Kate Green Portrait

Kate Green

Labour - Stretford and Urmston

Shadow Secretary of State for Education
27th Jun 2020 - 29th Nov 2021
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
10th Apr 2020 - 27th Jun 2020
Committee of Privileges
2nd Mar 2020 - 12th May 2020
Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority
27th Jan 2020 - 6th May 2020
Committee on Standards
27th Jan 2020 - 6th May 2020
Committee on Privileges
23rd Oct 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee of Privileges
26th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Standards
15th Oct 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee of Privileges
23rd Oct 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Standards Sub-committee on ICGS Matters
14th May 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
15th Oct 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Home Affairs Committee
23rd Jul 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Privileges
26th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Committee on Standards
26th Oct 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
European Scrutiny Committee
30th Oct 2017 - 21st Oct 2019
Justice Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
European Scrutiny Committee
18th Jul 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Shadow Minister (Equalities Office) (Women and Equalities)
14th Sep 2015 - 27th Jun 2016
Shadow Minister (Work and Pensions)
7th Oct 2013 - 14th Sep 2015
Shadow Minister (Equalities)
7th Oct 2011 - 7th Oct 2013
Work and Pensions Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 25th Oct 2011


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Wednesday 26th January 2022
Business without Debate
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 144 Labour No votes vs 0 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 176
Speeches
Wednesday 19th January 2022
Building Safety Bill
Does my hon. Friend agree that there is a real opportunity here for the Department to link up with the …
Written Answers
Wednesday 26th January 2022
Government Departments: Consultants
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total spending by …
Early Day Motions
Thursday 6th February 2020
EU Settlement Scheme
That this House is concerned that the EU Settlement Scheme does not deliver sufficient assurance of their future status to …
Bills
Tuesday 21st January 2014
Adventure and Gap Year Activity Companies (Accreditation and Inspection) Bill 2013-14
The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will …
Tweets
Thursday 27th January 2022
20:01
MP Financial Interests
Monday 8th June 2020
8. Miscellaneous
From 6 December 2016, an executive committee member of the Fabian Society. The Fabian Society is a think tank affiliated …
EDM signed
Wednesday 26th January 2022
Greater Manchester Clean Air Zone
That this House notes that some 1,200 deaths a year are attributable to poor air quality in Greater Manchester; believes …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 19th July 2017
Organ Donation (Deemed Consent) Act 2019
A Bill to make amendments of the Human Tissue Act 2004 concerning consent to activities done for the purpose of …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Kate Green has voted in 358 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Kate Green Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Gavin Williamson (Conservative)
(54 debate interactions)
Kevin Foster (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
(17 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(11 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department for Education
(120 debate contributions)
Home Office
(45 debate contributions)
Leader of the House
(8 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Kate Green's debates

Stretford and Urmston Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Kate Green has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Kate Green

26th January 2022
Kate Green signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 26th January 2022

Greater Manchester Clean Air Zone

Tabled by: Tony Lloyd (Labour - Rochdale)
That this House notes that some 1,200 deaths a year are attributable to poor air quality in Greater Manchester; believes that, on that basis, movement towards establishing a Clean Air Zone (CAZ) in Greater Manchester is vital; stresses that a CAZ must be properly resourced to prevent it simply becoming …
13 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 12
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
23rd September 2021
Kate Green signed this EDM on Thursday 21st October 2021

Campaign to secure the future of the Covid Memorial Wall

Tabled by: Afzal Khan (Labour - Manchester, Gorton)
That this House welcomes the creation of the Covid Memorial Wall on Albert Embankment by Covid-19 Bereaved Families for Justice; notes that this memorial now includes over 150,000 hand-painted hearts to symbolise all those who lost their lives during the coronavirus pandemic; praises the work of Covid-19 Bereaved Families for …
136 signatures
(Most recent: 5 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 97
Scottish National Party: 15
Liberal Democrat: 10
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Conservative: 3
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
View All Kate Green's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Kate Green, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


1 Urgent Question tabled by Kate Green

Thursday 23rd September 2021

1 Adjournment Debate led by Kate Green

Thursday 16th January 2020

1 Bill introduced by Kate Green


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision for a register of accredited providers of adventure and gap year activities in the UK and overseas, where such activities are offered by a UK-owned or managed business; for the provision of consumer information about the registration process; for inspections of providers of such activities and for a register of approved inspectors; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Tuesday 21st January 2014

216 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the total spending by each Department was on outside consultants in each of the last three years for which records are available.

It is standard for Government Departments to draw on the advice of external specialists for a range of services. Consultancy includes staff who provide objective advice relating to strategy, structure, management or operations of an organisation and may include the identification of options with recommendations.

Cabinet Office net spend on Consultancy is published in annual reports and accounts on GOV.UK.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many vacancies in each Government department are vacant due to a lack of applicants with the appropriate skills.

The number of vacancies in each government department currently vacant due to a lack of applicants with the appropriate skills is not held centrally.

Civil servants are employed by individual departments which are responsible for setting their terms and conditions of employment in accordance with the Civil Service Management Code. Departments will, therefore, be able to provide further information on the status of their vacancies.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many places he has allocated for Help to Grow Management in each (a) region of England and (b) devolved nation of the UK in (i) 2021-22, (ii) 2022-23 and (iii) 2023-24.

Help to Grow: Management aims to support up to 30,000 small and medium-sized (SME) businesses to boost their leadership and management capability over the lifetime of the programme. The programme will be delivered across all regions of England and the Devolved Administrations, and we will work with our delivery partner and the Small Business Charter accredited business schools to ensure that there is strong take up of the programme in every region, and that we effectively support all areas of the UK with lower productivity, in alignment with Government’s levelling up agenda.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether it is his policy to allocate the number of places on Help to Grow Management courses by (a) region in England and (b) devolved nation in the UK.

Help to Grow: Management aims to support up to 30,000 small and medium-sized (SME) businesses to boost their leadership and management capability over the lifetime of the programme. The programme will be delivered across all regions of England and the Devolved Administrations, and we will work with our delivery partner and the Small Business Charter accredited business schools to ensure that there is strong take up of the programme in every region, and that we effectively support all areas of the UK with lower productivity, in alignment with Government’s levelling up agenda.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how many and what proportion of the staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

As of 31 March 2020, the Civil Service has achieved a total of 2.1% of its total workforce as apprentices against the legislative target for the public sector of 2.3% by March 2021.

As at the end of January 2021, DCMS employed 1,726 FTE civil servants, 14 of whom are currently apprentices (0.81% of staff). This target is a percentage of the total workforce so the percentage attained will change in line with workforce fluctuations over time, making it challenging to predict when a department will meet it. The data for 2018/19 can be found here. The data for 2019/20 can be found here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-service-apprenticeship-data-2018-to-2019.

DCMS is committed to increasing the number of apprentices across the Civil Service and continue to work towards the 2.3% target. The impact of the current pandemic has slowed progress against the target due to priority work and logistics. DCMS had four apprentice starts in the first three quarters of 2020-21 and has a further 11 starts planned for Q4. This would take us to 1.68% by the end of the financial year.

With the current strategy and targets coming to an end in April 2021, the Civil Service is focusing on how to continue to support the apprenticeship agenda and drive forward apprenticeship recruitment, building on the Plan for Jobs initiative and considering the current economic situation.

17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent guidance he has issued to (a) local authorities and (b) academy trusts on using non-disclosure agreements for school staff.

The department has issued no new advice to local authorities or schools in relation to non-disclosure agreements (NDAs). Our position remains as set out in paragraph 5.29 of the Staffing and Employment Advice for Schools, that any settlement agreement between a school and a member of staff that includes a confidentiality clause must adhere to the provisions set out in the Employment Rights Act 1996.

Advice in relation to NDAs has recently been focused on higher education providers. On 18 January 2022, my right hon. Friend, the Minister for Higher and Further Education launched a new pledge alongside Maria Miller MP and Can’t Buy My Silence, which commits universities to not using NDAs to silence victims of sexual misconduct, bullying, or other forms of harassment. The list of those universities who have signed the pledge will be held by the campaign group, Can't Buy My Silence, and hosted on their website.

Harassment of any sort is abhorrent and cannot be tolerated at schools, colleges or universities. Education providers have a responsibility to ensure that they provide a safe and inclusive environment for all students and staff.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his Department’s publication Build Back Better: Our Plan for Growth, if he will publish the (a) number of people aged between 16 and 64 that qualified to NVQ4+ in each NUTS2 region in England and (b) gross value added per hour worked in each of those regions in the most recent year for which both sets of data are available.

The Office for National Statistics’ (ONS) Nomis data portal provides official labour market statistics. The attached table provides the number of people aged between 16 and 64 that are qualified to NVQ4+ in each Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics 2 (NUTS2) region in England in 2020 as estimated from the annual population survey.

Latest data on gross value added per hour worked is published by the ONS and available here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/labourproductivity/datasets/subregionalproductivitylabourproductivitygvaperhourworkedandgvaperfilledjobindicesbyuknuts2andnuts3subregions. This data release uses International Territorial Levels as the new UK geographies classification system. This has superseded the NUTS classification system. This transition has not changed the names of regions or the areas covered by them.

Alex Burghart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the hourly rate for early years providers delivering government funded childcare hours will be in (a) 2022-23, (b) 2023-24, and (c) 2024-25.

I refer the hon. Member for Stretford and Urmston to the answer I gave on 3 November 2021 to Question 68396.

Further to that response, the department will confirm the 2022/23 financial year hourly funding rates for individual local authorities shortly, followed by the initial allocations in December. Hourly rates for the 2023-24 and 2024-25 financial years will be announced in following years, according to the usual timetable.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
8th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021, what additional funding he will make available for early years entitlements in (a) 2022-23, (b) 2023-24 and (c) 2024-25.

I refer the hon. Member for Stretford and Urmston to the answer I gave on 3 November 2021 to Question 68396.

Further to that response, the department will confirm the 2022/23 financial year hourly funding rates for individual local authorities shortly, followed by the initial allocations in December. Hourly rates for the 2023-24 and 2024-25 financial years will be announced in following years, according to the usual timetable.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children in receipt of free school meals accessed provision through the Holiday Activities and Food Programme during the (a) Easter holiday and (b) summer holiday in 2021, by local authority.

Local authorities were asked to send reports to the department by 15 October 2021, including detailed information on their delivery of the programme to date. 131 delivery reports were received by 15 October 2021, and we have been in contact with local authorities directly to ensure the outstanding 20 are received promptly. The department is now examining these detailed individual reports and may need to clarify information with local authorities in some cases. The department will then consider the best way to share information on the programme.

In addition, as part of the financial assurance process, local authorities will complete a certificate of expenditure which will cover the 2021-22 financial year. As indicated in the grant determination letter, this will be commissioned after the upcoming Christmas school holidays and therefore this information is not currently available.

The department commissioned Ecorys UK to conduct an external evaluation of the programme. Fieldwork has taken place during and shortly after this year’s summer holidays, and we expect to publish findings in the New Year.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Holiday Activities and Food Programme, how many local authorities submitted a report detailing their summer activities and a delivery plan for the Christmas holidays by 15 October 2021.

Local authorities were asked to send reports to the department by 15 October 2021, including detailed information on their delivery of the programme to date. 131 delivery reports were received by 15 October 2021, and we have been in contact with local authorities directly to ensure the outstanding 20 are received promptly. The department is now examining these detailed individual reports and may need to clarify information with local authorities in some cases. The department will then consider the best way to share information on the programme.

In addition, as part of the financial assurance process, local authorities will complete a certificate of expenditure which will cover the 2021-22 financial year. As indicated in the grant determination letter, this will be commissioned after the upcoming Christmas school holidays and therefore this information is not currently available.

The department commissioned Ecorys UK to conduct an external evaluation of the programme. Fieldwork has taken place during and shortly after this year’s summer holidays, and we expect to publish findings in the New Year.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much of the funding allocated to the Holiday Activities and Food Programme has been spent on activities for children during the (a) Easter and (b) summer 2021 holidays.

Local authorities were asked to send reports to the department by 15 October 2021, including detailed information on their delivery of the programme to date. 131 delivery reports were received by 15 October 2021, and we have been in contact with local authorities directly to ensure the outstanding 20 are received promptly. The department is now examining these detailed individual reports and may need to clarify information with local authorities in some cases. The department will then consider the best way to share information on the programme.

In addition, as part of the financial assurance process, local authorities will complete a certificate of expenditure which will cover the 2021-22 financial year. As indicated in the grant determination letter, this will be commissioned after the upcoming Christmas school holidays and therefore this information is not currently available.

The department commissioned Ecorys UK to conduct an external evaluation of the programme. Fieldwork has taken place during and shortly after this year’s summer holidays, and we expect to publish findings in the New Year.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding has been allocated through the Holiday Activities and Food Programme to each local authority.

Funding allocations for each local authority are listed in Annex A of the grant determination letter for this programme, which is available at the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1001998/Updated_HAF_grant_determination_-_9_July_2021.pdf.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which schools have received capital funding in each financial year since 2015-16, broken down by region.

The department provides annual capital funding to support sufficient school places and to maintain and improve the condition of the school estate. In addition, the department also delivers capital building programmes, including the free schools programme, the Priority School Building Programme (PSBP) and the new School Rebuilding Programme (SRP). Schools included in the PSBP can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/priority-school-building-programme-psbp. The first 100 schools in the new SRP can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-rebuilding-programme/school-rebuilding-programme.

For a breakdown of the Capital Departmental Expenditure Limit (CDEL) in each financial year since 2015-16 please see the table below:

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20

CDEL £m

5,068

5,732

4,907

5,402

4,864

Note: 2015-2019 figures are taken from the DfE accounts which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/dfe-annual-reports.

The figures for 2020-21 will be published in due course. This year, the department is providing £5.6 billion of capital funding to support the education sector. Capital funding for years beyond 2021-22 will be determined at the Spending Review.

A large proportion of schools’ capital funding is delivered through annual allocations to local authorities, larger multi-academy trusts, and large voluntary-aided school bodies. This means that the majority of annual capital funding is not allocated at school level and investment decisions are taken at a local level. Some allocations, such as those to large multi-academy trusts, will also cut across regional boundaries.

The department allocates Basic Need capital funding annually to local authorities, to support them to meet their statutory duty to provide sufficient school places in their area: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/basic-need-allocations. In February 2021, we announced nearly £500 million to provide places for September 2023.

The department also allocated £365 million across 2018 to 2021 through the Special Provision Capital Fund, specifically aimed at helping local authorities develop provision for children and young people with Education, Health and Care Plans: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/send-provision-capital-funding-for-pupils-with-ehc-plans.

A further £300 million in High Needs Provision Capital Allocations was allocated in the financial year 2021-22 to support the delivery of new places for children with special educational needs and disabilities or who require alternative provision: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/high-needs-provision-capital-allocations.

The government’s free schools programme has delivered hundreds of new schools and provided thousands of good new school places across the country. Information on the current and pipeline schools in that programme is provided in the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/free-schools-successful-applications.

Since 2015, the department has allocated £11.3 billion in annual capital funding to improve the condition of the school estate, including £1.8 billion committed in the 2021-22 financial year. Condition funding allocations for this year, and links to allocations from previous years, can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/school-capital-funding#funding-allocations-for-the-2021-to-2022-financial-year. Local authorities, larger multi-academy trusts, and large voluntary-aided school bodies (such as dioceses) receive an annual School Condition Allocation to invest in maintaining and improving the condition of the buildings for which they are responsible. Smaller and stand-alone academy trusts, voluntary-aided schools not part of larger bodies, and sixth form colleges, instead bid into the Condition Improvement Fund each year. All schools also receive funding to spend on their capital priorities through an annual Devolved Formula Capital allocation.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 July 2021 to Question 25092 on Teachers: arts, how many schools lack a qualified teacher in each subject.

Legislation does not specify that teachers must have a degree in a particular subject or discipline. The Teachers’ Standards specify the subject knowledge required for the award of qualified teacher status. All trainee teachers must meet these by the time they complete their training.

In November 2019, of 2,948 state-funded secondary schools in England, the most common subjects taught where no teachers in a school held a relevant post A level qualification in the subject were computing (400), Spanish (292) and media studies (209). The attached table provides further detail on all subjects.

These figures relate only to schools where the subjects were taught. For example, a school that does not teach engineering and does not have a teacher with a post A level qualification in engineering is excluded from figures. In addition, figures only include schools that supplied both curriculum and teacher qualification data. This differs to the methodology used in the answer to question 25092, which included all schools, regardless of curriculum data and subjects taught. The present methodology better reflects the status of schools who do not have teachers with a post A level qualification in specific subjects.

The information provided does not consider the subject taught by teachers. For example, a teacher with a qualification in mathematics may instead teach computer science. Information on subjects taught and teacher’s post A level qualifications is published in the ‘School Workforce in England’ statistical publication at: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england

To reduce the burden during the COVID-19 outbreak, schools and local authorities were not required to provide information on teacher qualifications in 2020. Therefore, the information provided relates to the November 2019 School Workforce Census.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to (a) monitor and (b) publish data on (i) average food orders by schools supported through the National School Breakfast Programme this academic year, and (ii) the average percentage of students on roll that take up the offer of breakfast provision this academic year.

The government is committed to continuing support for school breakfast clubs and we are further investing up to £24 million to continue our national programme for the next two years. This funding will support around 2,500 schools in disadvantaged areas, meaning that thousands of children from low-income families will be offered free nutritious breakfasts to better support their attainment, wellbeing and readiness to learn.

The focus of the programme is to target the most disadvantaged areas of the country, including the Department for Education’s Opportunity Areas. Throughout the contract we will be working with our provider, Family Action, to monitor different aspects of the programme including the food ordering from schools, participation rates among children, and the benefits the programme is having on pupils who are attending. We will consider the best opportunities to share information on the programme as it progresses.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
8th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of charging schools supported by the new National School Breakfast Programme for 25 per cent of the cost of food ordered in the third term of support.

The government is committed to continuing support for breakfast clubs and we are further funding up to £24 million to continue our programme over the next two years. This funding will support around 2,500 schools in disadvantaged areas meaning that thousands of children in low-income families will be offered nutritious breakfasts.

The focus of the programme is to target the most disadvantaged areas of the country, including the Department for Education’s Opportunity Areas. Schools will be eligible for the programme if they have 50% or more pupils within bands A-F of the Income Deprivation Affecting Children Index scale.

In terms of the schools’ financial contribution, this is an attractive offer to schools, providing free breakfasts for their pupils for 2 terms followed by a very substantial discount for the following 4 terms. Asking schools to contribute a small proportion of the costs means that the overall funding of up to £24 million can go further, reaching a higher number of schools, and therefore more disadvantaged children overall. Since inviting expressions of interest, we have seen strong interest from eligible schools so far and our programme will make a real difference in terms of children’s health, attainment, wellbeing and readiness to learn. Our provider, Family Action, are ensuring that schools fully understand and are committed to their financial contribution when they join the programme.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 14 July 2021 to Question 30353 on ventilation in universities, what budget has been made available for enforcement activities in respect of ventilation in universities in each of the last 10 years; what enforcement action has been taken in respect of ventilation in universities in each of the last 10 years; and when he last met vice-chancellors to discuss ventilation.

As employers, higher education (HE) providers have a legal responsibility to protect workers and others from risk to their health and safety, including from the risks of COVID-19. They should complete a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks of COVID-19 in the workplace and identify control measures, including ensuring adequate ventilation, to manage that risk, based on relevant government guidance and best practice.

As HE providers are autonomous institutions, they should identify and put in place appropriate plans, in line with government guidance, based on their individual circumstances, and for allocating their budgets based on these plans.

HE providers should identify any poorly ventilated spaces as part of their risk assessment and take steps to improve fresh air flow in these areas, giving consideration when holding events where large numbers of visitors are on site. These can be achieved by a variety of measures as set out here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses/higher-education-covid-19-operational-guidance.

As set out in the answer of 14 July 2021 to Question 30353 on ventilation in universities, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have published guidance on ventilation during the COVID-19 outbreak which is relevant for HE providers and the HSE may take action if control of workplace risks is needed. This guidance can be found here: https://www.hse.gov.uk/coronavirus/equipment-and-machinery/air-conditioning-and-ventilation/assesssment-of-fresh-air.htm.

I and my officials regularly engage with the HE sector and the importance of ensuring adequate ventilation has been, and continues to be, discussed.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will set out the reasons for the Infrastructure and Projects Agency's red rating of delivery of the National Tutoring Programme in 2021.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) was developed at speed to respond to a very immediate need to support pupils to catch-up on education lost because of restrictions to schools and colleges.

The NTP is an ambitious scheme that supports schools to access additional targeted support for those children and young people who have been hardest hit from disruption to their education as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. In the longer term, we aim to stimulate a well-functioning and sustainable tutoring market, offering high quality tutoring across the country.

Since the programme launched in November 2020, over 240,000 pupils have enrolled on the NTP, and over 195,000 have now commenced tutoring. This is in addition to over 1,000 academic mentors that have been placed in our most disadvantaged schools to provide tuition to pupils that need the most help to catch up.

The Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) undertook a full review of the NTP on 1 March 2021. Nine recommendations were made, including more dedicated resourcing with relevant skills, longer term planning and more direct engagement with the sector.

The IPA carried out a review focused on progress against the recommendations at the end of April 2021, and found that progress had been made. Based on these findings, the review team rated the programme Amber.

A further review is planned for August 2021, focusing on readiness for launch of the Core NTP programme in academic year 2021-22 and progress on the expansion of the programme through school-led tutoring.

19th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answers of 14 July 2021 to Questions 30351 and 30352 on ventilation in schools and colleges, what budget has been made available for enforcement activities in respect of ventilation in each of the last 10 years in (a) schools and (b) colleges; what enforcement action has been taken in respect of ventilation in each of the last 10 years in (a) schools and (b) colleges; and when he last met school or college leaders to discuss ventilation.

The Department does not enforce action on ventilation in schools and colleges, but does provide guidance through ‘BB 101: Guidelines on ventilation, thermal comfort, and indoor air quality in schools’, which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/building-bulletin-101-ventilation-for-school-buildings. Good estate management for schools provides further guidance on managing school buildings effectively, further information can be found via this link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/good-estate-management-for-schools.

The Department has provided guidance on COVID-19 control measures, including ventilation, which is informed by the latest scientific evidence in consultation with Public Health England and the Health and Safety Executive.

The guidance for schools can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak and the guidance for further education colleges can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-further-education-provision.

Department officials and Ministers regularly meet with a wide range of stakeholder organisations to discuss the Government's COVID-19 response, including on the use of public health measures in schools and colleges, such as ventilation.

The Department allocates condition funding each year to schools and those responsible for school buildings to maintain and improve the condition of the school estate, including improving ventilation where that is their priority. This includes funding for 16 to 19 academies and sixth form colleges.

The Department has allocated £11.3 billion in condition funding since 2015, including £1.8 billion in the current financial year. Capital allocations for financial year 2021/22, how funding is allocated, and links to previous years’ allocations are available on GOV.UK.

13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much and what proportion of funds raised by the apprenticeship levy remain unspent for financial year 2020-21.

The funds in apprenticeship service accounts are available for levy-paying employers to use for 24 months before they begin to expire on a rolling, month-by-month basis. Employers began to pay the apprenticeship levy in April 2017 and unused levy funds began to expire in May 2019.

In the 2020-21 financial year, £2,631 million was paid into levy-paying employer’s apprenticeship service accounts. This includes the 10% government top up to funds entering employer accounts.

In the 2020-21 financial year, £1,314 million of levy funds expired from employer’s apprenticeship service account. Employers have 24 months from the point funds enter their account in which to spend it, so the expiry of levy funds in 2020-21 financial year relates to the funds which entered employer accounts in 2018-19 financial year.

We do not anticipate that all employers who pay the levy will use all the funds available to them, but they are able to if they wish. As well as funding new apprenticeships in levy-paying employers, income from the levy is used to fund new apprenticeships in employers that do not pay the levy, as well as existing apprentices that started in previous years.

The funds available to levy-paying employers through their apprenticeship service accounts are not the same as the Department for Education’s annual apprenticeships budget. The annual apprenticeship budget is set by Her Majesty's Treasury, and although closely linked, is distinct from the total levy income collected by Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs.

The levy is an important part of our reforms to apprenticeships which are vital for driving our economic recovery. It supports employers of all sizes to invest in high-quality apprenticeship training. In 2021-22, funding available for investment in apprenticeships in England will remain around £2.5 billion – double that spent in 2010-11 in cash terms.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance he has issued or plans to issue to principals of further education colleges on ensuring adequate ventilation in colleges to reduce risks of covid-19 infection; with reference to what standards should further education colleges plan and measure that ventilation; what enforcement activity he plans to undertake to ensure that guidance is followed and risk reduced; and whether he plans to make funds available to improve standards of ventilation those colleges.

The Department’s guidance states that it is important that schools or colleges, when open, ensure that they are well ventilated and that a comfortable teaching environment is maintained. This can be achieved by a variety of measures including using mechanical ventilation systems and/or natural ventilation, such as opening windows. In all cases, actions should be taken to encourage fresh air into the building, whilst striking a balance with thermal comfort. The guidance for schools can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak and the guidance for further education colleges can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-further-education-provision.

The Department continues to review the ventilation requirements set out in the guidance, including considering whether monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) levels would be appropriate, and we are working with Public Health England and ventilation experts on a pilot project to measure CO2 levels in typical classrooms.

The Department continues to keep the protective measures under review based on the latest scientific evidence and advice as this continues to evolve.

9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance he has issued or plans to issue to headteachers on ensuring adequate ventilation in schools to reduce risks of covid-19 infection; to what standards schools should plan and measure that ventilation; what enforcement activity he plans to undertake that guidance is followed and risk reduced; and whether he plans to make funds available to improve standards of ventilation in schools.

The Department’s guidance states that it is important that schools or colleges, when open, ensure that they are well ventilated and that a comfortable teaching environment is maintained. This can be achieved by a variety of measures including using mechanical ventilation systems and/or natural ventilation, such as opening windows. In all cases, actions should be taken to encourage fresh air into the building, whilst striking a balance with thermal comfort. The guidance for schools can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak and the guidance for further education colleges can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-further-education-provision.

The Department continues to review the ventilation requirements set out in the guidance, including considering whether monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) levels would be appropriate, and we are working with Public Health England and ventilation experts on a pilot project to measure CO2 levels in typical classrooms.

The Department continues to keep the protective measures under review based on the latest scientific evidence and advice as this continues to evolve.

9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance he has issued or plans to issue to vice-chancellors on ensuring adequate ventilation in universities and other higher education institutions to reduce risks of covid-19 infection; with reference to what standards vice-chancellors should plan and measure the effectiveness of that ventilation; what enforcement activity he plans to undertake to ensure guidance is followed and risk reduced; and whether he plans to make funds available to improve standards of ventilation in universities.

The department has published guidance for higher education (HE) providers for Step 4 of the government’s COVID-19 roadmap, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-reopening-buildings-and-campuses.

From Step 4 of the roadmap, the guidance advises that it is important to ensure settings are well ventilated when in use and a comfortable teaching environment is maintained.

HE providers should assess the risks of COVID-19 in the workplace and identify control measures to manage that risk. They should identify any poorly ventilated spaces as part of their risk assessment and take steps to improve fresh air flow in these areas, particularly when holding events where large numbers of visitors are on site.

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) guidance on air conditioning and ventilation during the COVID-19 outbreak and the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers COVID-19 advice provides more information. This can be found at: http://schools.oxfordshire.gov.uk/cms/sites/schools/files/folders/folders/documents/healthandsafety/proceduresaz/CIBSE_Covid_19_Ventilation_guidance.pdf. The HSE may take action to improve control of workplace risks if needed, for example through the issue of enforcement notices to help secure improvements.

Improving ventilation can be achieved by a variety of measures and there is no separate funding source for ventilation in HE.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department’s current non-executive directors were appointed; what oversight officials had of Ministerial appointments of non-executive directors; and what assessment was made of their experience against the requirements for breadth and depth of experience set out in the Cabinet Office guidance on Departmental Boards of November 2014.

The Department follows the principles set out in the Cabinet Office/HM Treasury ‘Corporate governance in central government departments: code of good practice’, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/corporate-governance-code-for-central-government-departments-2017.

The Department’s current non-executive directors are listed below with their dates of appointment:

  • Baroness Ruby McGregor-Smith, appointed December 2015.
  • Ian Ferguson, appointed January 2016.
  • Richard Pennycook, appointed October 2017.
  • Irene Lucas, appointed November 2018.
  • Toby Peyton-Jones, appointed November 2018.
  • Nick Timothy, appointed March 2020.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what declarations of interests have been made by his Department’s non-executive directors; and where those interests are published.

Non-executive directors comply with the provisions of the Cabinet Office’s Code of Conduct for Board Members of Public Bodies.

Board members are required to submit any declarable interests annually. This information forms part of the independent National Audit Office review ahead of the publication of Departmental annual report and accounts.

Information on any relevant interests is published alongside the Department annual report and accounts, which are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/department-for-education-consolidated-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-to-2020/list-of-board-members-interests-march-2020.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what private companies are contracted to provide security services at his Department’s buildings that contain Ministerial private offices; and whether there are closed circuit television cameras in any Ministerial private office within his Department's estate.

As has been the case under successive Administrations, it is not Government policy to comment on security procedures in government buildings.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what financial payments his Department makes to its non-executive directors; how many times his departmental Board will meet in 2021-22; and what work the non-executive directors undertake.

This information is published in the Department’s annual report and accounts, and is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/department-for-education-consolidated-annual-report-and-accounts-2019-to-2020.

The Department’s report and accounts for the 2021/22 financial year will be published in due course, in the usual way.

Departmental boards provide strategic leadership for each central government department, as well as advising on and challenging how the Department is performing. Each board is chaired by the Secretary of State and includes junior ministers, the Permanent Secretary and non-executive board members. Non-executives are appointed to government departments from the public, private and voluntary sectors. Their role is to provide advice and bring an external perspective.

A summary of the work of non-executive directors across Government can be found in the Government Lead Non-Executive's annual report, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/government-lead-non-executives-annual-report-2019-to-2020.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether a risk assessment has been carried out on the secure holding of CCTV footage within his Department.

As has been the case under successive Administrations, it is not Government policy to comment on security procedures in Government buildings.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his departmental IT systems routinely allow officials, advisers and Ministers to access private email accounts from their office desktop computers, department-issue laptop computers and mobile phone devices.

I refer the hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on the use of private emails, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-departments-on-private-email-use.

28th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether any departmental business has been conducted on private email addresses; and what mechanisms are in place to ensure that full records are kept of that business.

I refer the hon. Member to the Cabinet Office guidance to departments on the use of private emails, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-departments-on-private-email-use.

24th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many freedom of information requests his Department has referred to the central Cabinet Office Clearing House for advice on handling in each year since 2016.

The Department has referred requests to the Cabinet Office Clearing House where appropriate and in line with the published criteria which is available on gov.uk: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cabinet-office-and-freedom-of-information.

The Department does not maintain records of the number of referrals to the Clearing House.

22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his oral contribution of 21 June 2021, Official Report 587, whether individual children are able to access multiple courses of tutoring across different subjects.

Through the National Tutoring Programme (NTP), the Department is investing over £1 billion to deliver up to six million intensive 15 hour tutoring courses for 5 to 16 year olds by 2024.

Schools are best placed to identify which pupils would benefit from tuition, based on the needs of their individual pupils. The Department recognises that each school has pupils with varying needs, so we have developed a tutoring programme that provides a high degree of flexibility and choice. The Department has developed options that make it easier for schools to access tutoring whilst ensuring a high degree of discretion to support the pupils most in need.

The focus of the NTP is on supporting disadvantaged pupils, including those eligible for pupil premium. The Department expects a large proportion of pupils enrolled in the NTP to be eligible for pupil premium. Pupils who have received tuition in academic year 2020/21 will again be eligible in the next academic year 2021/22.

There are three subsidised tutoring options for academic year 2021/22:

  • A grant payment to all schools, based on the number of pupil premium students, to support school led tutoring. This payment will be ring-fenced to fund tutoring provision which can be locally sourced by schools.
  • Approved Tuition Partners will offer high quality, subsidised tuition to schools across a wide range of topics.
  • Schools in the most disadvantaged areas will also be supported to employ in house academic mentors to provide tuition to their pupils.
22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his oral contribution of 21 June 2021, Official Report 587, what estimate he has made of the number of tutoring sessions that each of the 6 million children will receive.

Through the National Tutoring Programme (NTP), the Department is investing over £1 billion to deliver up to six million intensive 15 hour tutoring courses for 5 to 16 year olds by 2024.

Schools are best placed to identify which pupils would benefit from tuition, based on the needs of their individual pupils. The Department recognises that each school has pupils with varying needs, so we have developed a tutoring programme that provides a high degree of flexibility and choice. The Department has developed options that make it easier for schools to access tutoring whilst ensuring a high degree of discretion to support the pupils most in need.

The focus of the NTP is on supporting disadvantaged pupils, including those eligible for pupil premium. The Department expects a large proportion of pupils enrolled in the NTP to be eligible for pupil premium. Pupils who have received tuition in academic year 2020/21 will again be eligible in the next academic year 2021/22.

There are three subsidised tutoring options for academic year 2021/22:

  • A grant payment to all schools, based on the number of pupil premium students, to support school led tutoring. This payment will be ring-fenced to fund tutoring provision which can be locally sourced by schools.
  • Approved Tuition Partners will offer high quality, subsidised tuition to schools across a wide range of topics.
  • Schools in the most disadvantaged areas will also be supported to employ in house academic mentors to provide tuition to their pupils.
22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his oral contribution of 21 June, Official Report 587, what is his planned timeframe for tutoring to have been rolled out to 6 million children.

Through the National Tutoring Programme (NTP), the Department is investing over £1 billion to deliver up to six million intensive 15 hour tutoring courses for 5 to 16 year olds by 2024.

Schools are best placed to identify which pupils would benefit from tuition, based on the needs of their individual pupils. The Department recognises that each school has pupils with varying needs, so we have developed a tutoring programme that provides a high degree of flexibility and choice. The Department has developed options that make it easier for schools to access tutoring whilst ensuring a high degree of discretion to support the pupils most in need.

The focus of the NTP is on supporting disadvantaged pupils, including those eligible for pupil premium. The Department expects a large proportion of pupils enrolled in the NTP to be eligible for pupil premium. Pupils who have received tuition in academic year 2020/21 will again be eligible in the next academic year 2021/22.

There are three subsidised tutoring options for academic year 2021/22:

  • A grant payment to all schools, based on the number of pupil premium students, to support school led tutoring. This payment will be ring-fenced to fund tutoring provision which can be locally sourced by schools.
  • Approved Tuition Partners will offer high quality, subsidised tuition to schools across a wide range of topics.
  • Schools in the most disadvantaged areas will also be supported to employ in house academic mentors to provide tuition to their pupils.
22nd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to his oral contribution of 21 June 2021, Official Report 587, what estimate his Department has made of the number of children that will receive tutoring under the Government’s plan in the academic years (a) 2020-21, (b) 2021-22, (c) 2022-23 and (d) 2023-24.

Through the National Tutoring Programme (NTP), the Department is investing over £1 billion to deliver up to six million intensive 15 hour tutoring courses for 5 to 16 year olds by 2024.

Schools are best placed to identify which pupils would benefit from tuition, based on the needs of their individual pupils. The Department recognises that each school has pupils with varying needs, so we have developed a tutoring programme that provides a high degree of flexibility and choice. The Department has developed options that make it easier for schools to access tutoring whilst ensuring a high degree of discretion to support the pupils most in need.

The focus of the NTP is on supporting disadvantaged pupils, including those eligible for pupil premium. The Department expects a large proportion of pupils enrolled in the NTP to be eligible for pupil premium. Pupils who have received tuition in academic year 2020/21 will again be eligible in the next academic year 2021/22.

There are three subsidised tutoring options for academic year 2021/22:

  • A grant payment to all schools, based on the number of pupil premium students, to support school led tutoring. This payment will be ring-fenced to fund tutoring provision which can be locally sourced by schools.
  • Approved Tuition Partners will offer high quality, subsidised tuition to schools across a wide range of topics.
  • Schools in the most disadvantaged areas will also be supported to employ in house academic mentors to provide tuition to their pupils.
14th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department operates a red, amber and green rating system for categorising Freedom of Information requests according to their presentational sensitivity.

The Department does not operate a red, amber and green rating system for categorising Freedom of Information (FOI) requests.

All FOI requests are treated exactly the same, regardless of who the request is from and their occupation.

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the projected profit margin is for the National Tutoring Programme contract awarded to Randstad.

The Department has announced that Randstad will be the new supplier of the National Tutoring Programme (NTP) from September 2021. They will be supported by Teach First to ensure the programme is successfully set up for effective delivery and continuous improvement in the 2021/22 academic year.

The new £25 million contract with Randstad runs for one year, with the option to extend for two further years. The original values were based on information from year 1, and this bid represents good value for money. The programme aims to reach some 750,000 disadvantaged pupils during the 2021/22 academic year.

The Department followed the open procedure as detailed in the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, to ensure a fair and open procurement to select the supplier for the 2021/22 academic year. Tenders were submitted which were then evaluated and independently moderated.

The Department is unable to provide information on the value of each bid and projected profit margins as it is commercially sensitive. We are currently working with Randstad to prepare for next year’s offer and will be able to provide further detail in due course.

The NTP will broadly remain the same into the next academic year. It will continue to operate with both the Tuition Partner and academic mentor pillars with quality approved tuition at its core. The Department has set out the Tutoring Partner Quality Standards and Accreditation Standards which Tutoring Partners will need to meet to be on the panel that schools will draw down from next year.

In addition to the core NTP offer, the Department has announced £579 million of funding will be given to schools to develop local tutoring provision using new or existing school staff. Tutors will be directly employed by schools, and schools will be funded in accordance with their pupil premium allocations.

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the value is of each bid received for the National Tutoring Programme contract for academic year 2021-22; and how many pupils are projected to receive tutoring under each of those bids.

The Department has announced that Randstad will be the new supplier of the National Tutoring Programme (NTP) from September 2021. They will be supported by Teach First to ensure the programme is successfully set up for effective delivery and continuous improvement in the 2021/22 academic year.

The new £25 million contract with Randstad runs for one year, with the option to extend for two further years. The original values were based on information from year 1, and this bid represents good value for money. The programme aims to reach some 750,000 disadvantaged pupils during the 2021/22 academic year.

The Department followed the open procedure as detailed in the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, to ensure a fair and open procurement to select the supplier for the 2021/22 academic year. Tenders were submitted which were then evaluated and independently moderated.

The Department is unable to provide information on the value of each bid and projected profit margins as it is commercially sensitive. We are currently working with Randstad to prepare for next year’s offer and will be able to provide further detail in due course.

The NTP will broadly remain the same into the next academic year. It will continue to operate with both the Tuition Partner and academic mentor pillars with quality approved tuition at its core. The Department has set out the Tutoring Partner Quality Standards and Accreditation Standards which Tutoring Partners will need to meet to be on the panel that schools will draw down from next year.

In addition to the core NTP offer, the Department has announced £579 million of funding will be given to schools to develop local tutoring provision using new or existing school staff. Tutors will be directly employed by schools, and schools will be funded in accordance with their pupil premium allocations.

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much his Department spent on consultancy services to support the work of former Education Recovery Commissioner Sir Kevan Collins.

The Department has not spent any money on consultancy services to support the work of Sir Kevan Collins in his role as Education Recovery Commissioner.

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assurances his Department has received on the qualifications of the tutors delivering tuition under the National Tutoring Programme contract awarded to Randstad.

The Department has announced that Randstad will be the new supplier of the National Tutoring Programme (NTP) from September 2021. They will be supported by Teach First to ensure the programme is successfully set up for effective delivery and continuous improvement in the 2021/22 academic year.

The new £25 million contract with Randstad runs for one year, with the option to extend for two further years. The original values were based on information from year 1, and this bid represents good value for money. The programme aims to reach some 750,000 disadvantaged pupils during the 2021/22 academic year.

The Department followed the open procedure as detailed in the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, to ensure a fair and open procurement to select the supplier for the 2021/22 academic year. Tenders were submitted which were then evaluated and independently moderated.

The Department is unable to provide information on the value of each bid and projected profit margins as it is commercially sensitive. We are currently working with Randstad to prepare for next year’s offer and will be able to provide further detail in due course.

The NTP will broadly remain the same into the next academic year. It will continue to operate with both the Tuition Partner and academic mentor pillars with quality approved tuition at its core. The Department has set out the Tutoring Partner Quality Standards and Accreditation Standards which Tutoring Partners will need to meet to be on the panel that schools will draw down from next year.

In addition to the core NTP offer, the Department has announced £579 million of funding will be given to schools to develop local tutoring provision using new or existing school staff. Tutors will be directly employed by schools, and schools will be funded in accordance with their pupil premium allocations.

7th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the minimum hourly rate for tutors is under the National Tutoring Programme contract awarded to Randstad.

The Department has announced that Randstad will be the new supplier of the National Tutoring Programme (NTP) from September 2021. They will be supported by Teach First to ensure the programme is successfully set up for effective delivery and continuous improvement in the 2021/22 academic year.

The new £25 million contract with Randstad runs for one year, with the option to extend for two further years. The original values were based on information from year 1, and this bid represents good value for money. The programme aims to reach some 750,000 disadvantaged pupils during the 2021/22 academic year.

The Department followed the open procedure as detailed in the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, to ensure a fair and open procurement to select the supplier for the 2021/22 academic year. Tenders were submitted which were then evaluated and independently moderated.

The Department is unable to provide information on the value of each bid and projected profit margins as it is commercially sensitive. We are currently working with Randstad to prepare for next year’s offer and will be able to provide further detail in due course.

The NTP will broadly remain the same into the next academic year. It will continue to operate with both the Tuition Partner and academic mentor pillars with quality approved tuition at its core. The Department has set out the Tutoring Partner Quality Standards and Accreditation Standards which Tutoring Partners will need to meet to be on the panel that schools will draw down from next year.

In addition to the core NTP offer, the Department has announced £579 million of funding will be given to schools to develop local tutoring provision using new or existing school staff. Tutors will be directly employed by schools, and schools will be funded in accordance with their pupil premium allocations.

14th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many designated Sure Start children's centres there were in Kirklees District Council area in (a) 2010 and (b) 2020.

Based on the information supplied by local authorities as at 17 May 2021, the attached table sets out the number of children’s centres sites in Kirklees in 2010 and 2020.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the National Tutoring Programme, how many academic mentors are in place across how many schools; how many children are in receipt of mentoring support; and how many of those children are eligible for pupil premium funding.

The National Tutoring Programme is an ambitious scheme that will provide additional, targeted support for those children and young people who have been hardest hit from disruption to their education as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

There is extensive evidence that tutoring is one of the most effective ways to accelerate pupil progress, and we want to extend this opportunity to disadvantaged and vulnerable pupils.

Over 196,000 pupils have been enrolled to receive tutoring from 4,727 schools. Of those enrolled, over 93,000 have commenced tutoring of which 45% are eligible for pupil premium funding.

We have placed 1,074 active mentors across 946 schools who have supported over 23,000 pupils. 83% of placements have been in schools with a greater than average proportion of pupils in receipt of pupil premium.

19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children have been allocated a tutoring place under the National Tutoring Programme and across how many schools; how many of those children have started to receive tutoring; and how many of those children are eligible for the pupil premium.

The National Tutoring Programme is an ambitious scheme that will provide additional, targeted support for those children and young people who have been hardest hit from disruption to their education as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

There is extensive evidence that tutoring is one of the most effective ways to accelerate pupil progress, and we want to extend this opportunity to disadvantaged and vulnerable pupils.

Over 196,000 pupils have been enrolled to receive tutoring from 4,727 schools. Of those enrolled, over 93,000 have commenced tutoring of which 45% are eligible for pupil premium funding.

We have placed 1,074 active mentors across 946 schools who have supported over 23,000 pupils. 83% of placements have been in schools with a greater than average proportion of pupils in receipt of pupil premium.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to publish a response to the consultation on Regulating independent educational institutions.

The consultation on Regulating Independent Educational Institutions was launched on 14 February 2020 and withdrawn on 7 May 2020 due to the COVID-19 outbreak. The consultation was relaunched on 13 October 2020 and closed on 27 November 2020.

Once we have completed the analysis of the responses, we will set out the Government response, including our legislative proposals, in due course.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to publish its response to the 2019 Children not in school consultation; and whether he plans to introduce the register of children educated otherwise than at mainstream schools outlined in that consultation.

Parents have a right to educate their children at home, and the Government wants the many parents who do it well to be supported. Most parents who take up the weighty responsibility of home education do a very good job, and many children benefit from being educated at home.

However, there are examples in which pupils are home educated but such education provided is inappropriate, ineffective or through unsuitable settings, such as unregistered independent schools.

In response to this, a consultation was held in the spring of 2019 on proposals for: a mandatory register of children not attending state or registered independent schools to help local authorities carry out their responsibilities in relation to children not in school; a duty on parents to register their child with the local authority if not registered at specified types of schools; a duty on proprietors of certain education settings to respond to enquiries from local authorities; and a duty on local authorities to provide support to parents who educate children at home.

The consultation closed on 24 June 2019 with nearly 5000 responses. We remain committed to a registration system for children not in school. Further details on this will be published in the government response to the consultation which we intend to publish in due course.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to require all full-time educational settings to be registered.

The consultation on Regulating Independent Educational Institutions was launched on 14 February 2020 and withdrawn on 7 May 2020 due to the COVID-19 outbreak. The consultation was relaunched on 13 October 2020 and closed on 27 November 2020.

Once we have completed the analysis of the responses, we will set out the Government response, including our legislative proposals, in due course.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when the National Centre for Social Research's Opportunity areas place-based evaluation will be completed; and if his Department will publish the findings of that evaluation.

The National Centre for Social Research's national qualitative process evaluation was commissioned by the department in October 2020 to cover the first 4 years of the Opportunity Areas programme, up to August 2021. The procurement of this evaluation was delayed due to the COVID-19 outbreak. This evaluation is exploring the delivery and progress made through this place-based approach. It will ensure that benefits, challenges and learnings are documented. A report of the findings is due to be published in spring 2022.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of schools and colleges in England are covered by the 59 Mental Health Support Teams currently in operation.

To provide increased access to support for children and young people with emerging mental health problems, in and around schools and colleges, we have committed to establish new Mental Health Support Teams (MHST) in 20% to 25% of the country by 2023. This is part of the reforms to provide additional support for children and young people’s mental health in the NHS Long Term Plan. Where already established, MHSTs are adapting their services to continue supporting children and young people remotely during the COVID-19 outbreak.

  • Over 180 MHSTs have been established or are in development across the country. Once fully operational they will cover 15% of pupils.
  • A further 104 teams are in the process of being established in financial year 2020/21. This will bring the total number of MHSTs to over 280.
  • A further 112 teams will be established in financial year 2021/22, totalling around 400 teams providing support to an estimated 3 million children and young people (around 35% of pupils in England), by 2023.
Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of schools and colleges have a Designated Senior Mental Health Lead.

The department and the Department of Health and Social Care jointly published ‘Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health: A Green Paper’ in 2017, and a subsequent consultation response in 2018, setting out the government’s commitments to improve mental health support in and around schools and colleges. The Green Paper can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/transforming-children-and-young-peoples-mental-health-provision-a-green-paper. We remain committed to these proposals, including incentivising and supporting all schools and colleges to have an effective senior mental health lead by offering training free of charge to every school and college in England by 2025.

The government has prioritised providing bespoke training and support to meet the immediate challenges that all schools and colleges face in supporting the wellbeing of children and young people during the COVID-19 outbreak through our £8 million Wellbeing for Education Return programme, delaying delivery of senior lead training.

The proportion of schools and colleges reporting they have a mental health lead has gone up to over three quarters in 2018 (82% of schools, 91% of further education colleges) from under half of schools in 2016 (49% of schools, 69% of colleges), albeit based on different sources, such as ‘The School Snapshot Survey: Winter 2018’, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-snapshot-survey-winter-2018, and the ‘Post-16 Institutions and Providers Omnibus’, summer 2018, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/post-16-institutions-and-providers-omnibus-wave-6-survey.

We have recently assessed the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the training needs of senior mental health leads and begun to engage the training provider market, and key education, health and local authority stakeholders with a view to offering senior lead training from the beginning of the next academic year (autumn 2021). Our intended option, subject to feasibility, is to provide schools and colleges with a grant, and appropriate support to identify and purchase high quality training that meets their needs. This training is intended to provide individuals with the additional knowledge and skills needed to develop or introduce a positive whole school or college approach to wellbeing and mental health, helping ensure pupils and students needing help with their mental health receive the appropriate support.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
9th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of the £95 million allocated in 2017 to train Designated Senior Mental Health Leads in schools has been spent to date; and how many Designated Senior Mental Health Leads have been trained.

The department and the Department of Health and Social Care jointly published ‘Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health: A Green Paper’ in 2017, and a subsequent consultation response in 2018, setting out the government’s commitments to improve mental health support in and around schools and colleges. The Green Paper can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/transforming-children-and-young-peoples-mental-health-provision-a-green-paper. We remain committed to these proposals, including incentivising and supporting all schools and colleges to have an effective senior mental health lead by offering training free of charge to every school and college in England by 2025.

The government has prioritised providing bespoke training and support to meet the immediate challenges that all schools and colleges face in supporting the wellbeing of children and young people during the COVID-19 outbreak through our £8 million Wellbeing for Education Return programme, delaying delivery of senior lead training.

The proportion of schools and colleges reporting they have a mental health lead has gone up to over three quarters in 2018 (82% of schools, 91% of further education colleges) from under half of schools in 2016 (49% of schools, 69% of colleges), albeit based on different sources, such as ‘The School Snapshot Survey: Winter 2018’, which is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/school-snapshot-survey-winter-2018, and the ‘Post-16 Institutions and Providers Omnibus’, summer 2018, which is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/post-16-institutions-and-providers-omnibus-wave-6-survey.

We have recently assessed the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the training needs of senior mental health leads and begun to engage the training provider market, and key education, health and local authority stakeholders with a view to offering senior lead training from the beginning of the next academic year (autumn 2021). Our intended option, subject to feasibility, is to provide schools and colleges with a grant, and appropriate support to identify and purchase high quality training that meets their needs. This training is intended to provide individuals with the additional knowledge and skills needed to develop or introduce a positive whole school or college approach to wellbeing and mental health, helping ensure pupils and students needing help with their mental health receive the appropriate support.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with Google on offering G Suite Enterprise for Education free of charge to schools to assist with remote learning.

In the first instance the Department’s primary goal was to respond to the demand and to ensure that schools are set up with a robust remote learning platform, offering schools the basic functionality needed to continue delivering remote education. The Department is working with Google to offer their standard free licence. The Department continues to work with Google and schools regularly to monitor how we can make improvements to the programme and are keeping this under constant review.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his timeframe is for the end of the get help with technology scheme.

The Department is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care. We have secured 1.3 million laptops and tablets and have already delivered over one million of these to schools, colleges, academy trusts and local authorities, supporting disadvantaged children and young people who would not otherwise have access to a digital device.

We are making further deliveries all the time and expect to achieve our overall commitment of delivering 1.3 million devices by the end of the spring term.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts, local authorities or further education providers who can lend these to the children and young people who need them most, during the current COVID-19 restrictions. They are not required to be returned to the Department.

The Department has partnered with the UK’s leading mobile network operators to provide free data to disadvantaged families, which will support access to education resources. Families will benefit from this additional data until July 2021.

22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether it is his Department's policy that devices distributed through the Get Help with Technology Service should be returned to his Department at the end of that scheme.

The Department is investing over £400 million to support access to remote education and online social care. We have secured 1.3 million laptops and tablets and have already delivered over one million of these to schools, colleges, academy trusts and local authorities, supporting disadvantaged children and young people who would not otherwise have access to a digital device.

We are making further deliveries all the time and expect to achieve our overall commitment of delivering 1.3 million devices by the end of the spring term.

Laptops and tablets are owned by schools, academy trusts, local authorities or further education providers who can lend these to the children and young people who need them most, during the current COVID-19 restrictions. They are not required to be returned to the Department.

The Department has partnered with the UK’s leading mobile network operators to provide free data to disadvantaged families, which will support access to education resources. Families will benefit from this additional data until July 2021.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 10 February 2021 to Question 149748 on Employment Schemes: Equality, if he will publish those equalities impact assessments.

We have undertaken an assessment of the equalities impact of the Skills Bootcamps and level 3 adult offers.

Further detail of the policies, their equalities impact and ongoing work to support equality across both the Skills Bootcamps and level 3 adult offer will be published online in due course.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether an equalities impact assessment was undertaken before his Department announced (a) digital skills bootcamps and (b) the qualification list for the lifetime skills guarantee.

The government recognises that it is vital that all eligible adults have equal opportunities to benefit from the Lifetime Skills Guarantee, including those with protected characteristics.

We have completed an equalities impact assessment before announcing the Skills Bootcamps. We are still testing and iterating the Skills Bootcamp model and we are carefully monitoring outcomes of all learners, including those with protected characteristics. We have worked with Skills Bootcamps providers to make the bootcamps accessible to all. For instance, we have worked with one bootcamp to help make their application process more accessible for women.

Similarly, an equalities impact assessment was completed prior to the publication of qualifications included in the level 3 adult offer, which is part of the Lifetime Skills Guarantee. We will also carefully monitor the impact of this policy amongst groups with protected characteristics as the offer is rolled out from April 2021.

These offers will support our ambition to level up the country, remove significant barriers to learning for the most disadvantaged, and deliver the skills needed for adults to progress in the labour market.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the effect on supply teaching staff of rules requiring employers to meet (a) national insurance and (b) pension costs for furloughed staff.

Department officials continue to engage with their counterparts across Government to co-ordinate the Government’s response to COVID-19.

If supply staff employed via employment agencies are unable to work due to COVID-19, their employment agency can place them on furlough and use the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) to claim for 80% of their wages, including during school holiday periods, provided that the eligibility criteria are met, further details can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/check-which-employees-you-can-put-on-furlough-to-use-the-coronavirus-job-retention-scheme.

From 1 November 2020 employers must pay employer National Insurance contributions (NICs) and pension contributions for the hours the employee is on furlough. Employer NICs and pension contributions are the only required contributions under the extension to the CJRS. For an average claim, this accounts for just 5% of total employment costs or £70 per employee per month.

This is a fair way to ask employers to contribute because it protects lower paid workers by limiting the cost to employers of lower paid workers. Indeed, an early assessment of CJRS claims suggested around 40% of employees using the scheme are below the NICs and pensions threshold and will therefore have no employer costs in the CJRS. Furthermore, many small employers can benefit from the Employment Allowance for support with their NICs bill.

The Government has provided additional financial support for those who are unable to work because they have COVID-19, or are self-isolating, which is outlined in the 'Coronavirus (COVID-19): what to do if you’re employed and cannot work' guidance which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-what-to-do-if-youre-employed-and-cannot-work?priority-taxon=5ebf285a-9165-476c-be90-66b9729f50da#if-someone-you-live-with-has-symptoms-of-coronaviru.

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprentices are unable to complete their training as a result of backlogs in functional skills tests.

We do not currently hold the data in the format requested.

Apprenticeship data for the first quarter of the 2020/21 academic year will be published on 28 January 2021.

The department is committed to supporting apprentices to complete their functional skills qualifications and their apprenticeship. Where functional skills assessments have been disrupted, we have been clear that training providers, employers, and awarding organisations must work together in the best interests of apprentices.

To ease immediate pressures, we have extended legacy functional skills qualifications to 31 July 2021. We have also extended, until March 2021, the flexibility which removes the requirement for level 2 apprentices to attempt level 2 functional skills.

In addition to wider programme flexibilities, we have expanded the examination support service to include apprenticeship training providers. These providers can now use this service to book COVID-19-secure exam space and invigilators and claim additional funding where this exceeds their normal delivery costs.

We continue to work closely with Ofqual, awarding organisations, and sector representatives to monitor the situation and agree how we can, together, identify and support apprentices that are unable to take their functional skills exams.

The departmental guidance about providing apprenticeships during the COVID-19 outbreak is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-apprenticeship-programme-response.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what mental health support the Government is providing to vulnerable young people attending school (a) in person and (b) virtually during the 2021 covid-19 lockdown.

The government has made children’s wellbeing and mental health a central part of our response to the COVID-19 outbreak, and the support we have already put in place for children and young people will be critical during this time. The department has issued guidance for schools which includes information and sources of further advice on supporting mental health and wellbeing, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak.

We have ensured that schools have the flexibility to offer a place in school as a vulnerable child to any pupils for whom being in school will help to manage their mental health, or to access support more easily. Decisions will be informed by the school’s experience of how pupils have been affected so far.

Schools will continue to offer pastoral support to pupils working remotely at home, informed, and supported by training and expert advice that we have made available, including through the £8 million Wellbeing for Education Return scheme and through local links with mental health providers. This information and support is relevant to remote provision as well as to those attending school. Schools should make sure that parents and pupils know who to contact if they have new concerns about mental health and wellbeing.

A £1 billion COVID “catch-up” package, with £650 million shared across early years, schools and 16-19 providers over the 2020/21 academic year, is also supporting education settings to put the right catch-up and pastoral support in place. The Education Endowment Foundation have published a COVID-19 support guide to support schools in directing this funding, which includes further information about interventions to support pupils’ mental health and wellbeing.

Public Health England has produced guidance for parents and carers on supporting children and young people's mental health and wellbeing. For those who need specialist support or help, all NHS Mental Health Trusts are providing 24/7 open access telephone lines to support people of all ages and continue to deliver mental health support to children and young people.

The government continues to invest in and prioritise mental health. The NHS will receive approximately an additional £500 million this year, to address waiting times for mental health services, give more people the mental health support they need, and invest in the NHS workforce.

In the long term, we remain committed to our joint green paper delivery programme with the Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England, including introducing new mental health support teams for all schools and colleges, providing training for senior mental health leads in schools and colleges, and testing approaches to faster access to NHS specialist support.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
30th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many teachers in earn at least £21,000 per year as at 30 November 2020.

Data relating to November 2020 is currently being collected and will be published in the annual “School workforce in England” statistical release in June 2021. Data for November 2019 showing the number of teachers for each pay band is published here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/data-tables/permalink/bdb1f916-27ad-4565-be31-38d397153f2f.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether the four tiered approach to school opening will remain in place when the autumn 2020 lockdown restrictions end on 2 December 2020.

The four-tiered approach to school opening will not remain in place when the national restrictions end on 2 December 2020. On 27 November 2020, the Department updated the guidance to reflect how schools and nurseries should operate under the new tiers to keep staff and students as safe as possible. We have implemented a simple and clear contingency framework, setting out the decision-making process and nature of restrictions that would be implemented in the exceptional circumstances in which further restrictions on education could be required as a scientific last resort.

The Government has made it a national priority that schools and nurseries should continue to operate as normally as possible during the COVID-19 outbreak. This remains the default position for all areas, irrespective of local restriction tiers.

Such measures will be implemented in the fewest number of schools and nurseries required, for the shortest time. Given the considerable benefits to children of continued face to face teaching, the threshold for moving to any restrictions will remain exceptionally high.

The education contingency framework can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-contingency-framework-for-education-and-childcare-settings.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his policy is on allowing schools to use a rota system to remain partially open during the covid-19 outbreak.

Schools should not move to rotas. The best place for children to be is in schools, which is why it remains a national priority to keep them open full time and avoid further disruption to education.

The Department has published an updated contingency framework which sets out that in the exceptional circumstances in which restrictions were required on schools, to help contain transmission of COVID-19 within a community, rotas would not be implemented. Any implementation remains a decision for central government and would only come as a last resort to control extremely high prevalence of COVID-19 if all other measures had been exhausted.

The updated contingency framework is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-contingency-framework-for-education-and-childcare-settings.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 12 November 2020 to Question 104751, what estimate he has made of the number of pupils in (a) primary schools, (b) secondary schools and (c) special schools that are not attending schools for reasons relating to the covid-19 outbreak in each (i) region and (ii) local authority area in the latest period for which information is available; and if he will publish that information on a monthly basis.

The Department intends to publish regional and local authority level data which includes a breakdown by phase on 15 December. This data will be included as part of the publication ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (Covid 19) outbreak’.

The Department is constantly reviewing the content of its publications. Announcements about future content will be made through the official statistics release page: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-education/about/statistics.

24th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the level of attendance of school staff since September 2020.

The Department intends to publish school workforce attendance data from the new year. This data will be included as part of the publication ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak’.

The frequency of the publication ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak’ will be reviewed in the new year.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information his Department holds on the number of clinically extremely vulnerable (a) teachers and (b) support staff.

The information requested is not held centrally.

The annual school workforce census provides data on school staff characteristics and although we collect sickness absence data, it does not record their health status. The latest school workforce census data can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england#dataBlock-465b74eb-234a-418d-b240-b678afa06e66-tables.

23rd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the cost to schools of supplying cover for clinically extremely vulnerable (a) teachers and (b) support staff during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department does not hold data on the number of clinically extremely vulnerable staff in schools and is therefore not able to confirm the costs to schools for supplying cover for clinically extremely vulnerable staff. The annual school workforce census provides data on school staff characteristics and although we collect sickness absence data, it does not record their health status. The latest school workforce census data can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/school-workforce-in-england#dataBlock-465b74eb-234a-418d-b240-b678afa06e66-tables

Following last year’s Spending Review, core school funding is increasing by £2.6 billion in 2020-21, and will increase by £4.8 billion and £7.1 billion in 2021-22 and 2022-23 respectively, compared to 2019-20. On average, schools are attracting 4.2% more per pupil this year compared to in 2019-20.

Schools have continued to receive their core funding allocations as usual, regardless of any periods of partial or complete closure due to the COVID-19 outbreak, and this has ensured they have been able to continue to pay for staff, and meet their other regular financial commitments.

The Department’s ‘Guidance for schools on full opening’ sets out the options available for schools seeking to manage staffing capacity and absences as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. In addition to using supply teachers and other temporary or peripatetic teachers, schools can also consider using existing staff more flexibly, including support staff and ITT trainees, or volunteers, as would usually be the case. The guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

As stated in our guidance, schools should continue to use their existing resources to manage staffing capacity. Where schools do hire agency workers, we recommend they consider using the Department’s and Crown Commercial Service’s agency supply deal, as this offers a list of preferred suppliers that must be transparent about the rates they charge. The deal can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/deal-for-schools-hiring-supply-teachers-and-agency-workers.

We continue to work with stakeholders and representative bodies to understand staffing capacity and are keeping the situation under close review.

18th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many apprenticeships starts were there in (a) the most recent period for which data is available and (b) the same time period in 2019, by (i) region and (ii) local authority area.

The number of learners starting apprenticeships by geographical area, including by region and local authority area, is published on GOV.UK. The table attached provides provisional apprenticeship starts for England based on learner home postcode in the first three quarters of the 2018/19 and 2019/20 academic years, reported to date.

Care should be taken in comparing in-year data with equivalent periods in previous years as this data is provisional and subject to revisions by further education providers; as well as interpreting overall change given the effect of COVID-19.

Further breakdowns by region and local authority for each academic year are published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/899753/201920-July_totals-since-may-2010-and-2015.xlsx.

The 2019/20 in-year figures here refer to ‘reported to date’ to reflect that they are provisional and subject to change. More accurate comparisons can be made once final returns for the 2019/20 academic year are available. Figures for the full, final 2019/20 academic year are due to be published in our next ‘Apprenticeships and traineeships’ statistics publication, on 26 November.

Data reported for the first three quarters this time last year for 2018/19 (August to April) including by region and local authority was published here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/814998/Apprenticeship-starts-ach-geography-tool_201718_Q3-201819_July2019.xlsx.

The above files can be accessed in the FE data library on GOV.UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/fe-data-library-apprenticeships.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether Coronavirus (COVID-19) catch-up premium funding is ring-fenced by schools for the provision of catch-up support to pupils who have missed learning as a result of the covid-19 outbreak; and whether his Department is monitoring the use of that allocated funding.

All students will have been impacted as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. We expect schools to spend this funding on the additional activities required to support children and young people to catch up after the period of disruption to their education. We know that each school will have different needs as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak and schools should tailor the catch-up funding to their specific contexts, and towards the pupils who need it most. We trust our excellent school leaders to make the appropriate decisions for their students to ensure that this money is spent wisely.

To help schools make the best use of this funding, the Education Endowment Foundation has published a support guide for schools with evidence-based approaches to catch up and a school planning guide, available here: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/#nav-covid-19-support-guide-for-schools1. Head teachers may use these documents and their strategic judgement to prioritise support for all pupils, guided by the level of individual need.

The first payment represents 25% of the total allocation and was made to schools in the autumn term. This autumn payment for schools totals £159,011,640. A detailed breakdown of the amount given in the autumn payment can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium-provisional-allocations.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the monetary value was of the first tranche of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) catch-up premium payments allocated by his Department to schools.

All students will have been impacted as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. We expect schools to spend this funding on the additional activities required to support children and young people to catch up after the period of disruption to their education. We know that each school will have different needs as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak and schools should tailor the catch-up funding to their specific contexts, and towards the pupils who need it most. We trust our excellent school leaders to make the appropriate decisions for their students to ensure that this money is spent wisely.

To help schools make the best use of this funding, the Education Endowment Foundation has published a support guide for schools with evidence-based approaches to catch up and a school planning guide, available here: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/#nav-covid-19-support-guide-for-schools1. Head teachers may use these documents and their strategic judgement to prioritise support for all pupils, guided by the level of individual need.

The first payment represents 25% of the total allocation and was made to schools in the autumn term. This autumn payment for schools totals £159,011,640. A detailed breakdown of the amount given in the autumn payment can be viewed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium-provisional-allocations.

17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many covid tests have been allocated to each higher education institution in England.

The higher education (HE) sector has engaged enthusiastically with the roll-out of mass testing, following my communications to all institutions on 7 and 9 November regarding participating in the testing programme.

Officials at the Department for Education and the Department of Health and Social Care are working collaboratively with the HE sector to stand up asymptomatic test sites in as many universities as possible by 30 November to assist in reducing the risk of transmission during the "student travel window".

Lateral flow device tests will be targeted at HE institutions with higher cases of COVID-19, in the highest prevalence areas and with more vulnerable students first. Lateral flow device testing kits will be allocated based on HE institutions’ specific requests and an understanding of their student population.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools in England were told on 24 October 2020 by his Department that their allocation of laptops for disadvantaged pupils had been reduced.

The Department has invested £195 million to support remote education and access to online social care. In addition to over 220,000 laptops and tablets being delivered during the summer term for disadvantaged children who would not otherwise have access, we have supplemented this support by making an additional 340,000 laptops and tablets available in the event that face-to-face education is disrupted as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. Since September 2020, over 100,000 of these have already been delivered to schools. More information about the allocation of laptops to date can be found here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/929064/Ad-hoc_stats_note_shipped_data_231020_FINAL.pdf.

The targeting of laptops and tablets through this scheme has continually been reviewed to ensure support is offered in the most effective way, to reflect the numbers of schools that have been disrupted and the number of laptops and tablets available at any time. In the context of significant demand, we have updated our allocation process to more accurately align orders with the number of students typically self-isolating, ensuring as many children as possible benefit from receiving a device this term. On 24 October 2020, the Department communicated this change in allocations to all schools. If schools are experiencing disruption to face-to-face education and believe they have a need for additional devices, they should contact the Department‘s service team via covid.technology@education.gov.uk to request additional laptops or tablets.

16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many and what proportion of pupils on roll were in attendance in state-funded schools in each region of England on 12 November 2020.

We collect data on both the open status of schools and number of schools that have indicated they have sent children home due to COVID-19 containment on a daily basis. This data is published from this collection at a national level as part of the official statistics series. The publication can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak. Data is published from 9 September 2020, but prior to 12 October 2020 information on pupils isolating was not collected.

The Department intends to publish regional and local authority level data on 15 December. This data will be included as part of the publication ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (Covid 19) outbreak’.

The frequency of the publication ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (Covid 19) outbreak’ will be reviewed in the new year.

The Department is constantly reviewing the content of its publications. Announcements about future content will be made through the official statistics release page: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-education/about/statistics.

16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools had one or more pupils self-isolating in each region of England on 12 November 2020.

We collect data on both the open status of schools and number of schools that have indicated they have sent children home due to COVID-19 containment on a daily basis. This data is published from this collection at a national level as part of the official statistics series. The publication can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak. Data is published from 9 September 2020, but prior to 12 October 2020 information on pupils isolating was not collected.

The Department intends to publish regional and local authority level data on 15 December. This data will be included as part of the publication ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (Covid 19) outbreak’.

The frequency of the publication ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (Covid 19) outbreak’ will be reviewed in the new year.

The Department is constantly reviewing the content of its publications. Announcements about future content will be made through the official statistics release page: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-education/about/statistics.

16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the number and proportion of schools that are (a) fully and (b) partially open in each region of England.

We collect data on both the open status of schools and number of schools that have indicated they have sent children home due to COVID-19 containment on a daily basis. This data is published from this collection at a national level as part of the official statistics series. The publication can be found here: https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/attendance-in-education-and-early-years-settings-during-the-coronavirus-covid-19-outbreak. Data is published from 9 September 2020, but prior to 12 October 2020 information on pupils isolating was not collected.

The Department intends to publish regional and local authority level data on 15 December. This data will be included as part of the publication ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (Covid 19) outbreak’.

The frequency of the publication ‘Attendance in education and early years settings during the coronavirus (Covid 19) outbreak’ will be reviewed in the new year.

The Department is constantly reviewing the content of its publications. Announcements about future content will be made through the official statistics release page: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-education/about/statistics.

11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what the selection criteria will be for pupils receiving tutoring under the National Tutoring Programme.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) will provide additional, targeted support to pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds who need the most help to catch-up. It is important that decisions about what support pupils receive are made locally by those who understand their needs.

For the 5-16 programme, the NTP Academic Mentors and Tuition Partners pillars are designed to support disadvantaged pupils as defined by Pupil Premium eligibility. Schools are encouraged to direct NTP support towards Pupil Premium pupils who have been hardest hit by disruption to their education. However, head teachers can exercise their professional judgement to include other disadvantaged and vulnerable children who they feel are most in need of support. In order to maximise the impact of tutoring and to support schools, the Education Endowment Foundation has provided a guide on how to get the best out of tutoring: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/resources/best-tutoring-practice-for-schools. This includes advice on selecting and grouping pupils for tutoring.

The NTP is also supporting an oral language programme for reception-aged children. The Department invited all state-funded schools with a reception class to register their interest in delivering the programme. Schools will be prioritised based on the proportion of pupils eligible for free school meals, in recognition of the disproportionate impact that time out of early education, as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, has had on disadvantaged and vulnerable groups. Delivery of this element will begin in January 2021.

Additionally, the 16 to 19 Tuition Fund will be used to deliver small group tuition where education has been disrupted. The Department has asked colleges to prioritise their disadvantaged students but recognise that there are different indicators of disadvantage. We have given colleges flexibility to target the students who are most in need of this support, but asked colleges to note the stipulations regarding eligibility set out in the published guidance: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-funding-16-to-19-tuition-fund.

11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make it his policy to collect data on the number of pupils in elective home education.

Parents are not obliged to register if they are home educating their children and, as a result, there is not a robust basis on which the Department can reliably collect statistics on home education.

Local authorities are responsible for taking action when it appears that the Elective Home Education (EHE) provision made by parents is unsuitable. If the local authority is not satisfied that the provision is suitable, then it can serve a school attendance order to parents. In April 2019, the Department issued new and strengthened guidance to local authorities on how they can exercise these powers.

In relation to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Department is working closely with local authorities to encourage a return to full attendance in school and is monitoring the situation. Initial conversations with local authorities indicate that the majority have noticed an increase in enquiries from parents about home education. Where parents are anxious about the safety of their children returning to school, local authorities and school leaders are reinforcing that it is in the best interests of pupils to return to school.

On 20 October 2020, the Department published advice for parents considering EHE. This is designed to be shared with parents, schools, social workers and local authorities, where the option of EHE is raised. The document is intended to make clear implications of withdrawing their child from school and the challenge involved in providing EHE.

At the same time, the Department also produced information for local authorities and those who work with children, setting out how we expect them to ensure children receive a suitable education, and to use their powers to engage with parents considering EHE where appropriate.

11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of effect on children's education attainment of elective home education.

Parents are not obliged to register if they are home educating their children and, as a result, there is not a robust basis on which the Department can reliably collect statistics on home education.

Local authorities are responsible for taking action when it appears that the Elective Home Education (EHE) provision made by parents is unsuitable. If the local authority is not satisfied that the provision is suitable, then it can serve a school attendance order to parents. In April 2019, the Department issued new and strengthened guidance to local authorities on how they can exercise these powers.

In relation to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Department is working closely with local authorities to encourage a return to full attendance in school and is monitoring the situation. Initial conversations with local authorities indicate that the majority have noticed an increase in enquiries from parents about home education. Where parents are anxious about the safety of their children returning to school, local authorities and school leaders are reinforcing that it is in the best interests of pupils to return to school.

On 20 October 2020, the Department published advice for parents considering EHE. This is designed to be shared with parents, schools, social workers and local authorities, where the option of EHE is raised. The document is intended to make clear implications of withdrawing their child from school and the challenge involved in providing EHE.

At the same time, the Department also produced information for local authorities and those who work with children, setting out how we expect them to ensure children receive a suitable education, and to use their powers to engage with parents considering EHE where appropriate.

11th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will take steps to ensure elective home education is limited to where it is in the child’s best interests.

Parents are not obliged to register if they are home educating their children and, as a result, there is not a robust basis on which the Department can reliably collect statistics on home education.

Local authorities are responsible for taking action when it appears that the Elective Home Education (EHE) provision made by parents is unsuitable. If the local authority is not satisfied that the provision is suitable, then it can serve a school attendance order to parents. In April 2019, the Department issued new and strengthened guidance to local authorities on how they can exercise these powers.

In relation to the COVID-19 outbreak, the Department is working closely with local authorities to encourage a return to full attendance in school and is monitoring the situation. Initial conversations with local authorities indicate that the majority have noticed an increase in enquiries from parents about home education. Where parents are anxious about the safety of their children returning to school, local authorities and school leaders are reinforcing that it is in the best interests of pupils to return to school.

On 20 October 2020, the Department published advice for parents considering EHE. This is designed to be shared with parents, schools, social workers and local authorities, where the option of EHE is raised. The document is intended to make clear implications of withdrawing their child from school and the challenge involved in providing EHE.

At the same time, the Department also produced information for local authorities and those who work with children, setting out how we expect them to ensure children receive a suitable education, and to use their powers to engage with parents considering EHE where appropriate.

6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much of the £650 million universal catch-up premium funding has (a) been given to schools so far and (b) projected to be spent this academic year.

The universal catch-up premium funding, worth £650 million, will be delivered in three payments across the 2020/21 academic year. The first payment (25% of total) has already been made to schools, totalling £159 million. The final allocations will be re-calculated once the October 2020 school census data is available. The second payment of catch-up premium funding will be made in the early new year, and the third payment in the summer term. The Department’s expectation is that all catch-up premium funding received will be spent during the 2020/21 academic year on the additional activities required to support children and young people to catch up.

6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children have received tutoring under the National Tutoring Programme to date.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) is an ambitious scheme that will provide additional, targeted support to pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds who need the most help to catch up.

The programme for 5-16 year olds comprises of two pillars to support schools. Tuition Partners offer high quality, subsidised tuition to disadvantaged pupils in schools across the regions, whilst schools in the most disadvantaged areas are being supported to employ in-house Academic Mentors to provide tuition to their pupils.

The programme went live on 2 November 2020 with provision to schools increasing over the winter and into the spring term. 32 approved Tuition Partners are ready to offer tuition to schools. The full list of approved Tuition Partners is available here: https://schoolsweek.co.uk/revealed-the-32-providers-selected-to-deliver-the-national-tutoring-programme/.

It is expected that they will support around 250,000 pupils over the academic year. The Department also placed its first 188 mentors with schools to work with pupils that need additional support. We expect to place around 1,000 Academic Mentors, with the remaining mentors starting in schools over the 2021 spring term. Further information about the NTP is available here: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/faqs.

As part of the Department’s £1 billion catch-up support to schools, it will spend up to £350 million on the NTP. To date, the NTP comprises of three elements. Further details about the 5-16 programme are available through the following link: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/news/national-tutoring-programme-launches-in-schools.

Details about small group tutoring via the 16-19 Tuition Fund can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-funding-16-to-19-tuition-fund.

Finally, details regarding the oral language support programme for Reception-aged children can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/early-years-support-package-to-help-close-covid-language-gap.

Further information on programmes within the NTP will be set out following the Spending Review.

6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what date the National Tutoring Programme is planned to be fully operational.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) is an ambitious scheme that will provide additional, targeted support to pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds who need the most help to catch up.

The programme for 5-16 year olds comprises of two pillars to support schools. Tuition Partners offer high quality, subsidised tuition to disadvantaged pupils in schools across the regions, whilst schools in the most disadvantaged areas are being supported to employ in-house Academic Mentors to provide tuition to their pupils.

The programme went live on 2 November 2020 with provision to schools increasing over the winter and into the spring term. 32 approved Tuition Partners are ready to offer tuition to schools. The full list of approved Tuition Partners is available here: https://schoolsweek.co.uk/revealed-the-32-providers-selected-to-deliver-the-national-tutoring-programme/.

It is expected that they will support around 250,000 pupils over the academic year. The Department also placed its first 188 mentors with schools to work with pupils that need additional support. We expect to place around 1,000 Academic Mentors, with the remaining mentors starting in schools over the 2021 spring term. Further information about the NTP is available here: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/faqs.

As part of the Department’s £1 billion catch-up support to schools, it will spend up to £350 million on the NTP. To date, the NTP comprises of three elements. Further details about the 5-16 programme are available through the following link: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/news/national-tutoring-programme-launches-in-schools.

Details about small group tutoring via the 16-19 Tuition Fund can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-funding-16-to-19-tuition-fund.

Finally, details regarding the oral language support programme for Reception-aged children can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/early-years-support-package-to-help-close-covid-language-gap.

Further information on programmes within the NTP will be set out following the Spending Review.

6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much of the £350m allocated for the National Tutoring Programme (a) has been spent to date and (b) is projected to be spent this academic year.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) is an ambitious scheme that will provide additional, targeted support to pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds who need the most help to catch up.

The programme for 5-16 year olds comprises of two pillars to support schools. Tuition Partners offer high quality, subsidised tuition to disadvantaged pupils in schools across the regions, whilst schools in the most disadvantaged areas are being supported to employ in-house Academic Mentors to provide tuition to their pupils.

The programme went live on 2 November 2020 with provision to schools increasing over the winter and into the spring term. 32 approved Tuition Partners are ready to offer tuition to schools. The full list of approved Tuition Partners is available here: https://schoolsweek.co.uk/revealed-the-32-providers-selected-to-deliver-the-national-tutoring-programme/.

It is expected that they will support around 250,000 pupils over the academic year. The Department also placed its first 188 mentors with schools to work with pupils that need additional support. We expect to place around 1,000 Academic Mentors, with the remaining mentors starting in schools over the 2021 spring term. Further information about the NTP is available here: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/faqs.

As part of the Department’s £1 billion catch-up support to schools, it will spend up to £350 million on the NTP. To date, the NTP comprises of three elements. Further details about the 5-16 programme are available through the following link: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/news/national-tutoring-programme-launches-in-schools.

Details about small group tutoring via the 16-19 Tuition Fund can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-funding-16-to-19-tuition-fund.

Finally, details regarding the oral language support programme for Reception-aged children can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/early-years-support-package-to-help-close-covid-language-gap.

Further information on programmes within the NTP will be set out following the Spending Review.

6th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many students are planned to receive tuition through the National Tutoring Programme this academic year.

The National Tutoring Programme (NTP) is an ambitious scheme that will provide additional, targeted support to pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds who need the most help to catch up.

The programme for 5-16 year olds comprises of two pillars to support schools. Tuition Partners offer high quality, subsidised tuition to disadvantaged pupils in schools across the regions, whilst schools in the most disadvantaged areas are being supported to employ in-house Academic Mentors to provide tuition to their pupils.

The programme went live on 2 November 2020 with provision to schools increasing over the winter and into the spring term. 32 approved Tuition Partners are ready to offer tuition to schools. The full list of approved Tuition Partners is available here: https://schoolsweek.co.uk/revealed-the-32-providers-selected-to-deliver-the-national-tutoring-programme/.

It is expected that they will support around 250,000 pupils over the academic year. The Department also placed its first 188 mentors with schools to work with pupils that need additional support. We expect to place around 1,000 Academic Mentors, with the remaining mentors starting in schools over the 2021 spring term. Further information about the NTP is available here: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/faqs.

As part of the Department’s £1 billion catch-up support to schools, it will spend up to £350 million on the NTP. To date, the NTP comprises of three elements. Further details about the 5-16 programme are available through the following link: https://nationaltutoring.org.uk/news/national-tutoring-programme-launches-in-schools.

Details about small group tutoring via the 16-19 Tuition Fund can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/16-to-19-funding-16-to-19-tuition-fund.

Finally, details regarding the oral language support programme for Reception-aged children can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/early-years-support-package-to-help-close-covid-language-gap.

Further information on programmes within the NTP will be set out following the Spending Review.

2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussions his Department had with industry bodies within the music education sector before the publication of the 13 October 2020 guidance that removed music from the list of postgraduate bursaries for Initial Teacher Training; and if he will further consult with that sector before progressing with that policy decision.

The Government believes that the arts are an essential part of a broad and balanced education. Music is a statutory subject within the National Curriculum for maintained schools in Key Stages 1 to 3. At Key Stage 4, all pupils in maintained schools must be offered the opportunity to study at least one subject in the arts 'entitlement' area.

The Department reviews the bursaries that are offered for initial teacher training (ITT) before the start of the annual recruitment cycle. The decisions made by the Department take account of several factors, including forecast economic conditions, previous recruitment, and teacher supply need in each subject. Being able to change bursary amounts gives the Department the flexibility to respond to the need to attract new teachers, and enables money to be spent where it is needed most.

In the 2020/21 academic year, we have seen an increase in applications compared to previous years, and a 32% increase in postgraduate ITT applications compared to the equivalent period in the 2019/20 academic year[1]. Departmental analysis suggests that this increase will continue for applications to ITT courses for the 2021/22 academic year.

The Department recognises the importance of music within the National Curriculum. As we review ITT financial incentives during each academic year, the Department will consider the offer across all subjects before announcing the incentives for ITT courses taking place in the 2022/23 academic year.

In the 2019 spending round, the Government announced funding increases for schools across the next three years. This will mean an additional £2.6 billion for the 2020/21 financial year, £4.8 billion for 2021/22, and £7.1 billion for the 2022/23 in cash terms compared to 2019/20. In terms of distribution, this funding increase will allow every secondary school to receive at least £5,000 per pupil, and every primary school at least £3,750 per pupil this year (rising to £4,000 per pupil in 2021-22).

[1] https://www.ucas.com/data-and-analysis/ucas-teacher-training-statistical-releases

2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the decision to remove postgraduate bursaries for Initial Teacher Training in Music on (a) levels of music teacher recruitment and (b) the ability of schools to ensure that every student has access to a broad and balanced curriculum which includes music as part of their statutory entitlement.

The Government believes that the arts are an essential part of a broad and balanced education. Music is a statutory subject within the National Curriculum for maintained schools in Key Stages 1 to 3. At Key Stage 4, all pupils in maintained schools must be offered the opportunity to study at least one subject in the arts 'entitlement' area.

The Department reviews the bursaries that are offered for initial teacher training (ITT) before the start of the annual recruitment cycle. The decisions made by the Department take account of several factors, including forecast economic conditions, previous recruitment, and teacher supply need in each subject. Being able to change bursary amounts gives the Department the flexibility to respond to the need to attract new teachers, and enables money to be spent where it is needed most.

In the 2020/21 academic year, we have seen an increase in applications compared to previous years, and a 32% increase in postgraduate ITT applications compared to the equivalent period in the 2019/20 academic year[1]. Departmental analysis suggests that this increase will continue for applications to ITT courses for the 2021/22 academic year.

The Department recognises the importance of music within the National Curriculum. As we review ITT financial incentives during each academic year, the Department will consider the offer across all subjects before announcing the incentives for ITT courses taking place in the 2022/23 academic year.

In the 2019 spending round, the Government announced funding increases for schools across the next three years. This will mean an additional £2.6 billion for the 2020/21 financial year, £4.8 billion for 2021/22, and £7.1 billion for the 2022/23 in cash terms compared to 2019/20. In terms of distribution, this funding increase will allow every secondary school to receive at least £5,000 per pupil, and every primary school at least £3,750 per pupil this year (rising to £4,000 per pupil in 2021-22).

[1] https://www.ucas.com/data-and-analysis/ucas-teacher-training-statistical-releases

30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what support his Department is providing to outdoor residential centres offering overnight educational visits that are unable to reopen as a result of covid-19 social distancing measures.

The Department’s educational visits advice, ‘Guidance for full opening: schools’, is in line with guidance from Public Health England, the Cabinet Office and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office. The guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools, and will be updated to reflect the national restrictions in place from 5 November. In addition to that update, the longer-term position regarding overnight educational visits is being reviewed in November.

The Department continues to work with representatives of the tour industry, devolved administrations, trade unions and other Government Departments as it works towards the November review.

The Government has made a number of support measures available to UK businesses. More information on business support can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus/business-support.

Information about the extension of the furlough scheme can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/furlough-scheme-extended-and-further-economic-support-announced.

13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when his Department plans to re-open the Register of Apprenticeship Training Providers.

The decision to close the Register of Apprenticeship Training Providers from midnight on 15 April 2020 was made as part of the implementation of the unprecedented response necessary across all of education and children’s social care to support the government’s response to COVID-19. These arrangements include the redeployment of Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) staff resources to priority areas, and the date of any re-opening of the register is being kept under review. The ESFA is currently looking into when and how to re-open the register in a way that continues to offer the right level of high-quality training. The ESFA are currently working through options and will provide an update in due course.

However, the ESFA are keen to ensure that levy-paying employers delivering services critical to the COVID-19 response, such as police forces and the NHS, are able to provide the apprenticeship training that their organisation needs. Levy-payers that employ critical workers, as defined by the department’s guidance, have been permitted to apply to the employer provider route by exception whilst the register has been closed. More details on this guidance are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-maintaining-educational-provision/guidance-for-schools-colleges-and-local-authorities-on-maintaining-educational-provision.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of apprentices made redundant as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

We do not currently publish data on redundant apprentices. We are working with employers and providers to improve our understanding of the number of apprentices affected by redundancy.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that learners who wish to study a full A-Level in a single year have the opportunity to do so.

It is for schools and colleges to decide how they timetable A levels and over what period of time they are taught.

As part of the wider COVID-19 skills recovery response, the Department will fund young people aged 18 and 19 for an additional programme of study of high value level 2 and 3 qualifications, for up to a year from September 2020, if they cannot find employment or work-based training. This includes the delivery of eligible A levels where these are delivered in a single year.

25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will ensure that there is no reduction in the per pupil allocations of the Pupil Premium for each year of the 2019 Parliament.

We are committed to levelling up opportunities to make sure everyone has a fair chance to realise their potential and no-one is left behind. The pupil premium furthers this objective by helping schools improve the academic attainment and wider outcomes of pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Since the pupil premium was introduced in 2011, it has provided?more than?£18 billion of additional funding for schools and has played an important role in contributing to the narrowing of the disadvantaged attainment gaps at the ages of 11 and 16 years.

Pupil premium allocations for the 2020-21 academic year were published in June and the first quarterly instalments were paid out in June and July. Announcements on pupil premium funding for the 2021-22 academic year will follow later in the year, in line with the usual timetable. Announcements for future years will be made in due course.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what changes are made to a student's maintenance loan when circumstances require them to change from a student living away from home to a student living at their home.

The government recognises that some may students may have to move back home as a result of changing circumstances due to COVID-19 and is considering what steps should be taken.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of support for English language teaching centres during the covid-19 outbreak.

English Language Teaching Centres are private language schools, and as such are not in receipt of any funding from the department. We have therefore made no assessment of the adequacy of support for them during the COVID-19 outbreak. My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer has announced an extensive and unprecedented package of support measures for businesses across the county such as loans, tax relief and cash grants.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many of the 230,000 laptops distributed to students during the covid-19 outbreak have been returned to his Department.

The Department has delivered over 220,000 laptops and tablets and over 50,000 4G wireless routers to local authorities and academy trusts for children who would not otherwise have access, as part of over £100 million invested to support remote education and access to online social care while schools were closed to the majority of pupils.

The Department has published data about the delivery of devices which is available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/892510/Devices_and_4G_wireless_routers_data_ad_hoc_stats.pdf.

The devices were an injection of support to help local authorities and academy trusts to provide access to education and social care during the COVID-19 outbreak. Local authorities and academy trusts are responsible for distributing the devices and are best placed to know which children and young people need access to a device.

Devices are owned by the local authority, academy trust or school that received them. They retain ownership of the devices when schools fully reopen and can continue to use them to benefit the children and young people who need them most, including those who may face disruption to face-to-face education in the event of future local COVID-19 restrictions.

2nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what progress has been made on training designated senior mental health leads in schools since that policy was announced in 2017.

The COVID-19 outbreak has had wide-reaching impacts across the education sector. In response, the government has initially prioritised providing bespoke training and support to meet the immediate challenges that all schools and colleges will face in supporting the wellbeing of children and young people during the outbreak and the wider return to schools and colleges.

Our £8 million Wellbeing for Education Return initiative will train local experts to provide additional training and advice for schools and colleges to help support pupil and student wellbeing, resilience and recovery in light of the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak and lockdown. It is being delivered in partnership with local authorities, the Department of Health and Social Care, the Health and Safety Commission, Health Education England, Public Health England, NHS England and voluntary sector organisations. It will give staff the confidence to support pupils and students, their parents, carers and their own colleagues, and help them know how and where to access appropriate specialist support when needed.

In addition, government guidance has advised schools on supporting mental health and wellbeing during the outbreak and specialist NHS services have remained open throughout. We have also provided over £9 million to leading mental health charities to help them expand and reach those most in need.

Alongside this additional new support, the government remains committed to the longer term improvements set out in the government’s 2018 response to the consultation on the relevant green paper. This includes our commitment to train senior mental health leads in schools and colleges, which we will take forward as soon as possible.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what additional funding he plans to allocate to (a) schools and (b) colleges for the cost of (i) invigilators and (ii) venues for the autumn exam series.

Students who are considering taking autumn exams should speak with their school or college and discuss their next best step.

The majority of students will now have the grades they need to move on to their next step. Those who did not receive a grade or who are unhappy with their grade will have the opportunity to take exams in the autumn. The Department have published guidance which makes it clear that they expect the school or college that entered students for the summer series to enter them for autumn if they want to sit exams. The Government is clear that given the unique circumstances in which the autumn exams are being run, students and their families should not have to meet the cost of fees if they want to enter.

So that schools and colleges have the support they need to run the additional autumn series, the Department is launching an Exam Support Service. Through this service, schools and colleges can book fully funded additional space to run exams if needed to avoid disruption to teaching. They will also be able to claim back for costs relating to autumn exam fees or invigilation where these exceed any savings they have made in those areas following the cancellation of summer exams. £30 million has been earmarked to deliver this support, although funding will be demand led and driven by the number of students who choose to sit the exams.

Further details can be found in our published guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/responsibility-for-autumn-gcse-as-and-a-level-exam-series.

20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will allocate additional funding to schools to meet the cost of entering candidates in the autumn exam series.

Students who are considering taking autumn exams should speak with their school or college and discuss their next best step.

The majority of students will now have the grades they need to move on to their next step. Those who did not receive a grade or who are unhappy with their grade will have the opportunity to take exams in the autumn. The Department have published guidance which makes it clear that they expect the school or college that entered students for the summer series to enter them for autumn if they want to sit exams. The Government is clear that given the unique circumstances in which the autumn exams are being run, students and their families should not have to meet the cost of fees if they want to enter.

So that schools and colleges have the support they need to run the additional autumn series, the Department is launching an Exam Support Service. Through this service, schools and colleges can book fully funded additional space to run exams if needed to avoid disruption to teaching. They will also be able to claim back for costs relating to autumn exam fees or invigilation where these exceed any savings they have made in those areas following the cancellation of summer exams. £30 million has been earmarked to deliver this support, although funding will be demand led and driven by the number of students who choose to sit the exams.

Further details can be found in our published guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/responsibility-for-autumn-gcse-as-and-a-level-exam-series.

20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if it is his policy to require (a) candidates or (b) schools and colleges to pay the entry fee for exams in the autumn series.

Students who are considering taking autumn exams should speak with their school or college and discuss their next best step.

The majority of students will now have the grades they need to move on to their next step. Those who did not receive a grade or who are unhappy with their grade will have the opportunity to take exams in the autumn. The Department have published guidance which makes it clear that they expect the school or college that entered students for the summer series to enter them for autumn if they want to sit exams. The Government is clear that given the unique circumstances in which the autumn exams are being run, students and their families should not have to meet the cost of fees if they want to enter.

So that schools and colleges have the support they need to run the additional autumn series, the Department is launching an Exam Support Service. Through this service, schools and colleges can book fully funded additional space to run exams if needed to avoid disruption to teaching. They will also be able to claim back for costs relating to autumn exam fees or invigilation where these exceed any savings they have made in those areas following the cancellation of summer exams. £30 million has been earmarked to deliver this support, although funding will be demand led and driven by the number of students who choose to sit the exams.

Further details can be found in our published guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/responsibility-for-autumn-gcse-as-and-a-level-exam-series.

20th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether (a) schools and (b) colleges are required to agree to requests from students wishing to enter the autumn exam series.

Students who are considering taking autumn exams should speak with their school or college and discuss their next best step.

The majority of students will now have the grades they need to move on to their next step. Those who did not receive a grade or who are unhappy with their grade will have the opportunity to take exams in the autumn. The Department have published guidance which makes it clear that they expect the school or college that entered students for the summer series to enter them for autumn if they want to sit exams. The Government is clear that given the unique circumstances in which the autumn exams are being run, students and their families should not have to meet the cost of fees if they want to enter.

So that schools and colleges have the support they need to run the additional autumn series, the Department is launching an Exam Support Service. Through this service, schools and colleges can book fully funded additional space to run exams if needed to avoid disruption to teaching. They will also be able to claim back for costs relating to autumn exam fees or invigilation where these exceed any savings they have made in those areas following the cancellation of summer exams. £30 million has been earmarked to deliver this support, although funding will be demand led and driven by the number of students who choose to sit the exams.

Further details can be found in our published guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/responsibility-for-autumn-gcse-as-and-a-level-exam-series.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many children eligible for free school meals (a) applied and (b) did not apply for support from the COVID Summer Food Fund before the deadline.

We do not ask individual pupils to register for the Covid Summer Food Fund. Schools can order vouchers on behalf of all eligible pupils through the Edenred online portal.

Where eligible families would be unable to access any of the supermarkets available through using Edenred e-gift cards, schools can make alternative voucher arrangements with a local supermarket.

Schools can claim for this through the exceptional costs fund in the autumn, providing schools have ordered their vouchers by the end of term.

Schools can also claim through the exceptional costs fund if they are arranging food parcels (rather than vouchers) for benefits-related free school meal pupils over the summer holidays.

Our national voucher scheme supplier, Edenred, have reported that:

  • over £272 million worth of voucher codes has been redeemed into supermarket e-gift cards by schools and families through the scheme as of Wednesday 15 July; and
  • over 18,500 schools had placed orders for the scheme as of Tuesday 30 June.
Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what proportion of children eligible for free school meals (a) did and (b) did not apply for support from the COVID Summer Food Fund before the deadline.

We do not ask individual pupils to register for the Covid Summer Food Fund. Schools can order vouchers on behalf of all eligible pupils through the Edenred online portal.

Where eligible families would be unable to access any of the supermarkets available through using Edenred e-gift cards, schools can make alternative voucher arrangements with a local supermarket.

Schools can claim for this through the exceptional costs fund in the autumn, providing schools have ordered their vouchers by the end of term.

Schools can also claim through the exceptional costs fund if they are arranging food parcels (rather than vouchers) for benefits-related free school meal pupils over the summer holidays.

Our national voucher scheme supplier, Edenred, have reported that:

  • over £272 million worth of voucher codes has been redeemed into supermarket e-gift cards by schools and families through the scheme as of Wednesday 15 July; and
  • over 18,500 schools had placed orders for the scheme as of Tuesday 30 June.
Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what additional funding his Department plans to allocate to services for (a) deaf and (b) disabled children as part of the £1 billion catch-up funding for missed education during the covid-19 outbreak.

The £1 billion COVID-19 catch-up package is made up of £650 million to be shared across state primary and secondary schools over the 2020-21 academic year, and a National Tutoring Programme, worth £350 million, which will increase access to high-quality tuition for the most disadvantaged children and young people over the 2020-21 academic year.

The universal £650 million catch-up premium funding recognises that all pupils, irrespective of their background or location, have lost time in education. Whilst school leaders will decide how it is used, the intention is that this money will be spent on the most effective interventions. The funding will be available for all state-funded mainstream and special schools, and alternative provision. All schools should use their catch-up premium funding as a single total from which to prioritise support for all pupils, guided by the level of individual need.

On Monday 20 July we announced more details about how the funding will be distributed to schools. This confirmed that a primary school of 200 pupils will receive £16,000 while a secondary school of 1,000 pupils will receive £80,000. Special, alternative provision and hospital schools will be funded at three times the rate of mainstream schools for the 2020-21 academic year.

This year we are providing £780 million additional high needs funding across England for children with the most complex special educational needs and disabilities. We are providing a further £730 million in 2021-22, which will bring the total high needs budget to over £8 billion. This is in addition to the catch-up funding.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how the £650 million additional catch-up funding for schools to support children who have missed education due to the covid-19 outbreak will be distributed; and if he will make a statement.

On Monday 20 July we announced more details about how the catch-up funding will be distributed to schools, available here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-catch-up-premium. This confirmed that a primary school of 200 pupils will receive £16,000 while a secondary school of 1,000 pupils will receive £80,000. Special, alternative provision and hospital schools will be funded at three times the rate of mainstream schools for the 2020-21 academic year.

The universal catch up premium will be paid as a grant to all state-funded primary and secondary schools in England over the 2020/21 academic year on a per pupil basis. The funding will be provided in three tranches. We will provide schools with an initial part payment in autumn 2020, based on the latest available data on pupils in mainstream schools and high needs place numbers in special, alternative provision, hospital and special schools not maintained by a local authority. We will then distribute a second grant payment in early 2021, based on updated pupil and place data. A further payment will be paid during the 2021 summer term.

The universal £650 million catch-up premium funding recognises that all pupils, irrespective of their background or location, have lost time in education. All schools should use their catch-up premium funding as a single total from which to prioritise support for all pupils, guided by the level of individual need. Whilst school leaders will decide how it is used, the intention is that this money will be spent on the most effective interventions.

To support schools to make best use of this funding, the Education Endowment Foundation have published a COVID-19 Support Guide for Schools with evidence based approaches to catch-up for all students: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/covid-19-resources/covid-19-support-guide-for-schools/#nav-covid-19-support-guide-for-schools1.

3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to support the families of pupils on free school meals in Stretford and Urmston during the school summer holidays in 2020.

I refer the hon. Members to the answer I gave on 23 June 2020 to Question 54195.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether examination boards will be required to refund schools for fees paid for examinations that have been cancelled as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Department recognises that schools and colleges want clarity on examination fees following the announcement that examinations will not take place in schools and colleges this summer. The Department and the examination boards are working together to ensure that schools and colleges are provided with further information as soon as possible. The examination boards are looking at the costs that will be saved this summer, alongside new work they need to undertake on the process for gathering examination centre grades and providing calculated grades to students.

Schools and colleges will continue to receive their budgets for the coming year, regardless of any periods of partial or complete closure. This will ensure that they are able to continue to meet their regular financial commitments. We expect schools and colleges to pay any due invoices, as the process is worked through.

7th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to promote degree apprenticeships as a route to an undergraduate degree.

Degree and degree-level apprenticeships at level 6 and above offer people of all ages and from all backgrounds the chance to earn while they train and access a range of professions.

Apprenticeship starts at level 6 and above have increased from 100 in 2014/15 to 22,480 in 2018/19. 120 employer-designed standards are now approved for delivery at levels 6 and 7, in a wide range of occupations. We are continuing to raise the profile of these apprenticeships as high-quality alternatives to academic study.

To support employers to raise awareness of opportunities in their businesses, we worked with the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) to develop an online higher and degree apprenticeship vacancy listing. The most recent update was published in National Apprenticeship Week for starts in 2020 and includes over a thousand vacancies from employers in a range of sectors, from aeronautical engineering to town planning.

Representatives from the National Apprenticeship Service also attended 30 UCAS exhibitions in 2019, engaging with around 10,000 young people, their parents and careers advisers. This work will continue throughout 2020 alongside our wider communications and marketing activity to raise the profile of apprenticeships, including the second phase of the ‘Fire It Up’ campaign. A number of the apprentices who feature in advertising throughout the second phase are undertaking degree or degree-level apprenticeships.

7th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of degree apprenticeships on (a) local and (b) national skills needs.

Our reforms to apprenticeships have put employers in the driving seat to design the apprenticeships to support the skills needs of their business, local area, or sector. This is creating an apprenticeship provider market that is highly responsive to the needs of employers, ensuring independent providers, further education colleges, and higher education institutions develop training at all levels to meet these skills needs. We know that employers, providers and apprentices alike are positive about degree apprenticeships. We want to continue to support employers to unlock their potential to improve productivity, bring parity of esteem with other higher education choices, and widen participation in employment and higher education.

We are encouraged to see examples of training providers across England working closely with employers and sector bodies to build effective partnerships which are delivering more degree-level apprenticeships each year. Those opportunities are responding to the employment needs of employers and developing hubs of high-quality apprenticeship training that provide the higher-level skills the economy needs.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the Answer of 2 June 2020 to Question 49674, whether her Department plans to provide additional funding to the Global Partnership for Education to sustain education systems in the global south during the covid-19 pandemic.

We are at an unprecedented moment when almost the entire school-going population is out of school, affecting more than 1.5 billion children, half of them girls. Girls’ education is a top UK development priority and my officials are assessing how multilateral and other investments can mitigate short-term risks while schools are closed and protect education systems and finance for the medium to long-term.

The UK is the largest donor to the Global Partnership for Education (GPE). We have supported GPE to urgently repurpose resources to support distance learning and help countries prepare plans to re-open schools through a dedicated $500 million COVID-19 accelerated funding window.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether her Department has provided additional funding to the Global Partnership for Education to sustain education systems in the global south during the covid-19 pandemic.

We are at an unprecedented moment when almost the entire school-going population is out of school, affecting more than 1.5 billion children, half of them girls. Girls’ education is a top UK development priority and officials are assessing how multilateral and other investments can mitigate short-term risks while schools are closed and protect education systems and finance for the medium to long-term.

The UK is the largest donor to the Global Partnership for Education (GPE). We have supported GPE to urgently repurpose resources to support distance learning and help countries prepare plans to re-open schools through a dedicated $250 million COVID-19 accelerated funding window. Beyond this, the UK has not provided additional funds to GPE.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many schools are planned to receive pacer trains for classrooms by (a) region and (b) local authority.

The Department has no plans to convert any pacer train carriages into classrooms.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many retired pacer trains are planned to become classrooms in how many schools.

The Department has no plans to convert any pacer train carriages into classrooms.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many and what proportion of the staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

The Department for Transport (DfT) remains fully committed to the Government’s apprenticeship agenda. Due to the diverse nature of our work, the central department (DfTc) and our executive agencies (DfT Group) have developed localised strategies to allow us to work towards the Government target.

As of 3rd February 2021, there were 302 staff across the Department who are apprentices. This figure includes apprentices across the central department (DfTc) and our four Executive Agencies (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency, Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency, Maritime and Coastguard Agency and Vehicle Certification Agency). This is 1.92% of the total staff employed across the DfT Group (headcount data taken as of 31 December 2020).

This figure is made up of apprentices who have been externally recruited as well as existing employees currently undertaking an apprenticeship. This figure does not include apprentices recently recruited by the Department who are waiting to start their apprenticeship programme.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of people who have been affected by underpayment of benefits after transitioning from incapacity benefit to employment and support allowance in (a) Trafford, (b) Stretford and Urmston and (c) Altrincham and Sale West constituency.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 19th January to question number 104377.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to Action for Children’s report, Childhood during coronavirus: protecting children from the effects of poverty, published in September 2020, what plans she has to implement a UK-wide child poverty strategy.

Our recent focus has been on supporting people financially during these unprecedented times. We have injected more than £9 billion into the welfare system in response to Covid-19, increasing Universal Credit and Working Tax Credit by up to £1,040 for this financial year. Our overall ambition is unchanged. We plan to tackle child poverty through our welfare system which works with the labour market to encourage parents to move into, and progress in work, wherever possible.

Our approach is based on clear evidence that work, particularly where it is full-time, substantially reduces the risks of poverty. The most recent data showed that there was only a 3% chance of children being in absolute poverty (before housing costs) if both parents worked full-time, compared with 47% where one or more parents in a couple was in part-time work. To support economic recovery, the Chancellor recently announced a £30 billion Plan for Jobs to protect, support and create jobs.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants are in the process of waiting five weeks to receive their first universal credit payment.

The latest Management Information on declarations to Universal Credit was published on 2 June 2020. It can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/universal-credit-declarations-claims-and-advances-management-information

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate her Department has made of the number of people unable to claim universal credit as a result of having savings of over £16,000.

In 2019, 8,670 claims were not eligible to Universal Credit due to having savings of over £16,000.

Time of Claim

% of claims ineligible due to capital

Number of claims ineligible due to capital

Number of Claims (declarations)

2019 claims

0.20%

8,670

3,472,000

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many households did not receive additional support through (a) tax credits and (b) universal credit due to the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children in April 2020.

The Government has committed to annual statistics releases related to the operation of the policy to provide support for a maximum of two children. Statistics related to the period up to April 2019 are available on GOV.UK. Statistics related to the period up to April 2020 will be published in the summer.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, with reference to the Answer of 23 January to Question 5323 on Maternity Allowance, what the average working day turn around for maternity allowance claims was from (a) 1 to 15 March 2020, (b) 16 to 31 March 2020, (c) 1 to 15 April 2020, and (d) 16 to 30 April 2020.

The average working day turnaround for Maternity Allowance claims for the following periods are as follows:

1 Mar – 15 Mar – 6.9 days

16 Mar -29 Mar – 9.4 days

30 Mar – 12 Apr – 9.4 days

13 Apr – 26 Apr – 11.4 days

27 Apr – 3 May – 9.5 days

We continue to monitor performance on a weekly basis.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims have been received for (a) contributions-based employment and support allowance and (b) contributions-based jobseekers' allowance in each of the last 12 months.

The information on the number of claimants who receive contribution-based employment and support allowance, including those in the assessment phase, by month of claim, is published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/jsf/login.xhtml

Guidance for users is available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

The information on number of all on-flows to Jobseeker’s Allowance can be found at:

https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/default.asp

Guidance for users can be found at:

https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/home/newuser.asp

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many staff employed in the Child Maintenance Service have been redeployed to other duties in her Department since 1 March 2020.

Within CMG we made 2886 available to support benefit activities, of which 1629 have been trained and deployed. The balance are currently unavailable due to leave relating to Covid-19.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many child maintenance arrangements have been (a) altered and (b) withdrawn by the Child Maintenance Service since 1 March 2020.

The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims for universal credit required a habitual residence test; and of those claims how many have been closed as a result of failing that test in each month since July 2018.

The table below gives UC claims with an associated HRT, whether the claimant passed the HRT, failed or the outcome could not be determined. Of these, the number of UC claims that were closed due to failing the HRT. The UC data supplied is derived from unpublished management information, which was collected for internal Departmental use only and has not been quality assured to National Statistics or Official Statistics publication standard. The data should therefore be treated with caution.

Month claim declared

UC Full Service claims with an associated HRT

UC Full Service claims closed due to failing the HRT

Jul-18

21,700

2,700

Aug-18

22,700

2,700

Sep-18

25,200

2,800

Oct-18

30,400

3,500

Nov-18

31,800

3,700

Dec-18

27,600

3,200

Jan-19

41,900

4,800

Feb-19

36,200

4,400

Mar-19

37,200

4,600

Apr-19

33,700

3,800

May-19

35,900

3,800

Jun-19

33,200

3,600

Jul-19

36,400

3,900

Aug-19

32,500

3,300

Sep-19

36,900

3,300

Oct-19

38,100

3,800

Nov-19

32,900

3,400

Notes:

  1. Figures are taken from Management Information on Universal Credit Full Service claims.
  2. All figures are rounded to the nearest 100.
  3. The month used in this data is the month in which the UC claim was declared (regardless of when the closure for the claim occurred because of a failed HRT)
  4. Information on Universal Credit Full service claims may be subject to future change; this is because claim data may be entered retrospectively for past months. Any retrospective changes are most likely to affect recent months; for this reason, we have provided data up to the end of November 2019.
  5. Subtracting the number of HRT fails from the total number of UC HRTs undertaken would not provide the number of HRT passes, as this also includes HRTs where the outcome could not be determined, for example, a claim was withdrawn before the HRT result was recorded

17th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to ensure (a) serving prisoners and (b) people remanded in custody do not receive social security benefits to which they are not entitled by reason of being in custody.

The Department is routinely notified by Prison Services in England, Wales and Scotland when offenders enter custody, including those on remand. We have specialist teams to identify claimants who are in receipt of Universal Credit and Legacy working age benefits so that the appropriate action can be taken.

Serving prisoners and those remanded can continue to receive the housing element of Universal Credit if they are due to serve 6 months or less in prison and were in receipt on of these payments on entry to prison.

The Department does not centrally collect data for claimants who are serving a custodial sentence, or who are remanded, in prison and in receipt of housing benefit, or the housing element of Universal Credit. To provide this would incur a disproportionate cost.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
17th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) women and (b) men (i) serving custodial sentences and (ii) remanded in custody received housing benefit or the housing element of universal credit during their time in custody in each of the past two years.

The Department is routinely notified by Prison Services in England, Wales and Scotland when offenders enter custody, including those on remand. We have specialist teams to identify claimants who are in receipt of Universal Credit and Legacy working age benefits so that the appropriate action can be taken.

Serving prisoners and those remanded can continue to receive the housing element of Universal Credit if they are due to serve 6 months or less in prison and were in receipt on of these payments on entry to prison.

The Department does not centrally collect data for claimants who are serving a custodial sentence, or who are remanded, in prison and in receipt of housing benefit, or the housing element of Universal Credit. To provide this would incur a disproportionate cost.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
10th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding has been allocated for mental health support teams in schools and colleges in each year between 2018-19 and 2023-24; and what proportion of schools and colleges were covered by those teams in each year from 2018-19 to date.

The funding profile for mental health support teams and four week waiting time pilots is shown in the following table.

2018/19 £ million

2019/20 £ million

2020/21 £ million

2021/221 £ million

2022/23 £ million

2023/24 £ million

24

76

115

136

185

249

Source: Mental Health Implementation Plan, NHS England

Note:

1 Excludes funding provided as part of £79 million additional funding for children and young people’s mental health services in 2021/22.

Information on the number of schools and colleges covered by mental health support teams is not held centrally.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether Government plans to fund a full roll out of mental health support teams to all schools and colleges.

We are planning for approximately 400 operational mental health support teams in schools and colleges in England by 2023, covering an estimated three million children and young people (around 35 per cent of pupils in England). This will be determined by future funding settlements.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many schools have withdrawn from the pilot programme to identify and limit the spread of covid-19 within schools without the use of bubbles; and for what reasons those schools have withdrawn from the programme.

This information is not currently available as the results of the pilot are still being validated.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when the pilot testing programme to help identify and limit the spread of covid-19 within schools without the use of bubbles will be (a) available and (b) ​made public.

The pilot testing programme is being reviewed in light of recent changes to self-isolation policy and for the data from pilots and clinical trials to be assessed and validated.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of the staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

The Department has grown in size in the past year and now employs 2,284 civil servants, headcount. There are 58 members of staff currently undertaking an apprenticeship, which constitutes 2.5% of this workforce. There are a further 10 members of staff expected to begin an apprenticeship within the next month.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total expenditure was on Healthy Start vouchers in the most recent year for which data is available.

The total expenditure on Healthy Start vouchers in England, for the most recent year that data is available (2018/19), was £44,787,081. This expenditure includes the expenditure on Healthy Start vouchers redeemed and the administrative costs for the scheme.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children were in receipt of Healthy Start vouchers in the most recent year for which data is available.

The average number of children in receipt of Healthy Start vouchers, in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, over the course of 2019/20, was 275,970.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the latest estimate of the covid-19 R number is for the North-West.

The Government Office for Science currently publishes the latest estimate of the United Kingdom-wide range for R on a weekly basis. At the time of writing the current range is estimated to be 0.7-0.9 and is based on latest data available to determine infection and transmission rates. We do not calculate the R rate in different regions or local authority areas.

R is an average number and so can be highly uncertain if based on small quantities of data, for example, the R value for Northern Ireland will be more uncertain than England as the population is smaller and there have been fewer COVID-19 cases to date from which R can be calculated. R is not usually a useful measure on its own and needs to be considered alongside the number of new cases. Because of this uncertainty, The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies’ view is that it is unhelpful to use estimates of R rates to monitor the epidemic in different regions.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will regularly publish the R value for covid-19 infections on a regional basis.

The Government Office for Science currently publishes the latest estimate of the United Kingdom-wide range for R on a weekly basis. At the time of writing the current range is estimated to be 0.7-0.9 and is based on latest data available to determine infection and transmission rates. We do not calculate the R rate in different regions or local authority areas.

R is an average number and so can be highly uncertain if based on small quantities of data, for example, the R value for Northern Ireland will be more uncertain than England as the population is smaller and there have been fewer COVID-19 cases to date from which R can be calculated. R is not usually a useful measure on its own and needs to be considered alongside the number of new cases. Because of this uncertainty, The Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies’ view is that it is unhelpful to use estimates of R rates to monitor the epidemic in different regions.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to produce a child-friendly guide to the covid-19 outbreak and relevant governmental actions, including schools closures and social distancing.

Public Health England (PHE) has signposted teachers to E-Bug resources that will help younger children understand how diseases spread at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-educational-settings-about-covid-19/guidance-to-educational-settings-about-covid-19

PHE will also publish guidance for teachers providing ideas on how emphasise the importance of handwashing through games, singing and play. This guidance will be published shortly.

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health has further resources on COVID-19, including a child friendly poster which can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.rcpch.ac.uk/sites/default/files/2020-03/covid-19_childfriendly_poster_cc_march2020_0.pdf

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to suspend NHS charges for secondary care for non-EEA visitors who require hospital treatment for covid-19 after their arrival in the UK.

Novel coronavirus COVID-19 has been added to Schedule 1 of the NHS (Charges to Overseas Visitors) Regulations.

This means, as for any other infectious disease in Schedule 1, there can be no charge made to an overseas visitor for the diagnosis, or, if positive, treatment, of this coronavirus.

No charge applies to a diagnostic test even if the result is negative. Also, no charge can apply to any treatment provided up to the point that it is negatively diagnosed.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether non-EEA visitors to the UK who are required to undergo testing for covid-19 will receive that test free of charge.

Novel coronavirus COVID-19 has been added to Schedule 1 of the NHS (Charges to Overseas Visitors) Regulations.

This means that, as for any other infectious disease in Schedule 1, there can be no charge made to an overseas visitor for the diagnosis or treatment, of this coronavirus.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to publish the final NHS People Plan.

The final NHS People Plan will be published by the National Health Service in early 2020 and will set out a clear framework for collective action on workforce priorities, with a focus on growing and sustaining a well-skilled workforce across the whole NHS.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, how many and what proportion of the staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

As of 31 December 2020, the Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) employed 122 apprentices, of whom 49 work for our Trading Fund, FCDO Services. This is 1.4% of the total of FCDO and FCDO Services UK Based (or "UK-registered") staff worldwide, and 1.9% of our staff working in the UK. We expect a further 2 FCDO staff to enrol on an apprenticeship by 31 March 2021.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 25 March 2020 to Question 31501 on Armed Conflict: Sexual Offences, what steps his Department is taking under the prevention of sexual violence in conflict initiative in addition to the faith and belief leader's declaration of humanity to provide support for women from minority religious communities who are vulnerable to sexual violence in conflict situations.

As stated in my [Minister Adams] answer to PQ 31501, the UK is fully committed to supporting all survivors of conflict-related sexual violence, and follows a survivor-centred approach. We recognise that women from minority religious communities can often suffer in situations of conflict because of both their gender and their faith. That is why we ensure that our human rights policy work considers the intersectionality of human rights, and the importance of addressing the specific vulnerabilities experienced by women from religious minority communities. Examples of our work include strengthening access to justice for survivors through training faith and belief groups on how to document and respond to sexual violence within their communities, and providing greater support and access to holistic care for children born of conflict-related sexual violence.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to (a) ensure progress on delivering the thematic strand of stigma contained in the Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative and (b) support faith leaders and faith groups to (i) help and (ii) care for women from minority religious communities that have experienced sexual violence in conflict.

The Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative (PSVI) is part of the UK's Women, Peace and Security National Action Plan (NAP), which includes our strategy for tackling and preventing conflict-related sexual violence. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office will be developing an additional three-year strategy on PSVI, which remains a top priority for the British Government. Our PSVI objectives will remain to champion wider restorative justice for survivors and hold perpetrators to account; support all survivors and children born of conflict-related sexual violence, and tackle the stigma they face including those from religious minority communities; and prevent sexual violence in conflict.

We are working with international faith and belief leaders to issue a 'Declaration of Humanity' which calls for the end of sexual violence in conflict and to tackle the stigma so often faced by survivors. We will also provide support to faith leaders and faith groups by training them on how to document and respond to conflict-related sexual violence, and will strengthen access to holistic care for all survivors, including for women from minority religious communities who have experienced sexual violence. We will ensure that the three-year strategy is survivor-centred, working closely with the UK's PSVI Survivor Champions throughout its development.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking under the Prevention of Sexual Violence in Conflict Initiative to protect women from religious minority communities who are specifically vulnerable to sexual violence.

The UK is fully committed to supporting survivors of conflict-related sexual violence and follows a survivor-centred approach. This includes working closely with survivor networks and organisations, including those from religious minority communities, to ensure their perspectives inform PSVI policy and programming. For example, strengthening support for the faith and belief leaders' Declaration of Humanity to tackle stigma faced by survivors and prevent sexual violence in conflict

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the hon. Member for South West Bedfordshire, representing the Church Commissioners, what progress has been made on (a) making Church land available for Gypsy and Traveller sites and (b) other plans to tackle racism and discrimination as agreed at the General Synod in February 2019.

The Church Commissioners manage the charitable and historic endowments of the Church to support mission and ministry financially. The Commissioners seek to make provision for a range of housing types on their land but have not recently been made aware of any requirements for the direct provision of Gypsy and Traveller accommodation on that land. Other land at a parish and diocesan level is not under the ownership or management of the Church Commissioners.

The Church has an active network for Gypsy, Roma and Traveller people and is also running an annual training day for clergy that offers support and guidance, alongside a conference on 24th March 2020 which aims to give voice and visibility to minorities not traditionally heard, seen and represented in the Church of England.

The Church of England’s Ministry Division and clergy senior appointments team have developed a programme of work to support vocations from UKME communities and is working towards increasing representation in the senior leadership of the Church.

The Church will also be making an additional £20 million available over three years under its new Social Impact Investment Project, which incentivises positive investment in communities over the maximisation of financial return. One of the key areas for this project will be looking at the social impact of housing and consideration will be given to the housing needs of Gypsy, Roma and Traveller peoples.

At its February 2020 session the General Synod of the Church of England debated and passed the following motion:

Windrush Commitment and Legacy

That this Synod, commemorating in 2018 the martyrdom of the Revd Dr Martin Luther King, Jr., noting with joy the 70th anniversary of the arrival of the Empire Windrush liner in the United Kingdom in June 1948 bringing nearly 500 Commonwealth citizens, mainly from the Caribbean, to mainland UK; and the eventual arrival of approximately half a million people from the West Indies, who were called to Britain as British subjects to help rebuild the post-war United Kingdom:

a. lament, on behalf of Christ's Church, and apologises for, the conscious and unconscious racism experienced by countless black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) Anglicans in 1948 and subsequent years, when seeking to find a spiritual home in their local Church of England parish churches, the memory of which is still painful to committed Anglicans who, in spite of this racism from clergy and others, have remained faithful to the Church of England and their Anglican heritage;

b. request the Archbishops’ Council to commission research to assess the impact of this on the Church of England in terms of church members lost, churches declining into closure, and vocations to ordained and licensed lay ministries missed, and to report back to this Synod and the wider Church.”

c. express gratitude to God for the indispensable contribution to the mission, ministry, prayer and worship of Christ's Church in this nation made by people of BAME descent in the Church of England;

d. acknowledge and give joyful thanks for the wider contribution of the 'Windrush generation' and their descendants to UK life and culture in every field of human activity, including service across the Armed Forces and other services during and after the Second World War; and

e. resolve to continue, with great effort and urgency, to stamp out all forms of conscious or unconscious racism, and to commit the Church of England to increase the participation and representation of lay and ordained BAME Anglicans throughout Church life;

f. request the Archbishop’s Council to appoint an independent person external to the Church to assess the current situation as regards race and ethnicity in the Church, in order to present a report to this Synod with recommendations for actions to achieve reconciliation and authentic belonging so that we can move towards truly being a Church for all people;

g. to the greater glory of the God in whose image every human being is made.

Andrew Selous
Second Church Estates Commissioner
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to inform family members of victims of serious crimes overseas of the outcome of local police investigations.

Anyone who is a victim of crime overseas can contact the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) 24/7 for advice. The FCO can give general information about local police and legal procedures. In many countries, investigating authorities and the courts may refuse to answer enquiries from other people and organisations, including consular staff. In such circumstances, we may advise people to consider appointing a local lawyer to look after their interests in court, and follow any trial. More information on consular assistance for victims of crime overseas is set out on page 15 of Support for British nationals abroad: a guide. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/support-for-british-nationals-abroad-a-guide.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
5th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how many cases in which a UK citizen was a victim of a serious crime in (a) Cambodia and (b) Vietnam did the UK (i) embassy and (i) local consular offices support in each of the last three years.

Data regarding consular cases is published monthly on the Foreign and Commonwealth Office Consular Data pages of GOV.UK, https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/foreign-commonwealth-office-consular-data-2019#history

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
4th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to assist international partners in improving the (a) living conditions and (b) processing of asylum applications of refugees on the island of Lesvos.

New migrant arrivals on the Greek islands are accommodated in Reception and Identification Centres ("hotspots") while they are processed in line with the 2016 EU/Turkey statement. Due to high numbers of arrivals, some of the hotspots are operating well beyond capacity and conditions for many migrants are poor. The United Kingdom continues to raise concerns about conditions on the islands in discussions with the Greek Government, most recently on 7 February by our Ambassador.

We are working closely with the Greek Government, who retain responsibility for the situation of migrants in the country. We remain committed to supporting Greece's efforts in dealing with the migration challenge including through providing interpreters to support the Greek Reception Service; a United Kingdom Border Force search-and-rescue cutter in the Aegean; and over £500,000 to support the humanitarian needs of migrants on the islands for the 2019/20 winter.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to line 20, table 2.1, of the March Budget 2021, what level of funding has been allocated to each (a) region of England and (b) devolved nation for Help to Grow Management in (i) 2021-22, (ii) 2022-23 and (iii) 2023-24.

Help to Grow: Management will be delivered by business schools across the UK. HM Treasury has provided ringfenced funding to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy for this programme; £62m in 2021-22, £74m in 2022-23, and £87m in 2023-24.

We are committed to ensuring that all regions and nations in the UK benefit from Help to Grow: Management. The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy will determine the funding that is allocated to each business school – and thereby to each region and devolved nation – in collaboration with its delivery partner, the Chartered Association of Business Schools.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Autumn Budget and Spending Review 2021, whether it is his policy to provide funding for Help to Grow Management to each region and devolved nation in the UK on a ring-fenced basis.

This government is committed to ensuring that all regions and nations in the UK benefit from Help to Grow: Management. The programme will be delivered by business schools across the UK.

HM Treasury has provided ringfenced funding to the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy for Help to Grow: Management. Within this allocation, funding has not been ringfenced for each region and devolved nation.

The Department for Business, Energy, and Industrial Strategy will determine the funding allocated to each business school – and thereby to each region and devolved nation – in collaboration with its delivery partner, the Chartered Association of Business Schools.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what discussions he has had with (a) employers and (b) HMRC on refunding childcare voucher payments to families who have not been able to use them as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The availability of a refund on childcare vouchers will depend on the precise terms and conditions of the employer’s childcare voucher scheme, which is a contractual arrangement between the parent, the employer and the childcare voucher provider.

Some schemes allow for refunds on the value of childcare vouchers in certain circumstances but there is no legal requirement to do so. Where a refund is provided, the refund is treated as income from the employee’s employment and should be subject to deductions of tax and National Insurance Contributions in the normal way.

Due to coronavirus restrictions, employees may not be using all of their childcare vouchers. Users of the childcare voucher scheme can continue to receive childcare vouchers, but may wish to temporarily reduce their contributions so that they don’t accumulate a stockpile.

Contributions can then be increased as and when required. Varying the amount will not affect continuing eligibility, providing that the normal conditions of the scheme are met.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
19th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of total parental contributions to childcare vouchers in the 2020-21 financial year.

The government does not hold data for parental contributions made towards childcare vouchers. We obtain estimates of numbers of recipients and value of vouchers from data supplied voluntarily by voucher providers to HMRC. These estimates for 2020/21 will be available in Autumn 2021.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
27th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on supply teaching staff of the requirement for employers to meet the cost of (a) national insurance and (b) pension contributions for furloughed staff.

Agency workers, including supply teachers, are eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) in the same way as other employees, and can continue to be claimed for during periods of school closure provided that the usual eligibility criteria are met.

Employers will only be asked to cover National Insurance and employer pension contributions for hours not worked. For an average claim, this accounts for just five per cent of total employment costs or £70 per employee per month. This is a fair way to ask employers to contribute because it protects lower paid workers, by limiting the cost of them to employers.

Since March, the Government has provided support for people, businesses and public services totalling an estimated £280 billion. In particular, businesses have received billions in loans, tax deferrals, Business Rate reliefs, and general and sector-specific grants. This support can be used by businesses to cover the costs of NICs and pension contributions, ensuring that they can continue to furlough their employees.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of the staff employed by her Department are apprentices.

The number of staff currently employed by the Home Office who have started an apprenticeship is 735, which is 2.29% of the department headcount calculated on 31/12/20 (this does not include individuals in the pipeline preparing to start and/or undergoing security checks).

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance has been issued to police forces on the carrying and use of tasers in schools by schools-based police officers.

The Government does not issue specific guidance on the use of police equipment in schools. This is an operational matter for Chief officers to determine. Officers must pass a comprehensive training programme before they can carry Tasers.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many schools-based police officers are (a) authorised to carry tasers and (b) permitted to carry tasers in schools in each police force in England.

The Home Office does not record the number of Taser devices or the number of officers authorised to carry Tasers. This is an operational matter for Chief Officers, and it is for them to determine the number of devices and specially trained officers needed based on their force assessment of threat and risk. Officers must pass a comprehensive training programme before they can carry Tasers.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will ensure broadband provision in asylum accommodation occupied by families to support children's education.

Guidance for families (in England) wishing to access support with their children’s education can be found on the following government website:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/get-help-with-technology-for-remote-education-during-coronavirus-covid-19

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether Border Force officers have been instructed to make an assessment of whether travel to the UK is essential and whether those officers have the power to refuse entry to the UK on grounds of non-essential travel.

Border Force officers continue to process arriving passengers in accordance with the Immigration Rules at ports across the UK, assessing each passenger on a case by case basis. We will continue to ensure our staff have clear guidance in place as to the correct interpretation of the Immigration Rules when assessing visitors seeking entry to the UK.

Any decision to implement additional restrictions on international travel to the UK or on arrival at ports/airports will be made by Ministers.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department plans to reinstate the Settlement Scheme online application for non-EEA nationals that do not have a Biometric Residence Permit during the covid-19 outbreak.

As part of the application process, non-EEA citizens need to provide their Biometrics if they are not already in possession of a Biometric Residence Card. In line with the latest advice from Public Health England the UK Visa and Citizenship Application Centres (UKVCAS) where non-EEA citizens need to attend to have their biometrics taken are temporarily closed in accordance with advice on limiting the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

The government will look again at these measures at regular intervals and relax them if the evidence shows this is possible.

Those applicants who already hold a Biometric Residence Card do not need to provide biometrics and so are still able to apply to the scheme while the current restrictions are in place.

UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) has set up a dedicated team for customers with immigration queries related to coronavirus, including questions about urgent, compelling, compassionate cases. More information can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-for-uk-visa-applicants-and-temporary-uk-residents

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to amend the Minimum Income Requirement to ensure that UK citizens and settled persons sponsoring their family members under the immigration rules are not penalised by (a) being furloughed, (b) having a wage cut and (c) being made redundant as a result of the covid-19 pandemic.

The Home Office has put in place a range of measures to support those affected by the Covid-19 outbreak. We continue to monitor the situation closely and take these exceptional circumstances into account.

The minimum income requirement can be met in a number of ways in addition to or instead of income from employment or self-employment. For example, income from the couple’s investments, property rental or pension may also be taken into account, together with their cash savings. Where there are exceptional circumstances, other sources of income can also be taken into account.

These are unprecedented times and we may make further temporary adjustments to requirements where necessary and appropriate. We will ensure people are not unduly affected or penalised by circumstances beyond their control.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on migrants in the UK who have no recourse to public funds.

The Home Office is working closely with other government departments to support people, including migrants with no recourse to public funds, through this crisis. We are taking a compassionate and pragmatic approach to an unprecedented situation.

Migrants with leave under the Family and Human Rights routes can apply to have the NRPF restriction lifted by making a ‘change of conditions’ application if there has been a change in their financial circumstances. The Home Office has recently digitised the application form to make sure it is accessible for those who need to remain at home, and I can assure you that the applications are being dealt with swiftly and compassionately.

Many of the wide-ranging Covid-19 measures the government has put in place are not public funds and therefore are available to migrants with no recourse to public funds (NRPF). We therefore do not believe it is necessary to suspend the NRPF condition.

The Coronavirus job retention scheme, self-employment income support and statutory sick pay are not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Contribution-based benefits are also not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Additionally, measures we have brought forward such as rent and mortgage protections are not considered public funds and can be accessed by migrants with leave to remain.

Local authorities may also provide basic safety net support if it is established that there is a genuine care need that does not arise solely from destitution, for example, where there are community care needs, migrants with serious health problems or family cases where the wellbeing of a child is in question.

The Government has made in excess of £3.2bn of funding available to local authorities in England to assist them in managing the pressures arising out of the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
21st Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it her policy to suspend the no recourse to public funds condition during the covid-19 lockdown.

The Home Office is working closely with other government departments to support people, including migrants with no recourse to public funds, through this crisis. We are taking a compassionate and pragmatic approach to an unprecedented situation.

Migrants with leave under the Family and Human Rights routes can apply to have the NRPF restriction lifted by making a ‘change of conditions’ application if there has been a change in their financial circumstances. The Home Office has recently digitised the application form to make sure it is accessible for those who need to remain at home, and I can assure you that the applications are being dealt with swiftly and compassionately.

Many of the wide-ranging Covid-19 measures the government has put in place are not public funds and therefore are available to migrants with no recourse to public funds (NRPF). We therefore do not believe it is necessary to suspend the NRPF condition.

The Coronavirus job retention scheme, self-employment income support and statutory sick pay are not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Contribution-based benefits are also not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Additionally, measures we have brought forward such as rent and mortgage protections are not considered public funds and can be accessed by migrants with leave to remain.

Local authorities may also provide basic safety net support if it is established that there is a genuine care need that does not arise solely from destitution, for example, where there are community care needs, migrants with serious health problems or family cases where the wellbeing of a child is in question.

The Government has made in excess of £3.2bn of funding available to local authorities in England to assist them in managing the pressures arising out of the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for a change of conditions to allow recourse to public funds her Department has (a) received and (b) granted since 1 March 2020; and what the average time was for her Department to determine its response to those applications.

The Home Office is working closely with other government departments to support people, including migrants with no recourse to public funds, through this crisis. We are taking a compassionate and pragmatic approach to an unprecedented situation.

Many of the wide-ranging Covid-19 measures the government has put in place are not public funds and therefore are available to migrants with no recourse to public funds (NRPF). We therefore do not believe it is necessary to suspend the NRPF condition.

Migrants with leave under the Family and Human Rights routes can apply to have the NRPF restriction lifted by making a ‘change of conditions’ application if there has been a change in their financial circumstances. The information you have requested regarding these applications is not assured to the standard required by ONS for publication, and as it would be too costly to do so we are unable to provide it. However, the Home Office has recently digitised the application form to make sure it is accessible for those who need to remain at home, and I can assure you that the applications are being dealt with swiftly and compassionately.

The Coronavirus job retention scheme, self-employment income support and statutory sick pay are not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Contribution-based benefits are also not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Additionally, measures we have brought forward such as rent and mortgage protections are not considered public funds and can be accessed by migrants with leave to remain.

Local authorities may also provide basic safety net support if it is established that there is a genuine care need that does not arise solely from destitution, for example, where there are community care needs, migrants with serious health problems or family cases where the wellbeing of a child is in question.

The Government has made in excess of £3.2bn of funding available to local authorities in England to assist them in managing the pressures arising out of the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an estimate of the cost of suspending the no recourse to public funds condition during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Home Office is working closely with other government departments to support people, including migrants with no recourse to public funds, through this crisis. We are taking a compassionate and pragmatic approach to an unprecedented situation.

Many of the wide-ranging Covid-19 measures the government has put in place are not public funds and therefore are available to migrants with no recourse to public funds (NRPF). We therefore do not believe it is necessary to suspend the NRPF condition.

Migrants with leave under the Family and Human Rights routes can apply to have the NRPF restriction lifted by making a ‘change of conditions’ application if there has been a change in their financial circumstances. The information you have requested regarding these applications is not assured to the standard required by ONS for publication, and as it would be too costly to do so we are unable to provide it. However, the Home Office has recently digitised the application form to make sure it is accessible for those who need to remain at home, and I can assure you that the applications are being dealt with swiftly and compassionately.

The Coronavirus job retention scheme, self-employment income support and statutory sick pay are not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Contribution-based benefits are also not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Additionally, measures we have brought forward such as rent and mortgage protections are not considered public funds and can be accessed by migrants with leave to remain.

Local authorities may also provide basic safety net support if it is established that there is a genuine care need that does not arise solely from destitution, for example, where there are community care needs, migrants with serious health problems or family cases where the wellbeing of a child is in question.

The Government has made in excess of £3.2bn of funding available to local authorities in England to assist them in managing the pressures arising out of the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect on the well-being of children of their parents or carers having no recourse to public funds.

The Home Office is working closely with other government departments to support people, including migrants with no recourse to public funds, through this crisis. We are taking a compassionate and pragmatic approach to an unprecedented situation.

Many of the wide-ranging Covid-19 measures the government has put in place are not public funds and therefore are available to migrants with no recourse to public funds (NRPF). We therefore do not believe it is necessary to suspend the NRPF condition.

Migrants with leave under the Family and Human Rights routes can apply to have the NRPF restriction lifted by making a ‘change of conditions’ application if there has been a change in their financial circumstances. The information you have requested regarding these applications is not assured to the standard required by ONS for publication, and as it would be too costly to do so we are unable to provide it. However, the Home Office has recently digitised the application form to make sure it is accessible for those who need to remain at home, and I can assure you that the applications are being dealt with swiftly and compassionately.

The Coronavirus job retention scheme, self-employment income support and statutory sick pay are not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Contribution-based benefits are also not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Additionally, measures we have brought forward such as rent and mortgage protections are not considered public funds and can be accessed by migrants with leave to remain.

Local authorities may also provide basic safety net support if it is established that there is a genuine care need that does not arise solely from destitution, for example, where there are community care needs, migrants with serious health problems or family cases where the wellbeing of a child is in question.

The Government has made in excess of £3.2bn of funding available to local authorities in England to assist them in managing the pressures arising out of the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the implementation of the no recourse to public funds condition on local authority children's services.

The Home Office is working closely with other government departments to support people, including migrants with no recourse to public funds, through this crisis. We are taking a compassionate and pragmatic approach to an unprecedented situation.

Many of the wide-ranging Covid-19 measures the government has put in place are not public funds and therefore are available to migrants with no recourse to public funds (NRPF). We therefore do not believe it is necessary to suspend the NRPF condition.

Migrants with leave under the Family and Human Rights routes can apply to have the NRPF restriction lifted by making a ‘change of conditions’ application if there has been a change in their financial circumstances. The information you have requested regarding these applications is not assured to the standard required by ONS for publication, and as it would be too costly to do so we are unable to provide it. However, the Home Office has recently digitised the application form to make sure it is accessible for those who need to remain at home, and I can assure you that the applications are being dealt with swiftly and compassionately.

The Coronavirus job retention scheme, self-employment income support and statutory sick pay are not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Contribution-based benefits are also not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Additionally, measures we have brought forward such as rent and mortgage protections are not considered public funds and can be accessed by migrants with leave to remain.

Local authorities may also provide basic safety net support if it is established that there is a genuine care need that does not arise solely from destitution, for example, where there are community care needs, migrants with serious health problems or family cases where the wellbeing of a child is in question.

The Government has made in excess of £3.2bn of funding available to local authorities in England to assist them in managing the pressures arising out of the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support her Department is providing to families with no recourse to public funds whose parents or main carers have lost their jobs as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Home Office is working closely with other government departments to support people, including migrants with no recourse to public funds, through this crisis. We are taking a compassionate and pragmatic approach to an unprecedented situation.

Many of the wide-ranging Covid-19 measures the government has put in place are not public funds and therefore are available to migrants with no recourse to public funds (NRPF). We therefore do not believe it is necessary to suspend the NRPF condition.

Migrants with leave under the Family and Human Rights routes can apply to have the NRPF restriction lifted by making a ‘change of conditions’ application if there has been a change in their financial circumstances. The information you have requested regarding these applications is not assured to the standard required by ONS for publication, and as it would be too costly to do so we are unable to provide it. However, the Home Office has recently digitised the application form to make sure it is accessible for those who need to remain at home, and I can assure you that the applications are being dealt with swiftly and compassionately.

The Coronavirus job retention scheme, self-employment income support and statutory sick pay are not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Contribution-based benefits are also not classed as public funds for immigration purposes. Additionally, measures we have brought forward such as rent and mortgage protections are not considered public funds and can be accessed by migrants with leave to remain.

Local authorities may also provide basic safety net support if it is established that there is a genuine care need that does not arise solely from destitution, for example, where there are community care needs, migrants with serious health problems or family cases where the wellbeing of a child is in question.

The Government has made in excess of £3.2bn of funding available to local authorities in England to assist them in managing the pressures arising out of the pandemic.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that foreign nationals will not be regarded as breaking their continuity of residence where their continued absence from the UK results from a restriction on international travel due to covid-19.

Due to travel restrictions because of coronavirus, some individuals may be facing uncertainty in relation to the expiry date of their current visa or leave to remain in the United Kingdom. We are taking steps to ensure foreign nationals will not be regarded as breaking their continuity of residence as a result of coronavirus and related travel restrictions.

Visas for Chinese nationals which were due to expire between 21st January and 30 March 2020 have already been automatically extended until 31 March 2020. We continue to monitor the situation in all countries and we are keeping this under constant review. A dedicated coronavirus immigration helpline https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-for-uk-visa-applicants-and-temporary-uk-residents#helpline has been set up for those who wish to discuss their circumstances. The freephone number is 0800 678 1767 (Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm).

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the implications for her Department's plans on the criminalisation of trespass of the judgment in Mayor and Burgesses of the London Borough of Bromley v Persons Unknown and Others [2020] EWCA Civ 12.

The Home Office is aware of the judgment in Mayor and Burgesses of the London Borough of Bromley v Persons Unknown and Others [2020] EWCA Civ 12.

Implications of this on the proposals to criminalise trespass or extend police powers will be taken into consideration throughout the development of the policy on unauthorised encampments.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what support will be provided to non-EEA nationals who are at risk of over-staying their short term visas as a result of self isolating in response to covid-19.

Due to travel restrictions because of coronavirus, some individuals may be facing uncertainty in relation to the expiry date of their current visa or leave to remain in the United Kingdom. We are taking steps to ensure foreign nationals will not be regarded as breaking their continuity of residence as a result of coronavirus and related travel restrictions.

Visas for Chinese nationals which were due to expire between 21st January and 30 March 2020 have already been automatically extended until 31 March 2020. We continue to monitor the situation in all countries and we are keeping this under constant review. A dedicated coronavirus immigration helpline https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-for-uk-visa-applicants-and-temporary-uk-residents#helpline has been set up for those who wish to discuss their circumstances. The freephone number is 0800 678 1767 (Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm).

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Corona virus (Covid-19) immigration guidance on travel restrictions and China, published by her Department on 17 February 2020, if she will extend that guidance to other non-EEA countries that have isolation measures in place.

Due to travel restrictions because of coronavirus, some individuals may be facing uncertainty in relation to the expiry date of their current visa or leave to remain in the United Kingdom. We are taking steps to ensure foreign nationals will not be regarded as breaking their continuity of residence as a result of coronavirus and related travel restrictions.

Visas for Chinese nationals which were due to expire between 21st January and 30 March 2020 have already been automatically extended until 31 March 2020. We continue to monitor the situation in all countries and we are keeping this under constant review. A dedicated coronavirus immigration helpline https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-for-uk-visa-applicants-and-temporary-uk-residents#helpline has been set up for those who wish to discuss their circumstances. The freephone number is 0800 678 1767 (Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm).

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what preparations the UKVI has made to process licence applications from businesses that wish to sponsor European nationals; and what assessment she has made of the preparedness of that organisation to undertake that work.

UK Visas & Immigration continually monitors the effectiveness of the sponsor licensing operation to ensure process efficiency and customer delivery. The unit continues to meet performance standards and this is reflected in the sponsorship transparency data. The transparency data can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/sponsorship-transparency-data-february-2020

The requirements for the licensing operation to deal with licence applications from employees for the new UK points-based system has been factored into the implementation plan for the new system.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to minimise the risk of covid-19 spreading to vulnerable groups in immigration removal centres.

All immigration removal centres have communicable disease contingency plans, based on guidance published by Public Health England. These plans are tested on a regular basis.

Measures such as protective isolation will be considered to minimise the risk of Covid-19 spreading to vulnerable groups in the immigration detention estate.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government has plans to agree a reciprocal Youth Mobility Scheme with the EU after the transition period.

The UK currently has youth mobility arrangements with eight countries and territories, resulting in around 20,000 young people coming to the UK each year.

We keep youth mobility scheme arrangements under review and will expand our offer to other countries if it is in the UK’s interest.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government has plans to agree a reciprocal Youth Mobility Scheme with individual EU member states after the transition period.

The UK currently has youth mobility arrangements with eight countries and territories, resulting in around 20,000 young people coming to the UK each year.

We keep youth mobility scheme arrangements under review and will expand our offer to other countries if it is in the UK’s interest.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how employers will establish whether an EU national starting work between 1 January 2021 and 30 June 2021 should have obtained permission to work under the points-based system or is eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme.

Employers will not be required to distinguish between those EU citizens who are eligible for the EU Settlement Scheme and new arrivals between 1 January 2021 and 30 June 2021. We have made it clear that all EU citizens can continue to use their passport or national identity card to evidence their right to work until 30 June 2021. This ensures those who are eligible for the EU Settlement Scheme but have not yet obtained status can continue to evidence their right to work.

More information is available on Gov.uk and we have a comprehensive programme of engagement with businesses of all sizes, across the UK, to ensure they fully understand their obligations as employers of EU citizens.

Further guidance on right to work checks after 30 June 2021 will be issued in due course.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether it will be possible to sponsor a migrant if they are paid less than £20,480 (a) under the New Entrant rate, (b) in a Shortage Occupation role or (c) in any other circumstances.

The Government published “The UK’s Points-Based System: Policy Statement” on 19 February.

Following advice from the independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), the Government will reduce the general salary threshold for skilled workers from £30,000 to £25,600. There will be a reduced rate for new entrants as well as for those with relevant PhDs and those coming to undertake occupations that are in shortage.

In line with MAC advice, the precise thresholds for any occupation will generally be based on data from the Annual Survey of Hours and Employment which will be updated between now and the points-based system coming into operation in January 2021.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to Answer of 22 May 2019 to Question 254747 on Asylum: Religion, when she plans to update the house on the progress of the review into the way asylum claims based on religious grounds and LGBT+ grounds are assessed.

The review into the way asylum claims on the basis of religious and LGBT+ grounds are assessed has been completed.

An action plan has been formed and we will ensure that this is acted upon appropriately. We do not have any plans to publish the findings of this internal review.

We continue to work to improve the quality and accuracy of decision-making to ensure that we get decisions right first time. This includes assuring that we properly consider all evidence provided by applicants in order to reduce the proportion of allowed appeals, analysing the reasons for allowed appeals and using this to inform and further improve guidance and training for decision making staff.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
30th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of people in the UK on a six month domestic work visa and who entered the National Referral Mechanism received a reasonable grounds decision after their visa expired in the last two years.

The Home Office publishes quarterly statistics regarding the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/national-referral-mechanism-statistics-quarter-3-2019-july-to-september and the UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2019-uk-annual-report-on-modern-slavery. In addition Home Office statistics on domestic work visas can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-statistics

Visa information and NRM information are held on separate databases. Cross matching data between the two databases is not straightforward as the two datasets do not contain a common unique identifier.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum applicants were detained in the UK in 2019 under each criterion for detention.

Migrants, including asylum claimants, may be detained for immigration purposes only in accordance with Home Office detention policy, as set out in Detention general guidance and adults at risk in immigration detention. The detention decision must always be made on the basis of the individual’s particular circumstances and eligibility for detention.

If at any time it is concluded that a particular detainee’s ongoing detention would not be appropriate, the individual must be released, with bail conditions appropriate to their particular circumstances.

Most people detained under immigration powers spend only short periods in detention. At any one time, 95% of those liable to be detained, are instead managed in the community.

We do not currently hold the data in the format you have requested, however published data on the number individuals held in immigration detention can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-december-2018/how-many-people-are-detained-or-returned

The Home Office records the number of all individuals referred to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) and this information is published quarterly and can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/national-referral-mechanism-statistics-quarter-2-2019-april-to-june

This information does not distinguish between those detained under immigration powers and those living in the community nor does it make the distinction between those accepted/not accepted as being victims of torture within the Rule 35 process under the Detention Centre Rules 2001.

The use of immigration detention in all cases is subject to regular reviews and consequently, a change in circumstance may result in a different consideration. It is quite possible that an immigration detainee is referred to the National Referral Mechanism during a detention period and is released into the community at any point during that process.

The Home Office do however, centrally record the number of Rule 35 reports raised by Doctors under the Detention Centre Rules 2001 and the number of those who were released as a result. This information is published quarterly in Immigration Enforcement Transparency data found at

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-november-2018

The Home Office do hold records of the number of Adults at Risk identified but could not break this down further to identify persons with specific requirements.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) victims of trafficking, (b) victims of torture and (c) people with other special reception needs were detained in the UK, by need, in 2019.

Migrants, including asylum claimants, may be detained for immigration purposes only in accordance with Home Office detention policy, as set out in Detention general guidance and adults at risk in immigration detention. The detention decision must always be made on the basis of the individual’s particular circumstances and eligibility for detention.

If at any time it is concluded that a particular detainee’s ongoing detention would not be appropriate, the individual must be released, with bail conditions appropriate to their particular circumstances.

Most people detained under immigration powers spend only short periods in detention. At any one time, 95% of those liable to be detained, are instead managed in the community.

We do not currently hold the data in the format you have requested, however published data on the number individuals held in immigration detention can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-december-2018/how-many-people-are-detained-or-returned

The Home Office records the number of all individuals referred to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) and this information is published quarterly and can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/national-referral-mechanism-statistics-quarter-2-2019-april-to-june

This information does not distinguish between those detained under immigration powers and those living in the community nor does it make the distinction between those accepted/not accepted as being victims of torture within the Rule 35 process under the Detention Centre Rules 2001.

The use of immigration detention in all cases is subject to regular reviews and consequently, a change in circumstance may result in a different consideration. It is quite possible that an immigration detainee is referred to the National Referral Mechanism during a detention period and is released into the community at any point during that process.

The Home Office do however, centrally record the number of Rule 35 reports raised by Doctors under the Detention Centre Rules 2001 and the number of those who were released as a result. This information is published quarterly in Immigration Enforcement Transparency data found at

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-november-2018

The Home Office do hold records of the number of Adults at Risk identified but could not break this down further to identify persons with specific requirements.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average length of detention was for detained migrants in 2019.

The Home Office publishes data on length of detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. The median length of detention of people in the immigration detention estate as at 31 September 2019 was between 15 and 28 days, and of people leaving the detention estate in year ending September 2019 was between 8 and 14 days. Banded length of detention figures are published in Det_D02 and Det_D03 of the Detailed Detention datasets .

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending September 2019. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the 'summary tables'. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. Q4 2019 figures will be released on 27th February 2020.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
28th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the average length of detention was for detained asylum seekers in 2019.

Migrants, including asylum claimants, may be detained for immigration purposes only in accordance with Home Office detention policy, as set out in Detention general guidance and adults at risk in immigration detention. The detention decision must always be made on the basis of the individual’s particular circumstances and eligibility for detention.

If at any time it is concluded that a particular detainee’s ongoing detention would not be appropriate, the individual must be released, with bail conditions appropriate to their particular circumstances.

Most people detained under immigration powers spend only short periods in detention. At any one time, 95% of those liable to be detained, are instead managed in the community.

We do not currently hold the data in the format you have requested, however published data on the number individuals held in immigration detention can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-statistics-year-ending-december-2018/how-many-people-are-detained-or-returned

The Home Office records the number of all individuals referred to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) and this information is published quarterly and can be found at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/national-referral-mechanism-statistics-quarter-2-2019-april-to-june

This information does not distinguish between those detained under immigration powers and those living in the community nor does it make the distinction between those accepted/not accepted as being victims of torture within the Rule 35 process under the Detention Centre Rules 2001.

The use of immigration detention in all cases is subject to regular reviews and consequently, a change in circumstance may result in a different consideration. It is quite possible that an immigration detainee is referred to the National Referral Mechanism during a detention period and is released into the community at any point during that process.

The Home Office do however, centrally record the number of Rule 35 reports raised by Doctors under the Detention Centre Rules 2001 and the number of those who were released as a result. This information is published quarterly in Immigration Enforcement Transparency data found at

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-november-2018

The Home Office do hold records of the number of Adults at Risk identified but could not break this down further to identify persons with specific requirements.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's White Paper of December 2018, The UK’s future skills-based immigration system, Cm 9722, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of extending the length of the low-skilled visa from 12 months to 24 months.

The Government commissioned the independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) to advise on salary thresholds and how points could be awarded to prospective migrants under a new points-based immigration system. The MAC published its report on 28 January and the Government will consider carefully their findings and recommendations before setting out further detail in due course.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's White Paper of December 2018, The UK’s future skills-based immigration system, Cm 9722, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of reducing the length of the cooling-off period applicable to low-skilled visas as set out in that paper.

The Government commissioned the independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) to advise on salary thresholds and how points could be awarded to prospective migrants under a new points-based immigration system. The MAC published its report on 28 January and the Government will consider carefully their findings and recommendations before setting out further detail in due course.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the oral contribution of the Prime Minister of 25 July 2019, Official Report column 1493, what progress her Department has made in reviewing the ban on asylum seekers working.

Work on the review of Home Office policy on asylum seeker right to work is ongoing. This is a complex issue and it is crucial we take the time to get this right. We are listening carefully to the arguments and considering the evidence put forward on the issue.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
16th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the Border Force budget was in each financial year since 2012-13; how many full-time equivalent staff were (a) planned for and (b) actually employed using that budget in each of those years; how much and what proportion of that budget was from a temporary budget increase relating to the UK leaving the EU; and what the Border Force's (i) budget and (ii) full-time equivalent staffing projections are for the financial years 2019-20 and 2020-21.

The latest published staffing and finance figures for Border Force can be found in the Home Office Annual Report for 2018-2019 on page 85 at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2018-to-2019

The previous published staffing and financial figures for Border Force in 2012-2019 and its predecessor the UK Border Agency in 2010-2012 can be found at the following links:

2012-2013:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2012-to-2013

2013-2014:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2013-to-2014

2014-2015:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2014-to-2015

2015-2016:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2015-to-2016

2016-2017:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2016-to-2017

2017-2018:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/home-office-annual-report-and-accounts-2017-to-2018

Excluding EU Exit, Border Force’s gross resource budget for 2019-20 is £488m. This includes an income target of £19m, which means a net allocation of £469m.

Border Force has received a total of c.£182m for EU Exit preparations in 2019/20. (£141m Resource and £41M Capital)

Border Force originally received funding, based on a Deal, of £100m; this funding was to fund recruitment for full customs compliance by the end of 2020. The recruitment and training for this uplift of permanent staff has completed bringing the Border Force FTE to over 8,700 from 7,700 in March 2018. The additional £41m Resource funding provided throughout 2019-20 enabled further recruitment with Border Force expecting to reach c9,300 FTE by March 2020.

Border Force received a total £82.1m for EU Exit preparations in 2018/19 (£72.1m Resource and £10m Capital)

Border Force received a total of £3.2m for EU Exit preparations in 2017/18 (£1.7m Resource and £1.5m Capital)

Budgets for 20-21 cannot be confirmed as they remain subject to final confirmation.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish the report of the Chief Inspector of Borders and Immigration on Adults at Risk in Detention Policy, which was submitted to her Department on 29 July 2019.

The Home Secretary is considering the ICIBI report on Adults at Risk in Detention Policy, and it will be laid in Parliament in due course.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the procedure is for UK employers from 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2021 will be able to check the right to work of an EEA citizen who has lived in the UK before 1 January 2021 but not yet gained (a) settled and (b) pre-settled status, given the deadline for applications settled status is 30 June 2021.

We will shortly set out details in relation to checks by employers and other third parties during the period from 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2021. Our approach will ensure that those who are eligible for the EU Settlement Scheme but have not yet obtained status will continue to have the right to work during this period.

We will also ensure that right to work checks continue to be straightforward for employers to carry out, and will communicate any changes to the current system clearly and well in advance of their introduction.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the procedure is for EEA citizens who have lived in the UK before 1 January 2021 and not gained (a) settled and (b) pre-settled status, to demonstrate their right to work in the UK after the introduction of a new immigration system on 1 January 2021 and before the deadline for settled status applications on 30 June 2021.

We will shortly set out details in relation to checks by employers and other third parties during the period from 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2021. Our approach will ensure that those who are eligible for the EU Settlement Scheme but have not yet obtained status will continue to have the right to work during this period.

We will also ensure that right to work checks continue to be straightforward for employers to carry out, and will communicate any changes to the current system clearly and well in advance of their introduction.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
15th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department will take to alert EEA citizens whose pre-settled status is about to expire to apply for settled status.

At paragraph 1.18 of the Statement of Intent on the EU Settlement Scheme, published in June 2018 (available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-settlement-scheme-statement-of-intent), the Government committed to reminding holders of pre-settled status, before its expiry, to apply for settled status.

Details of exactly how and when such reminders will be issued are currently being developed.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of section 176 of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 on shoplifting and associated violence against shop-workers, and if she will make a statement.

The Government recognises the damaging impact that violence and abuse can have on victims, businesses, and the wider community; and we are committed to tackling this issue.

To ensure that our response to retail crime is as robust as possible we work with a wide range of partners through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, including the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners and British Retail Consortium.

In addition, we launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse toward shop staff to help strengthen our understanding of the scale and extent of the issue. The call for evidence has now closed and we are carefully analysing the responses before deciding what further action may be required. We intend to publish the government’s response in due course.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she has plans to ask H.M. Inspectorate of Constabulary And Fire & Rescue Services to undertake an assessment of the adequacy of the performance of police forces in relation to violence in the retail sector, and if she will make a statement.

The Government recognises the damaging impact that violence and abuse can have on victims, businesses, and the wider community; and we are committed to tackling this issue.

To ensure that our response to retail crime is as robust as possible we work with a wide range of partners through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, including the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners and British Retail Consortium.

In addition, we launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse toward shop staff to help strengthen our understanding of the scale and extent of the issue. The call for evidence has now closed and we are carefully analysing the responses before deciding what further action may be required. We intend to publish the government’s response in due course.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking with (a) Police and Crime Commissioners and (b) Chief Constables to reduce incidences of violence against shop-workers.

The Government recognises the damaging impact that violence and abuse can have on victims, businesses, and the wider community; and we are committed to tackling this issue.

To ensure that our response to retail crime is as robust as possible we work with a wide range of partners through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, including the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners and British Retail Consortium.

In addition, we launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse toward shop staff to help strengthen our understanding of the scale and extent of the issue. The call for evidence has now closed and we are carefully analysing the responses before deciding what further action may be required. We intend to publish the government’s response in due course.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had with representatives of the British Retail Consortium on the findings of City, University of London's report entitled It’s not part of the job: Violence and verbal abuse towards shop workers, published in September 2019.

The Government recognises the damaging impact that violence and abuse can have on victims, businesses, and the wider community; and we are committed to tackling this issue.

To ensure that our response to retail crime is as robust as possible we work with a wide range of partners through the National Retail Crime Steering Group, including the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners and British Retail Consortium.

In addition, we launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse toward shop staff to help strengthen our understanding of the scale and extent of the issue. The call for evidence has now closed and we are carefully analysing the responses before deciding what further action may be required. We intend to publish the government’s response in due course.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many and what proportion of the staff employed by his Department are apprentices.

At 31 January 2021, 1.4 per cent of the total staff, or 34 of 2434, employed within the Department were employed as apprentices. The Civil Service continues to publish data on its apprenticeship targets; the data for which can be found below for 2018/19 and 2019/20.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-service-apprenticeship-data-2018-to-2019
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/civil-service-apprenticeship-data-2019-to-2020

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will make an assessment of the potential implications for his policies of the Friends Families and Travellers 2020 report entitled No place to stop: Research on the five year supply of deliverable Gypsy and Traveller sites in the South East of England.

Planning Policy for Traveller Sites is clear that Local Planning Authorities should set pitch targets for gypsies and travellers and plot targets for travelling showpeople which address the likely permanent and transit site accommodation needs of travellers in their area, working collaboratively with neighbouring local planning authorities. They should identify and update annually, a supply of specific deliverable sites sufficient to provide 5 years’ worth of sites against their locally set targets.

Through a Written Ministerial Statement on 6 February 2019 (HCWS1305), local authorities were reminded of their duties to assess the need for transit and permanent sites.

We have committed to a number of measures to support site provision including to finalise the 2016 draft guidance on assessing housing need including for those residing in caravans; and to consider making information on permanent and transit sites in plans freely available in open data format so that there is a single, clear source of data available. We will also consider writing to those authorities who do not have an up-to-date plan for travellers in place.

12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will make an assessment of the potential implications for his policies of the roundtable report entitled Challenging and improving planning policy for Gypsies and Travellers from the all-party parliamentary group on Gypsies Travellers and Roma.

Planning Policy for Traveller Sites is clear that Local Planning Authorities should set pitch targets for gypsies and travellers and plot targets for travelling showpeople which address the likely permanent and transit site accommodation needs of travellers in their area, working collaboratively with neighbouring local planning authorities. They should identify and update annually, a supply of specific deliverable sites sufficient to provide 5 years’ worth of sites against their locally set targets.

Through a Written Ministerial Statement on 6 February 2019 (HCWS1305), local authorities were reminded of their duties to assess the need for transit and permanent sites.

We have committed to a number of measures to support site provision including to finalise the 2016 draft guidance on assessing housing need including for those residing in caravans; and to consider making information on permanent and transit sites in plans freely available in open data format so that there is a single, clear source of data available. We will also consider writing to those authorities who do not have an up-to-date plan for travellers in place.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the May 2019 Building a Safer Future: Independent Review of Fire Safety: Final Report, Cm9607, whether the proposed Dutyholders will be the same as provided for in the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015.

The Government has been considering the feedback received from its ‘Building a Safer Future’ consultation carefully, working with other government departments, its delivery partners and stakeholders in the building safety sector to ensure that the reforms brought forward are comprehensive and deliver real change.

We will be shortly publishing our response to this consultation, setting out details of the new regulatory regime, to be legislated for in the Building Safety Bill, that will ensure residents are, and feel, safe in their homes.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the May 2019 Building a Safer Future: Independent Review of Fire Safety: Final Report, Cm9607, whether he plans to extend the requirement that buildings in use have a safety case to (a) residential facilities out of scope of the Independent Review, (b) office premises, (c) sports stadia, (d) transport hubs and (e) other public settings and events.

The Government has been considering the feedback received from its ‘Building a Safer Future’ consultation carefully, working with other government departments, its delivery partners and stakeholders in the building safety sector to ensure that the reforms brought forward are comprehensive and deliver real change.

We will be shortly publishing our response to this consultation, setting out details of the new regulatory regime, to be legislated for in the Building Safety Bill, that will ensure residents are, and feel, safe in their homes.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the May 2019 Building a Safer Future: Independent Review of Fire Safety: Final Report, Cm 9607, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of Dutyholders having to ensure that building safety risk is reduced so far as is reasonably practicable compared with as low as reasonably practicable.

The Government has been considering the feedback received from its ‘Building a Safer Future’ consultation carefully, working with other government departments, its delivery partners and stakeholders in the building safety sector to ensure that the reforms brought forward are comprehensive and deliver real change.

We will be shortly publishing our response to this consultation, setting out details of the new regulatory regime, to be legislated for in the Building Safety Bill, that will ensure residents are, and feel, safe in their homes.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the May 2019 Building a Safer Future: Independent Review of Fire Safety: Final Report. Cm9607, whether he plans to consult on the proposal to reduce building safety risk so far as is reasonably practical.

The Government has been considering the feedback received from its ‘Building a Safer Future’ consultation carefully, working with other government departments, its delivery partners and stakeholders in the building safety sector to ensure that the reforms brought forward are comprehensive and deliver real change.

We will be shortly publishing our response to this consultation, setting out details of the new regulatory regime, to be legislated for in the Building Safety Bill, that will ensure residents are, and feel, safe in their homes.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the May 2019 Building a Safer Future: Independent Review of Fire Safety: Final Report, Cm9607, what his timescale is for the full implementation of the proposals in that report.

The Government has been considering the feedback received from its ‘Building a Safer Future’ consultation carefully, working with other government departments, its delivery partners and stakeholders in the building safety sector to ensure that the reforms brought forward are comprehensive and deliver real change.

We will be shortly publishing our response to this consultation, setting out details of the new regulatory regime, to be legislated for in the Building Safety Bill, that will ensure residents are, and feel, safe in their homes.

Christopher Pincher
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
4th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what guidance is issued to local authorities on the inclusion in local plans of accessibility for disabled residents of and visitors to Traveller sites.

No specific guidance is produced in relation to the accessibility of traveller sites, however the National Planning Policy Framework is clear that local planning policy and decisions should ensure that developments create places that are safe, inclusive and accessible and which promote health and well-being, with a high standard of amenity for existing and future users.

Any permanent structures would also be subject to Part M of the Building Regulations, which require buildings to meet minimum accessibility standards.

3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what progress he has made on developing the UK Shared Prosperity Fund; and if he will make a statement.

The 2019 Conservative Manifesto committed to creating a UK Shared Prosperity Fund which binds together the whole of the United Kingdom, tackling inequality and deprivation in each of our four nations.

The Government recognises the importance of reassuring local areas on the future of local growth funding and of providing clarity on the UK Shared Prosperity Fund. Government officials have been working closely with interested parties and will continue to do so as we develop the fund.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
23rd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effect on (a) victims, (b) witnesses and (c) defendants of replacing jury trials with trials by a judge and two magistrates.

We are pursuing a number of measures to help our Criminal Courts’ recovery, including searching for new court capacity. It is right that we think ambitiously and consider a full range of options. The Ministry would carry out a detailed assessment of any measure before introducing legislation.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2020 to Question 58089, of the 230 women who were not deemed suitable for the End of Custody Temporary Release scheme how many (a) lacked suitable accommodation in the community, (b) no longer wished to proceed with their application and (c) were deemed to present an unacceptable level of risk if released.

236 women in custody asked to be considered for the End of Custody Temporary Release scheme (ECTR).

As of Friday 12 June, 6 women were released under ECTR and 22 were still in the process (undergoing police and probation checks).

49 women did not consent to ECTR.

128 women did not pass the initial risk screening at establishment level, and 31 were screened out later in the process following checks by police and probation.

No women were deemed unsuitable due to a lack of accommodation. The National Probation Service (NPS) established 7 joint NPS/CRC Homelessness Prevention Taskforces (HPT) in England and Wales in March 2020. All homeless prisoners who are otherwise eligible for ECTR, are referred to the HPTs who will work with local housing providers to source appropriate accommodation. During the Covid -19 pandemic, Ministry of Justice funding has also been made available to house ECTR released prisoners in short term accommodation for up to 56 nights. This can include hotel and B&B accommodation. Those who are at risk of homelessness, will be referred to Local Authorities for assistance. Through The Gate case workers will be assigned to each person released on ECTR to support their move into longer term housing as well as other resettlement pathways.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions his Department has had with women's (a) organisations and (b) centres on the support that they can provide to women released from custody under the End of Custody Temporary Release Scheme.

The early release schemes were introduced as one element of a package of measures to create headroom to help contain the spread of coronavirus in prisons, alongside the creation of temporary accommodation and expediting of remand cases. This has enabled us to compartmentalise prisons to isolate the sick, shield the vulnerable and quarantine new arrivals. These measures have helped to contain the spread of the virus and limit deaths significantly, compared to initial estimates.

Measures were taken in April to release a number of pregnant women in custody and mothers and babies living in prison Mother and Baby Units (MBUs). These measures were discussed with those representing women’s organisations, including the regional networks co-ordinated by Clinks, the umbrella body for organisations working with offenders, Women in Prison, Birth Companions and others.

An extra-ordinary meeting of the Advisory Board for Female Offenders, which includes representation from women’s organisations and other external stakeholders, was held on 27 April 2020, and chaired by the Minister of State for Prisons and Probation.

HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS) Women’s Team has a single point of contact within Clinks for work relating to women and with whom they have established and maintained regular contact. This has enabled local and regional contacts with third sector providers to be established at pace and their details shared with practitioners in custody and the community to ensure women have access to appropriate support and assistance upon their release.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to reduce the risk of covid-19 spreading to (a) prison staff and people serving sentences in custody and (b) people serving sentences in the community and the staff who supervise them.

HMPPS is working to prevent the spread of COVID-19, based on the very latest scientific and medical advice. We are working closely with Public Health England, the NHS and the Department of Health and Social Care to manage the challenges we face.

The safety and wellbeing of staff, service users and visitors to our estate is paramount and at the heart of our approach.

Prisons and probation have existing, well-developed policies and procedures in place to manage outbreaks of infectious diseases. This means they are well prepared to take immediate action whenever cases or suspected cases are identified.

Basic hygiene is a key part of tackling the virus and good practice is being promoted on posters throughout the estate. Handwashing facilities are available to all prisoners, services users, staff and visitors, and we have worked closely with suppliers to ensure adequate supply of soap and cleaning materials.

We have procedures agreed with our public health colleagues for protecting staff in the workplace but, like any member of the community, some prison and probation staff may need to self-isolate in line with public health advice, or may become infected. We are taking steps to boost staff availability and so enable us to continue to look after prisoners properly and maintain supervision of offenders in the community in the event of staff absences.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the provision of testing for covid-19 in prisons.

HMPPS is working to prevent the spread of COVID-19, based on the very latest scientific and medical advice. We are working closely with Public Health England, the NHS and the Department of Health and Social Care to manage the challenges we face.

The safety and wellbeing of staff, service users and visitors to our estate is paramount and at the heart of our approach.

Prisons and probation have existing, well-developed policies and procedures in place to manage outbreaks of infectious diseases. This means they are well prepared to take immediate action whenever cases or suspected cases are identified.

Basic hygiene is a key part of tackling the virus and good practice is being promoted on posters throughout the estate. Handwashing facilities are available to all prisoners, services users, staff and visitors, and we have worked closely with suppliers to ensure adequate supply of soap and cleaning materials.

We have procedures agreed with our public health colleagues for protecting staff in the workplace but, like any member of the community, some prison and probation staff may need to self-isolate in line with public health advice, or may become infected. We are taking steps to boost staff availability and so enable us to continue to look after prisoners properly and maintain supervision of offenders in the community in the event of staff absences.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has plans to increase the length of sentences for violent offences against shop-workers.

Everyone has the right to feel safe at work and assaults on shop workers are unacceptable.

There are a range of offences someone can be convicted of if they assault a shop worker. Maximum penalties for offences are set by Parliament and include five years’ custody for assault occasioning actual bodily harm and life imprisonment for the most serious cases of causing grievous bodily harm.

When making sentencing decisions the courts must follow any relevant sentencing guidelines, produced by the independent Sentencing Council. The Overarching Principles: Seriousness Guideline and Assault Guideline require the court to treat the fact that an offence was committed against those working in the public sector or providing a service to the public as an aggravating factor, making the offence more serious. The Council produced expanded explanations in 2019 which made clear that this factor “applies whether the victim is a public or private employee or acting in a voluntary capacity”. The Sentencing Council is reviewing its guidelines on assault and a consultation on a revised guideline is anticipated early this year.

On 5 April 2019 the Home Office launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse towards shop staff. The aim of this work is to strengthen our understanding of the issue, including how existing legislation is being applied. The call for evidence has now closed and the Home Office are carefully analysing the responses before deciding what further action may be required. The government’s response will be published in due course. ’The National Retail Crime Steering Group will continue to provide input on tackling this issue.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
9th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of (a) the effectiveness of the sentencing, (b) the length of sentencing or (c) the effect of custodial sentencing on levels of violence against shop staff; and whether he will make a statement.

Everyone has the right to feel safe at work and assaults on shop workers are unacceptable.

There are a range of offences someone can be convicted of if they assault a shop worker. Maximum penalties for offences are set by Parliament and include five years’ custody for assault occasioning actual bodily harm and life imprisonment for the most serious cases of causing grievous bodily harm.

When making sentencing decisions the courts must follow any relevant sentencing guidelines, produced by the independent Sentencing Council. The Overarching Principles: Seriousness Guideline and Assault Guideline require the court to treat the fact that an offence was committed against those working in the public sector or providing a service to the public as an aggravating factor, making the offence more serious. The Council produced expanded explanations in 2019 which made clear that this factor “applies whether the victim is a public or private employee or acting in a voluntary capacity”. The Sentencing Council is reviewing its guidelines on assault and a consultation on a revised guideline is anticipated early this year.

On 5 April 2019 the Home Office launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse towards shop staff. The aim of this work is to strengthen our understanding of the issue, including how existing legislation is being applied. The call for evidence has now closed and the Home Office are carefully analysing the responses before deciding what further action may be required. The government’s response will be published in due course. ’The National Retail Crime Steering Group will continue to provide input on tackling this issue.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)