Mark Field

Conservative - Former Member for Cities of London and Westminster

Minister of State (Foreign and Commonwealth Office)
13th Jun 2017 - 25th Jul 2019
Vice-Chair, Conservative Party
15th Jul 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament
13th Sep 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Procedure Committee
20th May 2008 - 6th May 2010
Crossrail Bill
14th Nov 2007 - 18th Nov 2007
Shadow Minister (Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Dec 2005 - 8th Nov 2006
Shadow Financial Secretary
10th May 2005 - 8th Dec 2005
Shadow Minister (London)
1st Jun 2003 - 1st Jun 2005
Opposition Whip (Commons)
1st Jun 2003 - 1st Jun 2004


Division Voting information

Mark Field has voted in 2452 divisions, and 48 times against the majority of their Party.

1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 236 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 273 Noes - 276
1 Apr 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship (Votes) - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 260 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 191 Noes - 292
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 94 Conservative No votes vs 157 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 160 Noes - 400
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 34 Conservative Aye votes vs 234 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 264 Noes - 272
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 10 Conservative Aye votes vs 259 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 184 Noes - 293
14 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 112 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 412 Noes - 202
13 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 66 Conservative No votes vs 149 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 164 Noes - 374
23 Jan 2018 - Electoral Commission - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative Aye votes vs 40 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 46 Noes - 77
11 Mar 2015 - Ark Pension Schemes - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 122 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 113
27 Oct 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 110 Conservative Aye votes vs 135 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 166 Noes - 340
28 Apr 2014 - High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 221 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 50 Noes - 451
10 Feb 2014 - Children and Families Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 99 Conservative No votes vs 127 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 376 Noes - 107
10 Dec 2013 - Business of the House (Today) - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative No votes vs 215 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 264 Noes - 7
21 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 124 Conservative Aye votes vs 134 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 161
5 Feb 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 131 Conservative Aye votes vs 139 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 400 Noes - 175
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 87 Conservative No votes vs 142 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 241 Noes - 256
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 93 Conservative Aye votes vs 139 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 267 Noes - 233
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 39 Conservative Aye votes vs 167 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 205 Noes - 228
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 40 Conservative Aye votes vs 141 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 105 Noes - 186
12 Mar 2012 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 32 Conservative Aye votes vs 134 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 101 Noes - 166
20 Jan 2012 - Daylight Saving Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 65 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 10 Noes - 121
24 Oct 2011 - National Referendum on the European Union - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative Aye votes vs 209 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 111 Noes - 483
15 Dec 2010 - Loans to Ireland Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 25 Conservative Aye votes vs 246 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 243 Noes - 301
12 Nov 2010 - Sustainable Livestock Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 8 Conservative Aye votes vs 26 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 62 Noes - 29
25 Oct 2010 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative Aye votes vs 245 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 241 Noes - 293
20 Oct 2010 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 272 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 237 Noes - 319
20 Oct 2010 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 273 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 212 Noes - 325
18 Oct 2010 - Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 269 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 233 Noes - 328
21 Jul 2010 - Use of the chamber (united kingdom youth parliament) - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 16 Conservative No votes vs 242 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 499 Noes - 21
15 Jun 2010 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 75 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 171 Noes - 263
4 Mar 2010 - Chair (Terminology) - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 28 Conservative No votes vs 74 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 106 Noes - 221
21 Jan 2010 - Bournemouth Borough Council Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative No votes vs 26 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 127 Noes - 5
14 Jan 2010 - Canterbury City Council Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative No votes vs 34 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 99 Noes - 11
30 Apr 2009 - Members’ Allowances - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative Aye votes vs 55 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 96 Noes - 285
1 Apr 2009 - Nick Cousins - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 27 Conservative Aye votes vs 83 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 304 Noes - 103
2 Mar 2009 - Political Parties and Elections Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 24 Conservative No votes vs 65 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 235 Noes - 176
3 Jul 2008 - Members’ Salaries - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 35 Conservative No votes vs 46 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 155 Noes - 196
19 May 2008 - Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 60 Conservative No votes vs 79 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 163 Noes - 342
6 May 2008 - Criminal Justice and Immigration Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 36 Conservative Aye votes vs 48 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 0 Noes - 0
25 Oct 2007 - Modernisation of the House of Commons - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 21 Conservative Aye votes vs 22 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 36 Noes - 74
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative No votes vs 175 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 416 Noes - 163
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 75 Conservative Aye votes vs 96 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 305 Noes - 267
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 55 Conservative Aye votes vs 121 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 337 Noes - 224
7 Mar 2007 - House of Lords Reform - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 14 Conservative Aye votes vs 106 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 391 Noes - 111
23 Feb 2007 - Prayers - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 16 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 3 Noes - 35
13 Dec 2006 - Justice and Security (Northern Ireland) Bill - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 7 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 299 Noes - 13
1 Nov 2006 - Legislative Process - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 143 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 290 Noes - 199
1 Nov 2006 - Legislative Process - View Vote Context
Mark Field voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 55 Conservative No votes vs 69 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 365 Noes - 62
View All Mark Field Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Chris Bryant (Labour)
(37 debate interactions)
John Bercow (Speaker)
(30 debate interactions)
Christopher Chope (Conservative)
(29 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(202 debate contributions)
Home Office
(109 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(74 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Local Government Finance Bill 2016-17
(9,305 words contributed)
Higher Education and Research Act 2017
(8,441 words contributed)
Criminal Finances Act 2017
(2,435 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Mark Field's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Mark Field

19th October 2016
Mark Field signed this EDM as a sponsor on Thursday 20th October 2016

EAST LONDON NHS FOUNDATION TRUST

Tabled by: Stephen Timms (Labour - East Ham)
That this House congratulates East London NHS Foundation Trust on becoming the first mental and community health trust in England to be rated outstanding by the Care Quality Commission; acknowledges the skills and passion of the Trust's staff; and commends them for the care they provide to their patients and …
10 signatures
(Most recent: 31 Oct 2016)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 5
Labour: 3
Independent: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
9th February 2016
Mark Field signed this EDM on Tuesday 9th February 2016

SUPPORT FOR ROYAL NAVY AND ROYAL MARINES SERVICE LEAVERS

Tabled by: Julian Lewis (Conservative - New Forest East)
That this House recognises the need for greater co-operation between separate service charities and those charities and the Armed Forces of the Crown; accordingly welcomes the launch of the Shipmates and Oppos programme for the support of all Service Leavers of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines and their Reserves; congratulates …
43 signatures
(Most recent: 11 May 2016)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 12
Conservative: 8
Scottish National Party: 8
Liberal Democrat: 2
Independent: 1
Non-affiliated: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Mark Field's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Mark Field, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Mark Field has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Mark Field has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Mark Field has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


47 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4th Jan 2016
To ask the Attorney General, pursuant to the Answer of 15 December 2015 to Question 19543, how many of those prosecutions for human trafficking resulted in a conviction.

During 2014-2015 the CPS prosecuted 187 defendants for offences connected with human trafficking. 130 of these defendants were convicted at a conviction rate of 69.5%.

Robert Buckland
Secretary of State for Wales
26th Sep 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what steps Ofcom is taking to encourage new entrants in the market for mobile and fixed wireless services in the London area.

Ensuring high quality of service and choice are priority areas for Ofcom. While Ofcom cannot compel providers to invest in particular areas, it has taken a number of steps to ensure that the regulatory regime supports competition and commercial rollout.

In 2010, Ofcom introduced requirements to allow competing providers to use infrastructure from Openreach, the wholesale provider which manages BT’s telecoms network, to deliver superfast services. Ofcom has been reviewing competition in the wholesale broadband market over the past year. In addition, it is also undertaking a review of business connectivity, which is looking at how well competition is working in the provision of dedicated connections known as leased lines.

In addition, in auctioning the spectrum suitable for 4G mobile broadband services, Ofcom put in place requirements to ensure spectrum was reserved for a fourth competitor. Alternative providers are now offering superfast services using 4G mobile broadband and a combination of wireless technologies in London.

Finally, Ofcom has granted an extension to a wireless spectrum licence held by UK Broadband Ltd. The company intends to deploy a national wireless broadband network focusing on major urban areas and reaching an estimated 45% of the UK’s population. It has already rolled out fixed wireless services to parts of London.

17th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the preparedness of the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS) to replace the EU’s Trade Control and Expert System; and what discussions she has had with representatives of port health authorities on contingency planning for IPAFFS after the UK has left the EU.

The Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS) was ready for use in advance of the last withdrawal date of 12 April. Since then, work on IPAFFS has continued to further develop and stabilise the system, improving the user experience and increasing functionalities for imports from countries outside the EU.

IPAFFS is currently available for businesses to register and begin familiarising themselves with the system. Businesses importing goods from outside the EU are able to use the system from Day 1. IPAFFS replicates the same functionality as the Trade Control and Expert System (TRACES) currently used by importers to notify authorities about imports of animal products, high-risk food and feed from non-EU countries.

For an interim period, businesses importing goods from the EU will follow a separate process whilst this functionality is built into IPAFFS.

As part of our programme’s nationwide business readiness activities we have been engaging with businesses, stakeholders and users of IPAFFS (including Port Health Authorities) to ensure they can familiarise themselves with the system ahead of 31 October.

The current IPAFFS contingency process is mostly unchanged from the one proposed for the previous departure date in March and follows a similar process to that used by TRACES if it were to stop working today. The National Clearance Hub has accepted the contingency as workable.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
17th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether UK ports will be required to undertake sanitary and phytosanitary controls of high-risk food and feed from the EU in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a withdrawal agreement; and if she will make a statement.

The process for importing feed and food from the EU to the UK will not change after Brexit. There will be no additional controls or checks. Full guidance has been published on Gov.uk and this includes new arrangements for the notification only of certain imports.

Options for a new, long term imports regime for animals and animal products are under consideration. The sanitary and phytosanitary conditions for trade between the UK and the EU will also be a matter for negotiation as part of our Future Relationship with the EU.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether UK ports will be required to undertake sanitary and phytosanitary controls on high risk food and feed from the EU in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a withdrawal agreement; and how long such controls are expected to be in place.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
27th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment the Government has made of the preparedness of the Import of Products, Animals, Food and Feed System (IPAFFS) to replace the EU’s Trade Control and Expert System; and what discussions the Government has had with representatives of port health authorities on contingency planning for IPAFFS after the UK has left the EU.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
27th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the UK will be a listed country for animal health in relation to (a) ungulates, (b) equines (c) dogs, (e) cats and (f) ferrets in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

i) Ungulates, Equines and commercial movement of cats, dogs and ferrets

The United Kingdom submitted its application to allow exports of live animals and animal products to the European Commission in January 2019.

The UK continues to undertake constructive engagement with the European Commission on third country listing, and has already provided the necessary assurances requested by the European Commission in order for the relevant Committee to consider listing the UK as a third country for exports of live animals and animal products. This would ensure that exports of ungulates (hoofed animals), equines and commercial movement of cats, dogs and ferrets to the EU would continue in a no deal.

The relevant Committee meeting to vote on our listed status is expected to be scheduled and meet ahead of exit date.

ii) Non-commercial movement of cats, dogs and ferrets

Non-commercial movement of cats, dogs and ferrets is covered by the EU Pet Travel Scheme which has 3 categorisations of third country: unlisted, Part 1 listed and Part 2 listed.

Third countries can apply to the European Commission to be listed under the EU Pet Travel Scheme. The United Kingdom submitted its application to allow the UK to become a Part 1 listed third country under Annex II of the EU Pet Travel Regulations to the European Commission in January 2019. It is for the Commission to consider our application for listed status. The UK is likely to be treated as an unlisted country under the EU Pet Travel Scheme if it leaves without a deal.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government has plans to implement EU Official Control Regulation 2017/625 on the application of food and feed law, rules on animal health and welfare, plant health and plant protection products.

The new Official Controls Regulation (EU) 2017/625 will apply in EU member states from 14 December 2019.

How and when the UK implements this Regulation will depend on our departure from the EU. If we leave the EU with a deal, there is likely to be an implementation period until at least 31 December 2020. During this period, EU law will apply including the Official Controls Regulation. The UK will therefore need to implement this new Regulation at the same time as EU member states on 14 December 2019.

In a no-deal situation, the UK will be able to choose whether and when to apply these measures as the Regulation will not apply automatically to the UK. However, UK exporters to the EU will have to meet the import requirements that apply to imports from third countries.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
27th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether live animal consignments designated under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) or non-CITES will be permitted to enter the UK using (a) the Port of Dover (b) Eurotunnel, (c) Harwich and (d) Portsmouth.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
27th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what (a) financial and (b) logistical support (i) has been and (ii) will be provided to port operators and port health authorities for potential changes in (A) throughput and (B) volume of trade at UK border control posts after the UK leaves the EU.

The Department for Transport has put in place £30M of funding for ports, Local Resilience Forums, and road & rail links.

Financial support is provided for sixteen ports across England who will receive a share of funding to help their preparations for Brexit on 31 October and beyond. The successful bidders of the £10m Port Infrastructure Resilience and Connectivity (PIRC) competition offers ports up to £1m each to deliver important infrastructure upgrades to help keep traffic and trade flowing smoothly across the border.

The fund PIRC is part of a wider £30m government package to support ports across England to operate efficiently post-Brexit. DfT is providing up to £5m to four Local Resilience Forums (LRF) outside Kent with the highest volumes of accompanied road freight traffic with EU ports. A further £15m will go towards the development of longer-term projects to boost road and rail links to ports.

Arrangements and support for Port Health and border operations are a matter for the responsible Government Departments.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury and Chief Whip
23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of unlicensed pedicabs on London's reputation as a tourist destination.

The Department for Transport has received representations from a number of businesses located in the West End of London who are concerned about the impacts of pedicabs on their customers, mainly in respect of congestion and anti-social behaviour. We are working with Transport for London to develop legislation to allow the Mayor of London to regulate the pedicab trade.

23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with Transport for London on regulation of pedicabs.

Ministers and officials have regular meetings with representatives of Transport for London at which various subjects are discussed, including pedicabs. The Department has been working closely with Transport for London on proposals for legislation to enable the Mayor of London to regulate the pedicab trade.

8th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions (a) he and (b) officials of his Department have had with Transport for London on the (i) timetable and (ii) provisions of legislation on pedicabs in London to ensure that they are able to regulate swiftly once primary legislation is in place.

The need for urgent action on pedicabs was discussed at the Secretary of State’s meeting with the Mayor on 13 June, and at Lord Ahmad’s meeting with the Deputy Mayor for Transport on 16 June. Officials from the Department for Transport have had regular meetings with their opposite numbers in Transport for London to ensure that TfL are ready to respond as soon as the necessary primary legislation is enacted.

26th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether he discussed with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government the local welfare provision review, published by his Department on 5 November 2014, prior to the publication of that review.

Ministers and officials from my Department and the Department for Communities and Local Government hold regular discussions about a number of issues. These include local welfare provision and my department’s review.

17th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to tackle (a) declining rates of childhood vaccination and (b) anti-vaccine misinformation.

The Department is working with Public Health England (PHE), NHS England and NHS Improvement and other stakeholders to deliver a comprehensive vaccine and immunisation strategy this autumn. The strategy will set out a clear vision for maintaining and developing England’s world-leading immunisation programme over the next 10 years and beyond.

Actions planned or underway to increase the uptake of childhood vaccination include:

- Strengthening the role of local immunisation coordinators – healthcare professionals that promote vaccine uptake, particularly in under-served groups, by supporting areas with low uptake and tailoring specific local interventions to under-vaccinated communities;

- Updating NHS.uk to ensure availability of National Health Service-approved, evidence-based and trusted advice on vaccines; and

- A review of general practitioner vaccinations and immunisation standards, funding, and procurement to incentivise improved immunisation coverage.

1st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to tackle (a) falling rates of childhood vaccination and (b) anti-vaccine misinformation.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

27th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the capacity of UK Border Force to manage high risk food and feed that does not enter through a Border Inspection Post or Designated Point of Entry in the event that the UK leaves the EU without a withdrawal agreement.

Third country high-risk food and feed consignments transiting the European Union destined for the United Kingdom will need to enter the UK at ports with the required facilities, such as Border Inspection Posts (BIP) and Designated Points of Entry (DPE) to undertake required controls. Following detailed analysis to determine the possible number of such transits, there is sufficient existing capacity at UK ports with those facilities to undertake all relevant import controls.

The importation of high-risk feed and foods that are not pre-notified to a port with a BIP or DPE or enter a port without a BIP or DPE are illegal imports and as such are subject to Border Force control.

14th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the estimated cost implications are of the proposed closure of congenital heart disease services at Royal Brompton Hospital, including (a) the cost of expanding provision elsewhere and (b) transferring staff and services.

Congenital heart disease services are paid for through tariff. Therefore, if NHS England proposals were to be implemented, and this resulted in changes to the flow of patients, funding for treatment would follow the patients.

NHS England is working with providers to seek assurances of their ability to accept additional patients if required to do so. This includes considering the effect of the potential changes on staff and to understand the cost implications of the changes which it is proposing.

14th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many paediatric intensive care unit beds there are in central London; and how many of those beds are at the Royal Brompton Hospital.

The information requested is in the table below. NHS England publishes monthly data on critical care bed capacity, including the number of paediatric intensive care beds. The data reports the numbers of beds that are open, as a snapshot, at midnight on the last Thursday of the month.

Number of paediatric intensive care beds in central London and the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust open on the last Thursday of the reporting period, September 2016

Organisation

Number of Paediatric intensive care beds

Central London of which:

102

Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust

24

Source: Critical care bed capacity and urgent operations cancelled, NHS England

23rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, if he will cap the legal fees paid by the NHS in clinical negligence cases; and if he will make a statement.

This Government believes that it is unacceptable for lawyers to incur costs that are far higher than the amount of any compensation awarded to the patient and want costs to be proportionate. High legal costs in clinical negligence cases divert money away from patient care in the National Health Service. This is why we have recently announced that we will be launching a formal consultation in the autumn with the goal of establishing an appropriate level of fixed costs for lower value clinical negligence claims.

20th Feb 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 10 February 2015 to Question 222787, what constitutes appropriate training for HM Revenue and Customs' staff dealing with accelerated payment notices; and what qualifications and training are required of the specialised team responsible for such notices.

HMRC’s staff dealing with Accelerated Payment Notices are trained to ensure that they have a clear understanding of the relevant legislation and the operational processes to be followed under the Accelerated Payments regime. Where necessary, for example if they are dealing with Accelerated Payment Notices to be issued in a specialist area of the tax code such as Stamp Duty Loan Trusts, staff also receive bespoke technical training in that area.

2nd Feb 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if his Department will make an assessment of the effect that accelerated payment notices have had on small and medium-sized businesses.

A Tax Information and Impact Notice (TIIN) published on 9 March 2014 set out the summary of potential impacts of Accelerated payments including impact on business.

The TIIN noted that Accelerated Payments will have no impact on business undertaking normal commercial transactions. Small and micro businesses will only be affected if they participate in tax avoidance. The TIIN also indicated that the measure would be monitored and evaluated.

The TIIN is available www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/293934/TIIN_5133_7040_and_9029_accelerated_payments_of_tax_DOTAS_GAAR.pdf.

30th Jan 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department plans to produce a report on its progress in using accelerated payment notices.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) ensures that all staff dealing with Accelerated Payment Notices have received appropriate training in the relevant legislation and the operational processes to be followed on receipt of representations made on accelerated payment notices that have been issued. A separate, specialised and trained team is responsible for dealing with representations received on these notices.

As part of its normal reporting of compliance and operational information, HMRC will include information on Accelerated Payments Notices in its Annual Report.

30th Jan 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that staff in HM Revenue and Customs' new counter-avoidance directorate have received adequate training to deal with challenges to Accelerated Payment Notices.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) ensures that all staff dealing with Accelerated Payment Notices have received appropriate training in the relevant legislation and the operational processes to be followed on receipt of representations made on accelerated payment notices that have been issued. A separate, specialised and trained team is responsible for dealing with representations received on these notices.

As part of its normal reporting of compliance and operational information, HMRC will include information on Accelerated Payments Notices in its Annual Report.

22nd Jan 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 14 January 2015 to Question 220189, whether his Department has developed specific guidelines to ensure that HM Revenue and Customs acts reasonably when dealing with taxpayers who seek additional time to pay as a consequence of accelerated payment notices.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) writes to individuals some weeks before issuing an Accelerated Payment notice, letting them know that one is on its way. The most important thing for anyone who thinks they might have genuine difficulty in paying the amounts due under an Accelerated Payment notice is to contact HMRC to discuss possible alternative payment arrangements.

In cases of genuine hardship, HMRC will consider time to pay. The priority in cases of genuine hardship will be to get people on to a payment track so that the debt is paid as quickly as possible. HMRC has put in place standard guidelines for staff dealing with these requests and these are carefully monitored.

HMRC will always ensure that its action is proportionate and that it is realistic that any agreed payment tracks will result in the liability being paid.

To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the cost to the public purse was of tax evasion cases brought on behalf of HM Revenue and Customs in each of the last three years for which figures are available; how many such cases resulted in a guilty verdict; and how much has been recovered following successful prosecution of those cases.

HMRC does not calculate the cost of individual tax evasion cases. The majority of such cases are dealt with using cost-effective civil settlement procedures. HMRC also has the power to investigate criminally those that seek to defraud the Exchequer, and it publishes its policy around when it will use this power.

HMRC is not a prosecuting authority. Where cases do proceed to the criminal courts the prosecution is carried out by the relevant independent prosecuting authority. This is the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) in England and Wales, the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service (COPFS) in Scotland, and the Public Prosecution Service for Northern Ireland (PPSNI).

Details of the total number of individuals convicted for tax offences are set out in the following table. These include offences in relation to both direct and indirect tax, excise duties and tax credits.

Convictions for tax offences

2010/11

280

2011/12

401

2012/13

522

2013/14

682

HMRC does not calculate how much has been recovered following successful prosecution. Individual cases are passed back for recovery action of tax evaded to compliance and debt teams. Additionally, fines, compensation orders and confiscation orders may in relevant circumstances be imposed by the courts. No central record is kept of all monies subsequently recovered in relation to specific convictions and therefore this information would be available only through manual intervention at disproportionate cost.

29th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the National Crime Agency's National Referral Mechanism Statistics - End of year summary 2015, of the 1,104 potential victims of trafficking who presented in the Metropolitan Police Force area in 2015 (a) how many came from EU countries, (b) from which region each such person came and (c) where each such person was first recruited for trafficking.

Of the 1,104 potential victims referred to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) in 2015 that presented in the Metropolitan Police Force area, 68 were EU nationals. The countries of origin of these EU nationals were: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and the UK. Information on the region of origin and location of recruitment of potential victims is not available.

All 1,104 potential victims who presented in the Metropolitan Police Force Area in 2015 were referred to the NRM by a first responder organisation. A breakdown of referrals is available from published NRM statistics on the National Crime Agency website and can be found here: www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics. Breakdowns of data about the London boroughs where potential victims presented are not available.

The Salvation Army and its subcontractors provide support in different locations within England and Wales for adult potential victims given a positive reasonable grounds decision. Following a reflection and recovery period, victims are assisted to move on within the UK or voluntarily return to their home country. The Home Office does not hold data on what happens to individuals once they leave the service.

29th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which organisations and agencies identified potential victims of trafficking in London boroughs in 2015; which UK regions victims were sent to for their reflection period; what information is held on those people after they exited the shelter; and what follow-up procedures are in place.

Of the 1,104 potential victims referred to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) in 2015 that presented in the Metropolitan Police Force area, 68 were EU nationals. The countries of origin of these EU nationals were: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and the UK. Information on the region of origin and location of recruitment of potential victims is not available.

All 1,104 potential victims who presented in the Metropolitan Police Force Area in 2015 were referred to the NRM by a first responder organisation. A breakdown of referrals is available from published NRM statistics on the National Crime Agency website and can be found here: www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics. Breakdowns of data about the London boroughs where potential victims presented are not available.

The Salvation Army and its subcontractors provide support in different locations within England and Wales for adult potential victims given a positive reasonable grounds decision. Following a reflection and recovery period, victims are assisted to move on within the UK or voluntarily return to their home country. The Home Office does not hold data on what happens to individuals once they leave the service.

29th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the National Crime Agency's National Referral Mechanism Statistics - End of year summary 2015, for what reasons only 89 of the 1104 potential victims of trafficking who presented in the Metropolitan Police Force area in 2015 were referred by that force to the National Referral Mechanism; and what process was followed for the remaining 1015 potential victims.

Of the 1,104 potential victims referred to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) in 2015 that presented in the Metropolitan Police Force area, 68 were EU nationals. The countries of origin of these EU nationals were: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and the UK. Information on the region of origin and location of recruitment of potential victims is not available.

All 1,104 potential victims who presented in the Metropolitan Police Force Area in 2015 were referred to the NRM by a first responder organisation. A breakdown of referrals is available from published NRM statistics on the National Crime Agency website and can be found here: www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics. Breakdowns of data about the London boroughs where potential victims presented are not available.

The Salvation Army and its subcontractors provide support in different locations within England and Wales for adult potential victims given a positive reasonable grounds decision. Following a reflection and recovery period, victims are assisted to move on within the UK or voluntarily return to their home country. The Home Office does not hold data on what happens to individuals once they leave the service.

29th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the National Crime Agency's National Referral Mechanism Statistics - End of year summary 2015, how many of the 1104 victims of trafficking identified in 2015 in the Metropolitan Police Force area were identified in each London borough.

Of the 1,104 potential victims referred to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) in 2015 that presented in the Metropolitan Police Force area, 68 were EU nationals. The countries of origin of these EU nationals were: Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and the UK. Information on the region of origin and location of recruitment of potential victims is not available.

All 1,104 potential victims who presented in the Metropolitan Police Force Area in 2015 were referred to the NRM by a first responder organisation. A breakdown of referrals is available from published NRM statistics on the National Crime Agency website and can be found here: www.nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/publications/national-referral-mechanism-statistics. Breakdowns of data about the London boroughs where potential victims presented are not available.

The Salvation Army and its subcontractors provide support in different locations within England and Wales for adult potential victims given a positive reasonable grounds decision. Following a reflection and recovery period, victims are assisted to move on within the UK or voluntarily return to their home country. The Home Office does not hold data on what happens to individuals once they leave the service.

4th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, on how many occasions the Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group on Modern Slavery met in (a) 2013, (b) 2014 and (c) 2015; who attended each such meeting; and in what ways that group is fulfilling the role of the national rapporteur.

The Inter-Departmental Ministerial Group (IDMG) on Modern Slavery met twice in each of the years 2013, 2014 and 2015.

In addition to these formal meetings of the IDMG group, on 17 October 2014 the Prime Minister, The Rt Hon David Cameron MP, also chaired a roundtable IDMG event as part of a programme of activity to mark the 2014 anti-slavery day.

This group fulfils the role of the UK’s national rapporteur equivalent mechanism, as set out in Article 19 of the EU directive on preventing and combating trafficking in human beings, by carrying out assessments of trends in trafficking, gathering statistics, measuring the results of anti-trafficking actions, and regularly reporting on the above.

IDMG reports are available on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/modern-slavery-inter-departmental-ministerial-group-publications. The most recent report was published on 21 October 2015.

Each report includes a list of all current members of the IDMG. Ministers from relevant Government departments are invited to attend meetings. Where they are unable to attend, they are asked to delegate attendance to senior officials.

13th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to mark Anti-Slavery Day 2015; what steps she is taking to increase awareness of the growth of modern day slavery; and if she will make a statement.

Increasing awareness of modern slavery is vital. As part of a wider programme of events being run by Non-Governmental Organisations, the Home Secretary attended the Human Trafficking Foundation’s Anti-Slavery Day Media Awards on 15 October, where she presented awards to recognise awareness-raising work by the media and voluntary sector. The Minister for Preventing Abuse and Exploitation on the same day attended an awareness-raising event at a London school.

This month we will commence Modern Slavery Act provisions to strengthen protections and support for victims. This includes a presumption about age provision to ensure that potential child victims receive specialist support without delay; updated guidance on identifying and supporting victims; and protections for Overseas Domestic Workers who are identified as victims of modern slavery. Subject to Parliamentary approval of the relevant regulations, we also intend to implement the new transparency in supply chains duty for major businesses to disclose what steps they have taken to ensure that their business and supply chains are slavery-free and to publish guidance to help business comply. On 1 November we will bring into effect a statutory duty for specified public bodies to notify the Home Office of any victims of modern slavery that they encounter, which will help to shine a light on this hidden crime. The Government will also publish its annual report on the scale and nature of modern slavery and the UK’s response to it, and the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner’s first ever strategic plan will be laid before Parliament.

15th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many victims of human trafficking were located as a result of calls to the NSPCC helpline in the last year; what grant her Department provides towards this provision; what data her Department holds on follow-ups to each call; and if she will make a statement.

The NSPCC is contracted by the Home Office to deliver a helpline that enables potential victims of modern slavery to access support services and advice. Between 31 July 2014 and 30 June 2015, 1,220 potential victims were identified by the helpline. 1,060 adult potential victims were identified and referred to the local police force; the Home Office does not hold information on the activity following this referral. 160 potential child victims were identified and were referred though the helpline to the NSPCC Child Trafficking Advice Centre. Each child referral is allocated to a social worker in the team to ensure each child is referred to Children’s Services and other relevant agencies, and that follow up advice is given. The Home Office funding for the contract is £50,000.

15th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many telephone calls were received by the Metropolitan Police's human trafficking helpline in each of the last three years; how many of these calls were from (a) victims of human trafficking, (b) professional workers and (c) the general public; and what the annual cost is of running the service.

The Home Office does not hold this data. The Metropolitan Police Human Trafficking helpline is owned by the Metropolitan Police and is independent of the Home Office.

15th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many convictions there were for human trafficking and modern day slavery in (a) 2012, (b) 2013 and (c) 2014; and from which countries those convicted originated.

The consolidated slavery and trafficking offences set out in the Modern Slavery Act 2015 will come into force on 31 July 2015. Information held by Ministry of Justice does not allow us to breakdown convictions by the offender’s country of origin. The Ministry of Justice publishes data on all offences, including human trafficking and slavery, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2014. To access the specific information requested, open the table ‘Outcomes by offence’.

27th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Government's announcement of 21 August 2019 that ports and local areas will receive £9 million of funding to prepare for the UK leaving the EU, how much funding will be allocated to the London Port Health Authority.

Across 2017/18 and 2018/19, my Department has made available £77 million to help local areas prepare for Brexit. This includes £60 million that has been distributed between all local authorities in England, including £314,952 to the City of London, and £3.14 million that was allocated to nineteen councils in March 2019 to increase capacity to plan for and accommodate changes in and around ports of entry. In August 2019 £5.01 million was announced to further support councils which either have, or are near to, a major air, land or sea port to ensure they continue to operate efficiently (£2.61 million to councils in Kent and £2.4 million to councils outside of Kent), and £4 million was allocated to Local Resilience Forums to support them with their core administration costs for preparing, testing, assuring and delivering plans for supporting the delivery of Brexit. This funding is for councils and Local Resilience Forums to boost their capacity and help them put in place measures that will protect the services that residents, communities and businesses rely upon.

6th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to extend the current exemptions in place for the office to residential change of use provisions in (a) Westminster and (b) other parts of central London; and if he will make a statement.

Permitted development rights for change of use from offices to residential were introduced for a period of three years from 30 May 2013 to 30 May 2016. These rights are contributing to a more efficient use of our existing building stock, and are providing badly needed new homes such as studios and one-bedroom flats for young people. Exemptions to this permitted development right were granted in exceptional circumstances, where local authorities could demonstrate a negative economic impact.

We are considering responses to the Technical consultation on planning which included a proposal to extend the permitted development right for change of use from offices to residential.

We recognise the strategic value of office space to the broader London and national economy in the current exempted zones.

5th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 14 October 2014 to Question 209508, when he plans to publish his Department's response to the consultation on the Review of Property Conditions in the Private Rented Sector.

We aim to publish the Government's response in due course.

26th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, how many responses were submitted to his Department's consultation on local welfare provision in 2015-16 (a) in total and (b) from local authorities.

The Government received more than 5,000 responses to the consultation which are being considered alongside the review by the Department for Work and Pensions into existing provision. The Government will make a decision based on this analysis in time for the provisional local government finance settlement in December 2014.

26th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the performance of local welfare assistance schemes on preventing and reducing homelessness.

The Department has not made any assessment of the performance of local welfare assistance schemes which are administered by local authorities. The Department for Work and Pensions published a wide ranging review into existing local welfare provision on 5 November.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prosecutions for human trafficking resulted in a conviction between 1 August 2015 and 1 January 2016; and how many orders made for victim compensation as a result of such convictions resulted in payments (a) by convicted traffickers and (b) at a cost to the public purse.

Statistics for prosecutions and convictions for 2015, including those for offences defined as human trafficking, are planned for publication in May 2016.


Overall court proceedings data for offences defined as human trafficking in England and Wales from 2004 to 2014 are published here.


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2014


The Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority cannot provide data on the compensation it has awarded to victims of a particular crime type. This is because it awards compensation in line with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme tariff of injuries rather than the type of incident that led to those injuries.

15th Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many confiscation orders of what value were made by HM Courts against those convicted of human trafficking offences in England and Wales in each of the last three years; and how much of that money has been awarded to the victims of trafficking.

The table below shows the total number of confiscation orders and their values made against defendants where the principal offence is categorised as People Trafficking.

The figures provided are for the financial years (April to March) and are based on the original order amount imposed, and therefore some of these orders may have been subject to subsequent appeals and/or variations.

People Trafficking

No. of orders made

Original order amount

Awarded as compensation

2012 – 2013

14

£457,722.18

£68,669.51

2013 – 2014

22

£593,415.43

£2,542.44

2014 – 2015

18

£1,113,038.77

£351,838.07

Confiscation orders are one of the key mechanisms available to the Government to deprive criminals of the proceeds of their crimes. The value of the order imposed, which is often very high, is based on the criminal benefit attributed to the crime and may, therefore, exceed the value of realisable assets that are known to the Court at the time of imposition. Crucially, an outstanding order stops the criminal benefitting from the proceeds of crime and ensures that, if the assets are discovered in the future, they can be seized.

HM Courts and Tribunals Service (HMCTS) and other enforcement agencies take the issue of recovering criminal assets very seriously and are working to ensure that clamping down on defaulters is a continued priority nationwide.

The amount defendants repaid from their criminal activity across all agencies has increased for the last six consecutive years and we are currently on course to have another highly effective year. £154.1million was collected in 2014/15 (which represented a 12% increase on the total recovered during 2013/14); as at the end of June 2015, £53 million had been recovered, which is an increase of 47% on the same period last year. After payment of compensation and external receiver’s fees, the balance is distributed across key Departments to support ongoing investigation, prosecution and enforcement activity.

The Modern Slavery Act 2015 amends the scope of the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 to include slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour. The Act also introduces Slavery and Trafficking Reparation Orders which can be used to award compensation to victims.

HMCTS is seeking a commercial partner to help increase collections, reduce enforcement costs and importantly, ensure more criminals pay. The improvement that the Agencies continue to make, combined with our future plans, will make sure that more criminals pay and that taxpayers get better value for money.

Shailesh Vara
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland