Baroness Quin Portrait

Baroness Quin

Labour - Life peer

Baroness Quin is not a member of any APPGs
3 Former APPG memberships
Osteoporosis, Osteoporosis and Bone Health, Osteoposis
Procedure and Privileges Committee
4th Feb 2021 - 12th May 2022
Communications and Digital Committee
25th May 2016 - 28th Jan 2021
European Union Committee
18th Dec 2013 - 30th Mar 2015
Shadow Spokesperson (Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Oct 2010 - 17th Oct 2011
Constitution Committee
19th Feb 2007 - 8th Apr 2010
Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament
30th Jul 2001 - 11th Jul 2005
House of Lords Reform (Joint Committee)
19th Jun 2002 - 5th May 2005
Minister of State (Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food)
29th Jul 1999 - 7th Jun 2001
Minister of State (Foreign and Commonwealth Office)
28th Jul 1998 - 29th Jul 1999
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th May 1997 - 28th Jul 1998


Division Voting information

Baroness Quin has voted in 984 divisions, and 10 times against the majority of their Party.

27 Feb 2017 - European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Labour Aye votes vs 53 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 136 Noes - 299
18 Nov 2015 - European Union Referendum Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour Aye votes vs 37 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 116 Noes - 214
26 Oct 2015 - Tax Credits (Income Thresholds and Determination of Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour Aye votes vs 6 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 99 Noes - 310
29 Oct 2013 - Care Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 46 Labour No votes vs 52 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 96 Noes - 271
14 Mar 2007 - House of Lords: Reform - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 45 Labour No votes vs 95 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 361 Noes - 121
14 Mar 2007 - House of Lords: Reform - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Labour Aye votes vs 105 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 46 Noes - 409
14 Mar 2007 - House of Lords: Reform - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Labour Aye votes vs 104 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 45 Noes - 392
14 Mar 2007 - House of Lords: Reform - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Labour Aye votes vs 100 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 114 Noes - 336
14 Mar 2007 - House of Lords: Reform - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 56 Labour Aye votes vs 79 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 122 Noes - 326
10 Oct 2006 - Police and Justice Bill - View Vote Context
Baroness Quin voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 11 Labour Aye votes vs 95 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 211 Noes - 98
View All Baroness Quin Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Henley (Conservative)
(59 debate interactions)
Lord Freud (Conservative)
(16 debate interactions)
Lord True (Conservative)
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
(15 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(23 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Finance Act 2019
(3,936 words contributed)
Elections Act 2022
(2,724 words contributed)
Ivory Act 2018
(2,304 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Baroness Quin's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Baroness Quin, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Baroness Quin has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Baroness Quin has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Baroness Quin has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Baroness Quin has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


89 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
2 Other Department Questions
9th Feb 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total cost of the Review of the Balance of Competences between the United Kingdom and the European Union to the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills and its associated agencies, broken down by (1) staff time, (2) printing costs, (3) running of engagement events, (4) witness expenses, (5) publicity of the reports, and (6) any and all other associated costs.

As you will be aware, the Balance of Competences Review concluded in December. It was the most comprehensive analysis of the UK’s relationship with the EU ever undertaken. The review involved a large number of Departments across Whitehall to produce 32 reports. The Review was based on the evidence and views received through widespread consultation with interested parties from across society. Across the whole review, departments received close to 2,300 evidence submissions. Departments held over 250 events, attended by around 2,100 stakeholders.

It was important that what is an unprecedented examination of EU membership was done with appropriate time and care. But the government is also very conscious of the need to ensure value for money in everything it does.

(1) Staff time

Between 2012-2013, the Balance of Competences Review Team in the Department was staffed by the equivalent of one Grade 7 (salary range £47, 545 - £55,882), and one intern (salary range £23,869 – £27, 281) dedicating 100% of their time to the review to project manage 7 BIS led reports and 1 joint report. Between 2013 – 2014 this was reduced to one Grade 7. Between 2012 – 2014 one Deputy Director (salary range £62,000 - £117,800) dedicated 20% of their time as the senior reporting officer for the review. All other work on the review was allocated, according to need, to existing staff within the Department. Therefore, providing a full breakdown of staff time and costs would exceed the disproportionate cost threshold.

(2) Printing costs

Printing and publication for the 8 Departmental reports, was coordinated centrally but paid for by the Department, with the exception of the Single Market Report which was printed in-house. Printing and publication costs for all 8 reports totalled £32,821.94. The costs for all 32 reports was £133, 053 This figure was a partial figure, covering the printing of some, but not all, reports across the whole review.

(3) Running of Engagement events

Each policy team in the Department held a wide range of engagement events over the 2 years; the department did not incur any costs for the running of these events. The facilities for hosting these events were either provided by other Government Departments or by business partners or were held on department premises at no extra cost to the department.

(4) Witness

From centrally held figures, we understand that across the whole of the Balance of Competences Review witness expenses amounted to approximately £2,255.00.

(5) Publicity

The Department did not incur any publicity costs as we published the reports and the call for evidence via email, social media and the Government website.

(6) All other associated costs

Between 2012 – 2014 the Department commissioned research and analysis to form part of the literature review to provide the reports with legal analysis to ensure the reports were neither too analytical or too speculative and political, but instead adhere to the agreed treaties. The cost for all 8 reports was £108, 738.28.


Department officials incurred some additional associated costs due to travel to meetings and stakeholder events in the UK. Some officials also incurred costs related to events in Brussels. We estimate that the additional travel costs incurred amounted to less than £300.

29th Jul 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what are their priorities regarding the European Union cohesion policy.

The budget and main regulations governing European Union cohesion policy for the 2014-20 programming period were agreed formally in December 2013. The focus now is on effective implementation.

9th Feb 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total cost of the Review of the Balance of Competences between the United Kingdom and the European Union to the Treasury Solicitor’s Department and its associated agencies, broken down by (1) staff time, (2) printing costs, (3) running of engagement events, (4) witness expenses, (5) publicity of the reports, and (6) any and all other associated costs.

As you will be aware, the Balance of Competences Review concluded in December. It was the most comprehensive analysis of the UK’s relationship with the EU ever undertaken. The Review involved a large number of Departments across Whitehall to produce the 32 reports. The Review was based on the evidence and views received through widespread consultation with interested parties from across society. Across the whole review, departments received close to 2,300 evidence submissions. Departments held over 250 events, attended by around 2,100 stakeholders.

It was important that what is an unprecedented examination of EU membership was done with appropriate time and care. But the government is also very conscious of the need to ensure value for money in everything that it does.

Lawyers in the Cabinet Office European Law Division of the Treasury Solicitor’s Department coordinated legal work on the Review. According to the Department’s time recording information, they spent a total of 192.5 hours on the Review between October 2013 (the earliest date from which this information is available) and December 2014. This consisted of 81 hours at Director level (salary range £85,000 to £162,500), 57 hours at Deputy Director level (salary range £62,000 to £117,800), and 54.5 hours at Grade 6 level (salary range £60,000 to £73,100).

Lawyers in other parts of the Treasury Solicitor’s Department provided legal services to a range of Government Departments in the course of the Review. They did so as part of their normal work, and did not separately record time spent on the Review. Providing a full breakdown of staff time and costs would exceed the disproportionate cost threshold.

The Department did not incur any other costs arising from the Review.

9th Feb 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total cost of the Review of the Balance of Competences between the United Kingdom and the European Union to the Attorney General’s Office and its associated agencies, broken down by (1) staff time, (2) printing costs, (3) running of engagement events, (4) witness expenses, (5) publicity of the reports, and (6) any and all other associated costs.

The Attorney General’s Office did not incur any costs in the Government’s Balance of Competence review.

9th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the report from the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament on Russian influence in UK politics will be published.

In line with his responsibilities in the Justice and Security Act 2013, the Prime Minister carefully considered and approved the report, and is content that its publication would not prejudice the functions of those bodies that safeguard our national security.

We acknowledge the public’s interest in the publication of the report; however the report itself is the property of the independent ISC. As such it is not for the Government to publish it; it is for the ISC to lay it before Parliament. Once a new Committee has been established, it will be up to them to choose when they wish to publish it. The process to establish a new Committee has already begun.

Earl Howe
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords
30th Oct 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much it cost to place the advert in Le Monde on 23 October entitled Brexit—31st October.

Information relating to individual adverts in specific locations is only obtainable at disproportionate cost.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
24th Oct 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much the advert placed in Le Monde on 23 February entitled Brexit—31st October cost.

Her Majesty’s Government did not place any adverts in Le Monde on 23 February.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
24th Oct 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many adverts they have placed in newspapers in EU27 countries alerting businesses to Brexit on 31 October; and what was the total cost of those adverts.

“Get Ready for Brexit” campaign activity has taken place in all 27 EU countries to make sure citizens and businesses have the facts they need to know about the steps they need to take to be ready for when the UK leaves the EU.

The overall costs of the public information campaign will be published monthly on a rolling basis as part of routine government transparency.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
20th Feb 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions members of the Cabinet have held on the impact of Brexit with (1) business, and (2) local government, representatives of the north east of England in the last three months.

Cabinet ministers have visited the North East of England on a number of occasions since the Referendum. The Government is committed to positive and productive engagement with key business stakeholders and local government in the North East, as well as all of the UK, to understand the potential impact and opportunities presented by EU Exit.

10th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what information they have concerning the proportion of employees working shifts of more than six hours who do not receive payment for the rest breaks to which they are entitled.

In Great Britain, working hours are governed by the Working Time Regulations, which set the maximum working hours and minimum rest breaks workers are entitled to. All workers are entitled to a minimum of 20 minutes’ rest break if they work at least six hours, which may be paid or unpaid depending on the employment contract. Some workers such as shift workers may be entitled to ‘compensatory rest’ if they don’t have the right to specific rest breaks.

Payment for rest breaks is a matter for individual contracts.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what information they hold on the number of UK companies who have set up (1) companies, and (2) distribution hubs, in the EU since 1 January; and the number of jobs that have been created in the EU as a result.

Companies House does not hold any information on how many companies have set up (1) companies and (2) distribution hubs, in the EU since 1 January, and the number of jobs that have been created in the EU as a result.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their policy regarding UK implementation of the 2019 Copyright Directive.

The deadline for implementing the EU Copyright Directive is 7 June 2021. The United Kingdom left the European Union on the 31 January and the transition period will end on 31 December 2020. Therefore, the United Kingdom will not be required to implement the Directive, and the Government has no plans to do so.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Sep 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they last met the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders to discuss the effects of a no-deal Brexit; and what was the outcome of those discussions.

We are working closely with businesses across the country to help ensure they are prepared for the UK leaving the EU on the 31st October, whatever the circumstances. This includes regular engagement with the automotive industry by both BEIS ministers and officials to discuss plans for no-deal.

Details of ministerial meetings with external bodies are published on the Gov.uk website of the relevant Department.

28th Jun 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for providing extra resources to the Competition and Markets Authority as a result of the UK no longer being a member of the EU.

At the Autumn Budget 2017, my rt. hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer committed £3 billion over the next two financial years to helping departments, including the CMA, and the devolved administrations to prepare for our exit from the EU. As part of the Spring Statement 2018, my rt. hon. Friend the Chief Secretary to the Treasury announced that the CMA has been allocated an additional £23.6m in 2018-2019 to prepare for EU exit.

9th Jan 2017
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what recent studies they have undertaken into retail petrol and diesel price differences across the nations and regions of the UK.

Her Majesty’s Government believes that a competitive market is the best way to keep prices low. Retail fuels markets are subject to UK competition law under the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA).

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not collect statistics by the nations or the regions of the UK but it does publish weekly UK statistics retail petrol and diesel prices: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/oil-and-petroleum-products-weekly-statistics. On 9 January 2017 the average retail price for petrol and diesel was 118.0 pence per litre and 121.3 pence per litre respectively.

The AA publishes data on regional retail petrol and diesel price differences across the UK: http://www.theaa.com/driving-advice/driving-costs/fuel-prices.

9th Jan 2017
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what information they have about retail petrol and diesel price differences across the UK.

Her Majesty’s Government believes that a competitive market is the best way to keep prices low. Retail fuels markets are subject to UK competition law under the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA).

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not collect statistics by the nations or the regions of the UK but it does publish weekly UK statistics retail petrol and diesel prices: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/oil-and-petroleum-products-weekly-statistics. On 9 January 2017 the average retail price for petrol and diesel was 118.0 pence per litre and 121.3 pence per litre respectively.

The AA publishes data on regional retail petrol and diesel price differences across the UK: http://www.theaa.com/driving-advice/driving-costs/fuel-prices.

22nd Mar 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of the proportion of people on zero-hours contracts who are seeking full-time employment with guaranteed pay and hours of work.

The Government has not made an assessment.

ONS statistics published on 9 March 2016, for the fourth quarter of 2015, show that for those individuals on a zero hours contract in their main job, 63 per cent were not looking for more hours or a different job.

12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the UK’s creative industries about continued UK participation in the EU Creative Europe programme.

The government has made the decision not to seek participation in Creative Europe in the next Multiannual Financial Framework. Prior to this decision, Ministers and officials engaged with relevant parts of industry and government-funded screen bodies including the British Film Institute.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of continued adherence in the UK to the revised Audiovisual Media Services Directive.

Implementation of the revised Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD) is required as part of the United Kingdom’s Withdrawal Agreement. Under the terms of this agreement, the UK will implement EU law adopted while it was a Member State where the implementation date falls within the transition period. After the transition period, the transposed measures in the Directive will become retained EU law and continue to apply to citizens and companies in the UK. Furthermore, the government has made a statutory instrument, the Broadcasting (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019, to correct deficiencies in broadcasting legislation as a result of leaving the EU and ensure that Ofcom continues to have effective oversight of broadcasting in the UK.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
12th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many firms in the creative industry sector formerly based in the UK have relocated to the EU in (1) 2016–18, (2) 2019, and (3) since 31 January 2020.

DCMS does not track this information.

Beyond the transition period, the UK has set out its proposals to the EU in a range of areas, making clear that we want a Canada-style relationship, based on a comprehensive Free Trade Agreement supplemented by other international agreements.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
5th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have made a study of the effectiveness of legislation in force in (1) France, and (2) Germany, to protect consumers from online harms.

Ministers and officials meet with their international counterparts, including the French and German governments, on a range of issues, including work to tackle online harms.

Many of the UK’s international partners are developing new regulatory approaches to tackle online harms. As set out in the Online Harms White Paper, the Government will continue to share experiences and work with partners internationally as we develop our own approach.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
16th Jul 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Commercial Broadcasters Association to ensure that international broadcasters and TV channels based in the UK will be able to continue to broadcast after Brexit as at present.

The government has been engaging extensively with the Commercial Broadcasters Association (COBA) and its members to discuss the impact of Brexit on international broadcasters based in the UK.

Over the past year, DCMS has hosted a number of ministerial roundtables on the topic of Brexit, attended by the COBA members. Ministers and officials have also held regular bilateral meetings with financial and policy teams from a variety of international broadcasting firms regarding the implications of our exit from the EU for these companies. COBA has been instrumental for enhancing the government’s understanding of sector’s priorities and concerns relating to EU Exit.

As set out by the recently published Brexit White paper, the UK is seeking the best possible arrangement for broadcasting that will work for the broadcasting sector, and we are committed to continue working with COBA members to understand their needs and concerns.

Lord Ashton of Hyde
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Oct 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what meetings they have held with representatives of the audio-visual industry about the implications for the industry of the result of the referendum on EU membership; and which government departments have been involved in such meetings.

The Government is determined to ensure the UK audio-visual industry thrives outside of the EU. The Secretary of State held a roundtable with key stakeholders to discuss implications for the industry, and over the coming weeks and months government will be engaging in further discussions with the businesses and key stakeholders.

Lord Ashton of Hyde
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
3rd Oct 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the effects of the UK leaving the EU on the audio-visual industry.

The Government is determined to ensure the UK audio-visual industry thrives outside of the EU. The Secretary of State held a roundtable with key stakeholders to discuss implications for the industry, and over the coming weeks and months government will be engaging in further discussions with the businesses and key stakeholders.

Lord Ashton of Hyde
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms (HM Household) (Chief Whip, House of Lords)
9th Feb 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total cost of the Review of the Balance of Competences between the United Kingdom and the European Union to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and its associated agencies, broken down by (1) staff time, (2) printing costs, (3) running of engagement events, (4) witness expenses, (5) publicity of the reports, and (6) any and all other associated costs.

As you will be aware, the Balance of Competences Review concluded in December. It was the most comprehensive analysis of the UK’s relationship with the EU ever undertaken. The Review involved a large number of Departments across Whitehall to produce the 32 reports. The Review was based on the evidence and views received through widespread consultation with interested parties from across society. Across the whole review, departments received close to 2,300 evidence submissions. Departments held over 250 events, attended by around 2,100 stakeholders.

It was important that what is an unprecedented examination of EU membership was done with appropriate time and care. But the government is also very conscious of the need to ensure value for money in everything that it does.

Work on the Review was allocated according to need to existing staff within the Department. Providing a full breakdown of staff time and costs would exceed the disproportionate cost threshold.

The Department of Culture, Media and Sport paid £3,321.15 for printing and publication of the Culture, Tourism and Sport report.

One engagement event for the Culture, Tourism and Sport report was held in Brussels and cost approximately £500. Other engagement events were held within the Department at no extra material cost.

Across the whole of the Balance of Competences Review witness expenses amounted to approximately £2,255.00.

There was no cost for the publicity of the Culture, Tourism and Sport report, which utilised existing free social media and internet channels. There were no other associated costs.

Lord Wallace of Saltaire
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Cabinet Office)
2nd Feb 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their policy in respect of the payment of at least the level of the "Living Wage" to staff employed in public museums and galleries.

The Government supports the London Living Wage, where possible. However, the Department's sponsored Museums and Galleries operate at arm's length from the Department, and as such they have responsibility for their own staffing and service arrangements, including wage levels. Those museums which are not sponsored by the Department make such staffing arrangements as they feel is appropriate.

2nd Feb 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have had with the Director of the National Gallery about the transfer of Gallery employees to a private company.

The Department was informed of the National Gallery's proposal to outsource visitor services and security in July 2014. The National Gallery operates at arm's length from the Department, and as such has responsibility for its own staffing and service arrangements.

24th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have they have made of the number of permissive access footpaths that have been closed to the public since permissive access payments provided through legacy environmental stewardship schemes ceased following the introduction of the Countryside Stewardship scheme.

Financial support for the permissive access options within agri-environment schemes was withdrawn by Defra Ministers as part of the Comprehensive Spending Review in 2010. Existing agreements under the original Countryside Stewardship Scheme (CSS) and Higher Level Stewardship Scheme (HLS) were allowed to run their course to expiry, with final agreements ending by 2021.

Since 2010, agreements providing about 31,000 kilometres of CSS and 27,500 kilometres of HLS permissive linear access paths (footpath, bridleway/cycle routes, reduced mobility access and upgrades to existing paths) have expired along with 5500 ha (CSS) and 4000 ha (HLS) of permissive open access. These 58,500 km of paths and 9,500 ha of open access were present on about 3600 sites. Agreement holders with permissive access options were initially encouraged to continue offering access, if practicable, without payment, but we do not have any record of the extent to which this occurred. During 2021/22 Natural England, on behalf of Defra, will be conducting research to determine what happened to access provision after the end of Stewardship agreements to help inform future public access provision within schemes.

5th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration, if any, they gave to the provision of financial help to those on low incomes when introducing the 2015 rules following their consultation Reform of the Regulatory System to Control Small Sewage Discharges from Septic Tanks and Small Sewage Treatment Plants in England.

A Regulatory Impact Assessment was carried out at the time that the 2015 rules were introduced. While no financial help is available for upgrading or replacing small sewage discharges regulated under General Binding Rules, the Environment Agency will agree a reasonable timescale with the owner where it identifies that improvements are required.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration, if any, they gave to providing financial help to householders when introducing the 2015 rules following their consultation on Reform of the Regulatory System to Control Small Sewage Discharges from Septic Tanks and Small Sewage Treatment Plants in England where the discharge facilities were situated within a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

A Regulatory Impact Assessment was carried out at the time that the 2015 rules were introduced. While no financial help is available for upgrading or replacing small sewage discharges regulated under General Binding Rules, the Environment Agency will agree a reasonable timescale with the owner where it identifies that improvements are required.

With specific regard to any discharge facilities situated within a Site of Special Scientific Interest, additional regulatory requirements only arise as a direct consequence of that if the discharge in question was first made on or after 1 January 2015.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
5th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what information they currently hold about the number of people on low incomes who are affected by the 2015 rules following their consultation on Reform of the Regulatory System to Control Small Sewage Discharges from Septic Tanks and Small Sewage Treatment Plants in England.

Neither the Environment Agency nor Defra holds any information regarding the number of people on low incomes who rely on non-mains sewerage systems.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking, if any, to ensure continued access for British citizens to the EU pet passport scheme after Brexit.

The non-commercial movement of cats, dogs and ferrets is covered by the EU Pet Travel Scheme which has three categorisations of third country: unlisted, Part 1 listed and Part 2 listed. Third countries can apply to the European Commission to be listed under the EU Pet Travel Scheme.

The UK submitted its application to allow the UK to become a Part 1 listed third country under Annex II of the EU Pet Travel Regulations to the European Commission in January 2019. Should the UK become a Part 1 listed country, there would be little change to the current arrangements, with only minor changes needed for documentation and, in most cases, no change for owners from what they currently need to do in terms of their animal’s health preparation. It is now for the Commission to consider our application for listed status.

6th Feb 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have held, in conjunction where appropriate with the devolved administrations, with representatives of the UK's sheep farming industry about finding new export opportunities for that industry post-Brexit.

Defra Ministers and officials have regular meetings with the devolved administrations and with representatives of the UK’s sheep farming industry to discuss a wide range of issues affecting the sheep sector.

6th Feb 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have held, in conjunction where appropriate with the devolved administrations, with representatives of the UK's sheep farming industry about maintaining and increasing sheep meat exports to the EU post-Brexit.

Defra Ministers and officials have regular meetings with the devolved administrations and with representatives of the UK’s sheep farming industry to discuss a wide range of issues affecting the sheep sector.

6th Apr 2017
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their estimate of the increase in the number of fines for fly-tipping which have been issued since the introduction of on-the-spot penalty notices on 9 May 2016.

Data on fly-tipping is reported to Defra by all local authorities in England. This data includes all Fixed Penalty Notices issued for fly-tipping offences. It is not currently possible to separate out information for on-the-spot penalty notices alone. We hope to publish the data for 2016/17 before the end of the year.

5th Sep 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they plan to undertake a consultation with farmers and farmers' organisations on any proposal to release lynx into Kielder Forest in Northumberland.

In accordance with the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, Natural England, as the licensing authority, considers any application for the reintroduction of former native species in England.

No application has been received to reintroduce lynx into England. If a licence application is received Natural England would consider it carefully in accordance with appropriate international guidelines, taking account of socio-economic impacts and the impact on the welfare of the animals themselves.

4th Feb 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what plans they have to ensure timely and effective processing of Rural Payments Agency payments to farmers in 2016.


The 2015 Basic Payment Scheme payment window runs between December 2015 and June 2016. As of the end of January the Rural Payments Agency had paid around 66,800 farmers approximately £1 billion. The Rural Payments Agency is focused on paying the remainder as promptly as possible.

2015 was the first year of the new complex Common Agricultural Policy. The Rural Payments Agency anticipates improvements on payment performance for the 2016 Basic Payment Scheme.

4th Feb 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government when they expect all valid claims from farmers in 2015 to the Rural Payments Agency to be paid.


The 2015 Basic Payment Scheme payment window runs between December 2015 and June 2016. As of the end of January the Rural Payments Agency had paid around 66,800 farmers approximately £1 billion. The Rural Payments Agency is focused on paying the remainder as promptly as possible.

2015 was the first year of the new complex Common Agricultural Policy. The Rural Payments Agency anticipates improvements on payment performance for the 2016 Basic Payment Scheme.

24th Jul 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have received from the insurance industry about their proposals for the services sector outlined in The future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union (Cm 9593), published in July.

Ministers and officials from my Department and across Government continue to engage broadly across all sectors - including the services industry - and across the UK to hear the business’ priorities and issues relating to our exit.

Representatives from services, including insurance, and other industries met with the Secretary of State and all the ministers in my Department to discuss the proposals made in the White Paper at Chevening House on 20 July.

The proposals outlined in the White Paper set out an ambitious and credible proposition for a close future relationship on financial services with the EU. This would provide stable and predictable access to each other’s markets, while recognising that the UK and the EU will exercise autonomy over regulatory decisions through domestic equivalence processes, and protect financial stability.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th Jul 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with representatives of (1) the City of London Corporation, and (2) the City of London financial services sector about the proposals for the financial services sector in The future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union (Cm9593), published in July.

Ministers and officials from my Department and across Government continue to engage broadly across all sectors - including the financial services sector - and across the UK to hear the business’ priorities and issues relating to our exit.

The Secretary of State and all the ministers in my Department met with business leaders from across the economy to discuss the White Paper at Chevening House on 20 July. This included a deep dive session on financial services with major firms and financial institutions, which included discussions on the proposed new economic and regulatory arrangement.

In addition, ministers and officials in the Treasury continue to engage closely with firms across the Financial Services sector on the White Paper and wider EU exit issues.

The proposals outlined in the White Paper set out an ambitious and credible proposition for a close future relationship on financial services with the EU. This would provide stable and predictable access to each other’s markets, while recognising that the UK and the EU will exercise autonomy over regulatory decisions through domestic equivalence processes, and protect financial stability.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Mar 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assurances they have given to the government of Gibraltar regarding Gibraltar’s access to the EU Single Market for services after Brexit.

The Government has been clear that we are leaving the Single Market when we leave the EU. We are discussing this matter with the Government of Gibraltar through the Joint Ministerial Council (Gibraltar EU Negotiations) chaired by Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Robin Walker MP. We are fully involving Gibraltar as we leave the EU, to ensure their interests are properly taken into account.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Mar 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they are giving to the economy of Gibraltar in negotiations on the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

The UK Government is working closely with the Government of Gibraltar to agree Gibraltar’s particular priorities in EU exit. Through this work, we know that Gibraltar also values its strong trade with the UK, particularly in financial services and online gambling. We are discussing all these issues with the Government of Gibraltar through the Joint Ministerial Council (Gibraltar EU Negotiations). Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Robin Walker MP chaired the most recent meeting of the JMC (GEN) on 8 March where we agreed a series of measures, including on the economy, detailed in my Written Ministerial Statement of 15 March.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Mar 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what mechanisms they have established to facilitate regular consultation with the government and people of Gibraltar in relation to Brexit negotiations.

The UK Government is clear that we will fully involve Gibraltar as we leave the EU, to ensure their interests are properly taken into account. We have established the quarterly Joint Ministerial Council (Gibraltar EU Negotiations) to deliver on this commitment. Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Robin Walker MP chaired the sixth meeting of the JMC (GEN) on 8 March, with the Economic Secretary to the Treasury and the Minister for Europe alongside the Chief Minister, Deputy Chief Minister, Finance Minister and Attorney General of Gibraltar. This is underpinned by extensive official-level engagement, including through working groups on key priorities such as financial services.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
20th Feb 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is their policy to ensure that no region of the UK will see economic growth reduce as a result of Brexit.

We are committed to getting the best possible deal for the United Kingdom - a deal that works for all parts of the UK.

We continue to engage with businesses and industry bodies from all sectors of the economy, and all regions and nations of the UK, in order to inform our negotiations.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
10th Jul 2017
Her Majesty's Government what their estimate of the number of UK nationals working in EU agencies that are located in (1) the UK, and (2) elsewhere in the EU.

The UK Government does not hold this information. Information relating to the breakdown by nationality of staff of the EU agencies is held by the EU agencies themselves. This information is sometimes published on their websites.

2nd Feb 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government in what ways they are currently supporting the education and advancement of women in Afghanistan.

The UK has prioritised education for girls as part of its development support to Afghanistan. The UK provides £58 million through its Girls Education Challenge Fund, which supports over 180,000 girls in some of the poorest rural and hard to reach areas of Afghanistan to have better access to a quality education. In addition the UK supports the Afghan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF), a World-Bank managed multi-donor fund. A proportion of this is used to support education and as a result, in 2015 there were more than 3.2 million Afghan girls attending school compared to virtually none in 2001.

The UK also supports programmes to protect women from violence, promote women’s economic empowerment, and strengthen political participation – all necessary to achieve lasting and transformative change for women in Afghanistan.

23rd Jul 2014
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what consideration they give, when allocating aid to Ethiopia, to the human rights situation in that country, particularly in relation to the Oromo population.

When allocating aid to Ethiopia, Her Majesty’s Government assesses the commitment of the Ethiopian government to our ‘Partnership Principles’, one of which relates to ‘Human Rights and International Obligations’. This assessment shapes how we work with the Government of Ethiopia in delivery of our aid.

We are concerned at recent events related to student protests in Oromia and have raised this issue at the highest levels of the Ethiopian government. We will continue to raise our concerns, press for an investigation into what happened, and for any members of the security forces who have used excessive force to be held to account.

14th May 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government with which countries, in order of priority, they wish to conclude trade deals post-Brexit; and what estimate they have made, if any, of the likely timescale of concluding such deals.

Our priority is to be in a position to begin formal negotiations with key partners after we leave the EU, and to then make progress towards substantive agreements, so long as such agreements work for the whole of the UK. We have completed public consultations on potential future free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations with the United States, Australia and New Zealand, and on the UK’s potential accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). We plan to publish Government responses for each of the four consultations before any formal negotiations begin.

Trade agreements vary in shape, scope and form, and there is no “average” timeframe for completion. For example, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between the EU and Canada took seven years to negotiate, the China-Switzerland FTA took two, but the USA-Jordan FTA negotiations only four months. The Government is clear that its objective is to negotiate the best possible FTAs for the whole of the UK, in the interests of business and consumers.

While we are looking to forge new agreements, the Government is also seeking continuity for our existing EU trade agreements as we leave the EU. A list of all signed trade continuity agreements is available on the GOV.UK website.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
20th Mar 2017
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the answer by Baroness Mobarik on 24 January (HL Deb, col 550) concerning UK exports, what criteria the Department for International Trade uses in deciding which markets and sectors to target through its export campaigns.

No set criteria are used in deciding which market-sectors should be export campaigns. Instead a range of different factors determine the campaigns. Primarily, we consider the ability of Government to add value to UK exports as recorded by the ONS. This is judged over a five-year forecasting period. We also consider the diversification across sectors and markets to ensure the portfolio of export campaigns is balanced. It is a proven framework for analysing where Government interventions can add the most value for the benefit of the whole of the UK.

20th Mar 2017
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the answer by Baroness Mobarik on 24 January (HL Deb, col 550) concerning UK exports, what export campaigns are currently sponsored by the Department for International Trade, broken down by market and sector.

It is the Department for International Trade’s policy not to disclose campaigns by market and sector. This is because many of the campaigns relate to specific commercial deals targeted by UK firms with Government support. Disclosing that information may put at risk the commercial deals they are pursuing.

28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had, and plan to have, with (1) The Road Haulage Association, and (2) The Freight Transport Association, about the negotiations on the UK’s future relationship with the EU.

The Department engages with the FTA and RHA regularly on issues related to the UK’s departure from the EU, preparations for the end of the Transition Period and the progress of the ongoing negotiations on the UK’s future relationship with the EU.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 20 January (HL273), whether they will now answer the question put, namely, on what dates HS2 is expected to reach (1) Newcastle, and (2) Edinburgh.

Currently, HS2 services to Newcastle and Edinburgh will start between 2036 and 2040. However, as recommended by the Oakervee review, government will work with the National Infrastructure Commission to develop an integrated plan for rail investment in the North and Midlands. This will look at HS2, Northern Powerhouse Rail, and our multi-billion-pound rail investment programme – to assess whether can deliver these projects faster, cheaper, and with greater benefits and fewer impacts for the North and Midlands.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect HS2 to extend to (1) Newcastle, and (2) Edinburgh.

As currently planned, HS2 trains will run directly to Newcastle via a connection to the East Coast Mainline. HS2 Services are currently planned to run directly to Edinburgh via a connection to the West Coast Mainline, which is dependent on the completion of Phase 2b. Proposed services will offer reduced journey times with London.

In August 2019, the Prime Minister asked Douglas Oakervee to chair an independent review of HS2 to provide advice on how and whether to proceed. The Government will set out the next steps for High Speed 2 in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Nov 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what evidence they have to support the statement in the 2012 impact assessment <i>Housing Benefit: Under-occupation of social housing</i> that the introduction of the under-occupancy charge would have no impact on health and well-being.

Following on from the 2012 impact assessment an independent two year evaluation was commissioned that looked at the effects of this policy.


The report is due to be published by the end of the year.


8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when, and for what reason, they decided to merge the North East region and the Yorkshire and Humberside region in their statistics on the incidence of COVID-19 and that virus's reinfection rates. [T]

Reporting on COVID-19 is broken down by NHS England’s seven regional teams. The North East and Yorkshire is one of the seven regional teams and so the statistics are merged for the North East and Yorkshire and Humber regions.

2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, what plans they have to introduce regional strategies to address COVID-19 death and infection rates. [T]

We are currently considering a range of options for addressing future phases of the COVID-19, including the implementation of tailoring containment measures to the regional and local level. As recently announced, each local authority will be given funding to develop local outbreak control plans, working with the local National Health Service, Public Health England and other stakeholders.

Any decisions on how to approach the mid- to long-term strategy to address the pandemic will be led by the science, build on the Government’s test and trace strategy, and be supported by the new Joint Biosecurity Centre.

21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) the British Medical Association and (2) other health sector representatives about the availability of hospital beds for patients needing urgent treatment for something other than COVID-19.

The Department regularly engages with the British Medical Association and other health sector representatives such as National Health Service trade unions, including through the Social Partnership Forum (SPF). SPF meetings are now exclusively focused on COVID-19 workforce issues.

19th Dec 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking, if any, to ensure continued access for British citizens to health services in the EU after Brexit, including continued access to the benefits of the European Health Insurance Card.

The agreement we have reached with the European Union is that until 31 December 2020 there will be no changes to reciprocal healthcare access for pensioners, workers, students, tourists and other visitors, the European Health Insurance Card scheme, or planned treatment.

People who have settled in the EU or United Kingdom before 31 December 2020, will continue to have life-long reciprocal healthcare rights provided they remain covered under the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement. This means existing healthcare arrangements will not change for those UK nationals who are resident in the EU and EU citizens in the UK before 31 December 2020, for as long as they are living in that country and covered by the agreement.

We want to continue discussing the future of reciprocal healthcare arrangements with the EU as part of the future relationship discussions.

27th Nov 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what arrangements they have made with the EU for the European Health Insurance Card to continue to be used by British citizens when travelling within the EU.

The current structure of European Union rules and regulations will apply during the implementation period, and this includes cover under the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) scheme.

With regard to EHIC cover under the Withdrawal Agreement, where the United Kingdom, or an EU 27 Member State, is responsible for the healthcare of those within scope of the social security coordination part of the Withdrawal Agreement, such individuals will be entitled to EHIC cover for as long as they remain in scope. We have also agreed to protect the rights of individuals who are in a cross-border situation at the end of the implementation period, and entitled to an EHIC, to continue to benefit from that scheme for as long as that cross-border situation in the State they are in continues.

In the White Paper of July 2018, The future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union, the UK Government has stated that it is seeking agreement on reciprocal healthcare including continued participation in the EHIC scheme.

24th May 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to ensure that UK citizens can participate in the European Health Card scheme (1) during, and (2) after, the transition period following the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

We have agreed reciprocal healthcare arrangements for the purposes of the Withdrawal Agreement with the European Union. The current structure of EU rules and regulations will apply until the end of the implementation period, including the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) scheme.

Individuals in scope of the Withdrawal Agreement will be entitled to reciprocal healthcare cover on the terms laid out under that deal.

Reciprocal healthcare rights for individuals not in scope of the Withdrawal Agreement will be a matter for further negotiation with the EU. We have been clear that we want all current and future United Kingdom EHIC holders to benefit from EHIC rights, subject to a reciprocal deal.

At every step of the negotiations we will work to ensure the best possible outcome for the British people.

23rd Apr 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the possible increases in travel insurance for UK citizens if the UK were no longer to be part of the European Health Insurance Card scheme after Brexit.

The Department has not made a formal assessment of the possible increases in travel insurance for United Kingdom citizens if the UK were no longer to be part of the European Health Insurance Card scheme after Brexit.

However, the Department engages regularly with the Association of British Insurers and industry to discuss matters relating to reciprocal healthcare and this will continue.

27th Feb 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in the light of proposals to restrict access to prescription-based vitamin D maintenance, whether they will undertake a study into how such proposals might affect at-risk groups, as set out in NICE Guidelines 56-2, and in particular those in the at-risk groups on low or fixed incomes.

NHS England undertook a study into how the proposals in the consultation Conditions for which over the counter items should not routinely be prescribed in primary care: A Consultation on guidance for CCGs might affect at-risk groups by accompanying the consultation with a full Equality and Health Inequalities Impact Assessment. The Impact Assessment, Equality and Health Inequalities – Full Analysis Form – Conditions for which over the counter items should not routinely be prescribed in primary care sets out how the proposals may affect groups protected by the Equality Act 2010 and those people on low income and ethnic minorities, including those at-risk groups, as set out in National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines. Copies of the consultation and Impact Assessment are attached.

In the summer months most people should be able to get all the vitamin D they need from sunlight on the skin. It is also found in some foods – oily fish, red meat, liver, egg yolks and fortified foods – such as most fat spreads and some breakfast cereals.

The Advisory Committee on Borderline Substances states that vitamins and minerals should be prescribed only in the management of actual or potential vitamin or mineral deficiency, and are not to be prescribed as dietary supplements. We understand that NHS England’s current consultation is in line with this. Prescribing vitamin D for maintenance would be classed as a treatment for prevention or as a dietary supplement.

4th Dec 2017
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to ensure that women over 60 years old are routinely offered bone density scans to ascertain bone health.

Fracture liaison services (FLS) provide secondary prevention for fragility fractures. These services identify patients in secondary and/or primary care who have suffered a fragility fracture and assess the patient’s risk of future fragility fracture in a timely fashion. A FLS then provides advice and/or therapy to reduce that risk.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) evidence based guideline Osteoporosis: assessing the risk of fragility fracture, updated in February 2017, sets out best practice on management of fracture risk in patients with osteoporosis. A copy of the guideline is attached. The guidance recommends that clinicians consider assessment of fracture risk in all women aged 65 years and over and all men aged 75 years and over. Women aged less than 65 years and men aged less than 75 years should be considered for assessment in the presence of certain risk factors, such as a family history of hip fracture or low body mass index.

Regarding bone density scanning, NICE recommends it be considered after patients have first been assessed using a validated risk assessment tool, such as FRAX, which clinicians can use to evaluate the 10-year probability of bone fracture risk in patient. The guidance also recommends other circumstances where bone density scanning should be considered, including for patients who are to undergo treatment which may affect bone density, such as certain treatments for breast or prostate cancer.

4th Dec 2017
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to ensure that all NHS users over 50 years old have access to Fracture Liaison Services to identify the link between any fracture and the bone health of the patient.

Fracture liaison services (FLS) provide secondary prevention for fragility fractures. These services identify patients in secondary and/or primary care who have suffered a fragility fracture and assess the patient’s risk of future fragility fracture in a timely fashion. A FLS then provides advice and/or therapy to reduce that risk.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) evidence based guideline Osteoporosis: assessing the risk of fragility fracture, updated in February 2017, sets out best practice on management of fracture risk in patients with osteoporosis. A copy of the guideline is attached. The guidance recommends that clinicians consider assessment of fracture risk in all women aged 65 years and over and all men aged 75 years and over. Women aged less than 65 years and men aged less than 75 years should be considered for assessment in the presence of certain risk factors, such as a family history of hip fracture or low body mass index.

Regarding bone density scanning, NICE recommends it be considered after patients have first been assessed using a validated risk assessment tool, such as FRAX, which clinicians can use to evaluate the 10-year probability of bone fracture risk in patient. The guidance also recommends other circumstances where bone density scanning should be considered, including for patients who are to undergo treatment which may affect bone density, such as certain treatments for breast or prostate cancer.

7th Nov 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they will consider the fortification of foods with vitamin D in order to implement the Reference Nutrient Intake for vitamin D recommended by the report of the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition on <i>Vitamin D and health</i>.

Following the recommendations of the report by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition on Vitamin D and Health, Public Health England has updated advice on vitamin D on the NHS Choices website. A copy of the NHS Choices advice webpage is attached.

The Government has looked at groups where dietary recommendations are not being reached and has decided that in these cases mandatory fortification is not the right way forward. There is no plan to introduce it for vitamin D in England.

7th Nov 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the light of the recommendations of the report by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition on<i> Vitamin D and health</i>, what steps they are taking in conjunction with Public Health England to raise public awareness of the need for greater intake of vitamin D through dietary supplementation and safe sun exposure.

Following the recommendations of the report by the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition on Vitamin D and Health, Public Health England has updated advice on vitamin D on the NHS Choices website. A copy of the NHS Choices advice webpage is attached.

The Government has looked at groups where dietary recommendations are not being reached and has decided that in these cases mandatory fortification is not the right way forward. There is no plan to introduce it for vitamin D in England.

5th Sep 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the future of the European Health Insurance Card in the light of the EU referendum result.

As the Prime Minister stated on 20 July 2016, as long as we are a member of the European Union we will respect the rights and obligations of EU membership, therefore the current arrangements for European Health Insurance Cards remain in place. As we move to a new relationship with Europe, our guiding principle will be ensuring the best possible outcome for British people.

8th Feb 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what consultations took place with the government of New Zealand prior to their decision to introduce new charges for New Zealand citizens for health and dental treatment in the UK from 6 April.

On 6 April 2015 the United Kingdom introduced an immigration health surcharge for non-European Economic Area nationals who come to the UK to temporarily reside for a period of over six months. At the time New Zealand nationals were granted a temporary exemption and we entered into a series of discussions with the New Zealand Government on the introduction of the surcharge for its nationals. The Secretary of State for Health wrote to the New Zealand High Commissioner confirming introduction of the surcharge on 17 December 2015. Introduction of the surcharge for New Zealand nationals was publicly announced by the Home Office on 4 February 2016 and subject to Parliamentary approval, it will come into effect from 6 April 2016.

8th Feb 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is the average waiting time for a result to be given of a DEXA bone density scan in each NHS region in England; and what assessment they have made of the average waiting time for such results in (1) Scotland, and (2) Wales.

Data are not collected on the average waiting time for a result to be given for a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan. Data are collected on the average waiting time from referral to test, and these are shown in the following table for the four NHS England commissioning regions for most recent period, which is November 2015. Health is a devolved matter in Scotland and Wales.

Table: average median waiting times in weeks for a DEXA scan from referral by NHS England commissioning region, November 2015

Region

Number of weeks

North of England

2.1

Midlands and East of England

1.7

London

1.8

South of England

1.8

England

1.9

7th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent representations they have made about the continuing imprisonment of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe.

​The Foreign Secretary raised his concerns about dual national detentions with Iranian Foreign Minister Zarif on 6 January. The Prime Minister raised his concerns with Iranian President Rouhani on 9 January. The Minister for the Middle East and North Africa called for their release in his call with Deputy Foreign Minister Araghchi on 12 January. We remain extremely concerned about the welfare of all British-Iranian dual nationals detained in Iran, including Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe. We have made clear to Iran that we expect them to ensure she is treated humanely and in line with international standards. We continue to request immediate consular access.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Sep 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the inquiry into the leaking of confidential messages from Sir Kim Darroch will conclude.

On 12 July, the Metropolitan Police Service announced it would be carrying out an investigation under the terms of the Official Secrets Act. That investigation is on-going.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Mar 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government in which areas of foreign policy cooperation with the EU they hope to continue participating after Brexit.

We intend to work closely on all existing areas of co-operation.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Mar 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what institutional mechanisms for future involvement in EU foreign policy cooperation they envisage for the UK after Brexit.

On leaving the EU, the UK will pursue an independent foreign policy. The future security partnership with the EU should respect both the EU's decision-making autonomy and the UK's sovereignty, and enable us to combine our efforts to the greatest effect where this is in our shared interest. We aim to be able to consult regularly with the EU, deliver operationally through EU mechanisms where this is in our shared interest, and work together on developing defence, cyber and space capabilities.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jan 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have held with consumer organisations about the different rates of compensation offered by UK banks to customers who have been affected by cyber fraud.

The government has not made an assessment of different rates of compensation offered by banks.

The Payment Services Regulations 2017 require banks to give a full refund to a customer who did not authorise a transaction on their account. However, if the unauthorised transaction arose from the use of a lost, stolen or misappropriated payment instrument, before the customer notified the bank of the loss, theft or misappropriation, the bank may require that the customer cover up to £35 of the liability.

In addition, customers may be liable for unauthorised transactions if they have themselves been involved in the fraudulent activity or have intentionally not complied with their obligations in relation to the payment instrument (or have been grossly negligent about those obligations), for example obligations to keep a payment instrument safe and to notify the issuer when becoming aware that a payment instrument has been lost or misappropriated.

The Payment Services Regulations do not require banks to compensate customers where a payment was validly authorised by the customer and correctly executed in accordance with the customer’s instructions. In some such cases banks may choose to compensate customers, and this can vary between institutions.

Treasury ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. This includes regular meetings with consumer organisations to discuss relevant regulatory issues, including compensation for victims of fraud.

Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations are published on GOV.UK on a quarterly basis.

15th Jan 2018
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the different rates of compensation offered by UK banks to their customers where cyber fraud has occurred.

The government has not made an assessment of different rates of compensation offered by banks.

The Payment Services Regulations 2017 require banks to give a full refund to a customer who did not authorise a transaction on their account. However, if the unauthorised transaction arose from the use of a lost, stolen or misappropriated payment instrument, before the customer notified the bank of the loss, theft or misappropriation, the bank may require that the customer cover up to £35 of the liability.

In addition, customers may be liable for unauthorised transactions if they have themselves been involved in the fraudulent activity or have intentionally not complied with their obligations in relation to the payment instrument (or have been grossly negligent about those obligations), for example obligations to keep a payment instrument safe and to notify the issuer when becoming aware that a payment instrument has been lost or misappropriated.

The Payment Services Regulations do not require banks to compensate customers where a payment was validly authorised by the customer and correctly executed in accordance with the customer’s instructions. In some such cases banks may choose to compensate customers, and this can vary between institutions.

Treasury ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery. This includes regular meetings with consumer organisations to discuss relevant regulatory issues, including compensation for victims of fraud.

Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations are published on GOV.UK on a quarterly basis.

18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to waive the cost requirement for the renewal of visas for those working in NHS hospitals in any capacity during the COVID-19 pandemic. [T]

The Government has announced we will extend the visas for a range of healthcare professionals working for the NHS and independent health and care providers, where their current visa expires between 31 March and 1 October. This offer also applies to their families. The 12-month extension is automatic and free of charge and those benefitting will not have to pay the Immigration Health Surcharge.

This is part of a wider Government approach to supporting the health and care sector during the COVID-19 pandemic. We will continue to keep all of our policies under review.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
19th Dec 2017
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they will take to ensure that lessons learned from the murder of Bijan Ebrahimi are acted upon by UK police forces.

The Government expects police forces to consider very seriously the findings and recommendations in the Safer Bristol Partnership’s December 2017 report into the murder of Bijan Ebrahimi in 2013.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission also published a report in July 2017 on Avon and Somerset Constabulary’s contact with Mr Ebrahimi prior to his murder. Where the IPCC has investigated, reported and issued learning recommendations, the police and other agencies are required to respond setting out what action they are taking or to explain why no action is being taken.

In its published response to the IPCC’s report, Avon and Somerset Constabulary set out the steps it had taken to improve the way it operates since 2013, including the design and implementation of a new operating model in 2014/15.

Evidence gathered by the IPCC informed criminal proceedings which resulted in two officers receiving prison sentences. These officers and two others were dismissed following misconduct proceedings brought by Avon and Somerset Constabulary.

Following publication of the Safer Bristol Partnership’s report, Avon and Somerset Constabulary has issued a statement fully accepting the findings of the report, and re-iterating the steps it has taken, following the IPCC’s report, to transform the way the Constabulary operates to prevent a repeat of what happened to Mr Ebrahimi.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
6th Apr 2017
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what initiatives they are currently pursuing to tackle rural crime.

The Government has ensured that, through the election of Police and Crime Commissioners, all communities, including those in rural areas, have a strong voice in determining how police resources are allocated. It is for Police and Crime Commissioners to hold their forces to account on how they tackle the crimes that matter most in rural areas.

In addition, in support of the Government’s Modern Crime Prevention Strategy, we continue to work with the police, industry and others and consider the evidence on what more can be done to prevent criminals committing crime.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2016
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what estimate they have made of the start-up and annual costs of administering the new health and dental charges for New Zealand citizens coming into force on 6 April.

An Impact Assessment was published on 4 February 2016, alongside the draft Immigration (Health Charge) (Amendment) Order 2016. The draft Order will, subject to Parliamentary approval, remove the surcharge exemption for nationals of Australia and New Zealand and reduce the Youth Mobility Scheme charge from £200 to £150.

The Impact Assessment, which can be viewed at the link below, sets out the reason for these changes and estimates associated costs and benefits: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukdsi/2016/9780111143278/impacts

These documents are available in the following locations of the House: The Vote Office (Commons) Printed Paper Office (Lords)

25th Sep 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth on 4 July (HL16607), whether they will now answer the question put, namely what recent considerations they have given to making it a requirement that all new homes be fitted with solar panels.

We have launched a consultation on options for a meaningful and achievable increase to the energy efficiency standards for new homes to be introduced through the Building Regulations in 2020, as a stepping stone to meeting our commitment to introduce a Future Homes Standard by 2025. Our preferred option for 2020 would achieve a 31% reduction in carbon emissions for an average home. We expect this would be achieved by homes being built with high fabric standards alongside the use of low-carbon heating, such as a heat-pump, or renewables technology, such as solar photovoltaic (PV) panels.

The Building Regulations set minimum energy performance standards for new homes and non-domestic buildings, but do not prescribe the technologies, materials or fuels to be used, allowing builders the flexibility to innovate and select the most practical and cost-effective solutions in particular circumstances. For example, many roofs are not suitable for solar PV panels because of visual amenity, age, strength, or orientation of the property. It would therefore be implausible for Government to enforce a blanket requirement to deploy solar PV panels on every new home.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
24th Jun 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent consideration they have given to making it a requirement that all new homes be fitted with solar panels.

The Building Regulations set minimum energy performance standards for new homes and non-domestic buildings. They are deliberately couched in performance terms and do not prescribe the technologies, materials or fuels to be used. For example, many roofs are not suitable for solar photovoltaic (PV) panels because of roof design, age, strength, or building orientation. It would therefore be implausible for a blanket requirement to deploy solar PV on every roof.

We are, however, planning to consult later this year on an uplift to the Building Regulations energy efficiency standards where there are safe, practical, cost-effective, and affordable opportunities to do so.

31st Jan 2019
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) the Bar Council, (2) the Law Society, and (3) other interested organisations about the impact of Brexit on the cross-border enforcement of civil judgments.

The Government has engaged regularly with the Law Society, the Bar Council and other interested representatives of the legal profession since the referendum about the impact of Brexit on all aspects of civil judicial cooperation, including the cross-border enforceability of judgments. This has included regular Ministerial meetings and senior official conversations and attending a variety of roundtables and events.

In addition, the Department asked the sector to lead a dedicated group, the Brexit Law Committee, to provide a forum through which the Government and the legal and business sectors could discuss legal and commercial issues arising out of EU exit. This Committee includes representatives of both the Law Society and the Bar Council, and representatives from other legal organisations, and business groups.

9th Feb 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total cost of the Review of the Balance of Competences between the United Kingdom and the European Union to the Scotland Office and its associated agencies, broken down by (1) staff time, (2) printing costs, (3) running of engagement events, (4) witness expenses, (5) publicity of the reports, and (6) any and all other associated costs.

The Balance of Competences Review concluded in December. It was the most comprehensive analysis of the UK’s relationship with the EU ever undertaken. The Review involved a large number of Departments across Whitehall to produce the 32 reports. The Review was based on the evidence and views received through widespread consultation with interested parties from across society. Across the whole review, departments received close to 2,300 evidence submissions. Departments held over 250 events, attended by around 2,100 stakeholders.

It was important that what is an unprecedented examination of EU membership was done with appropriate time and care. But the government is also very conscious of the need to ensure value for money in everything that it does.

Scotland Office did not lead on one report but fed into work across the Review. In terms of staff time, work on the Review was allocated according to need to existing staff within the Scotland Office. Providing a full breakdown of staff time and costs would exceed the disproportionate cost threshold. Scotland Office did not carry out any work in the other categories set out in the question.

9th Feb 2015
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what was the total cost of the Review of the Balance of Competences between the United Kingdom and the European Union to the Office of Advocate General for Scotland broken down by (1) staff time, (2) printing costs, (3) running of engagement events, (4) witness expenses, (5) publicity of the reports, and (6) any and all other associated costs.

The Office of the Advocate General has not been required to undertake any work as part of the Review of the Balance of Competences and has incurred no costs.