Mark Tami Portrait

Mark Tami

Labour - Alyn and Deeside

Opposition Pairing Whip (Commons)

(since April 2020)
Opposition Whip (Commons)
12th Feb 2020 - 10th Apr 2020
Opposition Pairing Whip (Commons)
7th Oct 2011 - 12th Feb 2020
Draft Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Bill
26th Nov 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Administration Committee
30th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Finance Committee (Commons)
30th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee of Selection
12th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Selection Committee
12th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Administration Committee
20th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Palace of Westminster (Joint Committee)
16th Jul 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Committee of Selection
17th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Opposition Whip (Commons)
8th Oct 2010 - 18th Sep 2015
Administration Committee
23rd Jan 2012 - 30th Mar 2015
Committee of Selection
13th Oct 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Speaker's Advisory Committee on Works of Art
18th Nov 2010 - 8th Nov 2011
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
2nd Jul 2007 - 6th May 2010
Crossrail Bill
14th Nov 2007 - 18th Nov 2007
Human Rights (Joint Committee)
22nd Jan 2007 - 6th Nov 2007
Tax Law Rewrite Bills (Joint Committee)
29th Nov 2005 - 6th Nov 2007
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee
16th Jul 2001 - 12th Jul 2005


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 15th December 2021
16:30
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 5th January 2022
16:30
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 18th January 2022
12:30
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 1st February 2022
12:30
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 1st March 2022
12:30
Division Votes
Tuesday 7th December 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 164 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 251 Noes - 296
Speeches
Wednesday 1st December 2021
Shotton Steelworks: 125th Anniversary

Once again, I agree. I am also very concerned that the Government only ever seem interested in the steel industry …

Written Answers
Tuesday 7th December 2021
Morocco: Detainees
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she (a) has made and (b) plans …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 9th February 2021
Glue traps
That this House calls for an urgent review into the use of glue traps as a means of pest control …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 4th October 2021
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: UK Music
Address of donor: 5th Floor, Savoy Hill House, London WC2R 0BU
Amount of donation or …
EDM signed
Tuesday 7th December 2021
Recognising the service of House of Commons staff member Will Conway
That this House wholeheartedly thanks Will Conway for his 28 years of service as a member of House of Commons …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Mark Tami has voted in 301 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Mark Tami Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lucy Powell (Labour (Co-op))
Shadow Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
(10 debate interactions)
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(10 debate interactions)
Greg Hands (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Leader of the House
(15 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(14 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Mark Tami's debates

Alyn and Deeside Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Alyn and Deeside signature proportion
Petition Debates Contributed

If nurseries are shut down in view of Covid-19, the Government should set up an emergency fund to ensure their survival and ensure that parents are not charged the full fee by the nurseries to keep children's places.

The prospect of widespread cancellations of concerts, theatre productions and exhibitions due to COVID-19 threatens to cause huge financial hardship for Britain's creative community. We ask Parliament to provide a package of emergency financial and practical support during this unpredictable time.

The cash grants proposed by Government are only for businesses in receipt of the Small Business Rates Relief or Rural Relief, or for particular sectors. Many small businesses fall outside these reliefs desperately need cash grants and support now.

For the UK government to provide economic assistance to businesses and staff employed in the events industry, who are suffering unforeseen financial challenges that could have a profound effect on hundreds of thousands of people employed in the sector.

After owning nurseries for 29 years I have never experienced such damaging times for the sector with rising costs not being met by the funding rates available. Business Rates are a large drain on the sector and can mean the difference between nurseries being able to stay open and having to close.

As we pass the COVID-19 Peak, the Government should: State where the Theatres and Arts fit in the Coronavrius recovery Roadmap, Create a tailor made financial support mechanism for the Arts sector & Clarify how Social Distancing will affect arts spaces like Theatres and Concert Venues.

As a result of the COVID-19 outbreak there are travel bans imposed by many countries, there is a disastrous potential impact on our Aviation Industry. Without the Government’s help there could be an unprecedented crisis, with thousands of jobs under threat.

To extend the business rate relief to all dental practices and medical and aesthetics clinics and any small business that’s in healthcare

Zoos, aquariums, and similar organisations across the country carry out all sorts of conservation work, animal rescue, and public education. At the start of the season most rely on visitors (who now won't come) to cover annual costs, yet those costs do not stop while they are closed. They need help.


Latest EDMs signed by Mark Tami

6th December 2021
Mark Tami signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 7th December 2021

Recognising the service of House of Commons staff member Will Conway

Tabled by: Charlotte Nichols (Labour - Warrington North)
That this House wholeheartedly thanks Will Conway for his 28 years of service as a member of House of Commons staff; offers gratitude for his over two decades of service as the Branch Secretary of the GMB Union representing House of Commons staff; thanks him for his support and assistance …
16 signatures
(Most recent: 8 Dec 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 12
Scottish National Party: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
17th November 2021
Mark Tami signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 18th November 2021

Welsh Men’s National Football Team Success

Tabled by: Hywel Williams (Plaid Cymru - Arfon)
That this house celebrates the success of the Welsh Men’s National Football team for securing a seeded play off spot for the 2022 World Cup qualification following their 1 to 1 draw with current FIFA World Ranking leaders Belgium; pays tribute to manager Rob Page and his backroom staff for …
13 signatures
(Most recent: 24 Nov 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Labour: 3
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Mark Tami's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Mark Tami, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Mark Tami has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Mark Tami has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Mark Tami has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Mark Tami has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


68 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Prime Minister, what meetings he has had with the Chairman of Northern and Shell on the (a) review of the Culligan Act 2005 and (b) fourth licence of the National lottery.

Details of my official meetings with external organisations are published and can be found on Gov.uk.

Boris Johnson
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
24th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to impose a maximum noise level of 90 decibels on fireworks sold for private use.

Existing legislation limits noise from fireworks available to consumers to a maximum of 120 decibels. Consumers can also choose to buy from a range of fireworks with lower noise levels.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) has been developing a fact-based evidence base on the key issues that have been raised around fireworks. This includes noise as well as anti-social behaviour, non-compliance, environmental impact, and the impact on humans and animals. This will build a full picture of the data around fireworks in order to identify whether, and what, further action is appropriate.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the involvement of CVC Capital in the bid by Sisal S.p.A for the National Lottery Licence, whether his Department has plans to introduce measures to ensure that (a) CVC Capital upholds obligations to Debenhams pension fund and (b) National Lottery funds will not be used to pay dividends to CVC Capital partners.

The competition for the next licence to run the National Lottery is run by the Gambling Commission. Government is not involved in selecting the winning bid. The Commission has received four final applications to run the licence. This is the highest number of applications received since the first licence was awarded in 1994 and reflects the strength of the competition, and the market’s recognition of the opportunity which exists.

While the competition remains on-going it is not appropriate to comment on whether an individual, or organisation, has participated in any stage of it. We have no plans to publish any correspondence received by the Department from either CVC Capital Group or Sisal partners.

As part of the Department’s public appointments process, applicants to public bodies roles, including to the Gambling Commission’s board, must declare in their application any private interests which would result in actual, potential or perceived conflicts of interest. On taking up an appointment to the Gambling Commission, Commissioners are required to adhere to principles in Nolan Principles and the Gambling Commission’s own Code of Conduct for Commissioners. Further to this:

  1. All Commissioners are required to declare interests at least annually, and ensure in year changes are notified as necessary;

  2. Their interests are published on the Gambling Commission’s website;

  3. Declarations of interest are sought at the beginning of every board and committee meeting; and

  4. When an interest is declared, it is reviewed by the Head of Governance and the Chair of the Commission to identify if any action is required as a result (up to and including asking my Department to terminate the appointment/asking them to terminate their interest).

The purpose of the National Lottery, as set out in legislation, is to raise monies for the four good cause pillars. The National Lottery must be run by a single purpose vehicle, with controls in place to ensure that proceeds cannot be diverted to another area of the operator’s business. The mechanism by which proceeds are divided between good cause returns and profits will be set out in the licence while decisions about the use of their profits will be a matter for the operator.

Defined benefit pension schemes are an important source of retirement income for many people in the UK, and the Government is committed to ensuring that they are protected. Whilst it is not appropriate for Ministers to comment on the arrangements of particular pension schemes, the Pensions Regulator monitors private Defined Benefit pension schemes and has the powers to act where they believe a breach of the law has taken place. The Government is committed to strengthening the powers at the disposal of the Regulator and new sanctions, within the Pension Schemes Act 2021, will strengthen the punishment for irresponsible management of pension schemes.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what processes are in place to ensure that members of the Board of Commissioners have no conflict of interest pertaining to the Fourth National Lottery Licence process.

The competition for the next licence to run the National Lottery is run by the Gambling Commission. Government is not involved in selecting the winning bid. The Commission has received four final applications to run the licence. This is the highest number of applications received since the first licence was awarded in 1994 and reflects the strength of the competition, and the market’s recognition of the opportunity which exists.

While the competition remains on-going it is not appropriate to comment on whether an individual, or organisation, has participated in any stage of it. We have no plans to publish any correspondence received by the Department from either CVC Capital Group or Sisal partners.

As part of the Department’s public appointments process, applicants to public bodies roles, including to the Gambling Commission’s board, must declare in their application any private interests which would result in actual, potential or perceived conflicts of interest. On taking up an appointment to the Gambling Commission, Commissioners are required to adhere to principles in Nolan Principles and the Gambling Commission’s own Code of Conduct for Commissioners. Further to this:

  1. All Commissioners are required to declare interests at least annually, and ensure in year changes are notified as necessary;

  2. Their interests are published on the Gambling Commission’s website;

  3. Declarations of interest are sought at the beginning of every board and committee meeting; and

  4. When an interest is declared, it is reviewed by the Head of Governance and the Chair of the Commission to identify if any action is required as a result (up to and including asking my Department to terminate the appointment/asking them to terminate their interest).

The purpose of the National Lottery, as set out in legislation, is to raise monies for the four good cause pillars. The National Lottery must be run by a single purpose vehicle, with controls in place to ensure that proceeds cannot be diverted to another area of the operator’s business. The mechanism by which proceeds are divided between good cause returns and profits will be set out in the licence while decisions about the use of their profits will be a matter for the operator.

Defined benefit pension schemes are an important source of retirement income for many people in the UK, and the Government is committed to ensuring that they are protected. Whilst it is not appropriate for Ministers to comment on the arrangements of particular pension schemes, the Pensions Regulator monitors private Defined Benefit pension schemes and has the powers to act where they believe a breach of the law has taken place. The Government is committed to strengthening the powers at the disposal of the Regulator and new sanctions, within the Pension Schemes Act 2021, will strengthen the punishment for irresponsible management of pension schemes.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if she will publish details of all official correspondence received by her Department from representatives of (a) CVC Capital Partners and (b) Sisal Group since 1 July 2019.

The competition for the next licence to run the National Lottery is run by the Gambling Commission. Government is not involved in selecting the winning bid. The Commission has received four final applications to run the licence. This is the highest number of applications received since the first licence was awarded in 1994 and reflects the strength of the competition, and the market’s recognition of the opportunity which exists.

While the competition remains on-going it is not appropriate to comment on whether an individual, or organisation, has participated in any stage of it. We have no plans to publish any correspondence received by the Department from either CVC Capital Group or Sisal partners.

As part of the Department’s public appointments process, applicants to public bodies roles, including to the Gambling Commission’s board, must declare in their application any private interests which would result in actual, potential or perceived conflicts of interest. On taking up an appointment to the Gambling Commission, Commissioners are required to adhere to principles in Nolan Principles and the Gambling Commission’s own Code of Conduct for Commissioners. Further to this:

  1. All Commissioners are required to declare interests at least annually, and ensure in year changes are notified as necessary;

  2. Their interests are published on the Gambling Commission’s website;

  3. Declarations of interest are sought at the beginning of every board and committee meeting; and

  4. When an interest is declared, it is reviewed by the Head of Governance and the Chair of the Commission to identify if any action is required as a result (up to and including asking my Department to terminate the appointment/asking them to terminate their interest).

The purpose of the National Lottery, as set out in legislation, is to raise monies for the four good cause pillars. The National Lottery must be run by a single purpose vehicle, with controls in place to ensure that proceeds cannot be diverted to another area of the operator’s business. The mechanism by which proceeds are divided between good cause returns and profits will be set out in the licence while decisions about the use of their profits will be a matter for the operator.

Defined benefit pension schemes are an important source of retirement income for many people in the UK, and the Government is committed to ensuring that they are protected. Whilst it is not appropriate for Ministers to comment on the arrangements of particular pension schemes, the Pensions Regulator monitors private Defined Benefit pension schemes and has the powers to act where they believe a breach of the law has taken place. The Government is committed to strengthening the powers at the disposal of the Regulator and new sanctions, within the Pension Schemes Act 2021, will strengthen the punishment for irresponsible management of pension schemes.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to ensure that political donations made to the Conservative Party by managing parties of CVC Capital, the owner of Sisal S.p.A Group do not influence the Government's approach to the Fourth National Lottery Licence.

The competition for the next licence to run the National Lottery is run by the Gambling Commission. Government is not involved in selecting the winning bid. The Commission has received four final applications to run the licence. This is the highest number of applications received since the first licence was awarded in 1994 and reflects the strength of the competition, and the market’s recognition of the opportunity which exists.

While the competition remains on-going it is not appropriate to comment on whether an individual, or organisation, has participated in any stage of it. We have no plans to publish any correspondence received by the Department from either CVC Capital Group or Sisal partners.

As part of the Department’s public appointments process, applicants to public bodies roles, including to the Gambling Commission’s board, must declare in their application any private interests which would result in actual, potential or perceived conflicts of interest. On taking up an appointment to the Gambling Commission, Commissioners are required to adhere to principles in Nolan Principles and the Gambling Commission’s own Code of Conduct for Commissioners. Further to this:

  1. All Commissioners are required to declare interests at least annually, and ensure in year changes are notified as necessary;

  2. Their interests are published on the Gambling Commission’s website;

  3. Declarations of interest are sought at the beginning of every board and committee meeting; and

  4. When an interest is declared, it is reviewed by the Head of Governance and the Chair of the Commission to identify if any action is required as a result (up to and including asking my Department to terminate the appointment/asking them to terminate their interest).

The purpose of the National Lottery, as set out in legislation, is to raise monies for the four good cause pillars. The National Lottery must be run by a single purpose vehicle, with controls in place to ensure that proceeds cannot be diverted to another area of the operator’s business. The mechanism by which proceeds are divided between good cause returns and profits will be set out in the licence while decisions about the use of their profits will be a matter for the operator.

Defined benefit pension schemes are an important source of retirement income for many people in the UK, and the Government is committed to ensuring that they are protected. Whilst it is not appropriate for Ministers to comment on the arrangements of particular pension schemes, the Pensions Regulator monitors private Defined Benefit pension schemes and has the powers to act where they believe a breach of the law has taken place. The Government is committed to strengthening the powers at the disposal of the Regulator and new sanctions, within the Pension Schemes Act 2021, will strengthen the punishment for irresponsible management of pension schemes.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what financial support the Government (a) has provided, (b) is providing and (c) plans to provide to assist in the purchase of equipment for the depuration of cockles for export to the EU from waters where depuration was not required prior to the end of the transition period; and what proportion of that support is available as (i) grants and (ii) loans.

There is no scientific or technical justification for the European Commission banning the import of Live Bivalve Molluscs (LBMs), including oysters, from class B waters (where depuration/processing is required after harvest). We are seeking urgent resolution on the European Commission’s decision.

Grant funding to support the purchase of equipment for depuration was previously made available across the UK through the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF). In England similar support was delivered through the Maritime and Fisheries Fund (MFF), with equivalent funding provided to the devolved administrations. The MFF will continue to fund activities such as depuration as long as funding remains available under this scheme.

At the Spending Review the Government provided replacement funds to enable the four nations of the UK to deliver their own domestic funding schemes, tailored to the needs of their sector. In England, we intend to open a new scheme for delivering grant funding in April. This will include support for the purchase of new equipment for depuration. The devolved administrations are responsible for the design and delivery of their own schemes.

All of the support available has been provided through grants.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will hold discussions with Natural Resources Wales on enabling it to refuse Dee Estuary cockle fisheries licences to applicants who have not made use of a previous such licence issued to them in order to increase availability of such licences for new applicants.

Whilst the Dee Cockle fishery straddles England and Wales, it is managed by Natural Resources Wales, and therefore comes under the auspices of the Welsh Government.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government plans to bring forward legislative proposals to ban the use of (a) remote controlled hand-held and (b) bark-activated electronic training collars for dogs.

The Government is committed to banning the use of hand-held remote controlled electronic dog collars and will lay the necessary legislation for such a ban as soon as Parliamentary time allows. The ban will not include dog bark induced collars or collars that work in connection with perimeter fencing.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, pursuant to the Answer of 2 February 2021 to Question 144942, on UK Trade with EU, how many businesses in (a) Alyn and Deeside and (b) the UK have been advised by her Department to transfer some operations to the EU in order to facilitate exports following the UK's departure from the EU regardless of whether or not this is her Department's policy.

The Department for International Trade’s (DIT) Customer Relationship Management System currently has over 200,000 active company records, and our advisers have many interactions with UK businesses every day. Whilst it is not possible to determine what was discussed in each of those interactions, DIT guidance to its staff is clear. Any decision to set up an operation in the EU is a commercial decision for the business, and it is not the role of DIT staff to advise companies on such decisions.

Of the interactions recorded since 1 December 2020, only one was with a company located in Alyn and Deeside, and that interaction related to a virtual trade mission to Canada. This reflects the fact the companies based in Wales receive local support on international matters from the Welsh Government, in line with their devolved responsibilities.

28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many businesses in (a) Alyn and Deeside and (b) the UK have been advised by her Department to transfer some operations to the EU in order to facilitate exports following the UK's departure from the EU.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 28 January to Question UIN 143100.

9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how long on average it takes her Department to respond to an application for an export licence for a dual use product in cases where that licence is (a) issued and (b) not issued.

Considering applications that were completed in 2019, the longest length of time taken for a dual-use item licence to be refused in 2019 was 315 working days; the longest length of time taken for a dual-use item licence to be issued was 731 working days. The latter application is not typical, but required a government-to-government assurance and could not be completed until the foreign government involved had provided the necessary documentation.

The average processing time for all Standard Individual Export Licence (SIEL) applications was 19 working days in 2019. These include military rated, dual use and other rateable items, such as end use and human rights related items. The results also include applications that were either stopped/withdrawn, or did not require a licence. The average processing time for solely dual use items can only be provided at disproportionate costs.

The Rt Hon. Gentleman may find it helpful to know that median processing times – and the number of applications that are processed within 20/60 working days – are published on GOV.UK.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
9th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what longest length of time has been taken by her Department to respond to an application for an export licence for a dual use product in cases where that licence has been (a) issued and (b) not issued.

Considering applications that were completed in 2019, the longest length of time taken for a dual-use item licence to be refused in 2019 was 315 working days; the longest length of time taken for a dual-use item licence to be issued was 731 working days. The latter application is not typical, but required a government-to-government assurance and could not be completed until the foreign government involved had provided the necessary documentation.

The average processing time for all Standard Individual Export Licence (SIEL) applications was 19 working days in 2019. These include military rated, dual use and other rateable items, such as end use and human rights related items. The results also include applications that were either stopped/withdrawn, or did not require a licence. The average processing time for solely dual use items can only be provided at disproportionate costs.

The Rt Hon. Gentleman may find it helpful to know that median processing times – and the number of applications that are processed within 20/60 working days – are published on GOV.UK.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, for what reasons Ecuador has been included in the red list in respect of covid-19 restrictions for international travel.

Ecuador has been on the red list since 15 January 2021 due to the ongoing presence of variants of concern. Government scientists will continue to engage with countries still on the red list and keep the evidence on variants of concern, especially Lambda and Mu, under close review in order to ensure the UK’s approach remains proportionate.

Decisions on red country assignment and associated border measures will continue to be taken by Ministers, who take into account the JBC risk assessments alongside wider public health factors.

The data for all countries and territories will be kept under regular review and the Government will not hesitate to take action where a country’s epidemiological picture changes.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many applications his Department received to the Levelling Up Fund by the closing date of 18 June 2021 for amounts (a) up to and (b) over £20 million.

The first round of the Levelling Up Fund received significant interest from England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland bidding authorities, across the three investment priorities of the Fund. Bids are currently being assessed in line with the published assessment process. Outcomes from the first round of bids for the Levelling Up Fund will be announced later in the year and bidding authorities will be informed in due course.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many applications his Department received to the UK Levelling Up Fund by the closing date of 18 June 2021 from local authorities in Wales.

The Levelling Up Fund received significant interest from Local Authorities in Wales, across the three investment priorities of the Fund. Bids are currently being assessed in line with the published assessment process. Outcomes from the first round of bids for the Levelling Up Fund will be announced later in the year and bidding authorities will be informed in due course.

Andrew Stephenson
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the impact of car parking charges and fines at car parks associated with railway stations on the number of drivers completing part of their journey by rail.

The Department for Transport has not conducted a specific assessment relating to the impact of car parking charges and fines at station car parks. Station car parks are managed and run by train operating companies and Network Rail based on the needs of passengers and the local community, including the availability of other nearby car parks or limitations posed by either being in city centre or rural locations. The Department encourages a wide range of modes of travelling to and from stations, to improve active travel connections to stations.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
29th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with representatives of Ryanair on (a) continuing to fly to countries where British holidaymakers will not be admitted due to covid-19 restrictions, and (b) Ryanair's policies on refunds to passengers on the grounds that those flights have gone ahead.

It is a commercial decision for airlines on whether to continue to fly to countries where COVID-19 related border restrictions apply as the restrictions may not apply equally to all customers. We have urged airlines and travel agents to be reasonable and flexible in their refund and rescheduling policies. Customers who are restricted by destination border conditions, applied after they booked travel, should discuss any compensation claims with the airline or their travel insurance provider, in the first instance.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the equity of the proportion of a self-employed parent's income that is payable as Child Maintenance.

The Child Maintenance calculation is designed to be fair and affordable, while ensuring that the paying parent contributes a significant proportion of their income to support their children.

For self-employed paying parents the income used to calculate child maintenance payments is usually provided by HMRC and is the gross taxable profit of the parent’s business, for the latest tax-year HMRC hold a complete record. The taxable profits of a business represent the amount from which a business owner can support themselves and meet their outgoings.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential (a) fairness and (b) sustainability of the Child Maintenance scheme in calculating payments from self-employed paying parents whose businesses had a short-term, exceptional increase in profit in tax year 2020-21 due to deferred costs and government grants relating to the outbreak of covid-19; and what assessment she has made of the effect on those paying parent's (i) finances and (ii) mental health where their business may have subsequently experienced a downturn.

The Child Maintenance calculation is designed to be fair and affordable, while ensuring that the paying parent contributes a significant proportion of their income to support their children.

For self-employed paying parents the income used to calculate child maintenance payments is usually provided by HMRC and is the gross taxable profit of the parent’s business, for the latest tax-year HMRC hold a complete record. The taxable profits of a business represent the amount from which a business owner can support themselves and meet their outgoings.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she conduct an impact assessment for her Department's policy requiring people whose entitlement to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) for a fixed period was established by the First Tier Tribunal to reapply for that benefit rather than have it reviewed through a PIP review form; and if she will make an assessment of the effect of that policy on the ability of disabled people to meet the additional costs of their disability or condition.

As explained in my answer to Question 156258 on 2 March, a First Tier Tribunal considering an appeal against a Personal Independence Payment (PIP) decision also considers the length of any award it may make. The length of award will be based on the individual’s needs and the likelihood of those changing. If the Tribunal gives a short, fixed-term award then it is indicating that the claimant’s limitations are likely to improve to the point they would not be entitled at the end of their PIP award. As claimants can continue to receive benefit under a new award in a similar way to someone having their award reviewed, no requirement for an Impact Assessment was established. The Department is currently reviewing the approach to Fixed Term Awards including where awarded after Tribunal.

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Answer of 2 March 2021 to Question 156258, for what reason it is her Department's policy that claimants with an award of Personal Independence Payment from the First Tier Tribunal are required to apply for PIP again by completing a PIP2 form when their award comes to an end, while claimants with an award of PIP directly from the Department itself are instead sent a PIP review form asking if anything has changed since their last award.

As explained in my answer to Question 156258 on 2 March, a First Tier Tribunal considering an appeal against a Personal Independence Payment (PIP) decision also considers the length of any award it may make. The length of award will be based on the individual’s needs and the likelihood of those changing. If the Tribunal gives a short, fixed-term award then it is indicating that the claimant’s limitations are likely to improve to the point they would not be entitled at the end of their PIP award. As claimants can continue to receive benefit under a new award in a similar way to someone having their award reviewed, no requirement for an Impact Assessment was established. The Department is currently reviewing the approach to Fixed Term Awards including where awarded after Tribunal.

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for what reason it is not her Department's policy to send all claimants with an award of PIP from a First Tier Tribunal a PIP2 form six months before the end of their award to minimise the possibility of a gap in their payments.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) claimants with an award without a review date have always been able submit a renewal claim up to six months prior to their existing award ending. Prior to 15 May 2021 the Department had been reminding claimants 14 weeks before their existing award was due to end that they could submit a new claim if they considered that they still have needs arising from their health condition or disability. From 15 May 2021 we have been sending the reminder to claim 26 weeks prior to the existing award ending.

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people and what proportion of people who have been awarded a Personal Independence Payment (PIP) by the first tier tribunal are not entitled to PIP at the end of their award.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

A claimant can lodge an appeal at the First-tier Tribunal (FtT) either for disallowance decisions, or when they have been awarded and continue to appeal for a higher award.

16th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people are claiming universal credit in each ward of each parliamentary constituency in North Wales.

Universal Credit caseload data are not available at ward level.

The available information on the number of people on Universal Credit, by Residence Based Geography: National - Regional - Local Authority - Output Areas, including parliamentary constituency, is published monthly and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the (a) mean, (b) median and (c) longest waiting period was experienced by claimants of personal independence payments whose award was made by a tribunal between that award and their following award where (i) the subsequent new claim was submitted before the last day of the previous tribunal-made award, (ii) a decision had not been made on the new claim by her Department by the final day of the previous award, (iii) the decision on the new award was to award neither the standard nor enhanced rate of either component and (iv) the decision on the new award was subject to appeal to a tribunal which awarded at least the standard rate of at least one component in each of the last three years.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the (a) mean, (b) median and (c) longest waiting period was experienced by claimants of personal independence payments whose award was made by a tribunal between that award and their following award where (i) the subsequent new claim was submitted before the last day of the previous tribunal-made award, (ii) a decision had not been made on the new claim by her Department by the final day of the previous award, (iii) the decision on the new award was to award at least the standard rate of at least one component and (iv) the decision on the new award was not subject to mandatory reconsideration or appeal in each of the last three years.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants of personal independence payments whose award was made by a tribunal made a new claim in a period between one day and one year after the end of their previous entitlement in each of the last three years.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants of personal independence payments whose award was made by a tribunal (a) made a new claim before the end of the award that came into payment with no break in the payment cycle and (b)made a new claim before the end of the award but a decision on the new claim had not been made by her Department before the last day of the previous award in each of the last three years.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for what reasons it is her Department’s policy that claimants with an award of personal independence payments from a tribunal are required to make a new claim at the end of the award rather than going through the renewal process.

A tribunal considering an appeal against a Personal Independence Payment (PIP) decision also considers the length of any award it may make. The length of award will be based on the individual’s needs and the likelihood of those changing. If it gives a short, fixed-term award then it is indicating that the claimant’s limitations are likely to improve to the point they would not be entitled at the end of their award. Accordingly, the Secretary of State implements the Tribunal’s decision on the award end date and does not schedule a review.

16th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether she intends to bring forward legislative proposals to protect the entitlement to Statutory Maternity Pay of people who received Statutory Sick Pay during their qualifying period where (a) they have a shielding letter and (b) their employer declined to use the Job Retention Scheme.

Statutory Sick Pay forms part of the average weekly earnings calculation carried out by employers to determine whether an employee qualifies for Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP), and if so, at what rate. This is because, for SMP purposes, pay is defined as gross pay due before any deductions. This includes sick pay (and other payments e.g. overtime, bonus payments, arrears of pay).

There are currently no plans to change the way that SSP is treated as part of the average weekly earnings calculation for SMP.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether each instance of Jobcentre Plus staff signposting claimants to local food banks is recorded on a claimant's case record.

Jobcentre staff are not required to keep records of the numbers of claimants signposted to food banks in their local area; however, in line with long-standing national guidance, they may record the issue of signposting slips for authentication purposes at the request of the local food bank.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the signposting of claimants to local food banks is in the form of (a) pieces of paper, (b) other written communication, or (c) verbal communication; and whether any written communication provided is directly transferable at a food bank for food.

The decision to award a food parcel is a matter for the food bank alone. The Department for Work and Pensions has long-standing guidance in place which allows staff to signpost claimants in writing to a food bank, using a nationally agreed signposting slip, where claimants have asked for information, and if all sources of statutory support have been exhausted.

During the Covid-19 outbreak, Jobcentres have been encouraged to take a flexible and innovative approach in their arrangements for signposting claimants to foodbanks, within the parameters of the existing guidance.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many and what proportion of claimants of Carers' Allowance also receive (a) one and (b) more than one means-tested benefit.

Of the 1.3 million Carer’s Allowance claimants, around 470,000 (36%) are also receiving one means-tested benefit and around 280,000 (22%) are also receiving more than one means-tested benefit.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims of carers' allowance have been closed due to the death of the person being cared for in each of the last five years; for how many of those claims was the recipient also in receipt of housing benefit; and how many of those carers allowance claimants received universal credit within (a) three and (b) 12 months of the death of the person whom carers' allowance had been claimed for.

The information requested is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will make it her policy to relax the qualifying conditions for Statutory Sick Pay to enable people contracted for 16 hours per week on the minimum wage to claim that benefit after they have been on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme in line with (a) Maternity Allowance, (b) Statutory Maternity Pay, (c) Statutory Paternity Pay, (d) Statutory Adoption Pay, (e) Statutory Shared Parental Pay and (f) Statutory Parental Bereavement Pay (Normal Weekly Earnings etc.) (Coronavirus) (Amendment) Regulations 2020.

This government has a strong safety net that helps people who are facing hardship and are unable to support themselves financially.

Individuals who meet the eligibility criteria, receive a flat rate of SSP at £95.85 per week irrespective of their wage. Since SSP is paid at a flat rate rather than being earnings-related, the impact on individuals whose salary is paid at a reduced rate under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is not as significant as for the statutory payments covered by those regulations. We will continue to review the situation and take appropriate measures in line with further developments.

SSP is just one part of our welfare safety net and our wider offer to support people in times of need. Many of those on low incomes are already in receipt of benefits. For those on Universal Credit, their award will rise if their income falls. Those who are not already in receipt of benefits may be able to claim Universal Credit and new style Employment and Support Allowance, depending on their personal circumstances, to support them when they are unable to work. We have ensured that benefits are easily accessible and more supportive for those who need to make a claim which will help millions of people most in need.

2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether people self-isolating due to possible covid-19 infection will be exempted from conditionality requirements for means-tested benefits.

.

Claimants who are self-isolating as a result of Covid-19 will have their mandatory work search and work availability requirements switched off during that period.

Any work-related requirements outside of this will be tailored to take into consideration the claimant’s capability and circumstances, can be conducted over the phone or through digital formats and ensure they are realistic and achievable.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans her Department has made to ensure that potential staff shortages due to covid-19 do not delay processing of benefits applications; and if she will make it her policy to backdate benefits for any claimants whose application is delayed due to staff shortages.

DWP has contingency plans in place that prioritise activities to protect payments to claimants and access to new claims when capacity is compromised.

The ‘date of claim’ will not be affected by capacity inside the Department.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment his Department has made of guidance on vitamin D consumption issued in the (a) UK, (b) US and (c) EU.

In 2016, the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) published a review of the evidence on vitamin D and a wide range of health outcomes. This included consideration of the approach taken by the Institute of Medicine in the United States in setting dietary reference intakes for vitamin D. In 2016, the SACN and the European Food Safety Authority published a joint explanatory note outlining their dietary reference values (DRVs) for vitamin D.

The SACN noted that for assessments carried out in the United Kingdom, US and the European Union, serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) continues to be the best indicator of exposure to vitamin D from skin synthesis and dietary intake, and is used to derive DRVs for vitamin D. However, the evidence considered for setting a target concentration of 25(OH)D, as the basis for setting DRVs, is not the same.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing a national strategy to reduce vitamin D deficiency, with particular regard to BAME groups.

We have not made a formal assessment.

Our current advice is to take a daily 10 microgram supplement of vitamin D throughout the autumn and winter for musculoskeletal health. In addition, people at risk of vitamin D deficiency including black, Asian and minority ethnic groups are advised to consider taking a daily supplement throughout the year.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that sarcoma patients receive routine access to mental health support (a) during and (b) after cancer treatment.

The NHS Long Term Plan states that where appropriate every person diagnosed with cancer, including sarcoma patients, should receive a Personalised Care and Support Plan based on a holistic needs assessment, end of treatment summaries and health and wellbeing information and support, including for mental health needs. All patients will have access to the right expertise and support.

People with long term conditions, such as cancer, have been identified as priority patients for accessing Improving Access to Psychological Therapy (IAPT) services. Many IAPT services have strong links with a range of health and care settings to ensure that patients and carers receive the right support as quickly as possible.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of covid-19 on the timely (a) assessment and (b) diagnosis of people with rare diseases; and what steps his Department plans to take to tackle the backlog of undiagnosed cases.

The Department, alongside NHS England, is considering the impact of COVID-19 on patients with rare diseases. NHS England has had discussions with some services and patients/patient groups to understand the impact of COVID-19 including what has worked well; what has not worked so well; and opportunities for transformation.

NHS England as a direct commissioner of services and clinical commissioning group commissioners are currently working with all service providers to restore diagnostic capacity for all patient care groups.

NHS England will continue to look at what services can be delivered successfully through virtual communication technology such as telephone consultation and videoconferences. Where services do need to be delivered face-to-face, including the diagnosing of new cases, NHS England will work with providers to ensure that patients have a safe journey through the hospital to the treatment area.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he is taking steps to allocate additional funding to the specialised drug budget to cater for technologies being developed for new rare disease patient groups.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) issues guidance for the National Health Service on whether drugs and other treatments represent an effective use of NHS resources through its technology appraisal and highly specialised technologies programmes, including drugs for patients with rare diseases.

NHS England and NHS Improvement will continue to fund new treatments, including for rare diseases, in accordance with NICE guidance.

Through the Early Access to Medicines Scheme, we are already making important drugs available to patients. So far around 1,500 patients have benefited from the scheme, which enables drugs to be used in clinical practice in parallel with later stages of the regulatory process.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that (a) people who have been advised by their healthcare teams to shield beyond 1 August 2020 and (b) other people on the Shielded Patients List are able to access healthcare up to and after that date.

From 1 August the Government will be advising that shielding will be paused, unless local measures are in place. From this date, the Government is advising the clinically extremely vulnerable to adopt strict social distancing rather than full shielding measures. Strict social distancing means you may wish to go out to more places and see more people but you should take particular care to minimise contact with others outside your household or support bubble.

The core support offer, which will continue to be available to the end of July, covers the following three areas of assistance:

- Essential supplies – a free, standardised weekly parcel of food and household essentials;

- Medicines – arrangements to have medicines delivered to people’s homes by local community pharmacies or their dispensing doctor; and

- Social contact and basic needs – for example, emotional or social support such as people to talk to on the phone or via a computer.

After 1 August, NHS Volunteers will continue to help with transport to a medical appointment, medicines deliveries and provide peer support and companionship to people who are shielding as they transition to the new guidance.

The Government will continue to engage extensively with partners and the healthcare system throughout this process to help ensure they are meeting the needs of those who are clinically extremely vulnerable.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of stem cell transplant patients on the Shielded Patients List.

No estimate has been made. People who have had stem cell transplants are not separately identifiable on the Shielded Patients List.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance he plans to issue to employers on their responsibilities to support individuals who are advised to continue shielding by their healthcare teams beyond 1 August 2020.

Employers have a legal duty to make sure the workplace is safe for their employees, including employees with disabilities and those who are clinically vulnerable or clinically extremely vulnerable.

Guidance on working safely during the COVID-19 outbreak has been issued to help employers in England make their workplaces COVID-19-safe for their employees, visitors and customers. This is available at the following link:

www.gov.uk/guidance/working-safely-during-coronavirus-covid-19

We are continuing to work across Government to ensure that clinically extremely vulnerable people can return to work safely. Further guidance will be issued on 1 August 2020.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether she (a) has made and (b) plans to make representations to her Moroccan counterpart on the case of a constituent of the hon Member for Alyn and Deeside, Abdul Kolim, imprisoned in Morocco.

We are in regular contact with Mr Kolim and the Moroccan authorities, and continue to provide consular support to Mr Kolim.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what financial support he plans to make available to (a) stem cell transplantation patients and (b) other clinically extremely vulnerable people who cannot work from home but have been advised by their doctor to not go into work during the November 2020 covid-19 lockdown in England.

The Government recognises the challenges presented by Covid-19 for stem cell transplantation patients and for all those who are Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (CEV). Individuals with underlying health conditions who cannot work from home can access the unprecedented package that the Government has introduced at this difficult time. This includes the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) which can both be claimed through the November 2020 lockdown. For clinically extremely vulnerable individuals who are on low incomes or who are out of work, the Government has injected a further £9.3bn into the welfare system according to OBR estimates.

To make a claim under the extended CJRS, employees must have been on their employers’ PAYE payroll on or before 30 October 2020. Moreover, self-employed CEV individuals may be eligible for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) which has recently been extended and been made more generous. The Government is increasing the support to the self-employed under the SEISS from 40 per cent of trading profits to 80 per cent for the month of November. As SEISS grants are calculated over 3 months, this increases the total level of the grant from 40 per cent to 55 per cent of trading profits for November to January.

In addition, those who receive a notification that they need to shield will be eligible for Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) from their employer, and New Style Employment and Support Allowance, subject to the wider eligibility criteria. Where an individual’s income is reduced while off work sick and they require further financial support, for example where they are not eligible for SSP, they may be able to claim Universal Credit, depending on their personal circumstances.

The Government is also providing £32 million in additional funding to local authorities to support CEV people most at risk, including helping them to access food and meeting other support needs to enable them to stay at home as much as possible for the 28 day period that the restrictive advice is in force.

28th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what support he has put in place for small businesses to access bounce back loans where their banking arrangements are solely with financial institutions that do not offer those loans.

The Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) was designed to ensure that the smallest businesses can access loans of up to £50,000, capped at 25% of firms’ turnover in a matter of just days. The Government is providing lenders with a 100% guarantee on each loan to give them the confidence they need to support the smallest businesses in the country, and no interest payments are due for the first 12 months. As of 20th September, over 1.2 million facilities have been approved through BBLS representing a value of more than £38bn.

The Bounce Back Loan scheme rules do not mandate that the applicant must have a business relationship with the lender in order to receive a BBLS loan. The British Business Bank has so far accredited 28 BBLS lenders, including several non-banks and alternative lenders.

The Government does not intervene in their lending decisions.

Some banks have made good on their intention to invite applications from new customers, and many of those that are still only open to existing customers are regularly reviewing that position. The Government have always made clear to lenders that they should open to new customers as soon as it is operationally possible for them to do so.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
27th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential (a) short-term and (b) long-term effect on seasonal workers in the offshore wind industry of the changes to IR35.

The Tax Information and Impact Note (TIIN) published in July 2019 sets out HMRC’s assessment that the reform to the off-payroll working rules is expected to affect 170,000 individuals. The TIIN can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/rules-for-off-payroll-working-from-april-2020/rules-for-off-payroll-working-from-april-2020.

HMRC are undertaking an extensive programme of education and support to help organisations and contractors prepare for the reform.

27th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the maximum appropriate rate of (a) income tax and (b) national insurance for workers when calculated together in each income tax band affected by the changes to IR35.

The off-payroll working rules have been in place for nearly 20 years. They are designed to ensure that someone working like an employee, but through a company, pays similar levels of tax to other employees. It is fair that individuals who work in a similar way should pay broadly the same amount of tax.

The rules apply to individuals who are working like employees under the current employment status tests; they do not apply to the self-employed or stop anyone working through their own company.

The reform shifts responsibility for operating the off-payroll rules from the worker’s company to the engager. It does not introduce a new tax liability, or change applicable income tax or National Insurance rates or thresholds.

16th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the potential merits of adding licensed drivers of Heavy Goods Vehicles to the shortage occupation list for immigration purposes.

The UK Government is working with the haulage sector to promote jobs, training and a range of other initiatives to get more people into HGV driving.

Like other sectors the focus should be on training and recruiting from the UK based workforce in the first instance, especially given the impact of the pandemic resulting in more looking for secure new employment. Immigration policy will be considered alongside strategies to do this, not separately or as an alternative to doing so.

The job of HGV driver is not eligible to be sponsored for a Skilled Worker visa so cannot be added to the Shortage Occupation List.

The Home Office has though amended the Immigration Rules to enable drivers who come to the UK on an international journey to transport goods or people on journeys within the UK and undertake cabotage operations in line with Department for Transport rules.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 22 March 2021 to Question 170550 on North Wales Police: Finance, if he will publish the same information for each year in the period 2008-09 to 2016-17.

The information requested is available online, on the Government website, at the link listed below. Here there are links to the Police Grant allocations for each year from 2010-11 and the Police Grant Report which is published annually and sets out details of Central Government to police forces in England and Wales. These reports contain information on funding to North Wales Police.

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-finance

Police funding prior to 2010-11 can be found on Parliament.uk at the following link.

House of Commons Hansard Ministerial Statements for 06 Dec 2007 (pt 0003) (parliament.uk)

It is important to note that it is difficult to make direct comparisons between current police funding figures and police funding in the years before 2015-16 due to a number of significant changes in the structure of police funding and the structure of policing over the period.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much central government funding, in real terms , has been allocated to North Wales Police in each year for which data is available.

The amount of central funding the Government has allocated to North Wales Police during the annual settlement process is as follows:

Central government funding (including capital) for North Wales Police (£m)

2021/22

2020/21

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

86.4

82.2

75.3

72.2

72.2

While the majority of funding for the police comes directly from the central Government grants, around a third comes from a share of council tax, known as the police precept. This is not included in the above figures.

The responsibility for setting the precept falls on individual PCCs, and they must consult their local electorate to ensure they explain how additional investment will help deliver a better police service.

This Police Grant Report (England and Wales) 2021/22 (publishing.service.gov.uk) explains the full allocation of police core settlement for 2021/22.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether (a) aerospace and (b) cybersecurity workers are exempt from quarantining when arriving in the UK if they carry out that work in another country and are returning to the UK.

The list of travellers exempt from quarantine can be found here (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-travellers-exempt-from-uk-border-rules/coronavirus-covid-19-travellers-exempt-from-uk-border-rules).

Passengers arriving from exempt countries and territories no longer need to self-isolate when entering England from 10th July.

Travellers will need to self-isolate if they visited or made a transit stop (https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-travel-corridors#transit-stops) in a country that is not on the list in the 14 days before they arrive in England.

Public health remains our top priority, and we will not hesitate to remove countries and territories from the list if the health risks are seen to increase.

Devolved administrations make their own decisions around public health measures in place and so it is important for travellers to familiarise themselves with the latest position in the nation of the UK they are travelling to.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department has taken to help ensure the safety of alleged victims in cases where a non-molestation order has been breached during the covid-19 outbreak and the alleged perpetrator of the breach is awaiting trial.

Domestic abuse cases are amongst the highest priority work being dealt with by the courts. Non-molestation?orders have been placed in the highest category of work in the magistrates’ and family courts, and they continue to be listed for urgent hearings despite the current restrictions. Domestic abuse cases will continue to be afforded a higher priority as public health restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic are adjusted.

Protecting victims of domestic abuse and robustly pursuing perpetrators remains a key policing priority during the pandemic and beyond. Where the police are dealing with breach of a non-molestation order, we expect them to engage with local IDVA (Independent Domestic Violence Advocate) and community-based services to ensure that the victim and their children receive appropriate specialist support throughout the criminal justice process.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of increasing the rate of asylum support during the covid-19 outbreak commensurate with the increase in the universal credit standard allowance.

We have been reviewing the level of the cash allowances provided to asylum seekers who would otherwise be destitute, as we do each year to ensure that they remain capable of meeting their essential living needs (the legal test).

As a result of this work, the standard allowance has been raised to £39.60 per week from £37.75 per week, an increase of around 5%. This increase is significantly higher than the current general rate of inflation, which Office of National Statistics data shows was only 0.5% in the 12 months period to May.

The level of the allowance is not linked to social security benefits.

In addition to the allowance, we also provide free accommodation, with utilities and council tax paid for and there is free access to the NHS and free access to education for their children.

The UK has a generous record in supporting asylum seekers. Last year, we made around 20,000 grants of asylum or protection (one of the higher figures in Europe), as well as offered protection to 3,000 Unaccompanied Asylum Seeking Children – the highest number of any country in Europe. In addition, we have directly resettled around 20,000 people from the most dangerous areas of the world (especially Syrians) in the UK over the last 5 years. Finally, we spend around £14 billion per year in Overseas Aid, helping millions of people around the world. This is the highest amount of any country in Europe and we are the only G7 country to meet the 0.7% of GNI Overseas Aid target.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what (a) maintenance, (b) repair, (c) overhaul and (d) upgrade work relating to the F-35 programme his Department has awarded to Sealand Support Services Limited; and what timescale those contracts cover.

Sealand Support Services Limited (SSSL) has been assigned by the US Government as a Maintenance Repair Overhaul and Upgrade (MRO&U) service provider for F-35 Lightning aircraft components. SSSL is currently going through the stand-up and activation stage to become an 'Approved Supplier' to Lockheed Martin and is negotiating the contracts that will underpin the MRO&U workload. Consequently, there are no contracts currently in place.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the principle of replacement, reduction and refinement of the use of animals in research, what plans there are to reduce the size of the breeding colony of marmosets at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory, Porton Down.

The size of the Dstl marmoset breeding colony is under constant review by veterinary staff, independent inspectors and the Dstl Animal Welfare Ethical Review Body, following the principles of replacement, reduction and refinement of the use of animals in research (the 3Rs). Accordingly, the breeding colony is maintained at the minimum size consistent with future research needs and maintaining suitable genetic diversity.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many applications his Department received to the Levelling Up Fund by the closing date for first round applications of 18 June 2021 from local authorities in Wales.

I am delighted to say that the first round of the Levelling Up Fund received significant interest from England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland bidding authorities across the three investment priorities of the Fund. Bids are currently being assessed in line with the published assessment process. Outcomes from the first round of bids for the Levelling Up Fund will be announced later in the year and bidding authorities will be informed in due course.

20th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many applications his Department received to the Levelling Up Fund by the closing date for first round applications of 18 June 2021.

I am delighted to say that the first round of the Levelling Up Fund received significant interest from England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland bidding authorities across the three investment priorities of the Fund. Bids are currently being assessed in line with the published assessment process. Outcomes from the first round of bids for the Levelling Up Fund will be announced later in the year and bidding authorities will be informed in due course.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, when his Department plans to publish the HM Courts and Tribunals Service workload weekly management information for SSCS Tribunals for the period from December 2019 onwards.

Following a move to a new operational system, new data extracts are under development to facilitate the production of Social Security and Child Support Tribunal datasets. These new datasets are currently undergoing stringent quality assurance checks before the data can be released into the public domain.

Once this data assurance has been completed these datasets will be released in the Ministry of Justice Official Published Statistics and in the published Management Information as they become available.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reasons the HM Courts and Tribunals Service workload weekly management information for SSCS Tribunals has not been published in the last 12 months.

Following a move to a new operational system, new data extracts are under development to facilitate the production of Social Security and Child Support Tribunal datasets. These new datasets are currently undergoing stringent quality assurance checks before the data can be released into the public domain.

Once this data assurance has been completed these datasets will be released in the Ministry of Justice Official Published Statistics and in the published Management Information as they become available.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to extend the period of validity for notices of marriage for weddings unable to take place as a result of the covid-19 lockdown restrictions.

We understand the frustration couples who have had to postpone their wedding or civil partnership must be feeling.

The requirement to solemnize a marriage within twelve months of giving notice to marry is set out in primary legislation, which does not provide for extending this period. It would require primary legislation to change this and we continue to explore potential legislative opportunities. In the meantime, the fees charged by local authorities for giving notice can be reduced, waived or refunded on compassionate grounds or in cases of hardship. It is for each local authority to determine when this can be applied.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that court hearings for breaches of non-molestation orders take place promptly during the covid-19 outbreak.

HMCTS is working closely with the Judiciary and criminal justice agencies to ensure cases that need to be prioritised can be.

Domestic Violence Protection Orders and Non-Molestation orders have been placed in the highest category of work in the magistrates’ and family courts for urgent hearings.

The prioritisation of cases and trials is a judicial decision and the senior judiciary has issued the following guidance:

https://www.judiciary.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Note-on-Listing-Magistrates-SPJ-DSPJ-14.04.20-FINAL.pdf

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)