Lord Farmer Portrait

Lord Farmer

Conservative - Life peer

Draft Domestic Abuse Bill (Joint)
6th Mar 2019 - 14th Jun 2019
Social Mobility Committee
11th Jun 2015 - 16th Mar 2016


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 28th April 2021
Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021
voted Aye - against a party majority
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 144 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 409
Speeches
Thursday 27th May 2021
Child Poverty: Ethnicity

My Lords, it is obviously concerning that certain ethnic minority groups still have a greater percentage of children in low-income …

Written Answers
Wednesday 9th June 2021
Child Maintenance Service: Reform
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reform the Child Maintenance Service.
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Farmer has voted in 145 divisions, and 7 times against the majority of their Party.

23 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 33 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 214
2 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 40 Conservative Aye votes vs 165 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 359 Noes - 188
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative Aye votes vs 125 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 112 Noes - 388
15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 127 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 355 Noes - 77
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 156 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 93 Noes - 418
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 26 Conservative Aye votes vs 151 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 63 Noes - 401
28 Apr 2021 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Farmer voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 144 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 409
View All Lord Farmer Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
(15 debate interactions)
Baroness Berridge (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
(8 debate interactions)
Baroness Stedman-Scott (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Justice
(18 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(11 debate contributions)
Home Office
(7 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(5 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Farmer's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Farmer, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Farmer has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Farmer has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Lord Farmer has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Farmer has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


36 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to recognise National Health Service workers who served on the medical front-line during the COVID-19 pandemic; and whether any such plans include minting a medal for such workers.

The Government is carefully considering the appropriate way to remember, reward and recognise those involved in the COVID-19 response. We will ensure that any recognition takes into account frontline workers and volunteers across all critical sectors, above all the NHS and social care. The profound gratitude the nation feels towards everyone on the frontline, and to those working in health and social care in particular, means it is beholden on the Government to ensure recognition is both timely and appropriate. Further details will be announced in the usual way.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
13th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a Cabinet-level minister has been appointed to coordinate cross-Government policy to strengthen families; and if so, (1) who is that minister, and (2) what support that minister will receive.

Families are a responsibility for the whole of government and departments undertake the Family Test to assess the impact of policies on family relationships and functioning. However, families are at the heart of this government's agenda, and to reflect this a specific lead Cabinet-level minister will be appointed. This will be announced in due course.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is a requirement for the same protections that exist for content in cinemas and on DVDs to be present for online content; and whether they are working with the film industry to seek the voluntary adoption of British Board of Film Classification age ratings for online content.

The Government is committed to making the UK the safest place in the world to be online. While adoption of the British Board of Film Classification’s best practice age ratings by online platforms is currently voluntary, we welcome Netflix’s commitment to work towards complete coverage and support the BBFC’s drive to encourage other Video On Demand platforms to follow suit. By doing so, this will provide consumers with well recognised age ratings and consumer advice.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what research they have conducted on children’s access to pornographic content online; what plans they have to conduct research on such access; and whether they have monitored whether there has been any increased access to such material by children during the COVID-19 lockdown.

The government is committed to ensuring children are protected from accessing inappropriate content online. The British Board of Film Classification, while designated as the age verification regulator under the Digital Economy Act, commissioned research on children’s access to pornographic content online. The research, published in early 2020, explored young people’s interactions with, and attitudes towards, online pornography and age verification. We will continue to develop our evidence base on online harms ahead of the implementation of the new online harms regulatory framework.

As a result of Covid-19 lockdown measures we expect more people, including children, to be spending more time online. Although it is too early to confidently analyse patterns from this period, there is universal concern about child online safety. We are working closely with technology companies, law enforcement and civil society to monitor trends, and to support users to understand and manage the risks and benefits of being online during this period.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the report on the impact and effectiveness of the regulatory framework provided for in Part 3 of the Digital Economy Act 2017 will be published.

As the government announced on 16 October last year, we will not be commencing Part 3 of the Digital Economy Act 2017 and its provisions on age verification for online pornography. Instead the online harms regime will include provisions to protect children from inappropriate content, including online pornography. The requirement for a report on the impact and effectiveness of the regulatory framework set out in Section 29 of the Digital Economy Act 2017 will therefore not be brought into force.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of the total population was ever in local authority care as children.

The information requested is not held by the department.

Information of the current number of children in care, as a proportion of the child population, is published in table A1 of the statistical release ‘National tables: children Looked after in England including adoption 2018 to 19’: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/children-looked-after-in-england-including-adoption-2018-to-2019.

Figures for the reporting year ending 31 March 2020 will be published later this year.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the appointment process for the Children's Commissioner for England; and when they expect to begin this process for the next Commissioner.

The Children Act 2004 states that the Children’s Commissioner is to be appointed by the Secretary of State for Education. The Children’s Commissioner post is a Significant Public Appointment and therefore follows the process and requirements set out in the Governance Code on Public Appointments.

Officials in the Department for Education have already started planning for the recruitment of the next Children’s Commissioner. We will be monitoring closely the current situation with the COVID-19 outbreak to see when would be most appropriate to launch the campaign.

The current Children’s Commissioner’s term in office will conclude at the end of February 2021. The Children’s Commissioner maximum term in office is six years as set out in primary legislation – the Children Act 2004, as amended by the Children and Families Act. An extension to the term of the Children’s Commissioner is not permitted under the current legislation.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the term of office for the current Children's Commissioner for England is due to end; and whether they anticipate an extension to that term.

The Children Act 2004 states that the Children’s Commissioner is to be appointed by the Secretary of State for Education. The Children’s Commissioner post is a Significant Public Appointment and therefore follows the process and requirements set out in the Governance Code on Public Appointments.

Officials in the Department for Education have already started planning for the recruitment of the next Children’s Commissioner. We will be monitoring closely the current situation with the COVID-19 outbreak to see when would be most appropriate to launch the campaign.

The current Children’s Commissioner’s term in office will conclude at the end of February 2021. The Children’s Commissioner maximum term in office is six years as set out in primary legislation – the Children Act 2004, as amended by the Children and Families Act. An extension to the term of the Children’s Commissioner is not permitted under the current legislation.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the welfare of young people in unregulated accommodation during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The government is committed to ensuring that vulnerable children and young people remain protected. Local authorities, social workers and those providing support and care for our most vulnerable children and young people deserve our immense gratitude.

Local authorities have the key day-to-day responsibility for delivery of children’s social care. They are continuing to prioritise their responsibilities towards vulnerable children and young people, including those in independent and semi-independent provision. While we will continue to work with local authorities and providers of this provision to ensure that placements remain as stable as possible during this time, we continue to consult on new measures to improve the quality of this provision and ban the placement of under 16s, given that this provision does not deliver care and therefore cannot be appropriate for a child of this age.

We are also working with those delivering services on the frontline to ensure that the support needed for vulnerable children and young people continues. The government has provided £3.2 billion of additional funding to support local authorities to address pressures they are facing in response to the COVID-19 outbreak, including for delivering children’s social care.

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Budget statement on 11 March, (1) how, and (2) by which Department, the £2.5 million for research and developing best practice around the integration of services for families will be administered; and to what criteria those applying for such funds will be subject.

The Department for Education will administer the £2.5 million for research and developing best practice around the integration of services for families. More information will be made available in due course

Baroness Berridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reform the three crop rule in agriculture as part of the UK's withdrawal from the EU; and what plans they have to inform the farming industry of any such rule changes by the end of June to enable planning for 2021.

We are looking to take the opportunities which leaving the EU presents to make further simplifications for the 2021 Basic Payment Scheme. This could include removing some or all of the burdensome greening rules which have failed to deliver for the environment such as the 'three crop rule' which tells farmers how many crops they must grow, regardless of the demands of the market. Relevant regulations will be subject to Parliament's approval. We will announce the new rules to farmers in due course.

28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any evidence that unrestrained depredation by cabbage stem flea beetle of oil seed rape prevents the growth of that crop; and what plans they have to review the ban on neonicotinoids following any such assessment.

Oilseed rape is a valuable crop for farmers and there is a greater risk of crop loss due to cabbage stem flea beetle (CSFB) since the restrictions on neonicotinoids came into force in 2014. Some growers have been heavily affected while others have not experienced similar problems. Defra has monitored the incidence of CSFB on untreated oilseed rape through the Crop Pest and Disease Survey. In autumn 2019, average numbers of CSFB were higher than levels before the ban on use of neonicotinoid insecticides. Out of 82 sites assessed, however, only eight had levels that exceeded the recommended threshold for spray application. Six of these eight sites were in the East of England.

The Government supports restrictions on neonicotinoids because the clear advice from scientific experts is that these seed treatments should not be used on flowering crops, such as oilseed rape. There is clear evidence on the toxicity of neonicotinoids to bees and their persistence in the environment. We are not prepared to put our pollinator populations at risk and so we will maintain the current restrictions on use of the three neonicotinoids when the transition period ends. We will only take a different position if the scientific evidence changes.

The Government supports a major, long-term research platform for Crop Genetic Improvement. This includes OREGIN, which is a dedicated programme on oilseed rape breeding to improve the resource use efficiency, sustainability and resilience of the crop. The research is carried out in close partnership with growers and breeders and determines beneficial traits to be included in breeding programmes to offer improved resistance to priority pests and diseases. The work is helping to reduce reliance on agrochemical inputs and also improve the overall resilience of crops.

7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reform the Child Maintenance Service.

We keep Child Maintenance policy and our operational delivery under review. The Child Maintenance Service (CMS) has introduced new digital services – such as the Apply Online Service that has reduced average application times from 45 to 15 minutes – which are available 24/7 and allow greater flexibility for separated parents to contact the CMS.

Operational reforms such as these help improve outcomes for children by enabling parents to set up and manage child maintenance arrangements in ways that suit their own circumstances.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the budget is for the Reducing Parental Conflict programme for the financial year 2021/2; and whether a budget for that programme has been agreed for subsequent financial years.

The Department for Work and Pensions’ Reducing Parental Conflict programme will continue in 2021-22. Budgets for the financial year 2021-2022 have not yet been set. Following completion of the one year Spending Review, the Department will commence a budget setting process for all its programmes, to conclude before the start of the 2021/2022 financial year. Decisions on subsequent financial years will be taken via future Spending Reviews.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are aware of any research on the effects of continuous mask-wearing over long periods; and if so what are the findings of that research.

Public Health England has not conducted any research nor conducted a review of research evidence on this topic.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many COVID-19 patients admitted to hospital aged 80 or over received ICU treatment; and how many of those patients survived.

The data is not available in the format requested.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
28th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many COVID-19 patients admitted to hospital aged 80 or over died of the disease without receiving ICU treatment before being discharged.

The data is not available in the format requested.

Lord Bethell
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much of the Youth Endowment Fund has been invested in working with parents of young people.

The Home Office will be investing up to £23 million in intervention programmes that evidence suggests will be effective in helping to stop young people from being drawn into violence.

This will be delivered through Violence Reduction Units (VRUs) in existing serious violence hotspot areas. Investment will be made in programmes working with young people who are at risk of engagement or currently involved in violence. We will shortly be opening a competition process for VRUs to apply for the programme funding. As such, we cannot provide details of interventions working with parents, until the successful bids are selected.

The funding will also pilot the Creating Opportunities Forum, a new programme to support young people who may be at risk of serious violence to access employment opportunities. The rest of the funding is for a small number of grants including our Young People’s Advocates who work with young women and girls at risk of violence.

The Government has also invested £200 million in early intervention and prevention support initiatives over 10 years to support children and young people at risk of exploitation and involvement in serious violence, through the Youth Endowment Fund (YEF).

The YEF has 5 family focused projects from their launch grant round that work with parent and child. The nature of support includes but is not limited to therapy, resilience projects and protecting a child from abuse from the family. The total invested amount across all 5 projects is just over £5.7 million.

The YEF will launch its second grant round of 2021 in September: “A Supportive Home”, which will focus on the role of home and families to prevent youth violence. The YEF will identify programmes that are ready for robust impact evaluation or should be supported to reach this point within two years and intends to invest up to £20 million depending on the quality of applications.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much of the £23 million for early intervention programmes to prevent young people being drawn into violence, announced on 8 March, will be used to work with their parents.

The Home Office will be investing up to £23 million in intervention programmes that evidence suggests will be effective in helping to stop young people from being drawn into violence.

This will be delivered through Violence Reduction Units (VRUs) in existing serious violence hotspot areas. Investment will be made in programmes working with young people who are at risk of engagement or currently involved in violence. We will shortly be opening a competition process for VRUs to apply for the programme funding. As such, we cannot provide details of interventions working with parents, until the successful bids are selected.

The funding will also pilot the Creating Opportunities Forum, a new programme to support young people who may be at risk of serious violence to access employment opportunities. The rest of the funding is for a small number of grants including our Young People’s Advocates who work with young women and girls at risk of violence.

The Government has also invested £200 million in early intervention and prevention support initiatives over 10 years to support children and young people at risk of exploitation and involvement in serious violence, through the Youth Endowment Fund (YEF).

The YEF has 5 family focused projects from their launch grant round that work with parent and child. The nature of support includes but is not limited to therapy, resilience projects and protecting a child from abuse from the family. The total invested amount across all 5 projects is just over £5.7 million.

The YEF will launch its second grant round of 2021 in September: “A Supportive Home”, which will focus on the role of home and families to prevent youth violence. The YEF will identify programmes that are ready for robust impact evaluation or should be supported to reach this point within two years and intends to invest up to £20 million depending on the quality of applications.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the success of Violence Reduction Units in preventing gang and knife crime committed by those from families where there is little or no father involvement.

This government is investing £70m over two years to support the development of Violence Reduction Units. Some VRUs have commissioned targeted initiatives aimed at parents and families which strengthen family-based decision-making, provide counselling support and support those with incarcerated parents. The impact of VRUs’ work will take time to be seen, and evidence from the Glasgow VRU suggests that the effect will be gradual and will accumulate over time.

The Home Office has commissioned an independent process evaluation of VRUs during 2019/20 which will be published later this summer. Evaluation of VRUs during 2020/21 will include both process and impact elements allowing us to investigate how and why any initial impact is occurring. The Youth Violence Commission has welcomed the Government’s commitment to VRUs and the package of challenge and support we have put in place for their success.

Whilst an assessment has not been made of the role of family hubs in preventing knife crime, this government has invested £1.085bn through the Troubled Families programme. The programme, which is delivered by local authorities and their partners, is driving public services to work together to provide effective, coordinated support to our most disadvantaged families. The risk of serious violence is one of the recently added criterion for suitability for the programme.

Similarly, this government has made early intervention and prevention a priority, investing £200 million in initiatives to support young people at risk of exploitation and involvement in serious violence, through the Youth Endowment Fund. We are also investing £500 million through the new DCMS Youth Investment Fund over five years, helping to build 60 new youth centres across the country, refurbish around 360 existing youth facilities, and provide over 100 mobile facilities for harder to reach areas. The YIF will also support the provision and coordination of high-quality services for young people, and an investment in the youth workforce.v

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the current, and (2) the potential future, role of family hubs in preventing knife crime.

This government is investing £70m over two years to support the development of Violence Reduction Units. Some VRUs have commissioned targeted initiatives aimed at parents and families which strengthen family-based decision-making, provide counselling support and support those with incarcerated parents. The impact of VRUs’ work will take time to be seen, and evidence from the Glasgow VRU suggests that the effect will be gradual and will accumulate over time.

The Home Office has commissioned an independent process evaluation of VRUs during 2019/20 which will be published later this summer. Evaluation of VRUs during 2020/21 will include both process and impact elements allowing us to investigate how and why any initial impact is occurring. The Youth Violence Commission has welcomed the Government’s commitment to VRUs and the package of challenge and support we have put in place for their success.

Whilst an assessment has not been made of the role of family hubs in preventing knife crime, this government has invested £1.085bn through the Troubled Families programme. The programme, which is delivered by local authorities and their partners, is driving public services to work together to provide effective, coordinated support to our most disadvantaged families. The risk of serious violence is one of the recently added criterion for suitability for the programme.

Similarly, this government has made early intervention and prevention a priority, investing £200 million in initiatives to support young people at risk of exploitation and involvement in serious violence, through the Youth Endowment Fund. We are also investing £500 million through the new DCMS Youth Investment Fund over five years, helping to build 60 new youth centres across the country, refurbish around 360 existing youth facilities, and provide over 100 mobile facilities for harder to reach areas. The YIF will also support the provision and coordination of high-quality services for young people, and an investment in the youth workforce.v

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the cost of suicides in prison over the last 12 months.

Every death in custody is a tragedy and the Government is committed to reducing the number of self-inflicted deaths in prison.

There is a variety of financial costs associated with responding to and investigating each self-inflicted death, making it difficult to calculate the total. However, it is the human cost, in terms of the loss of life, and the impact on the lives of others, including the bereaved family and friends and the staff who worked with the individual, that is of concern to the Government. It is our determination to avoid these harms, and our commitment to the welfare of those in our care, that drive our work to prevent self-inflicted deaths.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
12th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the average length of (1) a completed prison governor tenure, and (2) existing prison governor tenures.

(1) The average length of service of a completed prison governor tenure who left over the last 5 years is 4.2 years.

To note, the averages are based on total governor tenure (which would include them moving to different prisons) and not specific to time spent in one post.

(2) As at 30 June 2020, existing prison governors had spent an average of 2.7 years in their current post.

To note, this includes substantive band 10-11 Governing Governors only and does not include any deputy governors who may be filling the role on a temporary promotion.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
12th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of prison governors have stayed in post for more than (1) two, and (2) three years.

As at 30th June 2020, 48% of prison governors had stayed in their current post for more than two years, and 39% had stayed in their current post for more than three years.

To note, this includes substantive band 10-11 Governing Governors only and does not include any deputy governors who may be filling the role on a temporary promotion.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
12th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in increasing awareness of the Assisted Prisons Visits scheme among (1) prisoners, and (2) visitors, since the publication of the report by the National Offender Management Service Families Do Matter Project Report 2009, which found that 38 per cent of prisoners and visitors were unaware of that scheme.

A new online Help with Visits service (formerly known as the Assisted Prison Visits Scheme) was introduced in June 2017 to simplify the application process and the ease of access to the service for members of the public who are visiting prisons.

Family service providers have continued to assist HMPPS with raising the profile of the Help with Visits Scheme and, through their service user forum, have provided feedback on the design of the updated literature. This will be launched once Covid-19 restrictions ease across the prison estate.

Additionally, a pilot across a number of prisons will be used to review eligibility criteria to help inform potential changes that may be made to improve access to social visits for prisoners and their families.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
27th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many children who were living with people now in prison, are currently living with the prisoners' partners.

The information requested is not held centrally and could not be collated without incurring disproportionate cost as individual records would need to be analysed.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people in prison have dependent children with whom they were living prior to sentencing, broken down by gender.

The information requested is not held centrally and could not be collated without incurring disproportionate cost, as individual records would need to be analysed.

We acknowledge that distance from home can be a real challenge for the maintenance of family ties, and that this is particularly acute in the female estate. HM Prison and Probation Service is committed to ensuring that prisoners are accommodated as close as possible to their resettlement communities and families. We have introduced a range of measures to minimise the impacts of any suspension to visits, due to local restrictions. The Help with Prison Visits Scheme is also available for assistance where close relatives on a low income are able to apply for financial assistance on a means tested basis to facilitate visits to relatives in custody.

This included introducing almost 1,500 secure mobile PIN phone handsets to contact family, provided additional pin credit for calls, and introduced video calls which are currently operating in over 100 prisons across England and Wales.

Close proximity of is one of the key factors considered when choosing where to place prisoners, particularly for those on short sentences or nearing release, where they need to rebuild family ties, secure housing and health services and look for work. In the female estate, this is inevitably more challenging, as the smaller population means there are significantly fewer establishments more widely spread.

We are committed to tackling domestic abuse and to supporting vulnerable individuals, such as female offenders who have experienced domestic abuse, to ensure they can rebuild their lives. We also acknowledge the need for improved collection and transparency of data on primary carers in prison and their dependents in the community. Information on a prisoner’s caring responsibilities and children living in the community is monitored locally by prison Governors and Directors to ensure the appropriate support can be provided to women and their families.

We will continue to provide additional support to enable prisoners to maintain contact and support where prison regimes are restricted and will keep this under regular review especially for offenders and families with vulnerability issues.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the reoffending rates for prisoners who receive visits from family members, broken down by gender.

Families and friends can be a positive influence on reducing reoffending. Strengthening the ties individuals have with their families and friends is one of the many important factors to successful rehabilitation and reducing intergenerational crime.

Information relating to reoffending and individuals who receive visits from their family whilst in prison, are recorded on separate case management systems and therefore the information requested is not readily available without incurring disproportionate cost.

The latest published data on reoffending rates for prison leavers was published on 29th October. While information relating to those in receipt of visits is not available, the rates broken down by gender can be found in table A2 at https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/930448/proven-reoffending-oct18-dec18-3-monthly.ods

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the current level of intergenerational transmission of criminal offending, broken down by gender.

Families and friends can be a positive influence on reducing reoffending. Strengthening the ties individuals have with their families and friends is one of the many important factors to successful rehabilitation and reducing intergenerational crime.

The Ministry of Justice is working collaboratively with the Department for Education and the Welsh Government to ensure that effective support is available within the community for children of prisoners to reduce the likelihood of intergenerational offending.

The specific information you have requested is not held centrally by the Ministry of Justice. We do not collect data on the criminal conviction status of the parents or children of those who come into contact with the Criminal Justice System. Therefore, it would not be possible to do any analysis on either the proportion of offenders who had parents with a criminal conviction, or offenders with children who have a conviction.

In the absence of holding this data ourselves, we rely on estimates from research studies, such as the MoJ SPCR survey in 2005/6 which found that 37% of prisoners reported having family members who had been convicted of a non-motoring criminal offence.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people currently in prison spent time in care as children, broken down by gender.

The information requested is not held centrally and could not be collated without incurring disproportionate cost, as individual records would need to be analysed.

We acknowledge that distance from home can be a real challenge for the maintenance of family ties, and that this is particularly acute in the female estate. HM Prison and Probation Service is committed to ensuring that prisoners are accommodated as close as possible to their resettlement communities and families. We have introduced a range of measures to minimise the impacts of any suspension to visits, due to local restrictions. The Help with Prison Visits Scheme is also available for assistance where close relatives on a low income are able to apply for financial assistance on a means tested basis to facilitate visits to relatives in custody.

This included introducing almost 1,500 secure mobile PIN phone handsets to contact family, provided additional pin credit for calls, and introduced video calls which are currently operating in over 100 prisons across England and Wales.

Close proximity of is one of the key factors considered when choosing where to place prisoners, particularly for those on short sentences or nearing release, where they need to rebuild family ties, secure housing and health services and look for work. In the female estate, this is inevitably more challenging, as the smaller population means there are significantly fewer establishments more widely spread.

We are committed to tackling domestic abuse and to supporting vulnerable individuals, such as female offenders who have experienced domestic abuse, to ensure they can rebuild their lives. We also acknowledge the need for improved collection and transparency of data on primary carers in prison and their dependents in the community. Information on a prisoner’s caring responsibilities and children living in the community is monitored locally by prison Governors and Directors to ensure the appropriate support can be provided to women and their families.

We will continue to provide additional support to enable prisoners to maintain contact and support where prison regimes are restricted and will keep this under regular review especially for offenders and families with vulnerability issues.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people in prison have experienced (1) emotional, (2) physical, and (3) sexual abuse, broken down by gender.

The information requested is not held centrally and could not be collated without incurring disproportionate cost, as individual records would need to be analysed.

We acknowledge that distance from home can be a real challenge for the maintenance of family ties, and that this is particularly acute in the female estate. HM Prison and Probation Service is committed to ensuring that prisoners are accommodated as close as possible to their resettlement communities and families. We have introduced a range of measures to minimise the impacts of any suspension to visits, due to local restrictions. The Help with Prison Visits Scheme is also available for assistance where close relatives on a low income are able to apply for financial assistance on a means tested basis to facilitate visits to relatives in custody.

This included introducing almost 1,500 secure mobile PIN phone handsets to contact family, provided additional pin credit for calls, and introduced video calls which are currently operating in over 100 prisons across England and Wales.

Close proximity of is one of the key factors considered when choosing where to place prisoners, particularly for those on short sentences or nearing release, where they need to rebuild family ties, secure housing and health services and look for work. In the female estate, this is inevitably more challenging, as the smaller population means there are significantly fewer establishments more widely spread.

We are committed to tackling domestic abuse and to supporting vulnerable individuals, such as female offenders who have experienced domestic abuse, to ensure they can rebuild their lives. We also acknowledge the need for improved collection and transparency of data on primary carers in prison and their dependents in the community. Information on a prisoner’s caring responsibilities and children living in the community is monitored locally by prison Governors and Directors to ensure the appropriate support can be provided to women and their families.

We will continue to provide additional support to enable prisoners to maintain contact and support where prison regimes are restricted and will keep this under regular review especially for offenders and families with vulnerability issues.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the average distance from home that (1) adult prisoners, (2) imprisoned young offenders, and (3) imprisoned juvenile and child prisoners were held each year since 2009, broken down by gender.

The information requested is not held centrally and could not be collated without incurring disproportionate cost, as individual records would need to be analysed.

We acknowledge that distance from home can be a real challenge for the maintenance of family ties, and that this is particularly acute in the female estate. HM Prison and Probation Service is committed to ensuring that prisoners are accommodated as close as possible to their resettlement communities and families. We have introduced a range of measures to minimise the impacts of any suspension to visits, due to local restrictions. The Help with Prison Visits Scheme is also available for assistance where close relatives on a low income are able to apply for financial assistance on a means tested basis to facilitate visits to relatives in custody.

This included introducing almost 1,500 secure mobile PIN phone handsets to contact family, provided additional pin credit for calls, and introduced video calls which are currently operating in over 100 prisons across England and Wales.

Close proximity of is one of the key factors considered when choosing where to place prisoners, particularly for those on short sentences or nearing release, where they need to rebuild family ties, secure housing and health services and look for work. In the female estate, this is inevitably more challenging, as the smaller population means there are significantly fewer establishments more widely spread.

We are committed to tackling domestic abuse and to supporting vulnerable individuals, such as female offenders who have experienced domestic abuse, to ensure they can rebuild their lives. We also acknowledge the need for improved collection and transparency of data on primary carers in prison and their dependents in the community. Information on a prisoner’s caring responsibilities and children living in the community is monitored locally by prison Governors and Directors to ensure the appropriate support can be provided to women and their families.

We will continue to provide additional support to enable prisoners to maintain contact and support where prison regimes are restricted and will keep this under regular review especially for offenders and families with vulnerability issues.

Baroness Scott of Bybrook
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
6th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effectiveness of remote private and public family law proceedings in place due to the COVID-19 pandemic

The President of the Family Division published a report of a rapid consultation on the use of remote hearings in the family court due to the Covid-19 pandemic, produced by the Nuffield Family Justice Observatory, on 6 May. The Judiciary and HMCTS will further refine guidance on the use of remote hearings in family proceedings based on the evidence provided in this report.

13th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by Lord Farmer The Farmer Review: The Importance of Strengthening Prisoners' Family Ties to Prevent Reoffending and Reduce Intergenerational Crime, published in August 2017, what consideration they have given to the recommendation that prisons should ensure that virtual visits, using video calling technology, are available "for the small percentage of families or individual family members who cannot visit frequently or at all due to infirmity, distance or other factors".

HMPPS recognises that families or significant relationships can play an important role in supporting prisoners to reduce their risk of reoffending following release. We have implemented a number of the recommendations from the 2017 Farmer Review and continue to publish updates on progress on these every six months.

Visits have been suspended after the Government took vital steps to limit travel and social interactions in order to limit the spread of the virus. In recognition of the importance of continued contact with family, however, the Government has moved swiftly to keep prisoners in touch with their family members by other means.

As part of new measures introduced because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Ministers have approved the use of 900 locked SIM card handsets, allowing risk-assessed prisoners to speak to a small number of pre-authorised contacts.

Strict measures will ensure the phones are not misused with calls being time-limited and monitored closely. Additionally, handsets will include tamper-proof tape to prevent non-secure SIM cards being used.

As well as helping prisoners connect with their families, the phones will give prisoners access to support services such as the Samaritans, therefore reducing their risk of self-harm at a uniquely difficult time.

We are also urgently exploring options for the safe and secure use of video solutions in a range of establishments to facilitate family video calling. We expect that this approach will be available imminently to support the current situation, but beyond this, will consider how best to utilise the video-calling services to enable prisoners to maintain contact where they have historically not received regular visits.

13th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what guidance has been given to prison governors about visits from family and significant others during the COVID-19 pandemic.

HMPPS recognises that families or significant relationships can play an important role in supporting prisoners to reduce their risk of reoffending following release. We have implemented a number of the recommendations from the 2017 Farmer Review and continue to publish updates on progress on these every six months.

Visits have been suspended after the Government took vital steps to limit travel and social interactions in order to limit the spread of the virus. In recognition of the importance of continued contact with family, however, the Government has moved swiftly to keep prisoners in touch with their family members by other means.

As part of new measures introduced because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Ministers have approved the use of 900 locked SIM card handsets, allowing risk-assessed prisoners to speak to a small number of pre-authorised contacts.

Strict measures will ensure the phones are not misused with calls being time-limited and monitored closely. Additionally, handsets will include tamper-proof tape to prevent non-secure SIM cards being used.

As well as helping prisoners connect with their families, the phones will give prisoners access to support services such as the Samaritans, therefore reducing their risk of self-harm at a uniquely difficult time.

We are also urgently exploring options for the safe and secure use of video solutions in a range of establishments to facilitate family video calling. We expect that this approach will be available imminently to support the current situation, but beyond this, will consider how best to utilise the video-calling services to enable prisoners to maintain contact where they have historically not received regular visits.