Lord Farmer Portrait

Lord Farmer

Conservative - Life peer

Became Member: 5th September 2014


Draft Domestic Abuse Bill (Joint)
6th Mar 2019 - 14th Jun 2019
Social Mobility Committee
11th Jun 2015 - 16th Mar 2016


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Farmer has voted in 384 divisions, and 10 times against the majority of their Party.

23 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 33 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 214
2 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 40 Conservative Aye votes vs 165 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 359 Noes - 188
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative Aye votes vs 125 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 112 Noes - 388
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 127 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 355 Noes - 77
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 156 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 93 Noes - 418
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative Aye votes vs 151 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 401
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 144 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 409
21 Jun 2022 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2022 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative Aye votes vs 88 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 28 Noes - 181
10 Jul 2023 - Online Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 161 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 240 Noes - 168
23 May 2024 - Post Office (Horizon System) Offences Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative Aye votes vs 108 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 76 Noes - 111
View All Lord Farmer Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(20 debate interactions)
Baroness Barran (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(16 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(38 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(22 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(21 debate contributions)
Home Office
(19 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Health and Care Act 2022
(4,236 words contributed)
Public Order Act 2023
(3,470 words contributed)
Online Safety Act 2023
(2,578 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Farmer's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Farmer, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


2 Bills introduced by Lord Farmer


A Bill to amend the Child Benefit (Rates) Regulations 2006 to make provision to vary the rate of child benefit over the course of childhood to enable eligible parents to receive a higher rate during a child’s early years and a correspondingly reduced rate when that child is older

Lords - 60%

Last Event - Committee Stage
Friday 2nd December 2022

A Bill to amend the Child Benefit (Rates) Regulations 2006 to make provision to vary the rate of child benefit over the course of childhood to enable eligible parents to receive a higher rate during a child’s early years and a correspondingly reduced rate when that child is older

Lords - 20%

Last Event - 1st Reading
Wednesday 16th June 2021
(Read Debate)

Lord Farmer has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2nd May 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they have any more recent statistics on suicide other than the Office of National Statistics data for 2022, published on 19 December 2023.

The information requested falls under the remit of the UK Statistics Authority.

Please see the letter attached from the National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority.

The Lord Farmer

House of Lords

London

SW1A 0AA

8 May 2024

Dear Lord Farmer,

As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am responding to your Parliamentary Question of 3 May 2024, asking whether His Majesty’s Government have any more recent statistics on suicide other than the Office of National Statistics data for 2022, published on 19 December 2023. (HL4326)

In addition to our annual suicide statistics, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) also publish provisional quarterly suicide statistics for England. The latest statistics provide provisional suicide registrations for 2023. These statistics are derived from the information provided when deaths are certified and registered. Finalised 2023 suicide registrations for England and Wales will be published later in 2024. This will be forwarded to you once released.

The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities also publish near to real-time suspected suicide surveillance (nRTSSS) data for England. This data has been collected from Police Forces in England and provides an early indication of changes in suicide trends. The latest data was published on 25th April 2024 and covers November 2022 to January 2024.

Yours sincerely,

Professor Sir Ian Diamond

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
7th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government how parliamentarians and members of the public can engage with and make recommendations to the Queen Elizabeth Memorial Committee.

The Queen Elizabeth Committee is in the early stages of its work of developing recommendations for a national memorial to Queen Elizabeth II, including both a permanent memorial and a legacy programme.

As part of its work, the Committee will undertake public engagement and consultation, details of which will be shared in due course, and will consider how best to consult other stakeholders including parliamentarians.

Further information on the Committee can be found on GOV.UK on https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/the-queen-elizabeth-memorial-committee.

Baroness Neville-Rolfe
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to recognise National Health Service workers who served on the medical front-line during the COVID-19 pandemic; and whether any such plans include minting a medal for such workers.

The Government is carefully considering the appropriate way to remember, reward and recognise those involved in the COVID-19 response. We will ensure that any recognition takes into account frontline workers and volunteers across all critical sectors, above all the NHS and social care. The profound gratitude the nation feels towards everyone on the frontline, and to those working in health and social care in particular, means it is beholden on the Government to ensure recognition is both timely and appropriate. Further details will be announced in the usual way.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
13th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a Cabinet-level minister has been appointed to coordinate cross-Government policy to strengthen families; and if so, (1) who is that minister, and (2) what support that minister will receive.

Families are a responsibility for the whole of government and departments undertake the Family Test to assess the impact of policies on family relationships and functioning. However, families are at the heart of this government's agenda, and to reflect this a specific lead Cabinet-level minister will be appointed. This will be announced in due course.

Lord True
Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal
8th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what research they have conducted on children’s access to pornographic content online; what plans they have to conduct research on such access; and whether they have monitored whether there has been any increased access to such material by children during the COVID-19 lockdown.

The government is committed to ensuring children are protected from accessing inappropriate content online. The British Board of Film Classification, while designated as the age verification regulator under the Digital Economy Act, commissioned research on children’s access to pornographic content online. The research, published in early 2020, explored young people’s interactions with, and attitudes towards, online pornography and age verification. We will continue to develop our evidence base on online harms ahead of the implementation of the new online harms regulatory framework.

As a result of Covid-19 lockdown measures we expect more people, including children, to be spending more time online. Although it is too early to confidently analyse patterns from this period, there is universal concern about child online safety. We are working closely with technology companies, law enforcement and civil society to monitor trends, and to support users to understand and manage the risks and benefits of being online during this period.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is a requirement for the same protections that exist for content in cinemas and on DVDs to be present for online content; and whether they are working with the film industry to seek the voluntary adoption of British Board of Film Classification age ratings for online content.

The Government is committed to making the UK the safest place in the world to be online. While adoption of the British Board of Film Classification’s best practice age ratings by online platforms is currently voluntary, we welcome Netflix’s commitment to work towards complete coverage and support the BBFC’s drive to encourage other Video On Demand platforms to follow suit. By doing so, this will provide consumers with well recognised age ratings and consumer advice.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the report on the impact and effectiveness of the regulatory framework provided for in Part 3 of the Digital Economy Act 2017 will be published.

As the government announced on 16 October last year, we will not be commencing Part 3 of the Digital Economy Act 2017 and its provisions on age verification for online pornography. Instead the online harms regime will include provisions to protect children from inappropriate content, including online pornography. The requirement for a report on the impact and effectiveness of the regulatory framework set out in Section 29 of the Digital Economy Act 2017 will therefore not be brought into force.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to require schools’ relationships and sex education syllabuses to include (1) information about sexually transmitted infections (STIs), (2) the full range of ways to avoid contracting STIs, (3) the health and other benefits of later onset of sexual activity, and (4) the health and other benefits of sexual activity within committed relationships.

The Relationship, Sex and Health Education (RSHE) statutory guidance introduced in September 2020 states that secondary pupils should be taught factual knowledge around sex, sexual health, and sexuality, set firmly within the context of relationships. Pupils should learn about contraception, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), developing intimate relationships and resisting pressure to have sex. Further information on this guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/relationships-education-relationships-and-sex-education-rse-and-health-education.

The ‘intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health’ topic specifies that by the end of secondary school pupils should know how the different STIs are transmitted, how risk can be reduced through safer sex and the importance of and facts about testing. Pupils are also taught about STIs at key stage 4 of the science curriculum.

To support teachers to deliver these topics safely and with confidence the department has produced RSHE teacher training modules. The topic of ‘intimate and sexual relationships, including sexual health’ includes content on STIs and sexual health advice. Further information on these modules can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teaching-about-relationships-sex-and-health.

From primary education onwards, age-appropriate Relationships Education supports pupils to treat each other with kindness, consideration and respect, including understanding the importance of respectful relationships and the different types of loving and healthy relationships that exist.

The department will be launching a public consultation shortly on revised RSHE guidance, so that interested parties can contribute their comments and ideas, including on sexual health, relationships and STIs. The department will carefully consider responses received and intend to publish final guidance later in 2024.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
20th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government to what extent the Reducing Parental Conflict Programme is embedded in Family Hub services, particularly in local authorities that received money from the Family Hubs Transformation Fund.

Family hubs are ‘one stop shops’ that make it easier for families to get the support they need. The hub approach means professionals and partners work together more effectively, with a focus on supporting and strengthening family relationships.

The department is investing in 87 local authorities to develop family hubs in their areas. We have developed guidance and expectations for these participating local authorities, working across government to reflect a range of services to be accessed through their family hubs. This has included working with the Department for Work and Pensions to develop the expectations on family hubs around Reducing Parental Conflict.

Reducing Parental Conflict is embedded within the service expectations for family hubs. This means that staff in the family hub should be able to help identify families who may benefit from reducing parental conflict support and connect them to appropriate support, such as online resources or more intensive support, such as structured support from a trained practitioner.

The expectations for the family hubs funded through the Family Hubs and Start for Life programme are available in the attached file.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
7th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports that the Universities UK strategic advisory panel involves students from Sensible Drug Policy UK; and what assessment they have made of the implications of this involvement for illegal drug use on university campuses.

The department is clear there is no safe way to take illegal drugs. These drugs can devastate lives, ruin families, and damage communities. The government welcomes activity by universities and other organisations to raise awareness of the harms of illicit drugs and discourage drug misuse. This includes focusing on the health, safety and wellbeing of students, while working with public health and law enforcement agencies.

This government has invested a record £780 million to rebuild the national drug treatment and recovery system, to improve treatment and provide wider support, such as employment and housing, that people need to rebuild their lives.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the guidance 'How to be a white ally', published by Imperial College London; and whether they intend to take steps in response to review that institution’s funding.

Universities are autonomous institutions and as such have control over what they publish on their own websites.

Decisions about funding for individual higher education providers are made by the Office for Students, rather than the department.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they plan to take, if any, to increase the number of care leavers at high tariff higher education institutions.

We have published guidance for higher education (HE) providers, setting out areas where care leavers are likely to need additional support, including examples of the types of additional support that have been put in place, drawing on best practice from across the sector. We have also introduced the Care Leaver Covenant, which enables organisations, including HE providers, to make offers of support to care leavers.

The National Network for the Education of Care Leavers has developed the Quality Mark: a developmental accreditation process for universities and colleges to demonstrate their support for the inclusion and success of care experienced students. The Quality Mark has a focus on getting the right information to students on academic and pastoral support available to them, along with tailored mentoring and financial advice.

As autonomous bodies independent from government, HE providers are responsible for their own admissions decisions. However, the department encourages HE providers to put the interests of students at the heart of their decision-making, including providing the appropriate support for care leavers.

All HE providers in the approved (fee cap) category of the Office for Students’ (OfS) register are required to have an access and participation plan (APP) agreed by the Director for Fair Access and Participation at the OfS. In order to be approved, APPs must represent a credible, ambitious strategy to reduce gaps in access, participation and attainment for disadvantaged and under-represented groups.

As care leavers are underrepresented within HE, APPs will often address specific interventions by the provider for improving equality of opportunity for care-experienced individuals. This may take the form of targeted outreach, additional pastoral, accommodation or financial support while studying, or support through mentorship or buddy schemes.

Care leavers attending HE courses are treated as independent students when their entitlement to living costs is assessed. This means that in nearly all cases they will qualify for the maximum loan for living costs. Care leavers undertaking HE also qualify for a £2,000 HE bursary from their local authority. Additional bursaries are offered by some HE providers for care leavers in higher education.

The enclosed attachment contains the department’s analysis of the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) student record showing the number of care leavers who entered courses at English HE providers in each academic year from 2018/19 to 2020/21. Coverage refers to entrants domiciled in England prior to study and care leavers are defined as codes 01 and 04 in the HESA care leaver collection documentation. Further information can be found here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c20051/a/careleaver.

The summary table below shows the number of care leavers who entered courses at high tariff[1] English HE providers in each year, along with total care leavers entering courses at all HE providers. A full breakdown by institution can be found in the attachment.

Academic year

Care leavers entrants at high tariff providers

Care leavers entrants at all providers

2018/19

435

3,570

2019/20

505

3,895

2020/21

580

4,290

We will take account of the recommendations from the Independent Review of Children’s Social Care, which is due to report shortly, when assessing what further support can be provided to increase the number of care leavers who attend university.

[1] The tariff grouping used here is the same as that which the Office for Students defined in Annex A (pg 20) of their technicaly guidance, available here: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/media/6591e671-624a-4ebf-a5fb-1be904a5eb9f/technical-gudiance-to-accompany-provider-modelling-finalforweb.pdf.

They are based on the average UCAS tariff score of their young (aged under 21) UK-domiciled undergraduate entrants in the 2012-13 to 2014-15 academic years. Providers in the top third of the ranking by average tariff score form the ‘High tariff’ group.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many looked after children (1) started, and (2) completed, A-Level courses in each of the last three years for which the data are available.

The department does not hold information centrally on the types of qualifications looked-after children study and complete beyond key stage 4. The department does hold and publish information on pupils who were at the end of key stage 4 in the 2018/2019 academic year and reports on their destinations in the following academic year (2019/2020).

The figures show in the 2019/20 academic year, 5,450 children looked after were in a sustained education destination in the year following the end of key stage 4. Of these, 2,910 were in further education, 860 were in a school sixth form or sixth form college and 1,240 were in some other form of education. The full figures can be accessed here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/d583af1d-ad7d-4f1f-990b-2b27586d6c69.

The department does not hold information on the educational attainment of looked after children beyond key stage 4.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many care leavers entered high tariff higher education institutions in each of the last three years for which the data are available; and how many entered each institution.

The enclosed attachment contains the department’s analysis of the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) student record showing the number of care leavers who entered courses at English higher education providers (HEPs) in each academic year from 2018/19 to 2020/21. Coverage refers to entrants domiciled in England prior to study and care leavers are defined as codes 01 and 04 in the HESA care leaver collection documentation. Further information can be found here: https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c20051/a/careleaver.

The summary table below shows the number of care leavers who entered courses at high tariff[1] English HEPs in each year, along with total care leavers entering courses at all HEPs. A full breakdown by institution can be found in the attachment.

Academic year

Care leavers entrants at high tariff providers

Care leavers entrants at all providers

2018/19

435

3,570

2019/20

505

3,895

2020/21

580

4,290

[1] The tariff grouping used here is the same as that which the Office for Students defined in Annex A (pg 20) of their technical guidance, available here: https://www.officeforstudents.org.uk/media/6591e671-624a-4ebf-a5fb-1be904a5eb9f/technical-gudiance-to-accompany-provider-modelling-finalforweb.pdf.

They are based on the average UCAS tariff score of their young (aged under 21) UK-domiciled undergraduate entrants in the 2012-13 to 2014-15 academic years. Providers in the top third of the ranking by average tariff score form the 'High tariff' group.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government to which named funds the £500 million of families and early years funding will be directed.

Supporting families and children across the country to get the best start in life is a crucial part of the government’s ambition to level up. The £500 million announced at the Autumn 2021 Budget includes:

  • £300 million to transform ‘Start for Life’ services and create a network of family hubs in half of the council areas across England. This package of support will provide funding for the creation of a network of family hubs (£82 million), infant and perinatal mental health support (£100 million), breastfeeding support (£50 million), and parenting programmes (£50 million) in 75 areas. It will also provide the 75 local authorities with funding to co-design their Start for Life offer with parents and carers and publish it in an accessible format (£10 million). Trials of innovative workforce models for health visitors will also be funded in a smaller number of council areas to test approaches to improve the support available to new parents.
  • a £200 million uplift to the existing Supporting Families Programme to enable local authorities and their partners to provide help earlier and secure better outcomes for up to an additional 300,000 families across all aspects of their lives.
Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much new funding for family hubs they have set aside in the Autumn Budget and Spending Review for each financial year to 2024–25; and how local authorities can apply for these funds.

At Budget, the government announced £82 million to create a network of family hubs. This is part of a wider £300 million package to transform services for parents, carers, babies and children in half of council areas across England. The department will set out more detail in due course on how this new funding will be allocated.

The department has previously announced £39.5 million of funding to support the implementation of family hubs. Some of this has been direct support to local authorities:

  • A £12 million transformation fund to open family hubs in at least 12 new areas in England. This fund launched on 2 November 2021. Eligible local authorities have been invited to submit bids to the department by 17 December 2021
  • Grants to accelerate the opening of family hubs across all regions of the country (through the Children’s Social Care Covid-19 Regional Recovery and Building Back Better Fund). 9 local authorities have been chosen to work regionally to share good practice (total £1 million). 25 local authorities have been allocated funding to accelerate the opening of family hubs in their local areas (total £2.2 million)

The remainder of funding is for programmes to support the development of family hubs policy, evidence and data and digital implementation, covering mixed teams of local authorities, officials, and contracted partners. This includes:

  • A new national centre for family hubs to provide expert advice and guidance and an evaluation innovation fund to build the evidence base (£2.5 million over three years from the 2020/21 academic year to the 2022/23 academic year, announced at Budget 2020)
  • Data and digital products that will support the practical implementation of family hubs, through the family hubs-growing up well project (£11.8 million from the Shared Outcomes Fund, announced at Autumn Budget 2020; £10 million from a second Shared Outcomes Fund award announced in October 2021 totalling £20 million, of which the other £10 million was put to the Transformation Fund above (the £12 million total for the Transformation Fund includes a further £2 million of capital funding from the Department for Education’s budget))
Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much funding they have provided in total for family hubs since 2020; and how much of this has been allocated, broken down by fund.

At Budget, the government announced £82 million to create a network of family hubs. This is part of a wider £300 million package to transform services for parents, carers, babies and children in half of council areas across England.

Further information on funding profiles and how funding will be allocated will be made available in due course.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of the total population was ever in local authority care as children.

The information requested is not held by the department.

Information of the current number of children in care, as a proportion of the child population, is published in table A1 of the statistical release ‘National tables: children Looked after in England including adoption 2018 to 19’: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019.

Figures for the reporting year ending 31 March 2020 will be published later this year.

18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the appointment process for the Children's Commissioner for England; and when they expect to begin this process for the next Commissioner.

The Children Act 2004 states that the Children’s Commissioner is to be appointed by the Secretary of State for Education. The Children’s Commissioner post is a Significant Public Appointment and therefore follows the process and requirements set out in the Governance Code on Public Appointments.

Officials in the Department for Education have already started planning for the recruitment of the next Children’s Commissioner. We will be monitoring closely the current situation with the COVID-19 outbreak to see when would be most appropriate to launch the campaign.

The current Children’s Commissioner’s term in office will conclude at the end of February 2021. The Children’s Commissioner maximum term in office is six years as set out in primary legislation – the Children Act 2004, as amended by the Children and Families Act. An extension to the term of the Children’s Commissioner is not permitted under the current legislation.

18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the term of office for the current Children's Commissioner for England is due to end; and whether they anticipate an extension to that term.

The Children Act 2004 states that the Children’s Commissioner is to be appointed by the Secretary of State for Education. The Children’s Commissioner post is a Significant Public Appointment and therefore follows the process and requirements set out in the Governance Code on Public Appointments.

Officials in the Department for Education have already started planning for the recruitment of the next Children’s Commissioner. We will be monitoring closely the current situation with the COVID-19 outbreak to see when would be most appropriate to launch the campaign.

The current Children’s Commissioner’s term in office will conclude at the end of February 2021. The Children’s Commissioner maximum term in office is six years as set out in primary legislation – the Children Act 2004, as amended by the Children and Families Act. An extension to the term of the Children’s Commissioner is not permitted under the current legislation.

28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the welfare of young people in unregulated accommodation during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The government is committed to ensuring that vulnerable children and young people remain protected. Local authorities, social workers and those providing support and care for our most vulnerable children and young people deserve our immense gratitude.

Local authorities have the key day-to-day responsibility for delivery of children’s social care. They are continuing to prioritise their responsibilities towards vulnerable children and young people, including those in independent and semi-independent provision. While we will continue to work with local authorities and providers of this provision to ensure that placements remain as stable as possible during this time, we continue to consult on new measures to improve the quality of this provision and ban the placement of under 16s, given that this provision does not deliver care and therefore cannot be appropriate for a child of this age.

We are also working with those delivering services on the frontline to ensure that the support needed for vulnerable children and young people continues. The government has provided £3.2 billion of additional funding to support local authorities to address pressures they are facing in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, including for delivering children’s social care.

13th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Budget statement on 11 March, (1) how, and (2) by which Department, the £2.5 million for research and developing best practice around the integration of services for families will be administered; and to what criteria those applying for such funds will be subject.

The Department for Education will administer the £2.5 million for research and developing best practice around the integration of services for families. More information will be made available in due course

21st Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to help farmers maximise cereal production for export to offset global supply shortages due to the war in Ukraine.

To support our farmers we are bringing forward half of this year's BPS payment as an advance injection of cash to farm businesses and have delayed changes to the use of urea fertiliser until at least spring 2023. Farmers will be further supported through new slurry storage grants as of this year, helping meet the Farming Rules for Water and reducing dependence on artificial fertilisers by improving storage of organic nutrients.

UK cereals are mainly produced for the domestic market, and whilst the UK is 88% self-sufficient in domestically produced cereals, we do also export. It is not for the Government to dictate to famers, who are free to react to market signals, what crops to plant, or where that produce should be sold or exported.

We continue to keep the market situation under review through the UK Agriculture Market Monitoring Group, which monitors UK agricultural markets including price, supply, inputs, trade and recent developments. We have also increased our engagement with industry to supplement our analysis with real-time intelligence and to identify where mitigations are available.

Lord Benyon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reform the three crop rule in agriculture as part of the UK's withdrawal from the EU; and what plans they have to inform the farming industry of any such rule changes by the end of June to enable planning for 2021.

We are looking to take the opportunities which leaving the EU presents to make further simplifications for the 2021 Basic Payment Scheme. This could include removing some or all of the burdensome greening rules which have failed to deliver for the environment such as the 'three crop rule' which tells farmers how many crops they must grow, regardless of the demands of the market. Relevant regulations will be subject to Parliament's approval. We will announce the new rules to farmers in due course.

28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any evidence that unrestrained depredation by cabbage stem flea beetle of oil seed rape prevents the growth of that crop; and what plans they have to review the ban on neonicotinoids following any such assessment.

Oilseed rape is a valuable crop for farmers and there is a greater risk of crop loss due to cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB) since the restrictions on neonicotinoids came into force in 2014. Some growers have been heavily affected while others have not experienced similar problems. Defra has monitored the incidence of CSFB on untreated oilseed rape through the Crop Pest and Disease Survey. In autumn 2019, average numbers of CSFB were higher than levels before the ban on use of neonicotinoid insecticides. Out of 82 sites assessed, however, only eight had levels that exceeded the recommended threshold for spray application. Six of these eight sites were in the East of England.

The Government supports restrictions on neonicotinoids because the clear advice from scientific experts is that these seed treatments should not be used on flowering crops, such as oilseed rape. There is clear evidence on the toxicity of neonicotinoids to bees and their persistence in the environment. We are not prepared to put our pollinator populations at risk and so we will maintain the current restrictions on use of the three neonicotinoids when the transition period ends. We will only take a different position if the scientific evidence changes.

The Government supports a major, long-term research platform for Crop Genetic Improvement. This includes OREGIN, which is a dedicated programme on oilseed rape breeding to improve the resource use efficiency, sustainability and resilience of the crop. The research is carried out in close partnership with growers and breeders and determines beneficial traits to be included in breeding programmes to offer improved resistance to priority pests and diseases. The work is helping to reduce reliance on agrochemical inputs and also improve the overall resilience of crops.

21st Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to publicise the illegality of driving under the influence of cannabis; and what evidence is available of the effectiveness of this messaging.

THINK! is the government’s flagship road safety campaign, playing a vital role in tackling the attitudes and behaviours that lead to road casualties.

A £1M drug drive campaign ran in February 2015 to support the introduction of new legislation and raise awareness of the new laws amongst drivers. The campaign ran again in 2016, with a £1.3M investment, including a reminder to drivers on the presence of roadside testing. Some additional social media communications, focused on festival goers, ran in the summer of 2017.

- The 2016 campaign achieved good levels of recognition (73% awareness), driven by the “Paranoia” film, and overall recognition was higher than in 2015

- The “Paranoia” film communicated a general anti-drug drive message, while the online and print elements complemented this by showing the roadside swab which acted as a deterrent and improved credibility

- Knowledge of drug driving penalties increased over the campaign period, and these practical aspects were deemed more concerning than the emotional repercussions of being caught and convicted of drug driving

- As drug driving is perceived as a niche behaviour (with less of the audience knowing someone who drug drives when compared with other road safety behaviours), the campaign continued to lack relevance among some young male drivers

There are a number of issues and behaviours that warrant communications investment and spend is prioritised according to the following key principles:

- The scale of the issue

- Ability of communications to influence behaviour

- Public priorities

- Value for money

- Policy priorities and changes in supporting legislation

- Wider trends, for example the impact of the pandemic

THINK! communications for the next three -year period are currently being planned and will include a review on the status of drug driving within that planning and prioritisation process.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
20th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many parents have been directly supported since the start of phase two of the Reducing Parental Conflict programme through tested interventions that are proven to help parents who (1) want to stay together, and (2) are separating or separated.

This phase of the Reducing Parental Conflict (RPC) programme (2022-25) focuses on supporting and funding Local Authorities (LAs) to integrate RPC into their family help offer. As such, the programme does not directly put parents through RPC interventions, these decisions are instead taken at a local level.

LAs receive RPC funding through the RPC Local Grant, which makes up to £19m available from 2022-25. In the first year of grant funding, LAs have directly supported around 18,000 parents, and over 30,000 training places for staff. Further details on LA breakdowns of grant funding have been appended to the end of this PQ.

In the first year of the RPC Local Grant, LAs had spent £159,000 of their Local Grant funding to undertake evaluation activities. As we are at the start of the second year of a three-year grant process, this work is ongoing. There are however positive findings emerging from local evaluation work. For instance, through our partnered working with ‘Foundations’, these have been published on their website.

LAs are not required to provide data on whether those parents are together or separating/separated. The forthcoming Reducing Parental Conflict evaluation reports, announced on 19th July, will provide further detail on the effects of support on the relationships between intact parents and separating/separated parents.

RPC Local Grant Year 1

Activity Type

LA Spend

Training

£3,430,000

Delivery

£1,260,000

Co-ordination

£2,520,000

Admin

£400,000

Evaluation

£159,000

To Note:

The information in this PQ is derived from internal management information and is not quality assured to Official Statistics standards.

As this is ongoing Management Information, derived from 134 LAs, small amounts of additional resource which LAs have committed beyond their Grant Funding has not been disaggregated from the figures, as such totals may slightly exceed overall allocation in some places and the final reported figures will differ.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is the breakdown of spending by local authorities of Reducing Parental Conflict grants, in terms of matters such as internal human and other resources, training, and direct delivery to parents; and what are local evaluations showing is the impact of the way the grant is allocated locally.

This phase of the Reducing Parental Conflict (RPC) programme (2022-25) focuses on supporting and funding Local Authorities (LAs) to integrate RPC into their family help offer. As such, the programme does not directly put parents through RPC interventions, these decisions are instead taken at a local level.

LAs receive RPC funding through the RPC Local Grant, which makes up to £19m available from 2022-25. In the first year of grant funding, LAs have directly supported around 18,000 parents, and over 30,000 training places for staff. Further details on LA breakdowns of grant funding have been appended to the end of this PQ.

In the first year of the RPC Local Grant, LAs had spent £159,000 of their Local Grant funding to undertake evaluation activities. As we are at the start of the second year of a three-year grant process, this work is ongoing. There are however positive findings emerging from local evaluation work. For instance, through our partnered working with ‘Foundations’, these have been published on their website.

LAs are not required to provide data on whether those parents are together or separating/separated. The forthcoming Reducing Parental Conflict evaluation reports, announced on 19th July, will provide further detail on the effects of support on the relationships between intact parents and separating/separated parents.

RPC Local Grant Year 1

Activity Type

LA Spend

Training

£3,430,000

Delivery

£1,260,000

Co-ordination

£2,520,000

Admin

£400,000

Evaluation

£159,000

To Note:

The information in this PQ is derived from internal management information and is not quality assured to Official Statistics standards.

As this is ongoing Management Information, derived from 134 LAs, small amounts of additional resource which LAs have committed beyond their Grant Funding has not been disaggregated from the figures, as such totals may slightly exceed overall allocation in some places and the final reported figures will differ.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
7th Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to support older workers who left the labour market during the COVID-19 pandemic and are now in financial hardship get back into work.

The latest study by The Office of National Statistics (Working and workless households in the UK: January to March 2023) shows a decrease of 23,000 in the number of people aged 50-64 in workless households against the same period in 2022.

However, the Government recognises the challenges that older jobseekers face which is why we are delivering a comprehensive package of support to help them return to work.

In addition to the help in place for all Universal Credit claimants, eligible older jobseekers can access additional intensive, tailored support in the first 9 months of their Universal Credit claim.

A network of dedicated 50PLUS: Champions are in place in Jobcentre Plus districts across Great Britain, upskilling Work Coaches in supporting over 50s to return to work and engaging with employers to maximise opportunities for recruitment.

The Midlife MOT is delivered in Jobcentres across Great Britain, to help older workers to take stock of their finances, skills and health and, on 5th July 2023, an enhanced digital Midlife MOT went live to provide access to financial, health and career guidance.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the £500 million Household Support Fund will be made available; and what amount has been allocated for each of the financial years for which the Fund will be available.

The £421m Household Support Fund has been available to Local Authorities in England since 6 October 2021 and runs until 31 March 2022. The Barnett Formula will apply in the usual way, with the devolved administrations receiving almost £80 million (£41m for the Scottish Government, £25m for the Welsh Government and £14m for the NI Executive), for a total of £500 million. The devolved administrations are responsible for making their own plans to spend their funding.

21st Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many jobs facilitated by the Kickstart Scheme have (1) been approved, (2) been advertised, and (3) started, in each region of Great Britain.

As of the 22nd July, 50,000 young people have started Kickstart jobs.

As of the 21st of July, over 155,000 jobs have been made available for young people to apply for through the Kickstart Scheme with over 263,000 jobs approved for funding by the Scheme.

Between 23/06/2021 and 22/07/2021 an average of almost 600 young people started a Kickstart job each working day.

We are currently unable to provide data on the number of approved jobs by location, as at that stage in the process we do not hold information about the exact location of a job, only the head office of the employer.

Below are tables listing the number of Kickstart jobs which have been made available and started by young people to date by geographical area of Great Britain and work sector. The figures used are correct as of the 21st July and these figures have been rounded according to departmental standards.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing Kickstart applications, referrals and starts, the data collected might be subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system, which has been developed quickly.

The management information presented here has not been subjected to the usual standard of quality assurance associated with official statistics, but is provided in the interests of transparency. Work is ongoing to improve the quality of information available for the programme.

Location

Jobs Made Available

Total Jobs Started

East Midlands

10,200

3,000

East of England

12,200

3,500

London

30,400

11,110

North East

6,000

2,400

North West

20,200

6,300

Scotland

11,200

4,400

South East

18,100

5,400

South West

11,600

3,400

Wales

8,900

2,600

West Midlands

14,400

4,400

Yorkshire and The Humber

11,900

3,700

*These numbers are rounded and so may not match provided totals. Figures provided include jobs created but not funded by the scheme.

Sector

Jobs Made Available

Total Jobs Started

Administration

38,800

12,900

Animal Care

700

400

Beauty & Wellbeing

1,100

400

Business & Finance

5,700

1,800

Computing, Technology & Digital

11,400

4,600

Construction & Trades

4,900

1,700

Creative & Media

11,800

5,100

Delivery & Storage

4,800

1,500

Emergency & Uniform Services

300

100

Engineering & Maintenance

5,400

1,500

Environment & Land

2,900

1,000

Government Services

600

100

Healthcare

4,600

1,200

Home Services

1,200

200

Hospitality & Food

15,400

3,600

Law & Legal

300

200

Managerial

1,000

300

Manufacturing

3,700

1,400

Retail & Sales

23,600

8,000

Science & Research

700

200

Social Care

3,900

800

Sports & Leisure

3,800

1,100

Teaching & Education

7,700

1,800

Transport

600

100

Travel & Tourism

500

200

* These numbers are rounded and so may not match provided totals. Figures provided include jobs created but not funded by the scheme.

27th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the budget is for the Reducing Parental Conflict programme for the financial year 2021/2; and whether a budget for that programme has been agreed for subsequent financial years.

The Department for Work and Pensions’ Reducing Parental Conflict programme will continue in 2021-22. Budgets for the financial year 2021-2022 have not yet been set. Following completion of the one year Spending Review, the Department will commence a budget setting process for all its programmes, to conclude before the start of the 2021/2022 financial year. Decisions on subsequent financial years will be taken via future Spending Reviews.

27th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact on the UK of the global decline in fertility rates.

No such assessment has been made.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what action they are taking to help the mental health of boys who were impacted by the lockdown restrictions.

We want to ensure that all children and young people get the mental health support they need, including boys.

By the end of 2023/24 the overall spending on mental health has increased by more than £4.7 billion in cash terms since 2018/19 (before the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions were introduced).

There are now around 400 mental health support teams in place across England, covering 3.4 million children or around 35% of pupils in schools and colleges. We estimate this will increase to 44% by April 2024 and we are working to increase this coverage to 50% of pupils by March 2025.

There are also currently around 65 locally funded early support hubs in England. These hubs are open to those aged 11 to 25 years old and, importantly, they are for anyone who may not meet the threshold to receive National Health Service support. Following a competitive commercial process from hubs across the country, the government is now providing up to £8 million to 24 existing hubs to provide even more support. This means children and young people, including boys, who are experiencing feelings of anxiety or stress will have a physical space to go to in their community when their problems first emerge, without the need for a referral.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Mar 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the Abortion Act 1967 on UK birth rates.

No assessment has been made of the impact of the Abortion Act 1967 on United Kingdom birth rates. Parliament decided the circumstances under which abortion can legally be undertaken. Under the act, women have access to safe, legal, regulated abortion services.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the increase in sexually transmitted infections among 15–24 year-olds since the end of the COVID-19 lockdown.

The number of new sexually transmitted infections diagnosed among 15 to 24 years olds has increased by 29.3% from 2021 to 2022, or from 135,045 to 174,592. In particular:

- chlamydia diagnoses have increased 26%, from 88,367 in 2021 to 111,380 in 2022;

- gonorrhoea diagnoses have increased 91.7%, from 16,919 in 2021 to 31,037 in 2022;

- first diagnoses of genital herpes have increased 14.4%, from 8,270 in 2021 to 9,461 in 2022;

- diagnoses of infectious syphilis, including primary, secondary, and early latent, have increased 11.1%, from 968 in 2021 to 1,075 in 2022; and

- first diagnoses of genital warts have decreased 23.3%, from 7,559 in 2021 to 5,801 in 2022.

The data represents the number of diagnoses reported and not the number of people diagnosed. Data reported in 2020 and 2021 is notably lower than previous years due to the disruption to sexual health services during the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which reduced access to face-to-face appointments. Access to services subsequently recovered with the use of remote consultations and online testing expanding rapidly across the country.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Feb 2024
To ask His Majesty's Government whether they plan to bring forward a strategy for addressing the recent increase in sexually transmitted infections among 15–24 year-olds as called for by respondents to the House of Commons Women and Equalities Select Committee on 24 January.

We are considering the next steps needed to continue improving the sexual health of the whole population. The UK Health Security Agency is undertaking work with partner organisations to identify best use of existing and emerging interventions to address the increase in sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

The Department for Health and Social Care published the HIV Action Plan in 2021 which sets out the actions that we are taking over the period of 2022 to 2025 to move towards ending HIV transmissions, AIDS, and HIV-related deaths within England by 2030. As part of the plan, we are investing £4.5 million in our National HIV Prevention Programme, which annually runs National HIV Testing Week as well as summer campaigns. Their aim is to raise awareness of ways to prevent the spread of HIV and other STIs among the most affected communities, with a particular focus on young people and other at-risk populations.

The Department for Education is currently reviewing the relationships, sex and health education (RSHE) statutory guidance which includes reference to STI transmission, testing and prevention methods and is expected to soon launch a public consultation on the guidance. Following the consultation, they will make a decision about any new or revised content to be included in the RSHE curriculum, including the use of resources, and whether any further action would be appropriate.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how they will ensure guidance for the Down Syndrome Act 2022 is compliant with the Equality Act 2010 in respect of other genetic conditions similarly profound in their impact, such as 22q deletion and duplication syndromes.

The Down Syndrome Act does not remove the duties under the Equality Act 2010 for services to assess all the needs of people they provide support to, including those with genetic conditions such as 22q deletion and duplication syndromes. We are clear that prioritising funding or resources for people with Down syndrome above other groups without proper assessment of people’s needs would be unlawful.

We recognise that there are overlaps between the services that support people with Down syndrome and those that support people with other genetic conditions and/or a learning disability. The Down Syndrome Act guidance will focus on the unique support needs of people with Down syndrome. We will, however, highlight where best practice in service delivery would also be applicable to those with another genetic condition and/or a learning disability, including DiGeorge syndrome (22q11.2 deletion syndrome) and duplication syndromes.

An Equality Impact Assessment will be carried out on the draft guidance once produced to ensure it does not disadvantage certain groups relative to others. There will be a full public consultation on the draft guidance. The guidance will make clear the requirements on relevant authorities in respect of the Equality Act.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
19th Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of how the implementation of the Down Syndrome Act 2022 fits with their wider strategy for supporting people affected by disabilities.

No specific assessment has been made. Under the Down Syndrome Act 2022 we will be developing guidance for relevant authorities focused on how to meet the unique support needs of people with Down syndrome but which highlights where best practice in service delivery would also be applicable to those with another genetic condition and/or a learning disability. There will be a full public consultation once a draft of the guidance has been produced.

The Act will help achieve the Government’s wider commitment to improving outcomes for disabled people. In December 2022, Minister Pursglove, Minister of State for Disabled People, Health and Work, announced a new Disability Action Plan (DAP) which will be consulted on and published this year. The Government will consider all responses to the consultation carefully before publishing the final DAP.

This Plan will set out the practical action planned across government over the next two years to improve disabled people’s lives. The Plan will lay out joint action government departments can take to make a tangible difference to disabled people’s lives in the immediate term, as well as where we can make meaningful progress towards a longer-term goal, for example improved disability data and evidence.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Jan 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what plans they have to take a more holistic approach to men’s health, given that there are common underlying factors such as alcohol and drug abuse, and suicide, which are identifiable and frequently preventable.

The Government is taking action to address conditions that affect men, including suicide, alcohol and drug abuse. As with other major conditions and drivers of ill health, we consider the impact that each issue has at a population level and the most effective ways to address them, including for the groups most impacted.

On Tuesday 24 January, in the Written Statement on Major Conditions and Diseases, we announced that we will publish a refreshed suicide prevention strategy. This will reflect the most up to date evidence and address current challenges, risks, and opportunities to prevent suicide. The strategy will set out key areas for action, including those the government will take, to prevent suicide. We will continue working with our expert advisory network to inform this, including the National Advisory Suicide Prevention Strategy Advisory Group chaired by Professor Sir Louis Appleby.

Lord Markham
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress has been made on the development of a Men’s Health Strategy.

Although the Department does not have any current plans to develop a men’s health strategy, we have measures in place to address specific health issues which disproportionately affect men. This includes commitments in the NHS Long Term Plan to reduce stroke and heart attacks and the forthcoming new Tobacco Control Plan and significant investment in suicide prevention.

21st Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have plans to publicise findings from the SIREN study, and data from this and other studies about the protective effects against reinfection and serious illness of infection-acquired immunity (unboosted by vaccination).

Scientific papers and reports from the SIREN study are being publicised online through the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and in scientific journals. In addition, the study’s participant retention programme includes regular webinars, newsletters and videos to share its results and findings.

On 22 July 2022, the UKHSA published SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern and variants under investigation in England Technical briefing 44 with data on trends in primary infections and reinfections. A copy of the technical briefing is attached.

The Office for National Statistics’ COVID-19 Infection Survey publishes analysis on re-infections and the associated risk factors and symptoms. An updated assessment, Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey, characteristics of people testing positive for COVID-19, UK: 20 July 2022. Characteristics of people testing positive for COVID-19 from the Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection Survey, was published on 20 July 2022. A copy of the assessment is attached.

21st Jul 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by the Minister for Women's Health on 20 July, what evidence they have to support the claim that that there is a “gender health gap” adversely affecting women and the Government needs to “ensure women receive the same standards of care as men”, given that men die younger than women and are more likely to die from heart disease, suicide, COVID and diabetes.

The Women’s Health Strategy for England found that although on average women in the United Kingdom live longer than men, women spend a quarter of their lives in ill-health and disability compared to approximately one fifth of men. Disability-free life expectancy has reduced at almost twice the rate for women in England compared to men. A copy of the Women’s Health Strategy for England is attached.

The call for evidence which informed the Women’s Health Strategy received approximately 100,000 responses from individuals and over 400 written responses from organisations with expertise in women’s health. The Results of the ‘Women’s Health – Let's talk about it’ survey found that women have been under-represented in research studies, including clinical trials, therefore there is less understanding of how general health conditions and disabilities such as cardiovascular disease and mental health conditions can affect women and men differently. Respondents also reported that there is insufficient understanding of conditions which solely impact women, such as endometriosis or the menopause. A copy of the Results of the ‘women’s health – let's talk about it survey is attached.

The responses received to the call for evidence from organisations and experts in women’s healthcare also highlighted the need for improved education and training in women’s health conditions for healthcare professionals. Respondents also reported a lack of awareness of women’s health issues among some healthcare professionals, including the causes of infertility and treatment for gynaecological conditions. A copy of the Results of the of the written evidence submitted by organisations and experts is attached.

10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the cost to the NHS of remedial surgical interventions following surgical interventions intended to reduce gender dysphoria, and improve health, quality of life and social functioning in people who have gender dysphoria, in each year since 2019.

Surgical interventions intended to reduce gender dysphoria commissioned by the National Health Service are recorded in three categories: masculinising genital surgery; feminising genital surgery; and masculinising chest surgery. The following table shows the number of surgical interventions in each category and the associated costs in 2019/20.

Surgical interventions Cost

Masculinising genital surgery 573 £4,892,000

Feminising genital surgery 528 c. £8,944,381*

Masculinising chest surgery Not known*

Note:

*The cost of feminising genital and masculinising chest surgery is combined as some surgical providers offer both interventions therefore the costs are not recorded separately in data held by NHS England. The combined cost does not include the full cost of masculinising chest surgery, as this was partially funded by clinical commissioning groups in 2019/20.

Information on the number of surgical interventions for feminising genital surgery and masculinising chest surgery in 2020/21 is not currently held centrally. However, this data is expected to be available within the first quarter of 2022/23. While the allocated budget for specialist surgical procedures on the gender dysphoria pathway in 2020/21 was £19 million, actual spend can only be determined once the data on surgical numbers is available. The information requested on revision surgery is not available in the format requested this procedure was not recorded via a separate pathway until October 2020.

10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many remedial surgical interventions were commissioned by the NHS following surgical interventions intended to reduce gender dysphoria, and improve health, quality of life and social functioning in people who have gender dysphoria, in each year since 2019.

Surgical interventions intended to reduce gender dysphoria commissioned by the National Health Service are recorded in three categories: masculinising genital surgery; feminising genital surgery; and masculinising chest surgery. The following table shows the number of surgical interventions in each category and the associated costs in 2019/20.

Surgical interventions Cost

Masculinising genital surgery 573 £4,892,000

Feminising genital surgery 528 c. £8,944,381*

Masculinising chest surgery Not known*

Note:

*The cost of feminising genital and masculinising chest surgery is combined as some surgical providers offer both interventions therefore the costs are not recorded separately in data held by NHS England. The combined cost does not include the full cost of masculinising chest surgery, as this was partially funded by clinical commissioning groups in 2019/20.

Information on the number of surgical interventions for feminising genital surgery and masculinising chest surgery in 2020/21 is not currently held centrally. However, this data is expected to be available within the first quarter of 2022/23. While the allocated budget for specialist surgical procedures on the gender dysphoria pathway in 2020/21 was £19 million, actual spend can only be determined once the data on surgical numbers is available. The information requested on revision surgery is not available in the format requested this procedure was not recorded via a separate pathway until October 2020.

10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the cost to the NHS of surgical interventions intended to reduce gender dysphoria, and improve health, quality of life and social functioning in people who have gender dysphoria, in each year since 2019.

Surgical interventions intended to reduce gender dysphoria commissioned by the National Health Service are recorded in three categories: masculinising genital surgery; feminising genital surgery; and masculinising chest surgery. The following table shows the number of surgical interventions in each category and the associated costs in 2019/20.

Surgical interventions Cost

Masculinising genital surgery 573 £4,892,000

Feminising genital surgery 528 c. £8,944,381*

Masculinising chest surgery Not known*

Note:

*The cost of feminising genital and masculinising chest surgery is combined as some surgical providers offer both interventions therefore the costs are not recorded separately in data held by NHS England. The combined cost does not include the full cost of masculinising chest surgery, as this was partially funded by clinical commissioning groups in 2019/20.

Information on the number of surgical interventions for feminising genital surgery and masculinising chest surgery in 2020/21 is not currently held centrally. However, this data is expected to be available within the first quarter of 2022/23. While the allocated budget for specialist surgical procedures on the gender dysphoria pathway in 2020/21 was £19 million, actual spend can only be determined once the data on surgical numbers is available. The information requested on revision surgery is not available in the format requested this procedure was not recorded via a separate pathway until October 2020.

10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many surgical interventions intended to reduce gender dysphoria, and improve health, quality of life and social functioning in people who have gender dysphoria, have been commissioned by the NHS in each year since 2019; and of these, how many were (1) masculinising genital surgery, and (2) feminising genital surgery.

Surgical interventions intended to reduce gender dysphoria commissioned by the National Health Service are recorded in three categories: masculinising genital surgery; feminising genital surgery; and masculinising chest surgery. The following table shows the number of surgical interventions in each category and the associated costs in 2019/20.

Surgical interventions Cost

Masculinising genital surgery 573 £4,892,000

Feminising genital surgery 528 c. £8,944,381*

Masculinising chest surgery Not known*

Note:

*The cost of feminising genital and masculinising chest surgery is combined as some surgical providers offer both interventions therefore the costs are not recorded separately in data held by NHS England. The combined cost does not include the full cost of masculinising chest surgery, as this was partially funded by clinical commissioning groups in 2019/20.

Information on the number of surgical interventions for feminising genital surgery and masculinising chest surgery in 2020/21 is not currently held centrally. However, this data is expected to be available within the first quarter of 2022/23. While the allocated budget for specialist surgical procedures on the gender dysphoria pathway in 2020/21 was £19 million, actual spend can only be determined once the data on surgical numbers is available. The information requested on revision surgery is not available in the format requested this procedure was not recorded via a separate pathway until October 2020.