David Crausby Portrait

David Crausby

Labour - Former Member for Bolton North East

First elected: 1st May 1997

Left House: 6th November 2019 (Defeated)


Panel of Chairs
22nd Jun 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Panel of Chairs
21st Jun 2010 - 3rd May 2017
High Speed Rail (London - West Midlands) Bill (Commons)
7th Jul 2015 - 22nd Feb 2016
Committees on Arms Export Controls
10th Mar 2008 - 6th May 2010
Defence Committee
16th Jul 2001 - 6th May 2010
Social Security
6th Dec 1999 - 11th May 2001
Administration Committee
28th Jul 1997 - 11th May 2001


Division Voting information

David Crausby has voted in 2017 divisions, and 34 times against the majority of their Party.

29 Feb 2016 - Referendums - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 6 Labour No votes vs 184 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 475 Noes - 59
23 Feb 2015 - Serious Crime Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 178 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 201 Noes - 292
5 Mar 2014 - Judgments - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Labour No votes vs 182 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 360 Noes - 104
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of Births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 184 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 363 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 184 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 182 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 183 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 365 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Labour No votes vs 183 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 368 Noes - 98
21 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Labour No votes vs 194 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 161
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour Aye votes vs 201 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 150 Noes - 340
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Labour Aye votes vs 203 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 148 Noes - 339
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 18 Labour Aye votes vs 190 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 163 Noes - 321
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Labour Aye votes vs 190 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 375
5 Feb 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Labour No votes vs 216 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 400 Noes - 175
5 Feb 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Labour No votes vs 225 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 499 Noes - 55
12 Nov 2008 - MODERNISATION OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS (STANDING ORDERS) - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Labour Aye votes vs 33 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 87
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 48 Labour Aye votes vs 230 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 299
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 49 Labour Aye votes vs 227 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 206 Noes - 298
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 47 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 194 Noes - 306
22 Oct 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 45 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 183 Noes - 308
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 47 Labour Aye votes vs 226 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 217 Noes - 292
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 48 Labour Aye votes vs 227 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 222 Noes - 290
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 39 Labour Aye votes vs 240 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 190 Noes - 332
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 42 Labour Aye votes vs 229 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 173 Noes - 309
20 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 56 Labour Aye votes vs 231 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 233 Noes - 304
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Labour Aye votes vs 215 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 176 Noes - 336
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 62 Labour Aye votes vs 216 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 286
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 58 Labour Aye votes vs 217 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 181 Noes - 314
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 51 Labour Aye votes vs 225 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 163 Noes - 342
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 51 Labour Aye votes vs 216 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 200 Noes - 293
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 152 Labour No votes vs 162 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 416 Noes - 163
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 132 Labour Aye votes vs 177 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 178 Noes - 392
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 156 Labour Aye votes vs 157 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 267
17 Oct 2006 - Gambling Act 2005 (Amendment) - View Vote Context
David Crausby voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 46 Labour No votes vs 49 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 240
View All David Crausby Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Cameron of Chipping Norton (Conservative)
Foreign Secretary
(14 debate interactions)
Liam Fox (Conservative)
(11 debate interactions)
Theresa May (Conservative)
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Work and Pensions
(45 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(33 debate contributions)
Ministry of Defence
(24 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018
(5,176 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all David Crausby's debates

Bolton North East Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Schools are having to make difficult choices on how to spend their limited funding as their income has not kept pace with the rise in costs since 2010. All schools are working very hard to “make ends meet” but this is becoming increasingly difficult and verging on almost impossible.


Latest EDMs signed by David Crausby

24th October 2019
David Crausby signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 24th October 2019

RSPCA report on Fireworks

Tabled by: David Crausby (Labour - Bolton North East)
That this House welcomes the RSPCA report Bang Out Of Order which investigates the distress caused to pets by fireworks; is concerned that 62 percent of dogs, 54 percent of cats and 55 percent of horses show signs of distress as a result of the use of fireworks which means …
16 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Nov 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Independent: 2
Scottish National Party: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Conservative: 1
Green Party: 1
22nd October 2019
David Crausby signed this EDM on Thursday 24th October 2019

Cancer Research UK work with universities

Tabled by: Jim Shannon (Democratic Unionist Party - Strangford)
That this House welcomes the announcement that Cancer Research UK will work with UK universities and in the US to investigate how cancer is formed to facilitate the earliest possible treatment.
23 signatures
(Most recent: 16 Dec 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 7
Democratic Unionist Party: 6
Conservative: 3
Independent: 3
Scottish National Party: 3
Liberal Democrat: 1
View All David Crausby's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by David Crausby, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


David Crausby has not been granted any Urgent Questions

David Crausby has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

David Crausby has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

1 Bill co-sponsored by David Crausby

Representation of the People (Gibraltar) Bill 2017-19
Sponsor - Craig Mackinlay (Con)


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
5 Other Department Questions
17th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will take steps to increase the number of workers from ethnic minority backgrounds who are paid the living wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

The Government encourages employers to pay the Living Wage when it is affordable and not at the expense of jobs. However our primary policy for supporting the low paid is the National Minimum Wage (NMW) which is carefully set by the independent Low Pay Commission at a level that maximises their wages without damaging employment by setting it too high.

The NWW has benefitted all low paid workers across the UK, not just those from ethnic minority backgrounds. Since its introduction in 1999 it has increased faster than average earnings and inflation without an adverse impact on employment.

In addition to the NMW we are increasing the personal allowance for income tax, allowing workers to take home more of what they earn. From April 2015 changes to income tax will provide the average worker with an additional £800 to their pay packet and by then will have taken 3.2 million people out of tax altogether.

11th Jul 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will take steps to increase the national minimum wage so that its real terms value is equal to that of January 2010.

This Government is fully committed to the national minimum wage (NMW) set by the independent Low Pay Commission (LPC) at a level that maximises the wages of the low paid without damaging their employment prospects by setting it too high.

We welcome the LPC's 2014 assessment that marks the start of a new phase of bigger, real increases in the minimum wage, provided economic conditions continue to improve. In our recent 2015 remit we have asked the LPC to think ahead and build on the forward guidance that sets out our ambition to see real increases in the NMW.

Furthermore, since its introduction the NMW has increased faster than average earnings and inflation without an adverse effect on employment. From October this year the 3% rise of the adult rate means full time workers on national minimum wage will receive an additional £355 a year. This is the biggest cash increase since 2008.

26th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what steps he is taking to ensure that the recent reductions in wholesale gas prices available to energy companies are benefiting consumers.

In a competitive market, pricing decisions are a commercial matter for companies.

Consumers can put pressure on companies to reduce prices by switching to the best deal for them – Ofgem's Retail Market Reforms to deliver a simpler, clear market combined with Government's push to significantly reduce switching times and require suppliers to share consumer data with trusted third parties, should make this easier to do.

The Government supported Ofgem's recent letter to the largest suppliers, challenging them to explain to consumers the impact of falling wholesale prices on their retail prices. Evidence that large suppliers raise prices more quickly when costs increase than they reduce prices when costs fall was one of the issues underpinning Ofgem's recent referral of the energy markets to the Competition and Markets Authority.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps he has taken to increase the availability of credit for small businesses in (a) Bolton North East constituency and (b) England in the last year.

The Government is committed to ensuring businesses can access the finance they need for investment and growth.

The Bank of England and HM Treasury announced in November that the Funding for Lending scheme would be focused on lending to businesses to reflect the success that the scheme has had with households. Lending under the Funding for Lending Scheme has totalled over £16bn according to the latest figures.

The British Business Bank is being established to ensure that business finance markets work efficiently and effectively for smaller businesses, and its loan guarantee and investment programmes supported £660 million of lending and investment in 2013 across the UK.

A breakdown of the value of debt finance facilitated to businesses in Bolton North East constituency and England through British Business Bank programmes in the last year is detailed in the table below.

Enterprise Finance Guarantee Scheme (drawn down)

Start Up Loans Scheme

(drawn down)

Lending facilitated by the Business Finance Partnership

Bolton North East Constituency

7 Loans with a value of £1.14m

24 loans with a value of £117 330

North West Region: 462 loans with a value of nearly £ 27m

England

2857 loans with a value of £307.6 million

13432 with a value over £75m

3721 loans provided with a value of nearly £226m

To ask the hon. Member for South West Devon, representing the Speaker's Committee on the Electoral Commission, what the electoral registration figures were in each ward in the recent confirmation dry run conducted in Bolton North East constituency.

The Electoral Commission informs me that the confirmation dry run involved matching all entries on the electoral registers against the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) Customer Information System database. Entries would be marked as green if they matched with DWP, amber if they were a partial match or red if there was no match.

Results for all wards are available on the Commission's website here: http://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/__data/assets/excel_doc/0003/163146/Confirmation-dry-run-2013-Results-Wards.xls

The ward results for the Bolton North East constituency were as follows:

Ward

Green matches

Amber matches

Red matches

ASTLEY BRIDGE

82.7%

1.1%

16.2%

BRADSHAW

86.7%

1.1%

12.2%

BREIGHTMET

83.1%

1.4%

15.5%

BROMLEY CROSS

84.9%

0.8%

14.3%

CROMPTON

75.9%

2.8%

21.3%

HALLIWELL

73.4%

2.8%

23.8%

TONGE WITH THE HAULGH

79.5%

1.7%

18.8%

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what information the Government holds on the number of new businesses that were established in Bolton in the most recent year for which figures are available.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I
have asked the Authority to reply.

26th Jun 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what Government spending was in reform of the process of procurement and across central Government in each year since May 2010.

The Cabinet Office has been working with central Government departments to implement a demanding Commercial Reform agenda which is aimed at leveraging the Crown's buying power, deriving better value for money and savings for the taxpayer to support deficit reduction and growth. This work has been carried out across departments and costs are not held centrally.

As a result of our work to date, we have made the way we buy goods and services in central Government quicker, more competitive, more transparent, better value and far simpler than before. This has saved the taxpayer £2.9bn in 2010-11, with a further £3.0bn in 2011-12, £3.8bn in 2012-13 and £5.4bn in 2013-14. These savings are all calculated against a 2009-10 baseline and include both recurring and non-recurring items.

All of this could have been started before the 2010 General Election. However in May 2010 there was no effective central oversight of procurement, commercial skills were lacking and Government didn't even know who its strategic suppliers were, let alone how much was being spent with them.

17th Jun 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the number of people employed on zero-hour contracts in Bolton North East constituency.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

17th Jun 2014
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the number of people who are paid at a rate below the living wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation in Bolton North East constituency.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when her Department plans to bring forward legislative proposals to tackle unfair practices in the hospitality sector in relation to (a) tips, (b) gratuities, (c) cover charges and (d) service charges.

Through the Good Work Plan, the Government is taking forward the largest upgrade to workers’ rights in a generation. In order to improve fairness for workers, we have committed to introduce legislation to ensure that tips left to workers will go to them in full.

We expect over a million workers to benefit from new rules on tips, many of whom are in low-paid jobs. Consumers will have reassurance that the money they leave in good faith is going to the staff, as they intended.

We have been working closely with stakeholders and across Government to prepare this legislation and will lay measures in Parliament as soon as possible.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to bring forward legislative proposals to tackle unfair practices in the hospitality sector in relation to (a) tips, (b) gratuities, (c) cover charges and (d) service charges.

The Government has announced its intention to legislate to ensure that all tips left to workers are kept by them in full. In some sectors, tips are a significant part of staff income. It is only right that workers keep the full value of tips left in recognition of good service and hard work.

This commitment was published as part of the Government’s Good Work Plan, which represents the largest upgrade to workplace rights in a generation. Full details of legislation on tips will be published in due course.

7th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to conduct a review of the Pubs Code.

As required by the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015, my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State will review the operation of the Pubs Code and the effectiveness of the Pubs Code Adjudicator for the period to 31 March 2019. The Government is currently considering the format of the review and will ensure all those with an interest, including tenants and pub companies, have an opportunity to contribute.

7th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the Pubs Code Adjudicator.

As required by the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015, my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State will review the operation of the Pubs Code and the effectiveness of the Pubs Code Adjudicator for the period to 31 March 2019. The Government is currently considering the format of the review and will ensure all those with an interest, including tenants and pub companies, have an opportunity to contribute.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish the response to the consultation on tips, gratuities, cover and service charges which closed on 27 June 2016.

The Government‘s consultation identified a range of tipping practices used by employers. The Government is considering next steps and reserves the right to take further legislative action if restaurants do not pay their staff fairly. Any action must benefit workers and not place extra burden on those businesses that do pay their staff fairly.

18th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the level of availability of grants for the replacement of storage heaters in cold homes.

Storage heaters can be replaced under the Energy Company Obligation (ECO), specifically Affordable Warmth, the part of the scheme aimed at low income and vulnerable households. Government is currently consulting on ECO for 2018-22 which would see the whole scheme focused on low income and vulnerable households and we are proposing that storage heaters could be replaced in a wider set of circumstances.

19th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when his Department plans to publish the response to the consultation on Tips, gratuities, cover and service charges which closed on 27 June 2016.

The Government is considering the responses to this consultation, and will respond in due course.

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes have been insulated under national government schemes in each year since 2010.

Since 2013, and estimated 1,321,000 unique homes have received insulation measures through the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) and Green Deal schemes. The annual breakdown is shown in the table below.

Table: Number of homes insulated through ECO and Green Deal: 2013 – July 2017.

Year

Homes insulated (000s)

2013

277

2014

524

2015

284

2016

189

2017 (Year to July)

62

TOTAL unique homes insulated*

1,321

*Around 15,000 homes (1%) were insulated by multiple schemes since 2013. This double counting has been removed from the total homes insulated.

Prior to 2013, data are not available to estimate the number of unique homes receiving insulation measures. However, the number of professionally installed measures for cavity wall insulation, loft insulation and solid wall insulation through Government schemes since 2010 are shown in the table below. In addition to schemes shown above the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT) that closed in 2012 is included.

Table: Number of selected professionally installed insulation measures through CERT, ECO and Green Deal: 2010 – July 2017.

Year

Cavity wall insulation (000s)

Loft insulation (000s)

Solid wall insulation (000s)

2010

419

536

13

2011

521

871

9

2012

635

1,284

14

2013

166

127

28

2014

317

207

64

2015

150

101

57

2016

91

67

35

2017 (Year to July)

38

21

11

TOTAL

2,337

3,213

232

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 17 October 2017 to Question 107168 on housing: insulation, if his Department will provide a breakdown of those figures for (a) owner-occupied, (b) private-rented and (c) social sector housing.

The following table provides additional breakdown of the percentage of homes rated EPC band D or below by: (a) owner-occupied, (b) private-rented and (c) social sector housing. As before, these data are calculated based on weighted English Housing Survey data:

Table: Number of homes (000’s) in England rated EPC band D or below split by tenure

of which:

Number of homes (000’s)

(a) owner occupied

(b) private rented

(c) social sector housing

2010

18,588

70%

15%

15%

2011

18,465

69%

16%

15%

2012

17,714

69%

18%

14%

2013

17,347

68%

19%

13%

2014

16,630

68%

19%

13%

2015

16,208

67%

20%

12%

Note: totals may not add to 100 due to rounding

6th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department has taken to incentivise the installation of household insulation by private landlords and housing associations; and if he will make a statement.

The Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property)(England and Wales) Regulations 2015 require that, subject to certain exemptions, domestic and non-domestic private rented sector landlords improve any Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) F or G rated properties they rent to a minimum of EPC band E from April 2018. To reach this standard, landlords of poorly rated properties will be required to install energy efficiency measures relevant to those properties, which could include insulation.

The Energy Company Obligation (ECO) supports the installation of energy efficiency measures in both private rented housing and social rented housing. From January 2013 to June 2017, energy efficiency measures were installed in 242,348 private rented homes and 223,046 social rented homes under ECO.

The Government will also look at a long term trajectory for energy performance standards across the private rented sector, with the aim of as many private rented homes as possible being upgraded to EPC Band C by 2030, where practical, cost-effective and affordable. We will consider options with a view to consulting in 2018. In addition, the Government will also look at how social housing can meet similar standards on the same timetable. When looking at this we will need to take account of the findings of the independent public inquiry into the fire at Grenfell Tower and the Government’s separate work looking at wider social housing policy issues.

10th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how his Department's industrial strategy plans to protect jobs in the retail sector.

The Industrial Strategy is a framework for Government to work in partnership with industry, academia, civil society and business over the years ahead to build on the UK’s strengths, make more of our untapped potential and create a more productive economy that works for everyone across the UK.

Our ambition is, therefore, for the Industrial Strategy to support businesses from all sectors of the economy to prosper and grow, including in the retail sector.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what information his Department holds on the number of Citizens Advice Bureau offices which have closed since 2012-13.

The Department does not hold this information as central Government funds the umbrella organisation, Citizens Advice, but not individual bureaux. We have obtained the following information from Citizens Advice:

  • There are currently 292 local members (legal entities, formally known as CAB). There were 360 members at April 2012, representing a reduction of 68.

  • Citizens Advice has noted this reduction results mainly from a number of mergers of legal entities to provide efficiencies so that more resources can be targeted to frontline advice.

  • Generally across England and Wales, the number of access points for advice remains largely the same – 2,700 community locations, including GP surgeries, libraries and courts.

  • There have been 9 closures since April 2012, resulting from either the local service being no longer financially viable due to financial mismanagement, failure to address decreasing funding or the loss of a competitive tendering process.

  • In all cases where a closure has been necessary, Citizens Advice strive to continue to provide face to face services in those areas, albeit sometimes this has had to be reduced.

6th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many households in (a) England, (b) Bolton Metropolitan Borough and (c) Bolton North East constituency spend more than 10 per cent of their income on fuel bills.

In England, approximately 2.36 million households spent more than 10 per cent of their full income on fuel bills in 2015. This is around 10.4 per cent of all households. In the North West, approximately 0.41 million households (13.4 per cent), spent more than 10 per cent of their full income on fuel bills. Data is only available at the regional level and is not broken down further to Local Authority level.

Fuel poverty is based on the low income high costs (LIHC) indicator. In 2015, around 2.50 million households were in fuel poverty. This is around 11.0 per cent of all households. In the Bolton Metropolitan Borough, 14,800 households (12.5 per cent) were considered fuel poor. In the Bolton North East constituency, 5,400 households (12.8 per cent) were considered fuel poor.

These figures are based on the fuel poverty dataset. The methodology for this can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/fuel-poverty-statistics-methodology-handbook

The sub-regional figures can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/sub-regional-fuel-poverty-data-2017

This is based on data the English Housing Survey which is run by the Department for Communities and Local Government. The methodology for this can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/english-housing-survey-guidance-and-methodology

4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much money energy companies have spent on assisting low income households in each of the last five years.

Larger domestic energy suppliers have been required to provide assistance to households under a number of supplier statutory obligations in the last five years. The Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT), the Community Energy Savings Programme[1] (CESP) and the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) have required energy suppliers to provide energy efficiency measures to homes. CESP required measures to be installed in low income areas[2]. Under CERT at least 40% of carbon savings had to be delivered in homes of a Priority Group of low income and vulnerable households. ECO has had an element aimed primarily at low income and vulnerable households and from April this year that was increased to 70% of the obligation. In addition, the Warm Home Discount (WHD) primarily requires energy bill rebates to be made to low income and vulnerable households each winter.

Spending under ECO and Warm Home Discount

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

WHD[3]

£290m

£283m

£326m

£315m

£323m (est.)

ECO[4] (Affordable Warmth spending[5])

£7m

£630m

£175m

£206m

£242m

Total:

£297m

£913m

£501m

£521m

£565m

Although energy suppliers continued spending under CERT until 2012/13 and CESP until 2013/14 we do not have the data on the proportion of spending which went to low income households.

Energy suppliers have the ability to determine how to meet their obligations over designated time periods rather than following set delivery in any single year. They can frontload or backload delivery which affects the spend profile.

Energy suppliers have also provided direct financial and other assistance to their low income customers over the past five years but we do not have data on the value of that assistance.

[1] CESP was also an obligation on large electricity generators.

[2] The legislation required measures to be delivered in specific geographical areas (Lower Super Output Areas in England and Wales, and Data Zones in Scotland) selected using the Income Domain of the Indices of Multiple Deprivation (IMD) in England, Scotland and Wales. In England the lowest 10% of areas ranked in the IMD qualified and in Scotland and Wales the lowest 15% qualified.

[3] Source: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/environmental-programmes/social-programmes/warm-home-discount/warm-home-discount-reports-and-statistics

[4] ECO started in January 2013. Spending by quarter: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/ofgem-publications/58425/certfinalreport2013300413pdf

[5] The Affordable Warmth Group is made up of low income and vulnerable households.

13th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many insolvencies and bankruptcies there were in (a) the UK and (b) Bolton in (i) the current financial year to date and (ii) each of the previous five financial years.

Final answer to PQ 16545

The Insolvency Service does not produce UK-level statistics on insolvencies: statistics are presented separately for England and Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland because of differences in legislation and policy.

Statistics showing the number of bankruptcies, debt relief orders and individual voluntary arrangements are provided for each area since 2012 and can be found in the tables below. Bankruptcy, debt relief orders and individual voluntary arrangements apply to individuals only; regional breakdowns for the number of company insolvencies are not currently available.

The Insolvency Service compiles its regional Insolvency numbers statistics on a calendar year basis, therefore financial year totals are not available. Statistics for the calendar year 2016 were published on 13 July 2017, and statistics for 2017 are due to be published in July 2018.

Table1: Breakdown of total individual insolvencies, Bolton, 2012 to 20161

Year

Total individual insolvencies

Bankruptcies

Debt relief orders

Individual voluntary arrangements

2012

555

171

69

315

2013

486

122

64

300

2014

473

101

76

296

2015

388

71

69

248

2016

447

77

80

290

Table 2: Breakdown of total individual insolvencies, England and Wales, 2012 to 2016

Year

Total individual insolvencies

Bankruptcies

Debt relief orders

Individual voluntary arrangements

2012

109,640

31,787

31,179

46,674

2013

100,998

24,571

27,546

48,881

2014

99,223

20,345

26,688

52,190

2015

80,404

15,845

24,175

40,384

2016

90,619

15,006

26,196

49,417

Table 3: Breakdown of total individual insolvencies, Scotland, 2012 to 2016

Year

Total individual insolvencies

Sequestrations (of which LILA/MAP)1, 2

Protected trust deeds

2012

18,402

9,630 (3,886)

8,772

2013

14,250

7,189 (2,728)

7,061

2014

11,622

6,747 (2,533)

4,875

2015

8,785

4,477 (1,509)

4,308

2016

9,708

4,401 (1,824)

5,307

Source: Accountant in Bankruptcy.

1 On 1 April 2008, Part 1 of the Bankruptcy and Diligence etc. (Scotland) Act 2007 came into force making significant changes to some aspects of sequestration (bankruptcy), debt relief and debt enforcement in Scotland. This included the introduction of the new route into bankruptcy for people with low income and low assets (LILA). Of the number or sequestrations, individuals who meet LILA criteria are shown in brackets.

2 On 1 April 2015, part of the Bankruptcy and Debt Advice (Scotland) Act came into force making significant changes to some aspects of sequestration (bankruptcy). This included the introduction of the Minimal Asset Process (MAP), which replaced the LILA route into sequestration; mandatory debt advice for people seeking statutory debt relief; a new online process for applying for sequestration; and an additional year for people to make contributions to repaying their debts (increasing from three years to four, in line with protected trust deeds).

Table 4: Breakdown of total individual insolvencies, Northern Ireland, 2012 to 2016

Year

Total individual insolvencies

Bankruptcies

Debt relief orders

Individual voluntary arrangements

2012

3,189

1,452

506

1,231

2013

3,373

1,347

593

1,433

2014

3,395

1,367

536

1,492

2015

2,690

1,071

472

1,147

2016

2,582

997

366

1,219

Source: Department for the Economy, Northern Ireland.

It should be noted that these figures do not account for any changes in the base population over time. Using the rate of bankruptcies per 10,000 adults allows for a like-for-like comparison across years.

Headline figures for insolvencies in England and Wales can be found in the quarterly Insolvency Statistics release, a National Statistics publication. Figures for January-March 2017 were published on 28 April 2017, and can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/insolvency-statistics-january-to-march-2017

Annual numbers and rates of insolvencies by region for 2000-2016 are available in the Individual Insolvencies by Location, Age and Gender publication

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/individual-insolvencies-by-location-age-and-gender-england-and-wales-2016.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what meetings he has had with the Premier League in the last six months to discuss future funding for grassroots football.

I met with the Premier League on 31 January 2019. The Secretary of State met with them on 30 October 2018. The funding of grassroots football was discussed, and on both occasions the Premier League reaffirmed their commitment to invest over £100million in each of the next three years towards improving community football programmes and facilities across the whole of the country in partnership with the Football Association (FA) and Government.

Mims Davies
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to improve access to all-weather football pitches at grassroots level.

Sport England invests £18million each year into football facilities on behalf of the DCMS through ring-fenced exchequer contributions to the Football Foundation.

This funding, matched in partnership with the FA and the Premier League, sees more money than ever before going towards priorities identified in the National Football Facilities Strategy. The Strategy sets new challenging targets to significantly improve the nation’s facilities stock over the next 10 years with an increase in 3G pitches is a key strategic priority. This will be delivered through initiatives like the “Parklike Hubs” programme that predominantly aims to deliver multi pitch 3G hubs for community use at strategic locations across the country.

Local authorities are important stakeholders in the implementation of the National Football Facilities Strategy as so much of the stock of facilities are in public ownership. Sport England is working closely with the FA to develop Local Football Facility Plans for every Local Authority in England. The plans will be in place by 2020 and will identify local priorities where investment in grassroots facilities is needed the most.

Mims Davies
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has received recent representations on the role of local authorities in the future of grassroots football; and if he will make a statement.

Sport England invests £18million each year into football facilities on behalf of the DCMS through ring-fenced exchequer contributions to the Football Foundation.

This funding, matched in partnership with the FA and the Premier League, sees more money than ever before going towards priorities identified in the National Football Facilities Strategy. The Strategy sets new challenging targets to significantly improve the nation’s facilities stock over the next 10 years with an increase in 3G pitches is a key strategic priority. This will be delivered through initiatives like the “Parklike Hubs” programme that predominantly aims to deliver multi pitch 3G hubs for community use at strategic locations across the country.

Local authorities are important stakeholders in the implementation of the National Football Facilities Strategy as so much of the stock of facilities are in public ownership. Sport England is working closely with the FA to develop Local Football Facility Plans for every Local Authority in England. The plans will be in place by 2020 and will identify local priorities where investment in grassroots facilities is needed the most.

Mims Davies
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to improve public access to school football facilities to increase participation in grassroots football.

We want all schools to maximise the use of their facilities – for the mutual benefit of schools and their communities. This is an ambition set out in the Government's Sporting Future strategy and the Department for Education’s Governance Handbook for schools.

Sport England’s 'Use Our School' resource has been designed to support schools to open up their facilities for community use and to help those that are already open to stay open.

The new cross-departmental School Sport and Physical Activity Action Plan, which will be published in the spring, will also consider how school facilities can best be used to encourage all children to play more sports, including football, and to be more active.

Mims Davies
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to improve access to all-weather football pitches at grassroots level.

Through Sport England we are working in partnership with the FA and the Premier League on a new National Football Facilities Strategy that sets a clear framework for significant investment in football facilities over the next 10 years. The Strategy includes a target of delivering 1000 artificial 3G pitches across the country in that period. These include single site pitches in schools and community areas and multiple pitch sites through the FA Parklife hubs programme.

13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what information his Department holds on the amount of money invested by the Premier League in grassroots football in each year since 2013-14.

Between 2013-2016, The Premier League invested £183 million in total into community school sport, delivering participation programmes and creating new public sports facilities.

In 2016, DCMS agreed that grassroots football will benefit from at least £100 million a year on investment from the Premier League – double the previous commitment. This runs to 2019 and is set out in “Sporting Future” the Government’s strategy for sport.

The £100m a season currently goes to a range of activities, including investment in facilities, school sport, projects that encourage sports participation and tackle social health and wellbeing issues, that support disability and girls football, diversity and anti-racism programmes, player welfare and to organisations that give a voice to fans.

Further information on all Premier League grassroots activities can be found in their published annual report ‘available at www.premierleague.com/this-is-pl/the-communities

DCMS Ministers continue to meet with the EPL and FA on a regular basis to discuss a variety of matters, including to ensure that the grassroots benefits from a healthy proportion of the broadcast rights revenue generated by the Premier League and any commercial surplus made by the FA.

13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what information his Department holds on how the Premier League has distributed its funding for grassroots football projects since the start of the 2016-17 football season.

Between 2013-2016, The Premier League invested £183 million in total into community school sport, delivering participation programmes and creating new public sports facilities.

In 2016, DCMS agreed that grassroots football will benefit from at least £100 million a year on investment from the Premier League – double the previous commitment. This runs to 2019 and is set out in “Sporting Future” the Government’s strategy for sport.

The £100m a season currently goes to a range of activities, including investment in facilities, school sport, projects that encourage sports participation and tackle social health and wellbeing issues, that support disability and girls football, diversity and anti-racism programmes, player welfare and to organisations that give a voice to fans.

Further information on all Premier League grassroots activities can be found in their published annual report ‘available at www.premierleague.com/this-is-pl/the-communities

DCMS Ministers continue to meet with the EPL and FA on a regular basis to discuss a variety of matters, including to ensure that the grassroots benefits from a healthy proportion of the broadcast rights revenue generated by the Premier League and any commercial surplus made by the FA.

13th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what meetings he or Ministers of his Department have had with (a) the Premier League and (b) the FA on the issue of grassroots football in the last twelve months.

Between 2013-2016, The Premier League invested £183 million in total into community school sport, delivering participation programmes and creating new public sports facilities.

In 2016, DCMS agreed that grassroots football will benefit from at least £100 million a year on investment from the Premier League – double the previous commitment. This runs to 2019 and is set out in “Sporting Future” the Government’s strategy for sport.

The £100m a season currently goes to a range of activities, including investment in facilities, school sport, projects that encourage sports participation and tackle social health and wellbeing issues, that support disability and girls football, diversity and anti-racism programmes, player welfare and to organisations that give a voice to fans.

Further information on all Premier League grassroots activities can be found in their published annual report ‘available at www.premierleague.com/this-is-pl/the-communities

DCMS Ministers continue to meet with the EPL and FA on a regular basis to discuss a variety of matters, including to ensure that the grassroots benefits from a healthy proportion of the broadcast rights revenue generated by the Premier League and any commercial surplus made by the FA.

22nd Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to improve access to all-weather football pitches at grassroots level.

In partnership with the Football Association and the Premier League, the government is continuing to invest significant sums in grassroots football facilities every year. In addition to the £10million we give to the Football Foundation each year, this Government has dedicated £8million per year to the new 'Parklife' project that will double the number of 3G pitches and enable over 3,500 community sports matches to be played per week.

19th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what plans he has to encourage the Premier League adequately to contribute to the financing of grassroots football.

I will be continuing the discussions with the Premier League about how best to support the game. Government believesthat given the size of the League's new TV deal, football's grassroots should receive greater investment than ever before, and we will work in partnership to ensure that this happens.

30th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent meetings he has had to discuss the role of local authorities in the future of grassroots football.

On 7th July I met with Councillor Stephens from the Local Government Association and I am always open to engaging with local authority representatives on this important subject. Local authorities have a very important role in ensuring people from all backgrounds are able to participate in sport. They own or manage a large amount of sporting infrastructure in the country and have a responsibility to make sure that facilities and infrastructure are available and accessible. The Government, through Sport England, works closely with a wide range of local authorities, providing expert advice and funding to sustain and increase the number of people playing sport regularly.

30th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent meetings he has had with representatives of the Premier League to discuss that body's financial commitment to grassroots football.

I met with the Chief Executive of the Premier League to discuss this, and other topics on the 20th May. Further discussions are planned, and together we will work in partnership to ensure that funding for grassroots football remains strong.

30th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what recent meetings he has had with local authority representatives to discuss the funding of sporting facilities.

While there have been no recent meetings, I am always open to engaging with local authority representatives on this important subject. Local authorities have a very important role in ensuring people from all backgrounds are able to participate in sport. They own or manage a large amount of sporting infrastructure in the country and have a responsibility to make sure that facilities and infrastructure are available and accessible. The Government, through Sport England, works closely with a wide range of local authorities, providing expert advice and funding to sustain and increase the number of people playing sport regularly.

15th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of funding for sixth-form colleges to provide extra-curricular activities to develop employability skills.

Colleges use their funding to provide study programmes that are tailored to students’ needs and include employability, enrichment and pastoral (EEP) activities as well as teaching time for qualifications. EEP hours can include activities such as development of employability skills, careers advice and guidance, and pastoral support such as mental health support.

Colleges have a requirement in their funding agreements to secure access to independent careers guidance for 16 to 19-year olds. The government’s careers strategy expects colleges to use the benchmarks published by the Gatsby Foundation to develop and improve their careers provision. We have published guidance to set out in detail what colleges are expected to do. The department is not prescribing how each college fulfils the requirement. There is a wide range of support available, and drawing on connections with a network of employers should be a central aspect of the college’s overall careers strategy.

We have recently allocated additional funding to support institutions to develop their capacity to establish work placements, as part of the preparation to deliver T levels. This will have a direct impact on employability. A number of sixth form colleges will receive this funding.

We recognise that colleges cannot act alone to support the mental health of their students and the proposals in our green paper, ‘Transforming Mental Health Provision for Children and Young People’ to provide additional support to schools and colleges will be supported by over £300 million in additional funding.

In addition the department is actively considering the efficiency and resilience of the further education sector, and how far existing and forecast funding and regulatory structures meet the costs of delivering world-class provision.

15th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of funding for sixth-form colleges to provide mental health support.

Colleges use their funding to provide study programmes that are tailored to students’ needs and include employability, enrichment and pastoral (EEP) activities as well as teaching time for qualifications. EEP hours can include activities such as development of employability skills, careers advice and guidance, and pastoral support such as mental health support.

Colleges have a requirement in their funding agreements to secure access to independent careers guidance for 16 to 19-year olds. The government’s careers strategy expects colleges to use the benchmarks published by the Gatsby Foundation to develop and improve their careers provision. We have published guidance to set out in detail what colleges are expected to do. The department is not prescribing how each college fulfils the requirement. There is a wide range of support available, and drawing on connections with a network of employers should be a central aspect of the college’s overall careers strategy.

We have recently allocated additional funding to support institutions to develop their capacity to establish work placements, as part of the preparation to deliver T levels. This will have a direct impact on employability. A number of sixth form colleges will receive this funding.

We recognise that colleges cannot act alone to support the mental health of their students and the proposals in our green paper, ‘Transforming Mental Health Provision for Children and Young People’ to provide additional support to schools and colleges will be supported by over £300 million in additional funding.

In addition the department is actively considering the efficiency and resilience of the further education sector, and how far existing and forecast funding and regulatory structures meet the costs of delivering world-class provision.

15th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of funding for sixth-form colleges to provide careers advice.

Colleges use their funding to provide study programmes that are tailored to students’ needs and include employability, enrichment and pastoral (EEP) activities as well as teaching time for qualifications. EEP hours can include activities such as development of employability skills, careers advice and guidance, and pastoral support such as mental health support.

Colleges have a requirement in their funding agreements to secure access to independent careers guidance for 16 to 19-year olds. The government’s careers strategy expects colleges to use the benchmarks published by the Gatsby Foundation to develop and improve their careers provision. We have published guidance to set out in detail what colleges are expected to do. The department is not prescribing how each college fulfils the requirement. There is a wide range of support available, and drawing on connections with a network of employers should be a central aspect of the college’s overall careers strategy.

We have recently allocated additional funding to support institutions to develop their capacity to establish work placements, as part of the preparation to deliver T levels. This will have a direct impact on employability. A number of sixth form colleges will receive this funding.

We recognise that colleges cannot act alone to support the mental health of their students and the proposals in our green paper, ‘Transforming Mental Health Provision for Children and Young People’ to provide additional support to schools and colleges will be supported by over £300 million in additional funding.

In addition the department is actively considering the efficiency and resilience of the further education sector, and how far existing and forecast funding and regulatory structures meet the costs of delivering world-class provision.

14th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if his Department will make an assessment of the adequacy of the level of local authority early years funding rates in advance of the start of the next school year.

By 2019-20 the government will be investing £1 billion a year to increase our hourly funding rates for the free entitlements and delivery of 30 hours of free childcare. This will take the amount the government spends on early years’ education to around £6 billion by 2019-20 – the highest ever amount. These funding rates are based on our ‘Review of Childcare Costs’, which was described as “thorough and wide ranging” by the National Audit Office. This looked at both the current costs of childcare provision and the implications of future cost pressures facing the sector, including the National Living Wage.

We continue to monitor delivery costs of our early years’ entitlements and have commissioned new research to provide us with robust and detailed cost data from a representative sample of early years providers, which will be published in due course. We continue to monitor local authority funding of providers via the collection of data on their annual planned budget.

14th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the Government plans to provide business rates relief to childcare providers.

We are investing a record amount into the early years sector, spending around £6 billion per year by 2019-20, which includes £1 billion a year to deliver 30 hours of free childcare and increase our hourly funding rates that we introduced in April 2017. The government has also increased Small Business Rate Relief and provided local authorities with funding to support £300 million of discretionary business rates relief. Local authorities are able to use this to support local nurseries.

14th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many free schools have closed in each year for which data is available.

There are currently 393 free schools open. Since 2010, eight free schools have closed. and one closure is planned for summer 2018. The primary objective of the department when making a decision to close a school is to ensure the best possible educational outcomes for pupils and to secure value for money for the taxpayer.

Academic year

Free school closures

2013/14

Discovery New School

2014/15

The Durham Free School, Dawes Lane Academy, Stockport Technical School

2015/16

St Michael’s Secondary School

2016/17

Bolton Wanderers Free School, Collective Spirit Free School

Southwark Free School

Total

8

10th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many of her Department's staff have been employed in each region in each of the last five years.

The table attached, available from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), provides a breakdown in total headcount figures of Department staff in the last five years.

Published Civil Service statistics can be found on the ONS website: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/civilservicestatistics.

10th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many people in Bolton North East constituency have undertaken an apprenticeship in each of the last 10 years.

The table below provides the number of people who started an apprenticeship in the Parliamentary constituency Bolton North East for the last 10 academic years.

Academic Year

Starts

2007/08

570

2008/09

520

2009/10

660

2010/11

1000

2011/12

1130

2012/13

1150

2013/14

930

2014/15

1090

2015/16

1050

2016/17 (provisional)

960


Notes:

  1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.
  2. Figures for all years are final, except for the 2016/17 academic year, which is provisional.
  3. Figures for 2011/12 onwards are already published and can be obtained: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/650904/201617_Oct_Apps_Geography_Data_Pack_Final.xlsm.
  4. Figures for 2007/08 to 2010/11 are already published and can be obtained: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/586183/apprenticeships-starts-by-geography-learner-demographics-and-sector-subject-area.xlsx.
  5. Figures for 2011/12 onwards are not directly comparable to earlier years as a Single Individualised Learner Record data collection system has been introduced.
  6. Parliamentary Constituency data is based upon the home postcode of the learner.
  7. This table includes 2014/15 Employer Ownership Pilot (EOP) volumes that have not been finalised due to problems with the final 2014/15 EOP data collection.
10th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeships her Department supported in each subject area in the last year for which figures are available.

The table below provides the number of people who started apprenticeships in England in the provisional 2016/17 academic year, by a breakdown of sector subject area.

Sector Subject Area

Starts

Agriculture, Horticulture and Animal Care

7,290

Arts, Media and Publishing

860

Business, Administration and Law

137,480

Construction, Planning and the Built Environment

21,010

Education and Training

8,780

Engineering and Manufacturing Technologies

74,010

Health, Public Services and Care

138,410

Information and Communication Technology

15,010

Leisure, Travel and Tourism

13,670

Retail and Commercial Enterprise

74,520

Science and Mathematics

290

All

491,300

Note: Figures include all funded and unfunded learners reported on the Individualised Learner Record and are rounded to the nearest 10, with the grand total rounded to the nearest 100. This is currently published by the department, and is available in the ‘Apprenticeship starts by level, framework and sector subject area data tool’:
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/650226/201617_Oct_Apps_Level_SSA_And_Framework_Data_Tool_FINAL.xlsx.

10th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the average length of a modern apprenticeship was in the most recent period for which figures are available.

In the latest 2016/17 provisional final year figures, the average length of stay on apprenticeship programmes was 479.8 days.

Notes:

  1. Data source: Single Individualised Learner Record (SILR).
  2. Within the SILR, providers can record the start date, planned end date, and actual end date for each apprenticeship record.
  3. Actual end date is only recorded for learners who have reached the end of their programme, or those who have withdrawn early.
  4. This calculation only includes those learners who have completed their programme.
  5. Some learners can complete their programme in a shorter time due to prior learning.
  6. Some learners take longer than expected due to planned breaks in learning.
  7. A small number of learners from the Employer Outcome Pilot are not included in this calculation.