Lord Colgrain Portrait

Lord Colgrain

Conservative - Excepted Hereditary

Became Member: 27th March 2017


Horticultural Sector Committee
31st Jan 2023 - 26th Oct 2023
Environment and Climate Change Committee
14th Apr 2021 - 31st Jan 2023
Finance Committee (Lords)
12th Sep 2017 - 19th Jan 2022
Statutory Instruments (Joint Committee)
1st Jul 2019 - 28th Jan 2021
Rural Economy Committee
17th May 2018 - 26th Mar 2019


Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 14th March 2024
10:30
Food, Diet and Obesity Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Food, Diet and Obesity
14 Mar 2024, 10:30 a.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 25th March 2024
14:00
Division Votes
Tuesday 6th February 2024
Automated Vehicles Bill [HL]
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 184 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 200 Noes - 204
Speeches
Tuesday 12th December 2023
Bovine Tuberculosis
I thank my noble friend for his positive and most encouraging reply. Bovine TB devastates both emotionally and financially those …
Written Answers
Wednesday 20th December 2023
Capital Gains Tax
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the length of time it takes for His Majesty's …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Lord Colgrain has voted in 478 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Colgrain Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Benyon (Conservative)
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
(7 debate interactions)
Baroness Penn (Conservative)
Minister on Leave (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State)
(2 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(5 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Firearms Act 2023
(1,785 words contributed)
Environment Act 2021
(926 words contributed)
Agriculture Act 2020
(412 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Lord Colgrain's debates

Lords initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Colgrain, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.


Lord Colgrain has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Lord Colgrain has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


10 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
27th Jun 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what has been the cost of (1) the salaries, recruitment fees, and redundancy payments for non-parliamentary staff, and (2) the contractors to undertake surveys and preparatory work, to prepare for Restoration and Renewal since 2014.

The House of Lords does not hold detailed information regarding the salaries, recruitment fees, and redundancy payments for non-parliamentary staff involved in the Restoration and Renewal Programme.

The House of Lords is recharged for its share of Restoration and Renewal costs by the House of Commons. Since 2014 the House of Lords contribution to the Restoration and Renewal Programme has been £58.7m. Of this sum, staff costs have totalled £7.55m and other costs, which include the costs of contractors to undertake surveys and other preparatory work, have totalled £51.15m.

21st Jun 2022
To ask the Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body what has been the cost of the work on the Restoration and Renewal programme since 2012 in respect of (1) the salaries, recruitment fees, and redundancy payments for non-parliamentary staff, such as those working for the Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority, (2) the costs of contractors to undertake surveys and preparatory work, and (3) the work assessing and preparing decant locations.

The Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority were established in April and May 2020 respectively. Prior to this, the R&R Programme was funded and managed by the House Administrations.

The costs outlined below represent those incurred by the Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority since April and May 2020 respectively until the end of March 2022. Costs included for the 2021/22 financial year are based on the Quarter 3 forecast, which was presented in the Main Estimate Memorandum. The 2021/22 Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority accounts are currently being audited, and the final outturn position for 2021/22 presented as part of the Annual Report and Accounts will therefore vary from the forecast position.

The Sponsor Body has spent £8.2m on salaries (includng associated costs such as pension and national insurance contributions) and £45,000 on recruitment costs. The Delivery Authority has spent £25.3m on salaries (including associated costs such as pension and national insurance contributions) and £0.4m on recruitment costs. There have been no redundancy payments by either organisation in this period.

A further £10.9m has been spent on work assessing and preparing decant locations.

Excluding the costs outlined above, the Delivery Authority has spent £151m over this period on contractor costs. This comprises all third-party spend, including design and surveys work, programme delivery and project and programme management. It also includes spend required to establish and mature the organisation in preparation for delivery, such as in data and digital, and procurement. Excluding the costs above, the Sponsor Body spent £16.1m on all third-party suppliers. The most significant pieces of work included business case and Strategic Review consultancy, independent assurance, organisational development, corporate services, and public engagement.

The total expenditure on all these items is £212m.

Under the Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Act 2019, the Sponsor Body must, in exercising its functions, have regard to the need to ensure that the Parliamentary building works represent good value for money. The costs of the Sponsor Body and Delivery Authority to date have been through a comprehensive process of review and challenge led by the CEOs and Boards of both organisations, and scrutinised by the Commissions of both Houses as well as the Parliamentary Works Estimates Commission. These costs are also audited by the National Audit Office.

21st Nov 2022
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether all new builds should include solar panels, in the light of the decisions made at COP 27.

Solar power is a key part of the energy mix, and the Government will continue to support its deployment to meet energy security and net zero goals consistent with COP27 ambitions.

In December 2021, the Government introduced an uplift in energy efficiency standards for new builds, which came into force on 15 June 2022 and expects that to meet the new standards, most new buildings are likely to be built with renewables, principally rooftop solar panels.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Energy Security and Net Zero)
3rd Jul 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what are the criteria necessary for the (1) erection, and (2) display, of brown road signs to denote locations of cultural and historical significance; and whether local councils are required to provide assistance during that process.

The criteria necessary for a location of cultural and historical significance to potentially warrant a brown traffic sign are provided in Schedule 1 of the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions, 2016 (TSRGD). TSRGD defines the term ‘tourist destination’ with the following meaning:

(a) a Tourist Information Centre or Point;

(b) a permanently established attraction or facility (other than a leisure facility) which—

(i) attracts or is used by visitors to an area;

(ii) is open to the public without prior booking during its normal opening hours; and

(iii) is recognised as a tourist attraction or facility by the appropriate national promoter of tourism;

(c) a village, town or city that is of particular interest to tourists;

(d) a route that is of particular interest to tourists

VisitBritian is the national promoter for England and they have criteria for minimum number of visitors, car parking, toilets etc.

Decisions on whether to erect and display brown signs for any qualifying attraction is the responsibility of the relevant local authority. However, local councils are not required to provide assistance to attractions during the process of meeting the criteria.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Oct 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what progress they are making in accelerating the granting of licences for insecticides that will enable apiarists to control the spread of the Asian hornet.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is the regulator responsible for authorising biocidal products (which include insecticides) on the market in Great Britain.

Insecticide control options are already available to expert government officials carrying out treatments to destroy Asian hornet nests. Whilst there are currently no insecticide biocidal products specifically authorised for use against Asian hornets, there are a number of products available for use against hornets. Manufacturers of insecticides can apply to HSE if they wish to add specific claims for Asian hornets to their products.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Dec 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the length of time it takes for His Majesty's Revenue and Customs to calculate capital gains tax returns.

The vast majority of Capital Gains returns are filed online, through entries in a Self-Assessment Tax return or our online service for sale of a property which is not the main residence. Taxpayers using online services are presented with their tax calculation immediately, unless there are any exceptions requiring a manual check. For the small numbers of 2022-23 tax returns requiring manual checks, HMRC will complete these by 31 January.

For customers who file their self-assessment return on paper, HMRC aim to process 99% of returns received by the 31 October submission deadline by 31 December. They expect to meet that target this year.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government how many local revenue offices have informed tax payers that they should not expect tax repayment that they are owed until September, and for what reasons.

HMRC covers a wide range of taxes where refunds may be made. These include, for example, Income Tax (both Pay As You Earn and Self Assessment), Corporation Tax, Stamp Duty Land Tax, Value Added Tax (with a number of different regimes in use), Inheritance Tax and Capital Gains Tax.

The speed of repayment, and our service level agreements (SLAs) for speed of repayment, varies across different areas.

Footnote:

How HMRC is performing against its service standards can be found here:

https://www.tax.service.gov.uk/guidance/HMRC-service-dashboard/outcome/HMRC-service-dashboard

Baroness Penn
Minister on Leave (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State)
21st Jun 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what instructions, if any, they have issued to local revenue offices about deferring the repayment of tax.

HMRC covers a wide range of taxes where refunds may be made. These include, for example, Income Tax (both Pay As You Earn and Self Assessment), Corporation Tax, Stamp Duty Land Tax, Value Added Tax (with a number of different regimes in use), Inheritance Tax and Capital Gains Tax.

The speed of repayment, and our service level agreements (SLAs) for speed of repayment, varies across different areas.

Footnote:

How HMRC is performing against its service standards can be found here:

https://www.tax.service.gov.uk/guidance/HMRC-service-dashboard/outcome/HMRC-service-dashboard

Baroness Penn
Minister on Leave (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State)
14th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether the 45p per mile fuel allowance for cars and vans should be increased due to (1) the length of time it has remained unchanged, and (2) the increased cost of fuel.

The Government sets the Approved Mileage Allowance Payments (AMAPs) rates to minimise administrative burdens.

Employers are not required to use the AMAPs rates. Instead, they can agree to reimburse the actual cost incurred, where individuals can provide evidence of the expenditure, without an Income Tax or National Insurance charge arising.

Alternatively, they can choose to pay a different mileage rate that better reflects their employees’ circumstances. However, if the payment exceeds the amount due under AMAPs, and this results in a profit for the individual, they will be liable to pay Income Tax and National Insurance contributions on the difference.

The Government keeps this policy under review.

Baroness Penn
Minister on Leave (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State)
1st Feb 2023
To ask His Majesty's Government what is the target size for the number of personnel in the trained strength of the army reserve force; what is the total figure for trained strength of the reserve; and how many recruits there are in each arm or corps of the army reserve.

As at 1 October 2022, the Army Reserve had a trained strength of 23,030. It is planned to grow to 30,100 under Future Soldier plans, of which c.3,000 will be untrained personnel.

The below table shows a breakdown of recruits, i.e. untrained personnel, in the Army Reserve, as at 01 October 2022:

Arm / Service

Yeomanry

120

Royal Regiment of Artillery

180

Corps of Royal Engineers

210

Royal Corps of Signals

130

Infantry

1,120

Army Air Corps

50

Royal Army Chaplains’ Department

10

The Royal Logistic Corps

310

Royal Army Medical Corps

200

Corps of Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

70

Adjutant General’s Corps, Staff & Personnel Support

30

Adjutant General’s Corps, Provost Branch

40

Adjutant General’s Corps, Educational and Training

-

Adjutant General’s Corps, Army Legal Services Branch

-

Royal Army Veterinary Corps

-

Small Arms School Corps

-

Royal Army Dental Corps

-

Intelligence Corps

120

Royal Army Physical Training Corps

-

Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army Nursing Corps

40

General Service Corps/General List

10

Others

-

Source: Analysis (Army)

Notes/Caveats:

  1. Table 1 figures are for Army Reserve Group A only. Group A is a subset of Volunteer Reserves and includes Mobilised Volunteer Reserves, High Readiness Reserves and OTC support & training staff (it excludes Full Time Reserve Service (FTRS), Additional Duties Commitment (ADC), Volunteer Ex-Regular Reserve (VeRR), Non-Regular Permanent Staff (NRPS), and Expeditionary Forces Institute (EFI).

  1. Trained figures include all personnel who are Basic Trained. Untrained figures include all personnel who are undergoing Basic Training.

  1. "Others" include Group A personnel serving with UOTC units and those who have yet to be allocated an Arm/Service on the Joint Personnel Administrative System (JPA).

  1. The data has been rounded to the nearest 10 to limit disclosure and ensure confidentiality. "-" denotes zero or rounded to zero.