch Whisky.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Strategic Export Controls: Country Pivot Report 1 January 2020 - 31 December 2020 published in July 2021, which (a) companies, (b) individuals and (c) others were end user or users of machine gun components for which Colombia-specific OIELs were issued.

In 2020, one such Open Individual Export Licence was granted, for specific use by the Brazilian Navy in the maintenance and repair of their fleet while in port in Colombia.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has commissioned legal advice under her Department's contracts with (a) TLT LLP, (b) McDermott Will & Emery LLP or (c) Borden Ladner Gervais LLP on the potential effect of the (i) health and social care levy and (ii) increase in dividend tax rates announced on the 7 September 2021 on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has commissioned legal advice under her Department's contracts with (a) TLT LLP, (b) McDermott Will & Emery LLP or (c) Borden Ladner Gervais LLP on the potential effect of (i) the review of the Gambling Act 2005 and (ii) any changes to gambling legislation that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has commissioned legal advice under her Department's contracts with (a) TLT LLP, (b) McDermott Will & Emery LLP or (c) Borden Ladner Gervais LLP on the potential effect of the Government’s review of football governance, ownership and financial sustainability and any policies that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has commissioned legal advice under her Department's contracts with (a) TLT LLP, (b) McDermott Will & Emery LLP or (c) Borden Ladner Gervais LLP on the potential effect of the Government's proposals to ban online adverts for foods high in fat, sugar and salt on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
20th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to respond to Question 44264 on the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership: Pitcairn Islands, tabled on 7 September 2021 by the Rt. hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury.

Question 44264 was answered on 22nd September.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the timetable will be for the review of the Trade Remedies Authority, committed to in May 2021; and what the terms of reference are for that review.

The Department for International Trade is working closely with the Trade Remedies Authority to make sure the review is concluded as soon as possible, in accordance with the Written Ministerial Statement of 30th June.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has held discussions with her Australian counterpart on the implications for the agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, of the proposals set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

HM Government has negotiated an unprecedented animal welfare chapter in the Anglo-Australian Trade Deal that includes a non-regression clause and cooperation commitments. Nothing in the agreement will prevent the United Kingdom from amending or introducing any new labelling requirements for products to be sold here.

This deal will not compromise our animal welfare standards and does not create new permissions for imports from Australia. All agri-food imports imported into the United Kingdom under existing or future free trade agreements will, as now, must comply with our import requirements.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what legal advice she has (a) sought and (b) received on the compatibility of sections (a) 1.1, (b) 1.2, (c) 1.7 and (d) 1.8 of her agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, with the proposals set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

We will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare, and food standards.

All goods coming into the United Kingdom must meet our relevant domestic rules. Legal protections for food standards and import requirements remain in place, including through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and our other EU Exit legislation. This provides a firm basis for maintaining the same high level of protection for both domestic and imported products.

The responses to the call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the implications for her agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, of the proposals set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

We will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare, and food standards.

All goods coming into the United Kingdom must meet our relevant domestic rules. Legal protections for food standards and import requirements remain in place, including through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and our other EU Exit legislation. This provides a firm basis for maintaining the same high level of protection for both domestic and imported products.

The responses to the call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether agricultural imports on which tariffs will be reduced as part of the agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, will be required to meet the baseline UK welfare regulations set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

We will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare, and food standards.

All goods coming into the United Kingdom must meet our relevant domestic rules. Legal protections for food standards and import requirements remain in place, including through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and our other EU Exit legislation. This provides a firm basis for maintaining the same high level of protection for both domestic and imported products.

The responses to the call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether any of the agricultural imports on which tariffs are proposed to be reduced as part of the agreement in principle with Australia, announced on 17 June 2021, meet the definition of imports of lower welfare as set out in the Government’s Call for Evidence on Labelling for Animal Welfare, published on 13 September 2021.

We will not compromise on our high environmental protection, animal welfare, and food standards.

All goods coming into the United Kingdom must meet our relevant domestic rules. Legal protections for food standards and import requirements remain in place, including through the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 and our other EU Exit legislation. This provides a firm basis for maintaining the same high level of protection for both domestic and imported products.

The responses to the call for evidence will be used to inform any future policy proposals on animal welfare labelling.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate she has made of the effect on long-term trends in imports of UK legal services in (a) cash and (b) percentage terms of the (i) free trade agreement with (A) Australia, (B) New Zealand and (C) Japan and (ii) UK's accession to the CPTPP.

Legal services are crucial to the UK economy, contributing £29.2 billion (1.6%) to the UK’s gross value added (GVA) in 2020. The published assessments for these agreements assess the potential long-term impact on GVA for all business services, however they do not include a breakdown of the potential impact on legal services imports.

To support UK success in this sector, the Department for International Trade is seeking ambitious commitments in its Free Trade Agreements on cross-border trade in services, investment, mobility, and digital trade. This will reduce trade barriers, providing certainty and transparency for UK businesses, including legal services suppliers.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to publish the objectives and scoping assessments for (a) new free trade agreements with (i) India, (ii) the Mercosur countries and (iii) the Gulf Cooperation Council countries and (b) enhanced free trade agreements with (A) Turkey, (B) Israel, (C) Canada and (D) Mexico.

At the start of new free trade agreement negotiations, HM Government plans to publish its outline approach, including negotiating objectives and a scoping assessment. Having undertaken consultations on our proposed deals with India, Canada and Mexico, we plan to undertake further consultations in due course.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to hold consultations on (a) new free trade agreements with (i) the Mercosur countries and (ii) the Gulf Cooperation Council countries and (b) enhanced free trade agreements with (A) Turkey and (B) Israel.

At the start of new free trade agreement negotiations, HM Government plans to publish its outline approach, including negotiating objectives and a scoping assessment. Having undertaken consultations on our proposed deals with India, Canada and Mexico, we plan to undertake further consultations in due course.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has (a) sought and (b) received legal advice on the compatibility of UK GDPR with the electronic commerce chapter of CPTPP.

HM Government is committed to maintaining high standards of protection for personal data, including when it is transferred across borders. The rights of UK data subjects will not be impacted by the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). UK data protection rules, enshrined in the Data Protection Act 2018 and UK General Data Protection Regulation, will continue to apply.

HM Government takes a range of legal advice across policy areas, which is subject to legal privilege. HM Government does not generally comment on whether legal advice has been sought or received on a specific area.

8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has (a) sought and (b) received legal advice on the potential effect of the (i) health and social care levy and (b) increase in dividend tax rates announced on the 7 September 2021 on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK from regulating in the public interest, including through the adoption of new taxation policies. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she plans to include commitments to (a) Paris Agreement temperature goals and (b) a hierarchy clause regarding Multilateral Environmental Agreements in the UK-New Zealand Free Trade Agreement.

The UK is seeking an ambitious trade agreement with New Zealand, including a comprehensive environment chapter which supports climate ambition, and provisions which maintain the UK’s and New Zealand’s right to regulate for environment and climate change purposes.

The UK expects the agreement to set new precedent on a range of climate and environment issues, and establish a clear basis upon which the UK and New Zealand can cooperate to ensure trade and environment policies are mutually supportive.

Negotiations are still live and so it would be inappropriate at this stage to disclose the details of individual articles of text.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she plans to include commitments to (a) Paris Agreement temperature goals and (b) a hierarchy clause regarding Multilateral Environmental Agreements in the UK-Australia Free Trade Agreement.

The UK’s ambitious trade deal with Australia includes a substantive chapter on the environment, which includes commitments to work together on climate change and reaffirms both Parties’ commitments to upholding all their obligations under the Paris Agreement.

The deal does not stop the UK from fulfilling obligations under multilateral environmental agreements. The UK is committed to implementation of all its domestic and international obligations on climate change and the environment. The deal protects regulatory sovereignty on the environment and climate, in a manner consistent with all other trade agreements, going beyond most in its specificity of climate change law.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 12 July to Question 28135 on Department for International Trade: Treaties, whether she has (a) sought and (b) received legal advice on the possible inclusion of the Pitcairn Islands in the UK’s application for accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The UK is responsible for the international relations of all UK Overseas Territories, including the Pitcairn Islands, and will seek legal advice if, and where, appropriate as negotiations with trading partners progress.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 12 July to Question 28135 on Department for International Trade: Treaties, whether she has (a) sought and (b) received legal advice on the possible extension of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement to the Falkland Islands.

Cabinet Office is HM’s Government department responsible for the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement. The Secretary of State for International Trade has not, therefore, sought or received any legal advice on extension of the UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement to the Falkland Islands.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will provide (a) at which location and (b) for how many people her Department incurred £621.08 of expenditure on hotel bills on 15 May 2021.

The expenditure of £621.08 was incurred in Greece for one member of staff for three nights. The Government is supporting Babcock in a maritime export opportunity and this visit is to progress final elements of the Hellenic Navy Future Frigate requirement. For security reasons, the Department does not disclose the names or locations of hotels used.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason her Department incurred £505.67 of expenditure at a catering appliance superstore on 27 May 2021.

The expenditure of £505.67 with the Catering Appliance Superstore was incurred to purchase catering supplies for meeting rooms and offices following the Department’s move to the new offices in the Old Admiralty Building.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the (a) case for change, (b) target operating model and (c) benefits realisation model for her Department’s newly formed Maritime Capability Campaign Office.

The Department for International Trade is committed to the maritime sector and works closely with it on a wide range of export issues and opportunities. The Government is currently considering a range of options to support the sector’s export potential further as part of the forthcoming Spending Review. It is not yet possible to comment on the outcome of this process which will be communicated in the normal way.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the latest edition of the brand guidelines for UK Defence and Security Exports.

Brand guidelines are not normally published as they are internal design documents.

7th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what was the value of outstanding loans to private sector bodies guaranteed by UK Export Finance at the end of (a) 2015-16 financial year, (b) 2016-17 financial year, (c) 2017-18 financial year, (d) 2018-19 financial year, (e) 2019-20 financial year, (f) 2020-21 financial year and (g) August 2021.

The value of outstanding loans / facilities to private sector bodies guaranteed / directly funded by UK Export Finance (UKEF) was as follows:

Financial Year

Business issued (£ millions)

2015/16

1,590

2016/17

1,120

2017/18

1,766

2018/19

1,828

2019/20

2,806

2020/21

9,614

2021/22 (to 31 July 2021)

684

The figures quoted represent the UKEF’s Maximum Liability in respect of the transactions (i.e. the sums that UKEF has guaranteed) rather than the total value of the loans.

6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, in which years from 2016-17 to 2020-21 was it the practice of her Department to include export wins amongst the performance data used to calculate incentive payments for departmental suppliers of export support services over the course of their contracts.

The Department for International Trade supports exporting businesses through a number of delivery partners who are contracted on the basis of outcomes with incentive payments aligned to their delivery. The outcomes used every year since 2016 include export wins.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, in which years from 2016-17 to 2020-21 was it the practice of her Department to include export wins amongst the performance data used to calculate end of year bonus payments for members of departmental staff involved in export support roles.

Performance at the Department for International Trade (DIT) is assessed against objectives that relate to corporate and leadership activities, aligned to DIT values and the grade of an individual. Both the delivery and behaviours – the ‘what’ and ‘how’ – are considered equally when assessing performance. Whilst export wins may be one of a range of factors taken into account when considering eligibility, these would not solely determine the eligibility for end of year bonus payments for staff involved in export support roles.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much was spent by her Department on incentive payments for departmental suppliers of export support services in (a) 2016-17, (b) 2017-18, (c) 2018-19, (d) 2019-20 and (e) 2020-21.

For each of the financial years between 2016/17 and 2020/21 the Department for International Trade made the following contracted incentive payments across 11 export support services contracts.

16-17 Total Incentive Paid

17-18 Total Incentive Paid

18-19 Total Incentive Paid

19-20 Total Incentive Paid

20-21 Total Incentive Paid

£ Total

1,360,330

3,819,996

4,220,000

4,223,743

1,650,000

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when her Department next plans to review the (a) contents, (b) application and (c) nomenclature of the Consolidated EU and national arms export licensing criteria, last updated on 24 March 2014.

The Government keeps export licence control policy under regular review. Any change to the export licence assessment criteria will be announced to Parliament.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
6th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much was spent by her Department on end of year bonus payments for members of staff involved in export support roles in (a) 2016-17, (b) 2017-18, (c) 2018-19, (d) 2019-20 and (e) 2020-21.

The Department for International Trade sets aside 1.3% of its paybill for bonus payments in line with Civil Service rules, half of this will be for end of year bonuses and will be attributable to staff supporting exports. We do not hold a breakdown by role type. Information on performance related pay at the Department is published under Transparency data returns.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions she has had with British Sugar PLC on the tariff treatment of bioethanol since the start of 2019.

The Secretary of State has not had any discussions with British Sugar PLC on the tariff treatment of bioethanol since her appointment in July 2019.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when the Trade Remedies Authority will make a decision on the appeal of previous steel safeguard recommendations; and what representations she has made to the Trade Remedies Authority on that appeal.

On 7th September, the Trade Remedies Authority (TRA) announced a reconsideration of its recommendation on the UK’s steel safeguard measure. Further information can be found on the TRA page at: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/trade-remedies-authority

The TRA is an independent body and the Department cannot pre-empt the outcome of this reconsideration process. The Secretary of State cannot make unsought representations to the TRA. Interested parties should engage directly with the TRA to ensure their views are considered as part of this process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 27 May to Questions 6213 and 6214, whether the modelling for Scenario 2 in the scoping assessments published on 17 June 2020 assumes that there are currently effective tariffs in place on imports of bovine meat and sheep meat from (a) Australia and (b) New Zealand.

The scoping assessments published back in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand assessed the potential impacts of a deal in advance of negotiations, under various illustrative scenarios.

Modelling for scenario 2 in the Australia scoping assessment assumes that there are currently effective tariffs in place on imports of bovine meat and sheep meat from Australia.

Modelling for scenario 2 in the New Zealand scoping assessment assumes that there are currently no effective tariffs in place on imports of bovine meat and sheep meat from New Zealand, as a result of an adjustment to the modelling detailed in section 10.3.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she personally approved the adjustment in the proposed UK tariffs on bioethanol to be applied if the UK had left the EU without a deal, announced by her Department on 8 October 2019.

The Government noted that the refinery industry would be impacted by liberalisation in the event that the UK left the EU without a withdrawal agreement. The Government therefore retained tariffs on products from refineries in contingency planning for a No Deal exit.

As the Government secured the Withdrawal Agreement with the EU in advance of 31 January 2020, the contingency planning was for an outcome that is no longer relevant.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which product categories under the UK Global Tariff, presented with their commodity codes, the Government has assessed to be barriers to the liberalisation of environmental goods.

In setting tariff rates under the UK Global Tariff (UKGT), consideration is given to factors prescribed in the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act 2018. This includes the interests of producers and consumers as well as any impacts on competition, productivity, and external trade. As part of the UKGT, the UK has liberalised a list of 104 environmental goods to promote the deployment of renewable energy generation, energy efficiency, carbon capture, and the circular economy through recycling and reducing single use plastics.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate she has made of the proportion of the increase in imports projected to come from Malaysia to the UK as a result of the UK's accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership which will be produced in factories and plantations using forced labour.

On 22nd June 2021, the Government published a Scoping Assessment setting out the predicted impact of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) membership on trade with the region.

The UK is committed to ensuring that more trade supports an environment where workers’ rights are upheld, including working towards the eradication of modern slavery in global supply chains. The UK is playing a leading role in tackling modern slavery and is the first country to require businesses to report on how they are preventing modern slavery in their global supply chains. As more countries introduce their own legislation, the Government is working closely with partners to harmonise approaches and promote responsible business conduct.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether her Government's proposed 2022 ban on the promotion of unhealthy foods will fall under the scope of the ISDS provisions in CPTPP should the UK accede before that ban comes into force.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish a copy of the presentation discussed by her Strategic Trade Advisory Group on 19 July 2021 on the consumer interest in trade deals.

Strategic Trade Advisory Group (STAG) meetings are private so, whilst individual presentations are not made publicly available, summaries of STAG meetings are published on GOV.UK

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the compliance of the new government in Afghanistan with the conditions determining access to the Least Developed Countries framework of the UK's Generalised Scheme of Preferences.

It is too early to say what impact the current situation will have on the United Kingdom’s trade relationship with Afghanistan. However, HM Government continues to monitor the situation there closely.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
18th Aug 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she plans to suspend Afghanistan's access to the tariff preferences available under the Least Developed Countries framework of the UK's Generalised Scheme of Preferences.

It is too early to say what impact the current situation will have on the United Kingdom’s trade relationship with Afghanistan. However, HM Government continues to monitor the situation there closely.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the World Trade Organisation Committee on Regional Trade Agreements paper Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) (Goods and Services), dated 16 June 2021, what assessment she has made of the potential implications for her policies of the signatories' response to the question posed at section 1.72, page 23.

On June 22nd, the Government published the outline approach, scoping assessment, and consultation response, in advance of beginning formal negotiations with Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) countries. CPTPP has high environmental, labour and other standards. Its rules commit members to, for example, have a minimum wage, allow the freedom of association, protect the marine environment and, crucially, to enforcing their own laws in such areas. CPTPP also affirms members’ rights to regulate in their national self-interest, rather than forcing harmonisation on its members.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the World Trade Organisation Committee on Regional Trade Agreements paper Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) (Goods and Services), dated 16 June 2021, what assessment she has made of the potential implications for her policies of the signatories' response to the questions posed at article 14.11 and article 14.13, page 7.

On June 22nd, the Government published the outline approach, scoping assessment, and consultation response, in advance of beginning formal negotiations with Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) countries. CPTPP has high environmental, labour and other standards. Its rules commit members to, for example, have a minimum wage, allow the freedom of association, protect the marine environment and, crucially, to enforcing their own laws in such areas. CPTPP also affirms members’ rights to regulate in their national self-interest, rather than forcing harmonisation on its members.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the World Trade Organisation Committee on Regional Trade Agreements paper Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) (Goods and Services), dated 16 June 2021, what assessment she has made of the potential implications for her policies of the signatories' response to the question posed at section 1.7, page 3.

On June 22nd, the Government published the outline approach, scoping assessment, and consultation response, in advance of beginning formal negotiations with Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) countries. CPTPP has high environmental, labour and other standards. Its rules commit members to, for example, have a minimum wage, allow the freedom of association, protect the marine environment and, crucially, to enforcing their own laws in such areas. CPTPP also affirms members’ rights to regulate in their national self-interest, rather than forcing harmonisation on its members.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the World Trade Organisation Committee on Regional Trade Agreements paper Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) (Goods and Services), dated 16 June 2021, what assessment she has made of the potential implications for her policies of the signatories' response to the question posed at section 1.31, chapter 19, page 9.

On June 22nd, the Government published the outline approach, scoping assessment, and consultation response, in advance of beginning formal negotiations with Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) countries. CPTPP has high environmental, labour and other standards. Its rules commit members to, for example, have a minimum wage, allow the freedom of association, protect the marine environment and, crucially, to enforcing their own laws in such areas. CPTPP also affirms members’ rights to regulate in their national self-interest, rather than forcing harmonisation on its members.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of Malaysia’s compliance with the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership Articles 19.3 and 19.4.

The UK and Malaysia have a strong trading and investment relationship. The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will support shared ambitions to remove barriers to trade and create new opportunities for business and investors. CPTPP has high environmental, labour and other standards. Its rules commit members to, for example, having a minimum wage and allowing freedom of association. The agreement includes a comprehensive labour chapter that intends to ensure parties protect and enforce labour rights, improve working conditions, and strengthen cooperation on labour issues.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2021 to Question 35571, whether failure to prevent the organisation, funding and execution of acts of terrorism will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under her new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2021 to Question 35571, whether failure to prevent the trafficking and forced marriage of women will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under her new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2021 to Question 35571, whether the use of capital punishment against children and pregnant women will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under her new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2021 to Question 35571, whether the state-sanctioned use of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading punishment will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under her new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2021 to Question 35571, whether the mass detention of civilians without charge or trial will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under her new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2021 to Question 35571, whether the forced recruitment of children for use in armed conflict will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under her new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22July 2021 to Question 35571, whether failure to prevent the use of children for prostitution or for the production of pornography will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under the new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2021 to Question 35571, whether the use of forced or compulsory labour as a means of racial or religious discrimination will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under the new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2021 to Question 35571 on Trade: Developing Countries, whether instituting a system of racial segregation or apartheid will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under the new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 22 July 2021 to Question 35571 on Trade: Developing Countries, whether genocide against religious minorities will remain an act that could lead to the variation or suspension of a nation’s preferential treatment under her new Developing Countries Trading Scheme.

Decisions on the Developing Countries Trading Scheme have not yet been taken, given the ongoing public consultation. When considering the conditions that could lead to varying or suspending preferences, HM Government will give due consideration to the views expressed through the consultation.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she plans to take under the terms of Annex VII, Part 1, Article 3 of the UK-SACUM Economic Partnership Agreement in response to recent reports of human rights abuses in the Kingdom of Eswatini.

The United Kingdom is concerned by the recent events in Eswatini. When considering the essential and fundamental provisions in an Economic Partnership Agreement, we consider the economic and developmental impact to that partner and its people.

We raise the need to uphold rights and responsibilities with governments around the world, and we want to continue encouraging trade too – helping those most in need by providing valuable employment and lifting them out of poverty – as more trade, more jobs and more prosperity need not come at the expense of British values.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the compatibility of recent reports of human rights abuses in the Kingdom of Eswatini with that country's commitments under Annex VII, Part 1, Article 3 of the UK-SACUM Economic Partnership Agreement.

The United Kingdom is concerned by the recent events in Eswatini. When considering the essential and fundamental provisions in an Economic Partnership Agreement, we consider the economic and developmental impact to that partner and its people.

We raise the need to uphold rights and responsibilities with governments around the world, and we want to continue encouraging trade too – helping those most in need by providing valuable employment and lifting them out of poverty – as more trade, more jobs and more prosperity need not come at the expense of British values.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the implications for her international trade policies of recent reports of human rights abuses including the use of (a) live ammunition, (b) tear gas and (c) water cannon against pro-democracy protestors in the Kingdom of Eswatini.

The United Kingdom is concerned by the recent events in Eswatini. When considering the essential and fundamental provisions in an Economic Partnership Agreement, we consider the economic and developmental impact to that partner and its people.

We raise the need to uphold rights and responsibilities with governments around the world, and we want to continue encouraging trade too – helping those most in need by providing valuable employment and lifting them out of poverty – as more trade, more jobs and more prosperity need not come at the expense of British values.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to agree a revised Political, Free Trade and Strategic Partnership Agreement with Ukraine, to replace the current agreement signed on 8 October 2020; and for what reason a revised agreement is necessary.

The United Kingdom-Ukraine Political Free Trade and Strategic Partnership Agreement, entered into force on 1st January 2021. Neither the United Kingdom nor Ukraine are seeking to replace it. It is standard practice for agreements to be amended and updated over time to align with the developing interests of those involved, or to add greater clarity where this is helpful to businesses.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to her Department’s 19 July document, Statement of direction: designing a new UK trade preferences scheme to take effect in 2022, what assessment she has made of the (a) impact of her proposed tariff reductions in the General and Enhanced Frameworks and (b) effect of that matter on the value of preferences on (i) exports to the UK, (ii) wages, and (iii) GDP of the 47 countries under the Least Developed Countries Framework.

HM Government wants to take a more ambitious, generous, and pro-growth approach to trading with developing nations. Our proposed new scheme will mean more opportunity and less bureaucracy for our friends around the world.

There is an ongoing public consultation on the content of the scheme, which HM Government will take account of. We will consider where existing tariff rates may be particularly important for least developed countries also.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what proposed simplifications she is considering making to the conditions that could lead to variation or suspension of preferences for beneficiary countries under the (a) Least Developed Countries Framework and (b) General and Enhanced Frameworks as per the consultation launched by her Department on 19 July 2021.

HM Government wants to take a more ambitious, generous, and pro-growth approach to trading with developing nations. Our proposed new scheme will mean more opportunity and less bureaucracy for our friends around the world.

There is an ongoing public consultation on the content of the scheme, which HM Government will take account of. We will consider where existing tariff rates may be particularly important for least developed countries also.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason a declaration of her discussions on 28 August 2019 with Tony Abbott at Stoke Lodge on issues relating to the UK/Australia relationship was not included in her register of external meetings for the period July-September 2019, published on 23 January 2020.

The Department does not release details of meetings hosted by foreign Governments as part of the Ministerial Transparency data.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether (a) sheepmeat and (b) beef products destined for Northern Ireland from New Zealand under New Zealand-specific UK WTO tariff rate quota commitments are considered to be at risk under the terms of the Northern Ireland protocol and the decisions taken by the joint committee.

On 16 December 2020, the European Union unilaterally introduced Regulation 2020/2170 on the application of Union tariff rate quotas and other import quotas. If strictly applied, the Regulation would mean that importing goods subject to any EU tariff rate quotas or other import quotas directly into Northern Ireland would be unable to access either EU or UK quotas, and would need to pay the EU tariff. This would leave Northern Ireland importers in a uniquely disadvantaged position compared to their counterparts in Great Britain and the EU.

The UK has underlined to the Commission that this is a matter requiring urgent consideration as part of addressing issues with the operation of the Protocol. HM Government must find a new balance in the way the Protocol operates to ensure that goods flow as freely as possible into Northern Ireland and we are considering our next steps to achieve this.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether New Zealand is permitted, under the terms of the Northern Ireland protocol and the decisions taken by the joint committee, to export (a) sheepmeat and (b) beef to Northern Ireland under the UK’s New Zealand-specific WTO tariff rate quota commitments.

On 16 December 2020, the European Union unilaterally introduced Regulation 2020/2170 on the application of Union tariff rate quotas and other import quotas. If strictly applied, the Regulation would mean that importing goods subject to any EU tariff rate quotas or other import quotas directly into Northern Ireland would be unable to access either EU or UK quotas, and would need to pay the EU tariff. This would leave Northern Ireland importers in a uniquely disadvantaged position compared to their counterparts in Great Britain and the EU.

The UK has underlined to the Commission that this is a matter requiring urgent consideration as part of addressing issues with the operation of the Protocol. HM Government must find a new balance in the way the Protocol operates to ensure that goods flow as freely as possible into Northern Ireland and we are considering our next steps to achieve this.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 9 July 2021 to Question 22145, on Department for International Trade: Freedom of Information, what were the final colour-coded ratings applied to the Freedom of Information requests (a) FOI2020/04220, (b) FOI2020/05327, (c) FOI2020/06174, (d) FOI2021/01596, (e) FOI2021/02962, and (f) FOI2021/03419 from the office of the Rt hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury at the point they were fully processed by her Department and not subject to further change, respectively on (i) 17 December 2020, (ii) 11 November 2020, (iii) 29 December 2020, (iv) 22 June 2021, (v) 28 June 2021 and (vi) 7 July 2021.

Freedom of Information requests have been colour-coded according to the subject matter of the specific request in addition to other considerations. This consideration does not form part of the decision on whether or not to release information. The colour-coded status can also change during the lifecycle of a request, so no individual Freedom of Information request has a fixed colour-coded identifier.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what model or prototype her Department commissioned from Ogle Models and Prototypes Ltd at a cost of £39,080 in April 2021.

This cost was for the production and delivery of four models of the United Kingdom Pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai for promotion of the United Kingdom’s participation and programme of activity at the same event.

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what legal services her Department has procured from Fieldfisher LLP to advise on the territorial application of treaties; and in respect of which treaties those services will be required.

The Department has procured a contract for legal support in relation to the possible extension of its free trade agreements to territories for whose international relations the UK is responsible.

The contract will be published on the Government's Contracts Finder website in accordance with Government Transparency Requirements. The Contracts Finder website is available on GOV.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/contracts-finder

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which of the Government’s proposed new free trade agreements (a) she plans to have in place and (b) are planned to be subject to ongoing negotiations by February 2024.

Building on the success of the United Kingdom’s recent Agreement in Principle with Australia and the European Economic Area (EEA-EFTA), HM Government will continue to pursue deals with New Zealand and the US.

HM Government is progressing plans to accede to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) also, and recently launched public consultations for free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations with India, Canada and Mexico.

We have always been clear that negotiating comprehensive and ambitious FTAs that deliver jobs and growth for the whole of the United Kingdom is more important than meeting any particular deadline.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the (a) total cost is of and (b) forecast financial benefits are from the UK’s participation in the Dubai Expo from October 2021 to April 2022.

The total cost to HM Government is £36.5m. This is funded from existing budgets within the GREAT Campaign, the Department for International Trade and five Government Departments with an additional cash and value in kind sponsorship from industry worth £7.5m.

UK companies have already won contracts with Expo 2020 Dubai worth £1.2bn. UK companies will be provided with opportunities to connect and develop new partnerships with other businesses from across more than 190 participating nations to continue developing global relationships and trade.

5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what key deliverables were set out in her Department’s contracts with (a) Omnicom, (b) M&C Saatchi, and (c) Bray Leino for the financial years (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21.

The Department for International Trade has contracts with the named agencies that provide services to support the Department’s export and investment work, both in the UK and internationally.

Over the specified periods their contractual deliverables included:

  • Media planning and buying from Omnicom, the Government’s media buying agency.

  • Strategic marketing services, including research and creative solutions from M&C Saatchi. In 2019-20 this was for the Department’s international work. In 2020-21 they were awarded a contract for domestic and international projects through an open tender process.

  • Event production and delivery, including major world events like Dubai Expo from Bray Leino.
Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has made an assessment of the extent to which tariff lines under the UK Global Tariff present barriers to the liberalisation of environmental goods.

The UK Global Tariff (UKGT) liberalised 104 environmental products as part of the ‘Green 100’ initiative, thereby making the UKGT greener than the EU Common External Tariff. Tariffs can also play an important role in protecting sensitive domestic industries and supporting trade negotiations. Any decisions made on altering tariff lines must be balanced across a variety of considerations, as laid out in the five principles established in section 8(5) of the Taxation (Cross-Border Trade) Act 2018.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether her departmental IT systems routinely allow officials, advisers and ministers to access private email accounts from their office desktop computers, department-issue laptop computers and mobile phone devices.

I refer the Rt. Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

The Government Security Group have confirmed that it is government policy not to comment on specific technical security controls; however, the incidental personal use of private email accounts from departmental systems is subject to our IT Acceptable Use policy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of (a) the review of the Gambling Act 2005 and (b) any changes to gambling legislation that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health, football governance and gambling. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of (a) the review of the Gambling Act 2005 and (b) any changes to gambling legislation that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health, football governance and gambling. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has (a) sought and (b) received legal advice on the potential effect of (a) the review of the Gambling Act 2005 and (b) any changes to gambling legislation that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health, football governance and gambling. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what representations she has made to her Cabinet colleagues on the potential effect Government’s review of football governance, ownership and financial sustainability and any policies that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health, football governance and gambling. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of the Government’s review of football governance, ownership and financial sustainability and any policies that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health, football governance and gambling. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has (a) sought and (b) received legal advice on the potential effect of the Government’s review of football governance, ownership and financial sustainability and any policies that may arise from that review on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health, football governance and gambling. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what representations she has made to her Cabinet colleagues on the potential effect of the Government's proposals to ban online adverts for foods high in fat, sugar and salt on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health, football governance and gambling. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of the Government's proposals to ban online adverts for foods high in fat, sugar and salt on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health, football governance and gambling. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has (a) sought and (b) received legal advice on the potential effect of the Government's proposals to ban online adverts for foods high in fat, sugar and salt on the UK's exposure to Investor State Dispute Settlement claims under the provisions of Chapter 9 of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, including the currently suspended provisions of that chapter.

Acceding to the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) will not prevent the UK regulating in the public interest, including in relation to public health, football governance and gambling. CPTPP explicitly reaffirms states' right to regulate under international law. It also protects this right through numerous safeguards, including procedural provisions to minimise the impacts of frivolous and unsuccessful Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claims faced by states.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent risk assessment has been carried out on the secure storage of CCTV footage recorded within her departmental estate.

It is not government policy to comment on security procedures in government buildings.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether any departmental business has been conducted from private email addresses since 2016; and what mechanisms are in place to ensure that full records are kept of all official business conducted from private email addresses.

I refer the Rt. Hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on use of private emails.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 24 June 2021 to Question 15190, what colour-coded ratings applied to the Freedom of Information requests (a) FOI2020/04220, (b) FOI2020/05327 and (c) FOI2020/06174 from the office of the hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury on the dates they were responded to by her Department, respectively (i) 17 December 2020, (ii) 11 November 2020 and (iii) 29 December 2020.

Freedom of Information requests are colour-coded according to the subject matter of the specific request in addition to other considerations. This consideration does not form part of the decision on whether or not to release information. The colour-coded status can also change during the processing of a request, so no individual Freedom of Information request has a fixed colour-coded identifier.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 24 June 2021 to Question 15188, what assessment she made of the compatibility of the Answer that interactions with the Cabinet Office Clearing House are not recorded with the entries made in her Department's Freedom of Information case management system recording interactions with the Cabinet Office Clearing House on the handling of the Freedom of Information request FOI2021/01332.

I can confirm that the Department does not maintain a record of the number of Freedom of Information (FOI) requests referred to Cabinet Office Clearing House as was asked in Question 15188.

FOI requests are referred to the Clearing House in line with the published criteria available on gov.uk.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department’s policy paper, UK-Australia free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published on 17 June 2021, if she will publish the full DIT modelling used as the basis for (a) Table 4: Summary of UK macroeconomic impacts, long run change on baseline, (b) Table 5: UK GDP impact, by expenditure components of GDP, long run percentage change on baseline and (c) Table 17: Summary of estimated impacts of scenarios.

The scoping assessments published for the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), Australia, New Zealand, and the United States (US) set out the potential impacts of deals in advance of negotiations, including estimates of the long run impact on Gross Domestic Product, imports, exports, real wages, and welfare.

The full Department for International Trade modelling, including a description of the methods, evidence base and main modelling results are included within the scoping assessments published for Australia, New Zealand, and the US. For CPTPP, further technical detail on the methods used will be published in the forthcoming technical annexes.

Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published with updated modelling of the negotiated deals for each of the agreements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's document, UK-New Zealand free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published on 17 June 2021, if she will publish the full DIT modelling used as the basis for (a) Table 3: Summary of UK macroeconomic impacts, long run change on baseline, (b) Table 4: UK GDP impact, by expenditure components of GDP, long run percentage change on baseline and (c) Table 16: Summary of estimated impacts of scenarios.

The scoping assessments published for the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), Australia, New Zealand, and the United States (US) set out the potential impacts of deals in advance of negotiations, including estimates of the long run impact on Gross Domestic Product, imports, exports, real wages, and welfare.

The full Department for International Trade modelling, including a description of the methods, evidence base and main modelling results are included within the scoping assessments published for Australia, New Zealand, and the US. For CPTPP, further technical detail on the methods used will be published in the forthcoming technical annexes.

Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published with updated modelling of the negotiated deals for each of the agreements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the UK-US Free Trade Agreement, published on 2 March 2020, if she will publish the full DIT modelling used as the basis for (a) Table 6: Summary of UK macroeconomic impacts, long run change on baseline, (b) Table 7: Impact on UK GDP, by expenditure components of GDP, long run percentage point change and (c) Table 18: Summary of estimated impacts of scenarios (all measures relative to baseline).

The scoping assessments published for the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), Australia, New Zealand, and the United States (US) set out the potential impacts of deals in advance of negotiations, including estimates of the long run impact on Gross Domestic Product, imports, exports, real wages, and welfare.

The full Department for International Trade modelling, including a description of the methods, evidence base and main modelling results are included within the scoping assessments published for Australia, New Zealand, and the US. For CPTPP, further technical detail on the methods used will be published in the forthcoming technical annexes.

Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published with updated modelling of the negotiated deals for each of the agreements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department’s document, UK Accession to CPTPP: The UK’s Strategic Approach, published 22 June 2021, if she will publish the modelling used as the basis for (a) Table 5: Summary of UK macroeconomic impacts, long run change on baseline, (b) Table 6: Summary of UK macroeconomic impacts, long run change on baseline, from static modelling and (c) Table 14: Long-run changes in GDP in full range of baseline scenarios modelled (£ billion).

The scoping assessments published for the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), Australia, New Zealand, and the United States (US) set out the potential impacts of deals in advance of negotiations, including estimates of the long run impact on Gross Domestic Product, imports, exports, real wages, and welfare.

The full Department for International Trade modelling, including a description of the methods, evidence base and main modelling results are included within the scoping assessments published for Australia, New Zealand, and the US. For CPTPP, further technical detail on the methods used will be published in the forthcoming technical annexes.

Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published with updated modelling of the negotiated deals for each of the agreements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 21 June 2021 to Question 15187 on Department for International Trade: Freedom of Information, in which month of 2019 did officials in her Department introduce a colour-coding system to track the (a) timeliness of responses, (b) progress of responses and (c) sensitivity of information in all Freedom of Information cases.

The Department’s case management system was introduced to help the Department track and evidence compliance with its Freedom Of Information obligations, as part of regular ongoing improvements to the Department’s processes. It was introduced in May 2019.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 21 June 2021 to Question 15187 on Department for International Trade: Freedom of Information, who requested that officials in her Department in 2019 introduce a colour-coding system to track the (a) timeliness of responses, (b) progress of responses and (c) sensitivity of information in all Freedom of Information cases.

The Department’s case management system was introduced to help the Department track and evidence compliance with its Freedom Of Information obligations, as part of regular ongoing improvements to the Department’s processes. As such, no single person requested its introduction.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which product categories subject to a third-country duty under the UK Global Tariff, presented with their commodity codes, are classed as environmental goods.

The UK Global Tariff liberalised a list of 104 environmental goods to promote the deployment of renewable energy generation, energy efficiency, carbon capture, and the circular economy through recycling and reducing single use plastics. For example, goods such as LED lights, with commodity code 85395000, were identified for tariff reduction to support the Government’s objectives for energy efficiency and increasing generation of energy from renewable sources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which product categories under the UK Global Tariff, presented with their commodity codes, are classed as environmental goods.

The UK Global Tariff liberalised a list of 104 environmental goods to promote the deployment of renewable energy generation, energy efficiency, carbon capture, and the circular economy through recycling and reducing single use plastics. For example, goods such as LED lights, with commodity code 85395000, were identified for tariff reduction to support the Government’s objectives for energy efficiency and increasing generation of energy from renewable sources.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's report, UK-US Free Trade Agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published 2 March 2020, what the (a) percentage increase is of UK imports of US semi-processed food products modelled under scenario one, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes and (b) forecast increase is in total quantity of imports underpinning that estimate, expressed in (i) volume and/or (ii) financial value, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes.

The scoping assessments published in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand, and the US scoping assessment published in March 2020 assessed the potential impacts of possible deals in advance of negotiations, under various scenarios.

The assessments included estimates of the long run impacts on imports from these countries into the UK if the scenarios described in these assessments were implemented. The final agreement that the UK negotiates with these partners will differ from the scenarios described in those scoping assessments. Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's report, UK-US Free Trade Agreement, published 2 March 2020, what the (a) percentage increase is of UK imports of US agricultural products modelled under scenario one, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes and (b) forecast increase in total quantity of imports underpinning that estimate, expressed in (i) volume and/or (ii) financial value, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes.

The scoping assessments published in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand, and the US scoping assessment published in March 2020 assessed the potential impacts of possible deals in advance of negotiations, under various scenarios.

The assessments included estimates of the long run impacts on imports from these countries into the UK if the scenarios described in these assessments were implemented. The final agreement that the UK negotiates with these partners will differ from the scenarios described in those scoping assessments. Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's report, UK-US Free Trade Agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published 2 March 2020, what the (a) percentage increase is of UK imports of US semi-processed food products modelled under scenario two, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes and (b) forecast increase in total quantity of imports underpinning that estimate, expressed in (i) volume and/or (ii) financial value, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes.

The scoping assessments published in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand, and the US scoping assessment published in March 2020 assessed the potential impacts of possible deals in advance of negotiations, under various scenarios.

The assessments included estimates of the long run impacts on imports from these countries into the UK if the scenarios described in these assessments were implemented. The final agreement that the UK negotiates with these partners will differ from the scenarios described in those scoping assessments. Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's report, UK-US Free Trade Agreement, published 2 March 2020, what the (a) percentage increase is of UK imports of US agricultural products modelled under scenario two, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes and (b) forecast increase is in total quantity of imports underpinning that estimate, expressed in (i) volume and/or (ii) financial value, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes.

The scoping assessments published in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand, and the US scoping assessment published in March 2020 assessed the potential impacts of possible deals in advance of negotiations, under various scenarios.

The assessments included estimates of the long run impacts on imports from these countries into the UK if the scenarios described in these assessments were implemented. The final agreement that the UK negotiates with these partners will differ from the scenarios described in those scoping assessments. Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's report, UK-New Zealand free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published 17 June 2020, what the (a) percentage increase is of UK imports of New Zealand semi-processed food products modelled under scenario two, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes and (b) forecast increase is in total quantity of imports underpinning that estimate, expressed in (i) volume and/or (ii) financial value, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes.

The scoping assessments published in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand, and the US scoping assessment published in March 2020 assessed the potential impacts of possible deals in advance of negotiations, under various scenarios.

The assessments included estimates of the long run impacts on imports from these countries into the UK if the scenarios described in these assessments were implemented. The final agreement that the UK negotiates with these partners will differ from the scenarios described in those scoping assessments. Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's report, UK-New Zealand free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published 17 June 2020, what the (a) percentage increase is of UK imports of New Zealand agricultural products modelled under scenario two, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes and (b) forecast increase is in total quantity of imports underpinning that estimate, expressed in (i) volume and/or (ii) financial value, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes.

The scoping assessments published in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand, and the US scoping assessment published in March 2020 assessed the potential impacts of possible deals in advance of negotiations, under various scenarios.

The assessments included estimates of the long run impacts on imports from these countries into the UK if the scenarios described in these assessments were implemented. The final agreement that the UK negotiates with these partners will differ from the scenarios described in those scoping assessments. Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's report, UK-Australia free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published 17 June 2020, what the (a) percentage increase is of UK imports of Australian semi-processed food products modelled under scenario two, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes and (b) forecast increase is in total quantity of imports underpinning that estimate, expressed in (i) volume and/or (ii) financial value, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes.

The scoping assessments published in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand, and the US scoping assessment published in March 2020 assessed the potential impacts of possible deals in advance of negotiations, under various scenarios.

The assessments included estimates of the long run impacts on imports from these countries into the UK if the scenarios described in these assessments were implemented. The final agreement that the UK negotiates with these partners will differ from the scenarios described in those scoping assessments. Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to her Department's report, UK-Australia free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published 17 June 2020, what the (a) percentage increase is of UK imports of Australian agricultural products modelled under scenario two, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes and (b) forecast increase is in total quantity of imports underpinning that estimate, expressed in (i) volume and/or (ii) financial value, either in point estimates or a range of outcomes.

The scoping assessments published in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand, and the US scoping assessment published in March 2020 assessed the potential impacts of possible deals in advance of negotiations, under various scenarios.

The assessments included estimates of the long run impacts on imports from these countries into the UK if the scenarios described in these assessments were implemented. The final agreement that the UK negotiates with these partners will differ from the scenarios described in those scoping assessments. Following the conclusion of negotiations, a full impact assessment will be published.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to intensive poultry and pig farms which exceed the maximum limits on emissions of dust, bioaerosols or ammonia permitted for farms in the UK.

The Government has agreed a deal with Australia that will further environmental and climate policy priorities and publicly affirms the shared commitment to environmental standards.

The UK will not compromise on high environmental protection and this agreement does not create new permissions for imports from Australia. All agri-food imports imported into the UK under existing or future free trade agreements must, as now, comply with the UK’s import requirements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to meat produced on farms that permit cattle to cause poaching damage to grass and underlying soil within five metres of inland freshwaters.

The Government has agreed a deal with Australia that will further environmental and climate policy priorities and publicly affirms the shared commitment to environmental standards.

The UK will not compromise on high environmental protection and this agreement does not create new permissions for imports from Australia. All agri-food imports imported into the UK under existing or future free trade agreements must, as now, comply with the UK’s import requirements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to meat produced on farms that (a) store or deposit slurry and (b) position livestock feeders within 10 metres of inland freshwaters.

The Government has agreed a deal with Australia that will further environmental and climate policy priorities and publicly affirms the shared commitment to environmental standards.

The UK will not compromise on high environmental protection and this agreement does not create new permissions for imports from Australia. All agri-food imports imported into the UK under existing or future free trade agreements must, as now, comply with the UK’s import requirements.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to egg-based products from farms where laying hens are caged in stocking density as low as 550sq cm per hen.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to egg-based products from farms where laying hens are confined in barren battery cages.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to egg-based products from farms where laying hens are subject to the trimming of their beaks with a hot blade.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to pork produced on farms that keep pregnant pigs confined in sow stalls.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to pork produced on farms that carry out the castration of pigs up to the age of 21 days without pain relief.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to sheep meat produced on farms that carry out the castration of lambs up to the age of six months without pain relief.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to beef produced on farms that carry out the surgical removal of ovaries from cows without pain relief.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to beef produced on farms that carry out the dehorning of cattle without pain relief.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to beef produced on farms that carry out the branding of cattle with hot irons.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to meat produced from livestock transported over land for up to 48 hours without rest.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to sheep meat produced on farms that carry out the mulesing of lambs.

Maintaining the UK’s high domestic standards and including protections for the agriculture industry is a red line in trade negotiations. The manifesto states that in trade negotiations the Government will not compromise on high environmental protection, animal welfare and food standards. Imports will continue to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards as they did before.

More than 75% of Australian beef exports, and more than 70% sheep meat in 2020 were imported to Asia-Pacific markets, where the costs of beef production can be twice as high than the UK in some markets. It is unrealistic to think large volumes of beef and sheep will be diverted to the UK from those lucrative nearby markets.

The tariff reductions secured by the UK will benefit exporters across the country. By reducing tariffs, the Government are helping our farmers and food producers capitalise on the enormous global demand for British food and drink.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the tariff reductions the Government agreed on the 15 June 2021 for Australian agricultural exports to the UK will apply to meat produced from livestock treated with growth-promoting antibiotics.

The UK is a world leader in the battle against antimicrobial resistance – significantly cutting its use of antibiotics in farming. The Government have reached agreement with Australia to cooperate on combatting anti-microbial resistance, including a commitment to ensure appropriate use of and reduced need for antibiotics.

Imports to the UK will still have to meet the same UK food safety and biosecurity import standards, including clear controls on limits of veterinary medicine residues in meat and other animal products, as they did before. The use of antibiotics as growth promoters in animal feed remains banned in the UK under retained EU law.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish each of the reports distributed by the UK's trade commissioner for North America to individual members of the US Senate and US House of Representatives on the potential benefits of a UK-US trade deal for their states and districts.

The reports represent the current trade relationship between the UK and each of the 50 states, not the potential trade benefits of a UK-US free trade agreement. The reports were produced using data supplied by The Trade Partnership, an economic research firm in Washington, DC.

The 2020 state level reports were also produced from data supplied by The Trade Partnership, available on GOV.UK here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/uk-usa-trade-and-investment-highlights .

The UK-US 50 State and 435 Congressional District economic impact reports were authorised and commissioned by the US Prosperity Programme Board, which is made up of numerous officials. State export data comes from The Trade Partnership’s CDxports database.

The Trade Partnership derives goods exports primarily from data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Moody’s Analytics. The Trade Partnership derives services exports primarily from data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and Moody’s Analytics.

The 435 district-level reports, produced from the state level data, have not been previously published due to the disproportionate cost in staff time to format and upload them onto GOV.UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which Minister or official authorised the preparation and distribution of reports to individual members of the US Senate and US House of Representatives on the potential benefits of a UK-US trade deal for their states and districts.

The reports represent the current trade relationship between the UK and each of the 50 states, not the potential trade benefits of a UK-US free trade agreement. The reports were produced using data supplied by The Trade Partnership, an economic research firm in Washington, DC.

The 2020 state level reports were also produced from data supplied by The Trade Partnership, available on GOV.UK here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/uk-usa-trade-and-investment-highlights .

The UK-US 50 State and 435 Congressional District economic impact reports were authorised and commissioned by the US Prosperity Programme Board, which is made up of numerous officials. State export data comes from The Trade Partnership’s CDxports database.

The Trade Partnership derives goods exports primarily from data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Moody’s Analytics. The Trade Partnership derives services exports primarily from data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and Moody’s Analytics.

The 435 district-level reports, produced from the state level data, have not been previously published due to the disproportionate cost in staff time to format and upload them onto GOV.UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what data sources were used to produce the reports distributed to individual members of the US Senate and US House of Representatives on the potential benefits of a UK-US trade deal for their states and districts.

The reports represent the current trade relationship between the UK and each of the 50 states, not the potential trade benefits of a UK-US free trade agreement. The reports were produced using data supplied by The Trade Partnership, an economic research firm in Washington, DC.

The 2020 state level reports were also produced from data supplied by The Trade Partnership, available on GOV.UK here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/uk-usa-trade-and-investment-highlights .

The UK-US 50 State and 435 Congressional District economic impact reports were authorised and commissioned by the US Prosperity Programme Board, which is made up of numerous officials. State export data comes from The Trade Partnership’s CDxports database.

The Trade Partnership derives goods exports primarily from data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Moody’s Analytics. The Trade Partnership derives services exports primarily from data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and Moody’s Analytics.

The 435 district-level reports, produced from the state level data, have not been previously published due to the disproportionate cost in staff time to format and upload them onto GOV.UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which unit of government or external agency was responsible for producing the reports distributed to individual members of the US Senate and US House of Representatives on the potential benefits of a UK-US trade deal for their states and districts.

The reports represent the current trade relationship between the UK and each of the 50 states, not the potential trade benefits of a UK-US free trade agreement. The reports were produced using data supplied by The Trade Partnership, an economic research firm in Washington, DC.

The 2020 state level reports were also produced from data supplied by The Trade Partnership, available on GOV.UK here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/uk-usa-trade-and-investment-highlights .

The UK-US 50 State and 435 Congressional District economic impact reports were authorised and commissioned by the US Prosperity Programme Board, which is made up of numerous officials. State export data comes from The Trade Partnership’s CDxports database.

The Trade Partnership derives goods exports primarily from data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Moody’s Analytics. The Trade Partnership derives services exports primarily from data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and Moody’s Analytics.

The 435 district-level reports, produced from the state level data, have not been previously published due to the disproportionate cost in staff time to format and upload them onto GOV.UK.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many Freedom of Information requests have been referred by her Department for advice on handling to the Cabinet Office’s clearing house for Freedom of Information requests in each year since 2016.

The Department may seek advice from Clearing House experts on an ad hoc basis. As this is an informal process, these interactions are not recorded.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when and for what reason her Department adopted a policy of categorising Freedom of Information requests according to the workplace of certain individuals making requests; and which Minister or official is responsible for the introduction of that policy.

The Department has a standard set of processes to respond to all Freedom of Information (FOI) requests and these are applied regardless of who the request is from. The case management system does not categorise the workplace of individual requestors. The Department tracks timeliness and progress of responses in addition to the sensitivity of the information in all FOI cases. The Department’s case management system helps evidence our compliance with our FOI obligations.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when and for what reason her Department adopted a policy of rating Freedom of Information requests red, amber or green according to the presentational risks of disclosure; and which Minister or official is responsible for the introduction of that policy.

The Department’s internal Freedom of Information (FOI) case management system, which includes a colour-coding system, was introduced by officials in 2019. It is used to track timeliness and progress of responses in addition to the sensitivity of the information in all FOI cases. The Department’s case management system helps evidence our compliance with our FOI obligations.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what colour-coded ratings for presentational sensitivity have been given to the Freedom of Information requests (a) FOI2021/01595, (b) FOI2021/02962, (c) FOI2021/03419 and (d) FOI2021/03427.from the office of the hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury and currently being processed by her Department.

The colour-coded ratings used in the case management system are dependent on several factors, including the timeliness of the response and the sensitivity of the information we hold. The colour-coded status can also change during the processing of a request, so no individual Freedom of Information request has a fixed colour-coded identifier.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what colour-coded ratings for presentational risks were given to the Freedom of Information requests (a) FOI2020/04220, (b) FOI2020/05327 and (c) FOI2020/06174 from the office of the hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury and processed by her Department since April 2020.

The colour-coded ratings used in the case management system are dependent on several factors, including timeliness of the response and the sensitivity of the information we hold. The colour-coded status can change during the processing of the request, so no individual Freedom of Information request has a fixed colour-coded identifier.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what her planned timetable is for negotiating revised trade agreements with (a) Liechtenstein, (b) Switzerland, (c) Canada, (d) Singapore, (e) Israel, (f) Mexico, (g) Egypt, (h) North Macedonia, (i) Chile, (j) Morocco, (k) Ukraine, (l) Lebanon, (m) Jordan, (n) Tunisia, (o) Serbia, (p) Georgia, (q) Faroe Islands, (r) Moldova, (s) Albania, (t) Kosovo and (u) Palestine to enable companies using the duty-free provisions in the UK’s new generation of freeports to access the tariff reductions available on UK exports to those countries.

The United Kingdom has already committed to beginning negotiations with Canada and Mexico by the end of 2021. HM Government will continue to keep all agreements under review, as we seek to improve benefits for all British businesses, including those operating in our freeports.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the new trade agreement reached in principle with Norway and Iceland on 4 June 2021 removes the prohibition clause on drawback of, or exemption from, customs duties in Title IV, Article 14 of the previous Agreement on Trade in Goods with Norway and Iceland signed on 10 December 2020.

The new trade deal will replace the previous Agreement on Trade in Goods signed on 8th December 2020 and does not include prohibitions to the use of duty drawback and exemptions.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether companies based in the UK’s new generation of freeports will be able to (a) import goods duty free, (b) process them into finished goods and (c) export them to (i) Norway and Iceland and (ii) Liechtenstein on the same terms as companies based elsewhere in the UK under the agreement reached in principle with those countries on 4 June 2021.

The United Kingdom has agreed in principle an ambitious new trade agreement with Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein, which goes further than any other trade agreement these countries have negotiated before with a free trade agreement partner.

For Norway and Iceland, it includes provision for companies in a British freeport to import goods, suspending the duty payable, carry out a certain minimum amount of working and processing specified by the agreement and then export to the countries that are party to the new agreement under preference. However, Liechtenstein’s goods trading relationship with the United Kingdom continues to be governed by a separate agreement that was signed on 11th February 2019. This agreement includes prohibitions on the use of duty drawback and exemptions, similar to those with other trading partners that are signatories to the Pan-European-Mediterranean Convention. We will continue to keep such agreements under review in order to maximise benefits for all British businesses, including those operating in freeports.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether points two and three of Article 1.4 of the new trade agreement reached in principle with Liechtenstein on 4 June 2021 means that the prohibition clause on drawback of, or exemption from, customs duties in Title IV, Article 14 of the previous agreement signed on 11 February 2019 with Liechtenstein and Switzerland remains in force.

The United Kingdom has agreed in principle an ambitious new trade agreement with Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein, which goes further than any other trade agreement these countries have negotiated before with a free trade agreement partner.

For Norway and Iceland, it includes provision for companies in a British freeport to import goods, suspending the duty payable, carry out a certain minimum amount of working and processing specified by the agreement and then export to the countries that are party to the new agreement under preference. However, Liechtenstein’s goods trading relationship with the United Kingdom continues to be governed by a separate agreement that was signed on 11th February 2019. This agreement includes prohibitions on the use of duty drawback and exemptions, similar to those with other trading partners that are signatories to the Pan-European-Mediterranean Convention. We will continue to keep such agreements under review in order to maximise benefits for all British businesses, including those operating in freeports.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2021 to Question 1279 on Trade Agreements: Japan, on what date officials in her Department began discussions with Japanese authorities on the addition of new geographical indications; and which unit in her Department was responsible for those discussions.

Official discussions began on 2 February 2021 and involved Department for International Trade officials in the Trading Systems and Trade Negotiations Groups.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2021 to Question 1279 on Trade Agreements: Japan, what discussions with Japanese authorities were required prior to the UK's application for the addition of new geographical indications; and what changes resulted from those discussions.

Article 14.34.5 of the Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) sets out consultations should occur prior to adding additional geographical indications (GIs) for protection under the CEPA. These consultations took place to agree the modalities of exchanging lists of new GIs.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent progress she has made on rolling over the trade agreement in place before 1 January 2021 with Montenegro; and whether she plans to (a) seek to remove or (b) amend the clause in that agreement relating to duty drawback and exemption to exclude its application to the UK's new of freeports.

The Government has regularly offered Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro an agreement that would provide continuity for business, and on the same terms as the EU Agreement.

The Government understands that the authorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina are considering their position and the Government remains ready to conclude a trade agreement with Bosnia and Herzegovina when they are able to do so.

Following last year’s elections and formation of a new government in Montenegro, and with the COVID-19 situation there now improving, the Government stands ready to open discussions.

The Government will carefully assess and negotiate the terms of all future trade agreements, such as clauses related to duty drawback, to secure provisions that benefit all of the United Kingdom, including producers in the UK’s new freeports.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent progress she has made on rolling over the trade agreement in place before 1 January 2021 with Bosnia and Herzegovina; and whether she plans to (a) seek to remove or (b) amend the clause in that agreement relating to duty drawback and exemption to exclude its application to the UK's new of freeports.

The Government has regularly offered Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro an agreement that would provide continuity for business, and on the same terms as the EU Agreement.

The Government understands that the authorities in Bosnia and Herzegovina are considering their position and the Government remains ready to conclude a trade agreement with Bosnia and Herzegovina when they are able to do so.

Following last year’s elections and formation of a new government in Montenegro, and with the COVID-19 situation there now improving, the Government stands ready to open discussions.

The Government will carefully assess and negotiate the terms of all future trade agreements, such as clauses related to duty drawback, to secure provisions that benefit all of the United Kingdom, including producers in the UK’s new freeports.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent progress she has made on rolling over the trade agreement in place before 1 January 2021 with Algeria; and whether she plans to (a) seek to remove or (b) amend the clause in that agreement relating to duty drawback and exemption to exclude its application to the UK's new freeports.

The Government has made it clear that it is open to re-engage with Algeria to discuss new trading arrangements. Through the UK Embassy in Algiers, the Government maintains an open dialogue to address barriers to trade collaboratively with Algeria on a case-by-case basis. The Government will continue to carefully assess and negotiate the terms of all future trade agreements, such as clauses related to duty drawback, in order to secure provisions that benefit all of the United Kingdom, including producers in the UK’s new freeports.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Answer of 24 May 2021 to Question 1279 on Trade Agreements: Japan, on what date officials in her Department ordered the translation of technical documents necessary to apply for the addition of new geographical indications; and which unit in (a) the Government or (b) an external agency provided those translation services.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) was responsible for ordering the translation of technical documents. DEFRA awarded the contract for the translation of geographical indication technical documents to a single external company, Acuity Translations on 2 December 2020.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, on how many occasions the Government has faced legal action through the Energy Charter Treaty.

The UK has never faced an Investor–State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) claim under the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT).

27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the impact of the Energy Charter Treaty on the UK’s net-zero target.

The UK remains committed to ensuring that the right to regulate to reach net zero is protected in all our trade agreements, including the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT). The UK supports the work of the ECT in promoting investment in the energy sector and fostering international energy cooperation, including in the development of renewable energy worldwide.

The ECT specifically addresses environmental obligations, including calling on Member States to minimise the environmental impacts of energy operations. Member States of the ECT are currently engaged in a process to modernise the Treaty and as the modernisation process develops, we will ensure that it delivers for the Government’s priorities, which include tackling climate change and supporting the global clean energy transition.

27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what her Department’s policy is on the proposed modernisation of the Energy Charter Treaty.

The UK supports the modernisation of the Energy Charter Treaty (ECT) and will ensure that the Treaty delivers for the Government’s priorities, which include tackling climate change and supporting the global clean energy transition.

The UK encourages the renegotiation of the investment protection provisions in the ECT, which seek to bring the Treaty in line with modern investment treaty practices. We also welcome the role of the ECT in ensuring consistent legal protection for UK investors operating abroad. This will allow UK companies, investing in countries that have signed the Treaty, to enjoy more protection for their assets, including those involved in renewable energy production.

24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the modelling of Scenario 2 set out in her Department's report, UK-Australia free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published 17 June 2020, assumes the elimination of all tariffs on bovine meat and sheep meat.

The scoping assessments published back in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand assessed the potential impacts of a deal in advance of negotiations, under various illustrative scenarios.

Modelling for scenario 2 in these documents assumes the elimination of all tariffs, including those on bovine meat and sheep meat.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to Box 4 of her Department's report, UK-New Zealand free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published on 17 June 2020, whether the modelling of Scenario 2 in that report assumes the elimination of all tariffs on bovine meat and sheep meat.

The scoping assessments published back in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand assessed the potential impacts of a deal in advance of negotiations, under various illustrative scenarios.

Modelling for scenario 2 in these documents assumes the elimination of all tariffs, including those on bovine meat and sheep meat.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to table 12 of her Department's report, UK-Australia free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published on 17 June 2020, what the exact long run percentage change in employment is for (a) agriculture and (b) semi-processed food under (a) scenario 1 and (b) scenario 2.

The scoping assessments published back in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand assessed the potential impacts of a deal in advance of negotiations, under various illustrative scenarios.

The assessments include estimates of the long-run impacts on gross value added (GVA) and employment for various sectors. The sector estimates are subject to a high degree of uncertainty. They are therefore presented as ranges, rather than point estimates, to reflect the lack of precision for these estimates.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to table 11 of her Department's report, UK-New Zealand free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published on 17 June 2020, what the exact long run percentage change in employment is for (a) agriculture and (b) semi-processed food under (a) scenario 1 and (b) scenario 2.

The scoping assessments published back in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand assessed the potential impacts of a deal in advance of negotiations, under various illustrative scenarios.

The assessments include estimates of the long-run impacts on gross value added (GVA) and employment for various sectors. The sector estimates are subject to a high degree of uncertainty. They are therefore presented as ranges, rather than point estimates, to reflect the lack of precision for these estimates.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to table 6 of her Department's report, UK-Australia free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published on 17 June 2020, what the exact long run percentage change in Gross Value Added is for (a) agriculture and (b) semi-processed food under (a) scenario 1 and (b) scenario 2.

The scoping assessments published back in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand assessed the potential impacts of a deal in advance of negotiations, under various illustrative scenarios.

The assessments include estimates of the long-run impacts on gross value added (GVA) and employment for various sectors. The sector estimates are subject to a high degree of uncertainty. They are therefore presented as ranges, rather than point estimates, to reflect the lack of precision for these estimates.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to table 5 of her Department's report, UK-New Zealand free trade agreement: the UK's strategic approach, published on 17 June 2020, what the exact long run percentage change in Gross Value Added is for (a) agriculture and (b) semi-processed food under (a) scenario 1 and (b) scenario 2.

The scoping assessments published back in June 2020 for Australia and New Zealand assessed the potential impacts of a deal in advance of negotiations, under various illustrative scenarios.

The assessments include estimates of the long-run impacts on gross value added (GVA) and employment for various sectors. The sector estimates are subject to a high degree of uncertainty. They are therefore presented as ranges, rather than point estimates, to reflect the lack of precision for these estimates.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether UK firms that import components under the new tariff suspension scheme would be eligible for tariff preferences on their exports under UK trade deals that contain prohibitions on duty drawback and exemption.

The UK’s tariff suspension regime applies to UK imports and is a reduction in the ‘Most Favoured Nation’ rate, the UK Global Tariff, for all businesses. Restrictions on duty drawback in preferential agreements do not apply to tariff suspensions because tariff suspensions apply to all imports, whether or not they are then used as inputs for subsequent exports to the Free Trade Agreement partner. Duty drawback restrictions that exist in free trade agreements may only apply to drawback mechanisms for which the drawback is contingent on subsequent export. As such, any business based in the UK or Crown Dependencies that makes use of a suspension will also be able to take advantage of the benefits of trade deals that the UK is party to.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether UK importers will (a) automatically have duty suspended on any imported component covered by the new tariff suspension scheme or (b) be able to choose whether or not to have the duty suspended on a case-by-case basis.

Under the new tariff suspension scheme, UK and Crown Dependency importers can apply for tariff suspensions. The Government will assess these requests and decide whether to grant suspensions for specified goods based on a set of criteria and wider considerations.

All UK and Crown Dependency businesses can benefit from a suspension once it is granted, irrespective of whether that business applied for it, as long as it remains in force.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions she has had with her international counterparts in (a) Costa Rica, (b) Fiji, (c) Iceland, (d) New Zealand, (e) Norway and (f) Switzerland on the initiative towards an Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability.

The Secretary of State for International Trade has previously discussed the United Kingdom’s interest in joining the Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability (ACCTS) with her counterpart in New Zealand. While these have been high level discussions, officials have been engaging with all ACCTS member states, particularly New Zealand, on each area of the agreement – environmental goods and services liberalisation, fossil fuel subsidies, and ecolabelling – as we consider whether the United Kingdom should seek to join the negotiations.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the potential for the UK to participate in the initiative towards an Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability.

HM Government is actively considering whether the United Kingdom should join the Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability (ACCTS) negotiations. To inform our decision, we are assessing the three policy areas that comprise ACCTS – environmental goods and services liberalisation, ecolabelling and fossil fuel subsidies.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps the UK is taking in multilateral and plurilateral forums to eliminate harmful fossil fuel subsidies; and whether she plans to apply for the UK to participate in the initiative towards an Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability as a means of promoting that goal.

The United Kingdom has been a longstanding supporter of multilateral efforts to promote fossil fuel subsidy reform (FFSR) since these were first proposed in 2009.

In December 2020, the United Kingdom announced her endorsement to support for the “Statement on Global Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform” of the Friends of Fossil Fuel Subsidy Reform group led by New Zealand, aiming to build political consensus on the importance of fossil fuel subsidy reform.

The United Kingdom will continue her efforts to progress FFSR, including through trade policy, and is considering options for how best to do so.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps the UK is taking in multilateral and plurilateral forums to liberalise trade in environmental goods and services; and whether she will plans to apply for the UK to participate in the initiative towards an Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability as a means of promoting that goal.

HM Government is committed to environmental goods and services liberalisation and is exploring the most effective ways to promote clean growth through enhanced international trade.

HM Government was able to liberalise over 100 environmental goods after we took back control of our trade policy from the EU for the first time in almost 50 years, as we take our first steps towards a more Sustainable Global Trade Agenda.

The United Kingdom welcomes international dialogue on environmental goods and services liberalisation and encourages the widest possible participation across the World Trade Organisation (WTO) membership. The United Kingdom will use her independent seat at the WTO, and her G7 and COP26 presidencies to further this.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what advance visit was undertaken by her officials to prepare for the Prime Minister's scheduled visit to India on 26 April 2021; on what dates that advance visit began and ended; and how many individuals were involved.

DIT officials did not conduct an advance visit to prepare for the Prime Minister’s scheduled visit to India on 26th April 2021. DIT officials, based in both London and the British High Commission in India, supported preparations for the Prime Minister’s Summit with Prime Minister Modi on 4th May 2021. Following the Summit, the Prime Minister announced an Enhanced Trade Partnership with India, including the intent to begin negotiations on a Free Trade Agreement later this year, and over 6,500 new jobs created from export wins and investments.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps the UK is taking in multilateral and plurilateral forums to improve eco-labelling; and whether she plans to apply for the UK to participate in the initiative towards an Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability as a means of promoting that goal.

HM Government recognise the important role that eco-labelling and other forms of consumer information can play in supporting environmental outcomes. HM Government are developing an evidence base of existing voluntary schemes and the effectiveness of eco-labelling. In addition, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is seeking powers to introduce mandatory eco-labelling schemes for certain products as part of the Environment Bill.

The Department for International Trade is considering how trade policy can support eco-labelling. We recognise that the Agreement on Climate Change, Trade and Sustainability, and other plurilateral and multilateral forums like the Structured Discussions on Trade and Environmental Sustainability, could be useful platforms for the United Kingdom to influence international partners on a variety of green trade issues, from deforestation to carbon content.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Answer of 29 April 2021 to Question 175776, whether she plans to correct or provide an addendum to paragraph 51 of her Department's response to the House of Commons International Trade Committee report UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement, HC 1163, published on 25 January 2021, to correct the record.

The Department’s response to the House of Commons International Trade Committee report on the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement was accurate at the time of its placement in the Library of the House of Commons on 25 January 2021.

The right hon. Member for Islington South and Finsbury is referred to the answer given on 29 April 2021 to Question 175776, in which it was noted that in February 2021 the EU and Japan subsequently agreed to protect an additional 28 products from 12 EU countries under the EU Japan agreement.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what plans the Government has to include provisions in the Professional Qualifications Bill, announced in the Queen's Speech 2021, to provide for the implementation of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement on Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The Government will bring forward legislation to implement future Free Trade Agreements where existing powers do not exist on the statute book.

The Government will update Parliament in due course on its proposed accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement on Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) by publishing its negotiation bundle, including a response to the public consultation, economic scoping assessment and outline approach, in advance of accession negotiations beginning.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Answer of 29 April 2021 to Question 175773, what estimate she has made of when Geographical Indication protection will be confirmed by the Japanese government for the 77 UK products provided to Japan on 30 April 2021.

Article 14.34.5 of the Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement sets out that both Parties shall, as soon as practically possible after the entry into force of the Agreement, enter into consultations with a view to adding additional geographical indications. The UK subsequently started discussions with Japan in early 2021 regarding adding new geographical indications. After these consultations concluded, and following the necessary translation of technical documents, the UK shared its list of additional products with Japan on 30 April 2021.

These 77 GIs will now go through Japan’s procedures as quickly as possible.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Answer of 29 April 2021 to Question 175773, for what reason it took her Department four months to provide Japan with the list of 77 additional products for which it is seeking Geographical Indication protection under the terms of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership which came into effect on 1 January 2021.

Article 14.34.5 of the Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement sets out that both Parties shall, as soon as practically possible after the entry into force of the Agreement, enter into consultations with a view to adding additional geographical indications. The UK subsequently started discussions with Japan in early 2021 regarding adding new geographical indications. After these consultations concluded, and following the necessary translation of technical documents, the UK shared its list of additional products with Japan on 30 April 2021.

These 77 GIs will now go through Japan’s procedures as quickly as possible.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the 23 April 2021 Joint Statement on UK-Australia trade talks, what remaining issues are yet to be resolved in the proposed trade agreement with Australia.

Talks during Minister Tehan’s visit were very positive and have moved negotiations closer to a high-standard Free Trade Agreement later this year. Consensus has been reached on the vast majority of the deal, including ambitious provisions on services, innovation and mobility. The UK and Australia have agreed to intensify negotiations with a view to reaching agreement in principle in June.

These are live negotiations; the Secretary of State and Minister Tehan are continuing to hold weekly calls in the run up to this June moment to make progress on outstanding issues.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the 23 April 2021 Joint Statement on UK-Australia trade talks, whether the UK and Australia have reached consensus on the UK’s market access offer on agri-food products.

The UK and Australia continue to have discussions on market access, as both parties make progress with a view to reaching agreement in principle in June.

The Government’s aim is to reach far-reaching liberalisation of tariffs, ensuring that this is balanced and mutually beneficial for UK firms and consumers, whilst taking into account specific product sensitivities.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, who the current members of her Trade Union Advisory Group are; and on what dates Ministers from her Department have had meetings with members of that group since October 2020.

The membership of the Trade Union Advisory Group is published online at GOV.UK and the Group met on 16th October 2020, 22nd February 2021, and 26th April 2021.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to consult the members of her Trade Advisory Groups on (a) Telecoms and technology, (b) Creative industries, (c) Investment, (d) Transport services, (e) Professional advisory services and (f) Financial services on the final draft text of relevant chapters of her proposed trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand.

Trade Advisory Groups will be given an update at their next meetings, or at a special joint meeting.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to consult the members of her Trade Advisory Groups on (a) Automotive, aerospace and marine, (b) Manufactured and consumer goods, (c) Chemicals and (d) Life sciences on the final draft text of relevant chapters of her proposed trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand.

Trade Advisory Groups will be given an update at their next meetings, or at a special joint meeting.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she next plans to consult the members of her Trade Advisory Group on Agri-Food on the final draft text of relevant chapters of her proposed trade agreement with New Zealand.

Trade Advisory Groups will be given an update at their next meetings, or at a special joint meeting.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how far in advance of the G7 summit in June 2021 she plans to consult the members of her Trade Advisory Group on Agri-Food on the final draft text of relevant chapters of her proposed trade agreement with Australia.

Trade Advisory Groups will be given an update at their next meetings, or at a special joint meeting.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to consult the members of her Strategic Trade Advisory Group on the text of relevant chapters of her draft trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand.

The Strategic Trade Advisory Group (STAG) has met twice this year already: on 22nd February and 26th April. On both occasions, both the Australia and New Zealand Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) were discussed.

Outside the regular STAG meetings, members of the STAG are invited to updates on trade negotiations regularly. Most recently, a debrief was held following the fourth round of negotiations with New Zealand on 27th April, where officials updated interested parties and discussed key developments. STAG members were consulted and given an update on 4th May by officials on the progress made on the United Kingdom-Australia FTA also, following the visit of the Australian Trade Minister to London.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the members of her Trade Advisory Groups on (a) Telecoms and technology, (b) Creative industries, (c) Investment, (d) Transport services, (e) Professional advisory services and (f) Financial services have been consulted on the text of relevant chapters of her draft trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand.

Trade Advisory Groups (TAGs) are a key forum for sharing sensitive information and their members are regularly consulted on trade agreements.

All TAG members have been consulted throughout Australia and New Zealand Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations. Most recently, a debrief for all TAG members was held following the fourth round of negotiations with New Zealand on 27th April, where officials updated stakeholders and discussed key developments. All TAG members were given an update by the Chief Negotiator on the progress made on the United Kingdom-Australia FTA also, following the visit of the Australian Trade Minister to London on 4th May.

Additional updates were given at the previous TAG meetings below:

Sector:

Update given:

Agri-Food

8th February

Automotive, Aerospace and Marine

4th March

British Manufactured and Consumer Goods

4th February

Chemicals

28th January

Creative Industries

16th February

Financial Services

19th January

Investment

29th April

Life Sciences

13th January

Professional Advisory Services

14th January

Telecoms & Technology

25th February

Transport Services

21st January

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the members of her Trade Advisory Groups on (a) Automotive, aerospace and marine, (b) Manufactured and consumer goods, (c) Chemicals and (d) Life sciences have been consulted on the text of relevant chapters of her draft trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand.

Trade Advisory Groups (TAGs) are a key forum for sharing sensitive information and their members are regularly consulted on trade agreements.

All TAG members have been consulted throughout Australia and New Zealand Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations. Most recently, a debrief for all TAG members was held following the fourth round of negotiations with New Zealand on 27th April, where officials updated stakeholders and discussed key developments. All TAG members were given an update by the Chief Negotiator on the progress made on the United Kingdom-Australia FTA also, following the visit of the Australian Trade Minister to London on 4th May.

Additional updates were given at the previous TAG meetings below:

Sector:

Update given:

Agri-Food

8th February

Automotive, Aerospace and Marine

4th March

British Manufactured and Consumer Goods

4th February

Chemicals

28th January

Creative Industries

16th February

Financial Services

19th January

Investment

29th April

Life Sciences

13th January

Professional Advisory Services

14th January

Telecoms & Technology

25th February

Transport Services

21st January

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the members of her Trade Advisory Group on Agri-Food have been consulted on the text of relevant chapters of her draft trade agreement with New Zealand.

Trade Advisory Groups (TAGs) are a key forum for sharing sensitive information and their members are regularly consulted on trade agreements.

All TAG members have been consulted throughout Australia and New Zealand Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations. Most recently, a debrief for all TAG members was held following the fourth round of negotiations with New Zealand on 27th April, where officials updated stakeholders and discussed key developments. All TAG members were given an update by the Chief Negotiator on the progress made on the United Kingdom-Australia FTA also, following the visit of the Australian Trade Minister to London on 4th May.

Additional updates were given at the previous TAG meetings below:

Sector:

Update given:

Agri-Food

8th February

Automotive, Aerospace and Marine

4th March

British Manufactured and Consumer Goods

4th February

Chemicals

28th January

Creative Industries

16th February

Financial Services

19th January

Investment

29th April

Life Sciences

13th January

Professional Advisory Services

14th January

Telecoms & Technology

25th February

Transport Services

21st January

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the members of her Trade Advisory Group on Agri-Food have been consulted on the text of relevant chapters of her draft trade agreement with Australia.

Trade Advisory Groups (TAGs) are a key forum for sharing sensitive information and their members are regularly consulted on trade agreements.

All TAG members have been consulted throughout Australia and New Zealand Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations. Most recently, a debrief for all TAG members was held following the fourth round of negotiations with New Zealand on 27th April, where officials updated stakeholders and discussed key developments. All TAG members were given an update by the Chief Negotiator on the progress made on the United Kingdom-Australia FTA also, following the visit of the Australian Trade Minister to London on 4th May.

Additional updates were given at the previous TAG meetings below:

Sector:

Update given:

Agri-Food

8th February

Automotive, Aerospace and Marine

4th March

British Manufactured and Consumer Goods

4th February

Chemicals

28th January

Creative Industries

16th February

Financial Services

19th January

Investment

29th April

Life Sciences

13th January

Professional Advisory Services

14th January

Telecoms & Technology

25th February

Transport Services

21st January

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many members of staff, and at what grades, accompanied her on her visit to Singapore and Vietnam in December 2020; what the total cost to the public purse was of that visit for all UK attendees; and what the costs were of the (a) flights, (b) accommodation, (c) internal travel and (d) subsistence expenses for that visit.

The Government does not routinely release information regarding accompanying staff on ministerial engagements.

The total cost for this visit were: £28,310.03

A breakdown of costs is as follows:

a) Flights – £20,296.24

b) Accommodation – £3,980.06

c) Internal travel – nil.

d) subsistence and expenses – £4,034.00

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the answer of 26 October 2020 to Question 106261 and the publication of transparency data on 7 May 2021, how many members of staff, and at what grades, accompanied her on her visit to Japan from 21 to 24 October 2020; what the total cost to the public purse was of that visit for all UK attendees; and what the costs were of the (a) flights, (b) accommodation, (c) internal travel and (d) subsistence expenses for that visit.

The Government does not routinely release information regarding accompanying staff on ministerial engagements.

The total cost for this visit were: £20,782.08

A breakdown of costs is as follows:

a) Flights – £18,701.64

b) Accommodation – nil.

c) Internal travel – nil.

d) subsistence and expenses – £2,080.44

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she discussed the effect of prohibition clauses on duty drawback and exemption on the operation of freeports with the delegation of representatives from Teesside that she met on 12 October 2020.

The effective operation of freeports was discussed by my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State during her meeting including industry and the Mayor of the Tees Valley in October 2020. Further dialogue between businesses and HM Government will be vital to secure their success and we will make sure that traders can harness the potential that freeports present.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions negotiators from her Department have had with their counterparts from (a) Canada, (b) Mexico and (c) Turkey on the inclusion of prohibition clauses on duty drawback and exemption in the long-term trade agreements with those countries that will replace the interim agreements secured in December 2020.

HM Government will carefully assess and negotiate the terms of future trade agreements with Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Mexico in order to secure provisions that benefit all of the United Kingdom, including producers in our new freeports.

Our trade deal with the EU contains no duty drawback prohibitions, nor does the agreement with Turkey now in force, which is closely based upon it.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions negotiators from her Department have had with their counterparts from (a) Australia and (b) New Zealand on the inclusion of prohibition clauses on duty drawback and exemption in the proposed upcoming free trade agreements with those countries.

HM Government will carefully assess and negotiate the terms of future trade agreements with Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Mexico in order to secure provisions that benefit all of the United Kingdom, including producers in our new freeports.

Our trade deal with the EU contains no duty drawback prohibitions, nor does the agreement with Turkey now in force, which is closely based upon it.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to consult the members of her Trade Union Advisory Group on the text of relevant chapters of her draft trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand.

The Trade Union Advisory Group will be given an update at its next meeting.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, on what date the UK's Interim Economic Partnership Agreement with Cameroon is scheduled to complete the 21 day ratification process set out in the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010.

We expect the UK-Cameroon Economic Partnership Agreement to complete its Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010 scrutiny process on Thursday 10 June, subject to Parliamentary timetabling.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what changes were made to the Interim Agreement establishing a UK-Cameroon Economic Partnership Agreement between the version that was initialled on 27 December 2020 and the final version signed on 9 March 2021.

The United Kingdom-Cameroon Economic Partnership Agreement that was initialled on 27th December 2020, and the final agreement signed on 9th March 2021, have no substantial differences. As is usual international treaty practice, the Agreement underwent a legal review from both parties to ensure its accuracy.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the version of the Interim Agreement establishing an Economic Partnership Agreement between the UK and Cameroon initialled on 27 December 2020, annexed to the Memorandum of Understanding between the countries that took effect on 1 January 2021.

The United Kingdom-Cameroon Economic Partnership Agreement that was initialled on 27th December 2020, and the final agreement signed on 9th March 2021, have no substantial differences. As is usual international treaty practice, the Agreement underwent a legal review from both parties to ensure its accuracy.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what (a) line management and (b) contract management responsibilities have been transferred from her Department to the Cabinet Office alongside the transfer of Ministerial responsibility for the Government’s GREAT campaign.

Policy responsibility for the GREAT Britain and Northern Ireland campaign (GREAT) transferred from the Department for International Trade (DIT) to the Cabinet Office via a Written Ministerial Statement laid in Parliament on 20 April. The Prime Minister requested that GREAT was moved to the Cabinet Office. GREAT can play an enhanced role at the heart of government rather than within a specific department.

The headcount of 13.5 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees has been transferred from DIT to the Cabinet Office. The total GREAT campaign budget agreed at the 2020 Spending Review for FY21/22 is £60 million. £30 million of this budget was transferred from DIT to Cabinet Office in Main Supply Estimates. The remaining £30 million will remain with the other contributing government departments until Supplementary Estimates. At this point, the necessary transfers to other government departments for the funding allocations agreed by the GREAT Programme Board will be made. No other resources are being transferred.

The GREAT team’s line management structures have transferred over to the Cabinet Office, and all of the team continue to report into the Director of the GREAT Britain campaign. No commercial contracts are being transferred.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what (a) staff, (b) budget and (c) other resources have been transferred from her Department to the Cabinet Office alongside the transfer of Ministerial responsibility for the Government’s GREAT campaign.

Policy responsibility for the GREAT Britain and Northern Ireland campaign (GREAT) transferred from the Department for International Trade (DIT) to the Cabinet Office via a Written Ministerial Statement laid in Parliament on 20 April. The Prime Minister requested that GREAT was moved to the Cabinet Office. GREAT can play an enhanced role at the heart of government rather than within a specific department.

The headcount of 13.5 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees has been transferred from DIT to the Cabinet Office. The total GREAT campaign budget agreed at the 2020 Spending Review for FY21/22 is £60 million. £30 million of this budget was transferred from DIT to Cabinet Office in Main Supply Estimates. The remaining £30 million will remain with the other contributing government departments until Supplementary Estimates. At this point, the necessary transfers to other government departments for the funding allocations agreed by the GREAT Programme Board will be made. No other resources are being transferred.

The GREAT team’s line management structures have transferred over to the Cabinet Office, and all of the team continue to report into the Director of the GREAT Britain campaign. No commercial contracts are being transferred.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when and for what reason her responsibilities for chairing the Ministerial Committee on the Government’s GREAT campaign were transferred to the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster.

Policy responsibility for the GREAT Britain and Northern Ireland campaign (GREAT) transferred from the Department for International Trade (DIT) to the Cabinet Office via a Written Ministerial Statement laid in Parliament on 20 April. The Prime Minister requested that GREAT was moved to the Cabinet Office. GREAT can play an enhanced role at the heart of government rather than within a specific department.

The headcount of 13.5 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees has been transferred from DIT to the Cabinet Office. The total GREAT campaign budget agreed at the 2020 Spending Review for FY21/22 is £60 million. £30 million of this budget was transferred from DIT to Cabinet Office in Main Supply Estimates. The remaining £30 million will remain with the other contributing government departments until Supplementary Estimates. At this point, the necessary transfers to other government departments for the funding allocations agreed by the GREAT Programme Board will be made. No other resources are being transferred.

The GREAT team’s line management structures have transferred over to the Cabinet Office, and all of the team continue to report into the Director of the GREAT Britain campaign. No commercial contracts are being transferred.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the business case for her Department’s move to the Old Admiralty Building was prepared (a) before or (b) after the decisions to (i) transfer her ministerial responsibilities for the GREAT campaign to the Cabinet Office and (ii) provide her Department with support from the Cabinet Office on the coordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues.

The Old Admiralty Building (OAB) is the first Government Hub delivered by the London Whitehall Campus Programme, which aims to consolidate and rationalise the Government’s London estate. The Department for International Trade (DIT) and the Government Art Collection are tenants of the Hub in OAB and the Government Property Agency (GPA) is the landlord.

The GPA drafted and submitted the Full Business Case covering costs for both GPA and DIT for the completion and fit out of the Old Admiralty Building, including the Department for International Trade’s move costs. The business case was submitted by GPA in November 2019 and the Finance addendum submitted in January 2020.

The transfer of ministerial responsibilities for GREAT to the Cabinet Office was formally confirmed on 20 April 2021. There is no link between this transfer and the business case for DIT’s move to Old Admiralty Building.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether (a) staff, (b) budget and (c) other resources have been transferred from her Department to the Cabinet Office to enable that department to provide support on the coordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues.

My right hon. Friend the Prime Minister has appointed my noble Friend Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office where he will lead the United Kingdom’s institutional and strategic relationship with the European Union and help secure the benefits of Brexit.

The Department for International Trade will work closely with Lord Frost and the Cabinet Office to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from her trade deal with the EU, and her newly independent trade policy. HM Government will continue to provide support for businesses to adapt to the United Kingdom’s new trading arrangements with the EU.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason the decision was taken to give responsibility to the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost, for supporting the coordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues; and when that decision was taken.

My right hon. Friend the Prime Minister has appointed my noble Friend Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office where he will lead the United Kingdom’s institutional and strategic relationship with the European Union and help secure the benefits of Brexit.

The Department for International Trade will work closely with Lord Frost and the Cabinet Office to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from her trade deal with the EU, and her newly independent trade policy. HM Government will continue to provide support for businesses to adapt to the United Kingdom’s new trading arrangements with the EU.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what support her Department receives from the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost, for the coordination of cross-Government positions on trade issues.

My right hon. Friend the Prime Minister has appointed my noble Friend Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office where he will lead the United Kingdom’s institutional and strategic relationship with the European Union and help secure the benefits of Brexit.

The Department for International Trade will work closely with Lord Frost and the Cabinet Office to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from her trade deal with the EU, and her newly independent trade policy. HM Government will continue to provide support for businesses to adapt to the United Kingdom’s new trading arrangements with the EU.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which issues in (a) trade policy and (b) ongoing trade negotiations require the coordination of cross-Government positions with the support of the Minister of State in the Cabinet Office, Lord Frost.

My right hon. Friend the Prime Minister has appointed my noble Friend Lord Frost as Minister of State for the Cabinet Office where he will lead the United Kingdom’s institutional and strategic relationship with the European Union and help secure the benefits of Brexit.

The Department for International Trade will work closely with Lord Frost and the Cabinet Office to maximise the benefits to the United Kingdom, both from her trade deal with the EU, and her newly independent trade policy. HM Government will continue to provide support for businesses to adapt to the United Kingdom’s new trading arrangements with the EU.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, who in Government has responsibility for consulting business and other external stakeholders on the effective promotion of the UK’s exports and export industries through the Government’s GREAT campaign.

The Department for International Trade and UK Export Finance hold this responsibility. We work together to build strong relationships with business-representative organisations, trade associations and other strategic partners such as the major banks.

The GREAT Private Sector Council meets three times a year and is attended by industry leaders from across the private sector. The primary role of this group is to act as a business advisory panel, providing valuable advice, guidance and insights into improving the GREAT programme.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which of the continuity free trade agreements negotiated by her Department since 2019 contain prohibitions on duty (a) drawback and (b) exemptions.

There are currently prohibitions to duty drawback and exemptions in agreements with Canada, Chile, Mexico and Singapore. In addition, there are restrictions on duty drawback and exemptions in place with most trading partners that are signatories to the Pan-European-Mediterranean Convention.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the business case for moving her Department into the Old Admiralty Building.

Old Admiralty Building (OAB) is the first Government Hub delivered by the London Whitehall Campus Programme, which aims to consolidate and rationalise the Government’s London estate. The Department for International Trade (DIT) and the Government Art Collection are tenants of the Hub in OAB and the Government Property Agency (GPA) is the landlord.

For financial year 20-21, DIT was allocated £1.38m for the OAB Programme via the Full Business Case submitted by the GPA to HM Treasury. Any request for information in relation to this should be referred to the GPA. A further £0.15m was transferred from the GPA for IT peripherals and £0.45m was allocated from the DIT estates budget.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much funding has been allocated for the costs of moving her Department into the Old Admiralty Building.

Old Admiralty Building (OAB) is the first Government Hub delivered by the London Whitehall Campus Programme, which aims to consolidate and rationalise the Government’s London estate. The Department for International Trade (DIT) and the Government Art Collection are tenants of the Hub in OAB and the Government Property Agency (GPA) is the landlord.

For financial year 20-21, DIT was allocated £1.38m for the OAB Programme via the Full Business Case submitted by the GPA to HM Treasury. Any request for information in relation to this should be referred to the GPA. A further £0.15m was transferred from the GPA for IT peripherals and £0.45m was allocated from the DIT estates budget.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Government Response to the International Trade Committee's Report on the UK-Japan CEPA, whether her policy on Geographical Indication protection has changed in light of the 21 additional products from 10 EU countries designated with Geographical Indication protection by the Japanese Government on 1 February 2021.

We note that in February 2021 the EU and Japan agreed to protect an additional 28 products from 12 EU countries under the EU Japan agreement. The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) sets out an improved process for the addition of new Geographical Indications (GIs). Under CEPA, it has been agreed that all eligible UK products will be put through Japan’s GI approval process.

On 30th April, the UK and Japan will exchange new GIs to receive protected recognition under CEPA. These will then go through Japan’s standard procedures in accordance with Japanese law.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate she has made of the additional time it will potentially take for the UK's proposed Geographical Indication-protected products to have that status confirmed under the terms of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership in the event that such proposals face opposition in Japan.

We continue to work with the Government of Japan to ensure the process to protect more UK products is smooth. Unless there are exceptional circumstances - like a Japanese producer of Cornish clotted cream opposing that Geographical Indication - this should be a straightforward process.

In the event that such proposals faced opposition in Japan we would inform relevant UK stakeholders and consult with Japanese officials to ensure this is resolved as quickly as practically possible.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many UK businesses have approached the Government since January 2021 to propose additions to the list of 70 products for which it is seeking Geographical Indication protection under the terms of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership.

The UK Government was approached by a producer of Irish Poteen, who requested that Irish Poteen be included in the Geographical Indications (GIs) for protection under the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership (CEPA). We confirmed that we intended to include Irish Poteen in these GIs. The UK Government has not been approached by any other UK businesses regarding this.

The UK Government’s aim is to protect as many of our GIs as possible. In June 2020, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) contacted GI stakeholders across the UK to seek input on which GIs should be put forward for protection under CEPA.

In November 2020, Defra wrote to stakeholders again, to ensure the GIs we will put forward reflected their preferences.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when her Department provided Japan with its list of 70 products for which it is seeking Geographical Indication protection under the terms of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership; and what the planned timescale is for that geographical indication protection to be confirmed by the Japanese government.

On 30th April, the UK will provide Japan with 77 new GIs. These will then go through Japan’s procedures.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the breakdown of her Department’s overseas network in the Europe region was by each individual location where they are based as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives but contracted through the FCDO and based in the Europe region total 335. The table attached shows the individual country locations of where these staff are based.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break, and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) UK staff deployed overseas, (b) local staff and (c) local interns in the North America region there were in her Department's overseas network as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) UK staff deployed overseas, (b) local staff and (c) local interns in the Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan there were in her Department's overseas network as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) UK staff deployed overseas, (b) local staff and (c) local interns in the South Asia region there were in her Department's overseas network as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) UK staff deployed overseas, (b) local staff and (c) local interns in the Latin America and Caribbean region there were in her Department's overseas network as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) UK staff deployed overseas, (b) local staff and (c) local interns in her Department's overseas network were in the Eastern Europe and Central Asia region as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) UK staff deployed overseas, (b) local staff and (c) local interns in her Department's overseas network were in the Europe region as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) UK staff deployed overseas, (b) local staff and (c) local interns in her Department's overseas network were in the China and Hong Kong region as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) UK staff deployed overseas, (b) local staff and (c) local interns in her Department's overseas network were in the Asia Pacific region as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many (a) UK staff deployed overseas, (b) local staff and (c) local interns in the Africa region there were in her Department's overseas network as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the total size was of her Department’s overseas network by headcount as at 1 March 2021.

The Department for International Trade (DIT) employs both domestic and overseas staff, who are contracted separately through the Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). Staff working on DIT objectives, but contracted through the FCDO total 1,560. This consists of 148 UK staff deployed overseas, 1,357 local staff and 55 local staff interns. The table attached shows the breakdown of these staff, across each of the nine HM Trade Commissioner regions.

These figures do not include staff on loan to DIT from other government departments but who remain on their home departments payroll, contractors, military staff, people on secondment from other organisations, those who are on loan or secondment out of DIT, on unpaid special leave or career break and people working in UK Export Finance.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she plans to appoint a replacement for Helen Keefe as the BBC's representative on her Trade Advisory Group on Creative Industries.

My department is appointing Paul Oldfield, Controller of Policy at the BBC, to sit on the Creative Industries Trade Advisory Group.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to her Department's Analysis Paper: Local Jobs, Trade and Investment, whether the figures on the number of employees employed in nationally export intensive sectors are planned to be used to inform the offensive interests of UK trade policy.

HM Government is grateful to the Board of Trade for its thought leadership on trade policy. The Rt Hon. Lady will know from reading the Global Britain, Local Jobs report that there are benefits for the British people – in every corner of the country – from an ambitious trade agenda.

We are proud to have secured trade deals with 66 countries, plus the EU. These agreements provide a strong foundation for our trading relationships, covering trade worth £890 billion in 2019, but do not represent the limit of our ambition. We will seek to improve upon these to maximise trading opportunities.

HM Government will make sure digital markets are opened by reducing barriers to the flow of data, whilst maintaining high standards of protection. We will reduce regulatory divergence by securing commitments through Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, the WTO E-Commerce Joint Initiative negotiations, and the United Kingdom’s G7 Presidency. It is important that all regulations are proportionate and not trade-distorting. We will bring down non-tariff barriers through trade negotiations so that safe goods and services from the United Kingdom can be sold into new markets freely.

The Board of Trade report defines “key industries” as those parts of the economy with the greatest chances to increase their exports, thanks to trade policy and trade promotion interventions. HM Government agrees with the Board of Trade that trade agreements can deliver opportunities nationwide, and is considering how to add the data from this cutting-edge research into our policy.

The Rt Hon. Lady will know that the Department for International Trade (DIT) has already published an impact assessment for the FTA with Japan, setting out the potential impacts on every part of the United Kingdom.[1] The Board of Trade’s report focuses on the next international steps our nation can take. Domestic policy, including ‘freeports’, is not explored in the report. Neither the Board of Trade nor HM Government intend to publish an addendum to this report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to her Department's Analysis Paper: Local Jobs, Trade and Investment, what assessment she has made of the extent to which the figures on the number of employees employed in nationally export intensive sectors enable an accurate assessment of (a) how export intensive jobs are at the constituency level and (b) how many jobs are supported by exports at the constituency level.

HM Government is grateful to the Board of Trade for its thought leadership on trade policy. The Rt Hon. Lady will know from reading the Global Britain, Local Jobs report that there are benefits for the British people – in every corner of the country – from an ambitious trade agenda.

We are proud to have secured trade deals with 66 countries, plus the EU. These agreements provide a strong foundation for our trading relationships, covering trade worth £890 billion in 2019, but do not represent the limit of our ambition. We will seek to improve upon these to maximise trading opportunities.

HM Government will make sure digital markets are opened by reducing barriers to the flow of data, whilst maintaining high standards of protection. We will reduce regulatory divergence by securing commitments through Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, the WTO E-Commerce Joint Initiative negotiations, and the United Kingdom’s G7 Presidency. It is important that all regulations are proportionate and not trade-distorting. We will bring down non-tariff barriers through trade negotiations so that safe goods and services from the United Kingdom can be sold into new markets freely.

The Board of Trade report defines “key industries” as those parts of the economy with the greatest chances to increase their exports, thanks to trade policy and trade promotion interventions. HM Government agrees with the Board of Trade that trade agreements can deliver opportunities nationwide, and is considering how to add the data from this cutting-edge research into our policy.

The Rt Hon. Lady will know that the Department for International Trade (DIT) has already published an impact assessment for the FTA with Japan, setting out the potential impacts on every part of the United Kingdom.[1] The Board of Trade’s report focuses on the next international steps our nation can take. Domestic policy, including ‘freeports’, is not explored in the report. Neither the Board of Trade nor HM Government intend to publish an addendum to this report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report did not include the role that freeports will play in contributing to her Department’s strategy; and if she will publish an addendum on this subject in light of the announcements in the Chancellor’s Budget statement on 3 March 2021.

HM Government is grateful to the Board of Trade for its thought leadership on trade policy. The Rt Hon. Lady will know from reading the Global Britain, Local Jobs report that there are benefits for the British people – in every corner of the country – from an ambitious trade agenda.

We are proud to have secured trade deals with 66 countries, plus the EU. These agreements provide a strong foundation for our trading relationships, covering trade worth £890 billion in 2019, but do not represent the limit of our ambition. We will seek to improve upon these to maximise trading opportunities.

HM Government will make sure digital markets are opened by reducing barriers to the flow of data, whilst maintaining high standards of protection. We will reduce regulatory divergence by securing commitments through Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, the WTO E-Commerce Joint Initiative negotiations, and the United Kingdom’s G7 Presidency. It is important that all regulations are proportionate and not trade-distorting. We will bring down non-tariff barriers through trade negotiations so that safe goods and services from the United Kingdom can be sold into new markets freely.

The Board of Trade report defines “key industries” as those parts of the economy with the greatest chances to increase their exports, thanks to trade policy and trade promotion interventions. HM Government agrees with the Board of Trade that trade agreements can deliver opportunities nationwide, and is considering how to add the data from this cutting-edge research into our policy.

The Rt Hon. Lady will know that the Department for International Trade (DIT) has already published an impact assessment for the FTA with Japan, setting out the potential impacts on every part of the United Kingdom.[1] The Board of Trade’s report focuses on the next international steps our nation can take. Domestic policy, including ‘freeports’, is not explored in the report. Neither the Board of Trade nor HM Government intend to publish an addendum to this report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, what assessment she has made of whether the UK-Japan CEPA helped to level up the UK; and how her Department made that assessment.

HM Government is grateful to the Board of Trade for its thought leadership on trade policy. The Rt Hon. Lady will know from reading the Global Britain, Local Jobs report that there are benefits for the British people – in every corner of the country – from an ambitious trade agenda.

We are proud to have secured trade deals with 66 countries, plus the EU. These agreements provide a strong foundation for our trading relationships, covering trade worth £890 billion in 2019, but do not represent the limit of our ambition. We will seek to improve upon these to maximise trading opportunities.

HM Government will make sure digital markets are opened by reducing barriers to the flow of data, whilst maintaining high standards of protection. We will reduce regulatory divergence by securing commitments through Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, the WTO E-Commerce Joint Initiative negotiations, and the United Kingdom’s G7 Presidency. It is important that all regulations are proportionate and not trade-distorting. We will bring down non-tariff barriers through trade negotiations so that safe goods and services from the United Kingdom can be sold into new markets freely.

The Board of Trade report defines “key industries” as those parts of the economy with the greatest chances to increase their exports, thanks to trade policy and trade promotion interventions. HM Government agrees with the Board of Trade that trade agreements can deliver opportunities nationwide, and is considering how to add the data from this cutting-edge research into our policy.

The Rt Hon. Lady will know that the Department for International Trade (DIT) has already published an impact assessment for the FTA with Japan, setting out the potential impacts on every part of the United Kingdom.[1] The Board of Trade’s report focuses on the next international steps our nation can take. Domestic policy, including ‘freeports’, is not explored in the report. Neither the Board of Trade nor HM Government intend to publish an addendum to this report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, how her Department defines key industries.

HM Government is grateful to the Board of Trade for its thought leadership on trade policy. The Rt Hon. Lady will know from reading the Global Britain, Local Jobs report that there are benefits for the British people – in every corner of the country – from an ambitious trade agenda.

We are proud to have secured trade deals with 66 countries, plus the EU. These agreements provide a strong foundation for our trading relationships, covering trade worth £890 billion in 2019, but do not represent the limit of our ambition. We will seek to improve upon these to maximise trading opportunities.

HM Government will make sure digital markets are opened by reducing barriers to the flow of data, whilst maintaining high standards of protection. We will reduce regulatory divergence by securing commitments through Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, the WTO E-Commerce Joint Initiative negotiations, and the United Kingdom’s G7 Presidency. It is important that all regulations are proportionate and not trade-distorting. We will bring down non-tariff barriers through trade negotiations so that safe goods and services from the United Kingdom can be sold into new markets freely.

The Board of Trade report defines “key industries” as those parts of the economy with the greatest chances to increase their exports, thanks to trade policy and trade promotion interventions. HM Government agrees with the Board of Trade that trade agreements can deliver opportunities nationwide, and is considering how to add the data from this cutting-edge research into our policy.

The Rt Hon. Lady will know that the Department for International Trade (DIT) has already published an impact assessment for the FTA with Japan, setting out the potential impacts on every part of the United Kingdom.[1] The Board of Trade’s report focuses on the next international steps our nation can take. Domestic policy, including ‘freeports’, is not explored in the report. Neither the Board of Trade nor HM Government intend to publish an addendum to this report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to page 24 of the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, whether each tariff reduction previously available to key UK industries was maintained in the Free Trade Agreements covering 66 countries negotiated by her Department.

HM Government is grateful to the Board of Trade for its thought leadership on trade policy. The Rt Hon. Lady will know from reading the Global Britain, Local Jobs report that there are benefits for the British people – in every corner of the country – from an ambitious trade agenda.

We are proud to have secured trade deals with 66 countries, plus the EU. These agreements provide a strong foundation for our trading relationships, covering trade worth £890 billion in 2019, but do not represent the limit of our ambition. We will seek to improve upon these to maximise trading opportunities.

HM Government will make sure digital markets are opened by reducing barriers to the flow of data, whilst maintaining high standards of protection. We will reduce regulatory divergence by securing commitments through Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, the WTO E-Commerce Joint Initiative negotiations, and the United Kingdom’s G7 Presidency. It is important that all regulations are proportionate and not trade-distorting. We will bring down non-tariff barriers through trade negotiations so that safe goods and services from the United Kingdom can be sold into new markets freely.

The Board of Trade report defines “key industries” as those parts of the economy with the greatest chances to increase their exports, thanks to trade policy and trade promotion interventions. HM Government agrees with the Board of Trade that trade agreements can deliver opportunities nationwide, and is considering how to add the data from this cutting-edge research into our policy.

The Rt Hon. Lady will know that the Department for International Trade (DIT) has already published an impact assessment for the FTA with Japan, setting out the potential impacts on every part of the United Kingdom.[1] The Board of Trade’s report focuses on the next international steps our nation can take. Domestic policy, including ‘freeports’, is not explored in the report. Neither the Board of Trade nor HM Government intend to publish an addendum to this report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to page 24 of the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, in which of the Free Trade Agreements covering 66 countries negotiated by her Department have tariff reductions been expanded for key UK industries.

HM Government is grateful to the Board of Trade for its thought leadership on trade policy. The Rt Hon. Lady will know from reading the Global Britain, Local Jobs report that there are benefits for the British people – in every corner of the country – from an ambitious trade agenda.

We are proud to have secured trade deals with 66 countries, plus the EU. These agreements provide a strong foundation for our trading relationships, covering trade worth £890 billion in 2019, but do not represent the limit of our ambition. We will seek to improve upon these to maximise trading opportunities.

HM Government will make sure digital markets are opened by reducing barriers to the flow of data, whilst maintaining high standards of protection. We will reduce regulatory divergence by securing commitments through Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, the WTO E-Commerce Joint Initiative negotiations, and the United Kingdom’s G7 Presidency. It is important that all regulations are proportionate and not trade-distorting. We will bring down non-tariff barriers through trade negotiations so that safe goods and services from the United Kingdom can be sold into new markets freely.

The Board of Trade report defines “key industries” as those parts of the economy with the greatest chances to increase their exports, thanks to trade policy and trade promotion interventions. HM Government agrees with the Board of Trade that trade agreements can deliver opportunities nationwide, and is considering how to add the data from this cutting-edge research into our policy.

The Rt Hon. Lady will know that the Department for International Trade (DIT) has already published an impact assessment for the FTA with Japan, setting out the potential impacts on every part of the United Kingdom.[1] The Board of Trade’s report focuses on the next international steps our nation can take. Domestic policy, including ‘freeports’, is not explored in the report. Neither the Board of Trade nor HM Government intend to publish an addendum to this report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to page 25 of the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, what current UK regulations she has assessed (a) are not proportionate or (b) place too large an impact on the ease of doing business.

HM Government is grateful to the Board of Trade for its thought leadership on trade policy. The Rt Hon. Lady will know from reading the Global Britain, Local Jobs report that there are benefits for the British people – in every corner of the country – from an ambitious trade agenda.

We are proud to have secured trade deals with 66 countries, plus the EU. These agreements provide a strong foundation for our trading relationships, covering trade worth £890 billion in 2019, but do not represent the limit of our ambition. We will seek to improve upon these to maximise trading opportunities.

HM Government will make sure digital markets are opened by reducing barriers to the flow of data, whilst maintaining high standards of protection. We will reduce regulatory divergence by securing commitments through Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, the WTO E-Commerce Joint Initiative negotiations, and the United Kingdom’s G7 Presidency. It is important that all regulations are proportionate and not trade-distorting. We will bring down non-tariff barriers through trade negotiations so that safe goods and services from the United Kingdom can be sold into new markets freely.

The Board of Trade report defines “key industries” as those parts of the economy with the greatest chances to increase their exports, thanks to trade policy and trade promotion interventions. HM Government agrees with the Board of Trade that trade agreements can deliver opportunities nationwide, and is considering how to add the data from this cutting-edge research into our policy.

The Rt Hon. Lady will know that the Department for International Trade (DIT) has already published an impact assessment for the FTA with Japan, setting out the potential impacts on every part of the United Kingdom.[1] The Board of Trade’s report focuses on the next international steps our nation can take. Domestic policy, including ‘freeports’, is not explored in the report. Neither the Board of Trade nor HM Government intend to publish an addendum to this report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Board of Trade’s Global Britain, Local Jobs report, what steps her Department is taking through its trade agreements to reduce the risk of regulatory divergence in relation to data and digital services.

HM Government is grateful to the Board of Trade for its thought leadership on trade policy. The Rt Hon. Lady will know from reading the Global Britain, Local Jobs report that there are benefits for the British people – in every corner of the country – from an ambitious trade agenda.

We are proud to have secured trade deals with 66 countries, plus the EU. These agreements provide a strong foundation for our trading relationships, covering trade worth £890 billion in 2019, but do not represent the limit of our ambition. We will seek to improve upon these to maximise trading opportunities.

HM Government will make sure digital markets are opened by reducing barriers to the flow of data, whilst maintaining high standards of protection. We will reduce regulatory divergence by securing commitments through Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations, the WTO E-Commerce Joint Initiative negotiations, and the United Kingdom’s G7 Presidency. It is important that all regulations are proportionate and not trade-distorting. We will bring down non-tariff barriers through trade negotiations so that safe goods and services from the United Kingdom can be sold into new markets freely.

The Board of Trade report defines “key industries” as those parts of the economy with the greatest chances to increase their exports, thanks to trade policy and trade promotion interventions. HM Government agrees with the Board of Trade that trade agreements can deliver opportunities nationwide, and is considering how to add the data from this cutting-edge research into our policy.

The Rt Hon. Lady will know that the Department for International Trade (DIT) has already published an impact assessment for the FTA with Japan, setting out the potential impacts on every part of the United Kingdom.[1] The Board of Trade’s report focuses on the next international steps our nation can take. Domestic policy, including ‘freeports’, is not explored in the report. Neither the Board of Trade nor HM Government intend to publish an addendum to this report.

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to publish the Trade Partnership Agreement between the UK and Ghana signed on 2 March 2021.

Both agreements will be published at the earliest opportunity. The corresponding Memorandum of Understanding for the United Kingdom-Cameroon agreement will be published at the same time.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when she plans to publish the (a) Economic Partnership Agreement between the UK and Cameroon signed on 9 March 2021 and (b) Memorandum of Understanding previously in place between the UK and Cameroon as a bridging mechanism until that agreement was signed.

Both agreements will be published at the earliest opportunity. The corresponding Memorandum of Understanding for the United Kingdom-Cameroon agreement will be published at the same time.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the new Memorandum of Understanding agreed between her Department and UK Export Finance.

The Memorandum of Understanding will be published in due course. A letter from my Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade to UK Export Finance’s Chief Executive, Louis Taylor, on its annual priorities has been published.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/letter-from-the-department-of-international-trade-to-uk-export-finance-on-ukefs-annual-priorities/letter-from-the-department-of-international-trade-to-uk-export-finance-on-ukefs-annual-priorities.

22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what estimate she has made of the cost to the Exchequer of the decision to suspend tariffs on imports from the US arising from the Boeing-Airbus dispute during the period from 1 January to 4 March 2021.

Countermeasures are not designed as a revenue raising measure and place an additional cost on British importers. The United Kingdom’s bold, de-escalatory decision to suspend tariffs brought the US to the negotiating table, resulting in joint tariff suspension. The suspension of US tariffs on around £550 million of British exports benefits businesses in every corner of our country.
Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she (a) has the legal authority and (b) plans to double retaliatory tariffs on imports of bourbon whiskey from the US after 1 June 2021.

The Government takes its international and domestic legal obligations very seriously. Under Article 8.3 of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Agreement on Safeguards, the UK has the right to impose rebalancing measures in response to the US’s WTO-inconsistent tariffs on steel and aluminium products, and derivatives. The domestic power to impose such measures is provided in the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act 2018.

We are considering whether to introduce additional rebalancing measures from June 2021. Our priority is to defend British interests across all sectors of the economy.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason her Department's policy on retaliatory tariffs against the US differs in relation to the (a) steel and aluminium and (b) Boeing-Airbus dispute.

The UK Government is committed to resolving both issues to defend UK industry and jobs.

The s.232 tariffs placed on the UK by the US are World Trade Organisation (WTO)-inconsistent and damaging to our steel and aluminium industry. It is important to retain our rebalancing measures to defend our economic interests and uphold the rules-based international trading system. If the US removes these tariffs, we will remove our rebalancing measures.

The retaliatory tariffs from the Boeing-Airbus disputes were awarded by the WTO, and we have agreed a four-month mutual suspension that benefits key UK industries like Scotch Whisky, Irish Whiskey, pork, construction vehicles, cashmere, cheese and others, and creates space to reach a negotiated settlement.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions have taken place between UK and Australian trade negotiators on potential UK import restrictions on meat products treated with growth-promoting antibiotics.

The fourth round of negotiations on the Australia-UK Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was held virtually from 22nd February to 5th March, covering trade in goods among other issues typically covered in a comprehensive FTA.

The UK prohibits the use of artificial growth hormones in both domestic production and imported products, and is a world leader in the battle against antimicrobial resistance – significantly cutting our use of antibiotics in farming.

Furthermore, all agri-food products imported into the UK under existing or future FTAs will, as now, have to comply with our import requirements, which include clear controls on limits of veterinary medicine residues in meat and other animal products.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps her Department has taken to mitigate the effect of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement on producers in (a) Jamaica, (b) India, (c) Mauritius, (d) Pakistan, (e) South Africa, (f) Sri Lanka and (g) Vietnam.

The Government’s published impact assessment identified certain products in these countries that may face greater competition when exporting to the UK as a result of the UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement. However, it concludes that the agreement is not likely to have major implications for trade flows between the UK and these countries.[1]

[1] https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-japan-cepa-final-impact-assessment

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when her Department plans to make an announcement on the future of the Trade Show Access Programme.

Announcements in respect of grant allocations, and the 2021-22 programme for trade show support, will be dependent on how business planning discussions are concluded, as part of the overall Spending Review priorities process.

10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what plans she has to refund the tariffs incurred between the date on which agreement was reached in principle on the UK-Ghana Interim Trade Partnership Agreement and the date on which it came into effect.

There are no plans to refund duties that were correctly charged to imports originating from Ghana until the agreement took effect.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussions UK and US trade negotiators have had on the effect of a UK-US trade deal on the economies of Caribbean countries.

The Scoping Assessment of the UK-US Free Trade Agreement, published on 2 March 2020, set out that the agreement could affect countries other than the UK and the US, including countries in the Caribbean region, although our modelling suggests that there would be a negligible impact on the long run GDP of these countries.

UK negotiators have presented the information on potential impacts to their US counterparts as part of discussions on trade and development and seek to ensure the UK-US trade agreement supports our broader objectives on trade and development, which include supporting developing countries to reduce poverty through trade.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, when the draft texts of (a) the UK-Australia and (b) the UK-New Zealand trade agreements will be shared with members of the (i) Trade Advisory Group on Agri-Food and (ii) Trade and Agriculture Commission.

The expertise of the Agri-food Trade Advisory Group (TAG) is drawn upon at key stages during negotiations, including on the initial Market Access offers for both the Australia and New Zealand free trade agreements. We intend to share draft text for both agreements with TAG members where this is relevant, and we have systems in place in preparation for this.

Treaty text will be shared with the Trade and Agriculture Commission at a point appropriate to ensure the membership’s time and expertise is used most efficiently, and within the bounds of Parliamentary protocol.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, which UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement data provisions are (a) models for agreements on digital and data with other countries the UK is seeking to negotiate trade or digital deals with and (b) bespoke arrangements for the circumstances of UK-Japan trade.

The UK-Japan Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) seeks to remove unjustified barriers to data flows to ensure trade can flourish. CEPA recognises the importance of data protection by committing both parties to maintain national data protection regimes. The UK-Japan CEPA does not undermine or change the UK’s data protection laws, or provide a legal basis for the transfer of personal data to Japan.

The ability to transfer data across international borders is crucial to a well-functioning economy, alongside wider priorities such as law enforcement and security. The UK will therefore pursue ambitious provisions in future agreements which seek to commit parties to the cross-border free flow of data, consistent with local laws restricting personal data flows.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the 6 July 2020 publication Statistics on DIT export support objectives (2019 to 2020), what her Department's validated export wins over £50 million were from the first to third quarters of the financial year 2019/20, by target overseas region where that data is available.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the 6 July 2020 publication Statistics on DIT export support objectives (2019 to 2020), what her Department's validated export wins over £50 million recorded from the first to third quarters of the financial year 2019/20 were, by English region where that data is available.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the 6 July 2020 publication Statistics on DIT export support objectives (2019 to 2020), what (a) proportion and (b) value of total export wins recorded by her Department in the first three quarters of 2019-20 were led by, or contributed to by, departmental teams in the English regions.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the 6 July 2020 publication Statistics on DIT export support objectives (2019 to 2020), what (a) proportion and (b) value of total export wins recorded by her Department in the first three quarters of 2019-20 were over £50 million.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the 6 July 2020 Statistics on DIT export support objectives (2019 to 2020), what factors her Department uses to assess barriers to digital trade.

To be clear, the statistics to which the Rt Hon. Lady refers are not reflective of digital barriers alone. The 1,238 barriers on the Digital Market Access Service system in 2019/2020, and the 175 resolved barriers, cover a range of sectors, countries and issues, not just digital barriers.

The Digital Market Access Service is an internal digital platform used by government officials to help improve access and opportunity for British businesses around the world. The platform enables officials to record up to date information on market access barriers, and supports joint working to remove them where it is possible to do so.

We have begun to publish information on GOV.UK, in a form that enables users to search for barriers based on their location or sector and read descriptions explaining their effect. Users can search for barriers that have been resolved too. Barriers published on this service are not an indication of government priority.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the 6 July 2020 Statistics on DIT export support objectives (2019 to 2020), how many of the 465 priority barriers to digital market access have been solved.

To be clear, the statistics to which the Rt Hon. Lady refers are not reflective of digital barriers alone. The 1,238 barriers on the Digital Market Access Service system in 2019/2020, and the 175 resolved barriers, cover a range of sectors, countries and issues, not just digital barriers.

The Digital Market Access Service is an internal digital platform used by government officials to help improve access and opportunity for British businesses around the world. The platform enables officials to record up to date information on market access barriers, and supports joint working to remove them where it is possible to do so.

We have begun to publish information on GOV.UK, in a form that enables users to search for barriers based on their location or sector and read descriptions explaining their effect. Users can search for barriers that have been resolved too. Barriers published on this service are not an indication of government priority.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the 6 July 2020 Statistics on DIT export support objectives (2019 to 2020), what were (a) the 1,238 barriers to digital market access identified and (b) the 175 barriers to digital market access solved.

To be clear, the statistics to which the Rt Hon. Lady refers are not reflective of digital barriers alone. The 1,238 barriers on the Digital Market Access Service system in 2019/2020, and the 175 resolved barriers, cover a range of sectors, countries and issues, not just digital barriers.

The Digital Market Access Service is an internal digital platform used by government officials to help improve access and opportunity for British businesses around the world. The platform enables officials to record up to date information on market access barriers, and supports joint working to remove them where it is possible to do so.

We have begun to publish information on GOV.UK, in a form that enables users to search for barriers based on their location or sector and read descriptions explaining their effect. Users can search for barriers that have been resolved too. Barriers published on this service are not an indication of government priority.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 24 February 2021 to Question 154868, how the total for outward direct investment wins reported by her Department in its 2019-20 annual report was calculated; and what that figure was by quarter.

An Export or Outward Direct Investment Win is a deal, contract, sale, or other specific type of agreement for an eligible UK company resulting from support provided by the Department for International Trade (DIT) and captures the expected value of the Win up to a five-year period. DIT creates a Win record using a digtal framework. Once entered, the UK customer which received support is required to confirm the Win details. A Win counts once it has been confirmed. It is the sum of these wins (post validation) that is reported.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 24 February 2021 to Question 154868, how the total for export wins reported by her Department in its 2019-20 annual report was calculated; and what that figure was by quarter.

An Export or Outward Direct Investment Win is a deal, contract, sale, or other specific type of agreement for an eligible UK company resulting from support provided by the Department for International Trade (DIT) and captures the expected value of the Win up to a five-year period. DIT creates a Win record using a digtal framework. Once entered, the UK customer which received support is required to confirm the Win details. A Win counts once it has been confirmed. It is the sum of these wins (post validation) that is reported.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the 6 July 2020 publication Statistics on DIT export support objectives (2019 to 2020), what her Department's validated export wins over £50 million were from the first to third quarters of the financial year 2019/20, by economic sector where that data is available.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, with reference to the 6 July 2020 publication Statistics on DIT export support objectives (2019 to 2020), what her Department's validated export wins over £50 million were from the first to third quarters of the financial year 2019-20, by size of UK business where that data is available.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what plans he has to (a) implement new exemptions or (b) rollover existing EU exemptions to anti-dumping duties on certain bike and e-bike lines.

The Department for International Trade issued a Call for Evidence to assess whether the EU trade remedy measures on bicycles and electric bicycles should continue to apply after the transition period. Initial evidence provided by producers of bicycles and electric bicycles in the United Kingdom indicated there were not sufficient domestic sales to transition this measure.

However, new evidence provided in December 2020 showed that the criteria for transition had been met. Accordingly, we transitioned definitive EU trade remedy measures on bicycles, electric bicycles, and bicycle parts from China. As part of this, we transitioned any definitive EU business exemptions that were in operation already under the bicycle parts measures. Pending or provisional EU decisions on business exemptions from the bicycle parts measures were not transitioned into our system and ceased to apply from 1st January 2021. We are exploring the possibility of introducing a scheme in the United Kingdom to allow for some further exemptions for parts for the bicycle industry.

HM Government intends to review the trade remedy measures on bicycles, electric bicycles and certain bicycle parts originating in China, as with all transitioned measures. The transition reviews will be initiated by the Trade Remedies Investigations Directorate (or its successor, the Trade Remedies Authority) before expiry of the current measures.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what consultation HMRC undertook with industry before removing anti-dumping duty exemptions for certain bike and e-bike lines after the transition period.

The Department for International Trade issued a Call for Evidence to assess whether the EU trade remedy measures on bicycles and electric bicycles should continue to apply after the transition period. Initial evidence provided by producers of bicycles and electric bicycles in the United Kingdom indicated there were not sufficient domestic sales to transition this measure.

However, new evidence provided in December 2020 showed that the criteria for transition had been met. Accordingly, we transitioned definitive EU trade remedy measures on bicycles, electric bicycles, and bicycle parts from China. As part of this, we transitioned any definitive EU business exemptions that were in operation already under the bicycle parts measures. Pending or provisional EU decisions on business exemptions from the bicycle parts measures were not transitioned into our system and ceased to apply from 1st January 2021. We are exploring the possibility of introducing a scheme in the United Kingdom to allow for some further exemptions for parts for the bicycle industry.

HM Government intends to review the trade remedy measures on bicycles, electric bicycles and certain bicycle parts originating in China, as with all transitioned measures. The transition reviews will be initiated by the Trade Remedies Investigations Directorate (or its successor, the Trade Remedies Authority) before expiry of the current measures.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reason anti-dumping duty exemptions on certain bike and e-bike lines have not been maintained after the end of the transition period.

The Department for International Trade issued a Call for Evidence to assess whether the EU trade remedy measures on bicycles and electric bicycles should continue to apply after the transition period. Initial evidence provided by producers of bicycles and electric bicycles in the United Kingdom indicated there were not sufficient domestic sales to transition this measure.

However, new evidence provided in December 2020 showed that the criteria for transition had been met. Accordingly, we transitioned definitive EU trade remedy measures on bicycles, electric bicycles, and bicycle parts from China. As part of this, we transitioned any definitive EU business exemptions that were in operation already under the bicycle parts measures. Pending or provisional EU decisions on business exemptions from the bicycle parts measures were not transitioned into our system and ceased to apply from 1st January 2021. We are exploring the possibility of introducing a scheme in the United Kingdom to allow for some further exemptions for parts for the bicycle industry.

HM Government intends to review the trade remedy measures on bicycles, electric bicycles and certain bicycle parts originating in China, as with all transitioned measures. The transition reviews will be initiated by the Trade Remedies Investigations Directorate (or its successor, the Trade Remedies Authority) before expiry of the current measures.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the titles and dates are of all memoranda of understanding agreed by UK Export Finance with other domestic and overseas bodies since the start of 2016.

UK Export Finance (UKEF) has agreed the attached list of memoranda of understanding (MoUs) with domestic and overseas bodies since the start of 2016.

There are seven further MoUs whose details are being withheld for reasons of commercial sensitivity.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the £4.92 billion in outward foreign direct investment wins reported by her Department in its 2019-20 annual report by the nine target regions for outward foreign direct investment wins set out in that report, namely (a) Africa, (b) Asia Pacific, (c) China and Hong Kong, (d) Eastern Europe and Central Asia, (e) Europe, (f) Latin America and the Caribbean, (g) Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan, (h) North America and (i) South Asia.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, if she will publish the £24.4 billion in export wins reported by her Department in its 2019-20 annual report by the nine target regions for export wins set out in that report, namely (a) Africa, (b) Asia Pacific, (c) China and Hong Kong, (d) Eastern Europe and Central Asia, (e) Europe, (f) Latin America and the Caribbean, (g) Middle East, Afghanistan and Pakistan, (h) North America and (i) South Asia.

The Department is not able to provide, reliably, the breakdowns requested.

8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 8 February 2021 to Question 148746 on Trade Agreements: Cameroon, when she expects to sign the UK's economic partnership agreement with Cameroon.

Where the UK or its treaty partners are unable to fully ratify or provisionally apply an agreement, the UK has sought to give effect to the preferences in arrangements reached with partners through alternative bridging mechanisms. These non-binding and temporary mechanisms include Memoranda of Understanding or the Exchange of Diplomatic Notes, which ensure continuity of trade and prevent disruption.

The UK considers arrangements under bridging mechanisms to be compliant with WTO rules under Article XXIV of GATT and Article V of GATS. Accordingly, we have notified to the WTO these trading arrangements.

We are working to ensure that the Economic Partnership Agreement with Cameroon is signed and ratified as quickly as practicable. We have established a bridging mechanism with Cameroon to ensure continuity in trade preferences between our countries, avoiding any disruption that otherwise would have occurred.

The text of the agreement will be laid in Parliament under the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act (CRaG) and the corresponding Memorandum of Understanding published on GOV.UK once the formal process of signing the Agreement is complete.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 8 February to Question 148746 on Trade Agreements: Cameroon, if she will update paragraph six of the Provisional Application and Bridging Mechanisms Information Note published by her Department in December 2020 to clarify the position on the use of bridging mechanisms in relation to trade agreements that have not yet been signed.

Where the UK or its treaty partners are unable to fully ratify or provisionally apply an agreement, the UK has sought to give effect to the preferences in arrangements reached with partners through alternative bridging mechanisms. These non-binding and temporary mechanisms include Memoranda of Understanding or the Exchange of Diplomatic Notes, which ensure continuity of trade and prevent disruption.

The UK considers arrangements under bridging mechanisms to be compliant with WTO rules under Article XXIV of GATT and Article V of GATS. Accordingly, we have notified to the WTO these trading arrangements.

We are working to ensure that the Economic Partnership Agreement with Cameroon is signed and ratified as quickly as practicable. We have established a bridging mechanism with Cameroon to ensure continuity in trade preferences between our countries, avoiding any disruption that otherwise would have occurred.

The text of the agreement will be laid in Parliament under the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act (CRaG) and the corresponding Memorandum of Understanding published on GOV.UK once the formal process of signing the Agreement is complete.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 8 February 2021 to Question 148746, what (a) precedents exist and (b) the legal basis is for the use of a Memorandum of Understanding as a bridging mechanism pending the ratification and entry into force of an agreement that has not yet been signed.

Where the UK or its treaty partners are unable to fully ratify or provisionally apply an agreement, the UK has sought to give effect to the preferences in arrangements reached with partners through alternative bridging mechanisms. These non-binding and temporary mechanisms include Memoranda of Understanding or the Exchange of Diplomatic Notes, which ensure continuity of trade and prevent disruption.

The UK considers arrangements under bridging mechanisms to be compliant with WTO rules under Article XXIV of GATT and Article V of GATS. Accordingly, we have notified to the WTO these trading arrangements.

We are working to ensure that the Economic Partnership Agreement with Cameroon is signed and ratified as quickly as practicable. We have established a bridging mechanism with Cameroon to ensure continuity in trade preferences between our countries, avoiding any disruption that otherwise would have occurred.

The text of the agreement will be laid in Parliament under the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act (CRaG) and the corresponding Memorandum of Understanding published on GOV.UK once the formal process of signing the Agreement is complete.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 2 February 2021 to Question 144971, whether an Economic Partnership Agreement with Cameroon had been formally signed prior to the Memorandum of Understanding taking effect from 1 January 2021.

I refer my Right Hon. Friend for Islington South and Finsbury to the answer I gave on 2 February 2021, UIN:144971. In this case, negotiations with Cameroon were not concluded until 24 December. In order to prevent trade disruption and fulfil our trade continuity objective, we secured a temporary bridging mechanism with Cameroon to continue the effects of our trading arrangements for the time needed until both parties can sign and fully ratify the Agreement.

We are working to conclude this process as quickly as possible. The text of the agreement will be laid in Parliament under the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act (CRaG) and the corresponding Memorandum of Understanding published on GOV.UK once the formal process of signing the Agreement is complete.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the answer of 2 February 2021 to Question 144971 and with reference to the publication of the Memorandums of Understanding with the Solomon Islands and Samoa, St Kitts and Nevis, Trinidad and Tobago, Kenya, and Canada, for what reason the Memorandum of Understanding agreed with Cameroon has not been published to date.

I refer my Right Hon. Friend for Islington South and Finsbury to the answer I gave on 2 February 2021, UIN:144971. In this case, negotiations with Cameroon were not concluded until 24 December. In order to prevent trade disruption and fulfil our trade continuity objective, we secured a temporary bridging mechanism with Cameroon to continue the effects of our trading arrangements for the time needed until both parties can sign and fully ratify the Agreement.

We are working to conclude this process as quickly as possible. The text of the agreement will be laid in Parliament under the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act (CRaG) and the corresponding Memorandum of Understanding published on GOV.UK once the formal process of signing the Agreement is complete.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, on what occasions she has raised human rights concerns with representatives from the Cambodian Government since the implementation of the least developed countries framework.

The United Kingdom continues to raise its concerns about human rights with the Cambodian government at every opportunity. For example, when explaining the UK’s approach on trade preferences to Cambodia, Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Cambodia expressed our concerns about the human rights situation to Cambodia’s Deputy Prime Minister in December 2020.

At UN Human Rights Council sessions in late 2019 and June 2020, the UK also publicly urged the Cambodian authorities to lift restrictions on political debate and to create the conditions for a proper functioning democracy. The United Kingdom continues to seek opportunities to increase our engagement with Cambodia directly on these issues.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, for what reasons the decision to extend least developed countries framework preferences to Cambodia was not presented to Parliament.

The approach on trade preferences and Cambodia was set out to the Chair of the International Trade Committee in a letter dated 21 January 2021.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment she has made of the adequacy of the Cambodian Government's implementation of the core human and labour rights UN/ILO conventions necessary to qualify for the least developed countries framework.

The United Kingdom has concerns about human rights in Cambodia and continues to raise these with the Cambodian government at every opportunity.

We continue to monitor the situation in Cambodia and consider if it is appropriate to suspend preferences in line with the provisions of our Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP) scheme, taking into account the human rights situation as well as the economic impact of COVID-19 and the impact on vulnerable people, including female garment factory workers.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what evidence the Government used to assess human rights concerns in Cambodia when determining that country's full access to the least developed countries framework.

The United Kingdom has concerns about human rights in Cambodia and continues to raise these with the Cambodian government at every opportunity.

We continue to monitor the situation in Cambodia and consider if it is appropriate to suspend preferences in line with the provisions of our Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP) scheme, taking into account the human rights situation as well as the economic impact of COVID-19 and the impact on vulnerable people, including female garment factory workers.