Glyn Davies

Conservative - Former Member for Montgomeryshire

First elected: 6th May 2010

Left House: 6th November 2019 (Standing Down)


Welsh Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 22nd Oct 2018
Environmental Audit Committee
4th Dec 2017 - 4th Jun 2018
Environmental Audit Committee
31st Oct 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Welsh Affairs Committee
25th Apr 2016 - 3rd May 2017
Energy and Climate Change Committee
8th Jul 2015 - 17th Oct 2016
Welsh Affairs Committee
5th Nov 2012 - 30th Mar 2015
Welsh Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 2nd Nov 2010


Division Voting information

Glyn Davies has voted in 1889 divisions, and 14 times against the majority of their Party.

3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 110 Conservative Aye votes vs 190 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 123 Noes - 488
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 200 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 377
11 Mar 2015 - Ark Pension Schemes - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 122 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 113
27 Oct 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 110 Conservative Aye votes vs 135 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 166 Noes - 340
13 May 2014 - Prohibition of Unpaid Internships - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 16 Conservative Aye votes vs 18 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 181 Noes - 19
5 Mar 2014 - Judgments - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 360 Noes - 104
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of Births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative No votes vs 124 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 363 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 84 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 365 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 79 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 368 Noes - 98
10 Feb 2014 - Children and Families Bill - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 99 Conservative No votes vs 127 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 376 Noes - 107
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 48 Conservative No votes vs 139 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 391 Noes - 57
20 May 2013 - Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Bill - View Vote Context
Glyn Davies voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 56 Conservative Aye votes vs 136 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 70 Noes - 375
View All Glyn Davies Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Lansley (Conservative)
(56 debate interactions)
Alun Cairns (Conservative)
(33 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(98 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(86 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(79 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Overseas Electors Bill 2017-19
(2,874 words contributed)
Wales Act 2017
(324 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Glyn Davies's debates

Montgomeryshire Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Glyn Davies has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Glyn Davies

27th June 2019
Glyn Davies signed this EDM on Tuesday 16th July 2019

GLOBAL POLIO ERADICATION INITIATIVE

Tabled by: Jeremy Lefroy (Conservative - Stafford)
That this House recognizes that the world has nearly eliminated polio thanks to dedicated healthworkers who are committed to immunizing every last child, as well as the tireless efforts of Rotary and other civil society volunteers to raise funds and awareness to end polio; and calls for full political and …
60 signatures
(Most recent: 1 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 25
Conservative: 14
Independent: 5
Scottish National Party: 5
Liberal Democrat: 4
Plaid Cymru: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 3
The Independent Group for Change: 1
Green Party: 1
8th April 2019
Glyn Davies signed this EDM as a sponsor on Monday 8th April 2019

ANTISEMITISM

Tabled by: Lord Mann (Non-affiliated - Bassetlaw)
That this House notes the contribution of one million euros made by Borussia Dortmund Football Club towards the expansion of Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial in Israel; congratulates the club for their commitment to the memory of the Holocaust and their ongoing action against modern day antisemitism; highlights an example of …
74 signatures
(Most recent: 3 Sep 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 44
Conservative: 9
Independent: 7
Liberal Democrat: 4
Scottish National Party: 4
Crossbench: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Non-affiliated: 1
Plaid Cymru: 1
The Independent Group for Change: 1
View All Glyn Davies's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Glyn Davies, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Glyn Davies has not been granted any Urgent Questions

3 Adjournment Debates led by Glyn Davies

Wednesday 2nd October 2019
Thursday 2nd February 2017
Tuesday 23rd April 2013

1 Bill introduced by Glyn Davies


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to make provision extending the basis on which British citizens outside the UK qualify to participate in parliamentary elections; and for connected purposes.

Commons - 80%

Last Event - 3rd Reading: House Of Commons
Friday 22nd March 2019
(Read Debate)

Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
4 Other Department Questions
30th Jun 2015
To ask the hon. Member for Mole Valley representing the House of Commons Commission, where defibrillator units are located on the Parliamentary Estate; and how often they are serviced to ensure they are working.

There are 18 Defibrillators across the Parliamentary estate in the following locations:

Palace of Westminster

  • Lower Waiting Hall
  • Members’ Lobby
  • Peers’ Lobby
  • River Restaurant
  • Victoria Tower
  • Engineers’ Control
  • Cromwell Green Visitor Entrance
  • Elizabeth Tower – top floor
  • Elizabeth Tower – room one
  • Peers’ Entrance


7 Millbank

  • 7 Millbank reception
  • Health & Wellbeing Service (4th floor)


Millbank House

  • House of Lords Library / Reception area


6/7 Old Palace Yard

  • Reception (whilst this building is being refurbished the defibrillator is being held in Millbank House reception)


Norman Shaw North

  • Reception


Canon Row

  • Westminster Gym


14 Tothill Street

  • Reception


Portcullis House

  • Digital Services Desk


Defibrillators are checked weekly to ensure that they are working, and receive a full service annually.

17th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what amount the National Grid is expected to spend on (a) preparatory, (b) consultancy, (c) construction and (d) all other costs for connecting wind farms in mid-Wales with the grid in North Shropshire.

National Grid’s proposals for the Mid-Wales connection are still in development, but it currently estimates that the new connection may cost £360m to £400m. National Grid’s costs are regulated by Ofgem to ensure they are justified and efficient.

9th Mar 2015
To ask the hon. Member for Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross representing the House of Commons Commission, what proportion of the meat served in Parliament's restaurants in the last year had been sourced from animals slaughtered by non-stun methods.

House of Commons catering services do not purchase or serve any meat from animals slaughtered by non-stunned methods. House of Lords restaurants are a matter for that House; however, I understand that it takes a similar approach.

16th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what assessment he has made of the UK's security of energy supply.

The UK enjoys a stable and secure energy supply, and we are working hard to ensure that it continues. As a Government, we are actively managing a number of risks to our current and future energy supplies, including the current challenges from Iraq, Russia and Ukraine. Our recent national gas risk assessment demonstrated that our gas infrastructure is robust. The measures recently announced by National Grid respond to the energy crunch that, owing to the legacy of under-investment and neglect, was predicted for this winter, but which will not now happen.

23rd May 2016
To ask the Attorney General, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of introducing a new criminal offence of failure to prevent economic crime on the number of prosecutions for such crimes.

Under existing law, a company only faces criminal liability if prosecutors can prove a sufficiently senior person knew about the criminal conduct. It can be extremely hard to prove this, especially in large companies with complex management structures.

A new failure to prevent offence could help prosecutors hold all companies to account for criminal conduct and bring some positive changes in corporate culture.

20th Oct 2014
To ask the Attorney General, what the policy is of the Crown Prosecution Service in prosecuting cases of encouraging or assisting suicide.

When prosecuting cases of encouraging or assisting suicide, Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) prosecutors make decisions in accordance with the Code for Crown Prosecutors and the Director of Public Prosecutions Policy for Prosecutors in respect of cases of Encouraging or Assisting Suicide.

Following the recent Supreme Court Judgement in the case of ‘Nicklinson and others’, the policy was updated on the 16 October 2014 to clarify issues raised regarding healthcare professionals (and others with similar responsibilities for individuals).

A copy of the updated policy is available on the CPS website at: http://www.cps.gov.uk/publications/prosecution/assisted_suicide_policy.html

26th Nov 2015
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Welsh language is taken into account in his Department's policy development processes.

We expect all policy making to take account of the needs of all parts of the UK, including Wales, and continue to build up our policy making capability to do so. The government fully recognises the importance of the Welsh language in providing services to citizens. For Cabinet Office, the priority is to make sure that GOV.UK carries high quality Welsh content and to provide the tools for other parts of government to publish in both languages.

13th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which grace period deadline would apply to Bryn Blaen Wind Farm in Powys under the Renewables Obligation support scheme.

I cannot comment on which grace period might be applicable to the Bryn Blaen wind farm as this is a commercial matter for the operator. Ofgem will assess whether a station meets the conditions of the relevant grace period at the point at which the station submits a full application for accreditation.

13th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether any of the applicants for developing onshore wind farms have been informed that subsidy will be available to developments not beginning production until after March 2017.

The Renewables Obligation (RO) support scheme closed early to new onshore wind capacity in Great Britain after 12 May 2016, with limited grace periods allowing projects meeting certain criteria to gain accreditation up to 31 January 2019. The early closure and grace periods were brought into effect by the Energy Act 2016 and the rules are explained in guidance available on Ofgem’s website.[1] When developers apply for support under the RO scheme, Ofgem assesses their application in line with the relevant legislation and informs them if their station meets the criteria for accreditation (including the conditions for any relevant grace period).

Support for onshore wind installations of up to 5 MW total installed capacity is available through the Feed-in Tariff scheme.

[1] Available at: https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/system/files/docs/2016/10/renewables_obligation_-_closure_of_the_scheme_to_onshore_wind_england_wales_and_scotland.pdf

23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of Warm Home Discount recipients whose energy is supplied by (a) British Gas, (b) EDF, (c) EON, (d) nPower, (e) Scottish Power, (e) SSE and (f) all six firms are on their supplier's standard variable tariff.

Ofgem collect data on the number of Warm Home Discount recipients; the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy collect data from the energy companies on the type of tariff that their customers are on. These two data sources cannot be combined, and for this reason it is not possible to provide the proportion of Warm home Discount recipients that are on their supplier’s standard variable tariff.

The total number of customers that received the Warm Home discount in 2015/16 was 1,350,403 within the core group as well as further 836,201 to those eligible under the broad group. This data is published by Ofgem in their Annual report online (https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/system/files/docs/2016/11/whd_annual_report_sy5_final_for_publication_0.pdf). The number given by each of the companies listed is given below. Please note, this will not sum to the total number of rebates as the whole scheme includes small suppliers as well:

Company

Number of Rebates

British Gas

700,400

EDF

236,700

E.on

357,000

Npower

208,300

Scottish Power

215,100

SSE

366,800

All 6 companies

2,084,000

The proportion of customers on standard tariffs is collected by BEIS in confidence and as such specific company data cannot be provided. Of all domestic customers, in quarter 2 2016, 69 per cent of standard electricity and 67 per cent of gas customers were on variable tariffs. These figures are published as part of our Quarterly Energy Prices publication and can be found in Tables 2.4.2 and 2.5.2 (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/annual-domestic-energy-price-statistics).

23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of domestic energy consumers switched tariff in each of the last three years; and what proportion of those consumers were switching from standard variable tariffs to fixed rate tariffs.

Data is published by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) on switching. The data is collected by Ofgem and republished by BEIS in Table 2.7.1 of which can be found online (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/quarterly-domestic-energy-switching-statistics ).

The number of domestic energy supplier switches as a proportion of total customer numbers in Great Britain is as follows:

Year

Proportion of electricity customers switching supplier

Proportion of gas customers switching supplier

2013

12%

10%

2014

11%

10%

2015

12%

12%

This is calculated by combining all switches made within the year, divided by the total domestic customers. Multiple switches made by the same customer within each year are counted as separate switches. The number of customer switching from standard variable to fixed rate tariffs is not collected or held by BEIS.

23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many domestic consumers whose energy was supplied by one of the Big Six suppliers and who were on a standard variable tariff switched tariff (a) with the same supplier and (b) to a new supplier in each of the last three years.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy collect data on the type of tariff which customers are on for the big six energy suppliers as part of our domestic fuels inquiry. We do not collect or hold data for customers and therefore cannot identify how long a customer has been with the same supplier or which customers have moved to a new supplier.

23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what additional written communications each of the Big Six energy companies give to recipients of the Warm Home Discount to support them in switching to the lowest priced energy tariffs; and whether the provision of such communication is monitored by Ofgem.

Energy suppliers must include on bills and other communications to domestic customers information about the savings they can make by moving to their supplier’s cheapest tariff.

Suppliers are not required to provide any additional written communications to recipients of the Warm Home Discount scheme concerning switching to the lower tariff, and Ofgem does not monitor suppliers’ tariff communications with scheme recipients.

23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of Cold Weather Payment recipients whose energy is supplied by (a) British Gas, (b) EDF, (c) EON, (d) nPower, (e) Scottish Power, (f) SSE and (g) all Big Six companies are on their supplier's standard variable tariff.

The Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) does not collect or hold data on those who receive Cold Weather Payments. BEIS collects data from energy suppliers regarding the tariff that customers are on as part of the Domestic Fuel Inquiry. The tariff data is collected from the energy suppliers in confidence; As such we cannot provide figures for specific companies. In quarter 2 2016, 69 per cent of domestic standard electricity customers were on a variable tariff. For domestic gas customers, 67 per cent were on a variable tariff. This data is published as part of our Quarterly Energy Prices publication which can be found in tables 2.4.2 and 2.5.2 (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/annual-domestic-energy-price-statistics ).

23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the (a) mode and (b) mean length of time is that Big Six energy customers stay on their supplier's standard variable tariff.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy does not hold information on the length of time that a customer has been on the same tariff.

23rd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of customers of the Big Six energy companies have been on their supplier's standard variable tariff for each year from 2006 to 2016.

The Government wants to see energy companies treating all of their customers fairly, including those on Standard Variable tariffs, not just those who switch.

The Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) collects data, including customers’ tariff information, from energy companies as part of the domestic fuels inquiry (DFI). In the second quarter of 2016, 69 per cent of domestic standard electricity customers and 67 per cent of domestic gas customers were on variable tariffs. This data is published within our Quarterly Energy Prices publication and can be found in Tables 2.4.2 and 2.5.2 which is available online: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/annual-domestic-energy-price-statistics.

BEIS started collecting this data at the end of 2012; therefore annual data is available for 2013 onwards. These figures are based on the DFI which covers around 85 per cent of the market. This includes all of the big 6 energy suppliers, Northern Ireland suppliers and one smaller supplier. The proportion of customers on variable tariffs, including standard variable tariffs, is as follows:

Standard Electricity

Gas

2013

81

79

2014

75

73

2015

73

70

15th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what steps he is taking to support British steelmaking.

This Government has taken unprecedented action to help our steel industry.

We’re cutting electricity costs by hundreds of millions, tackling unfair trade and are the first EU country to introduce new flexibility in public procurement.

We have also offered an unparalleled package of support to secure the long term future of Tata Steel’s UK operations.

That is what the steel industry has asked for and that is what we are delivering.

4th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what plans she has for supporting the development of tidal energy projects.

The Government recognises the potential that tidal energy could play as part of the UK energy mix.

We are considering how best we can support the development of tidal stream energy, following my rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State’s autumn speech.

On 10 February the Government announced that it will commission an independent review to assess the strategic case for tidal lagoons and whether they could represent good value for consumers. We anticipate that the review will be completed in due course.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what criteria her Department uses to designate technologies as less established for the purpose of Contract for Difference auctions.

In designating technologies in the less established group, we considered which technologies could have a significant long-term role in the UK energy mix, and where there remains significant potential for future cost reduction.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
4th Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, when she plans to publish further details of the next Contract for Difference auction; and which technologies she plans will be eligible for inclusion in that auction.

As announced by the Secretary of State in her speech in November, the current intention is to hold the next CFD allocation round for ‘less established’ technologies (pot 2) in late 2016.

We will set out details around future rounds in due course.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps she is taking to strengthen cultural links with Colombia.

Strengthening cultural relations is an important element of the UK's bilateral relationship with Colombia. We commend the admirable work of the British Council, which is leading a broad programme of work to build partnerships with Colombian artists and civil society through cultural exchanges. This includes skills-sharing and projects which use the arts to support Colombia's efforts to promote peace and social transformation across society. Working closely with Nesta, the Council is supporting creative entrepreneurs throughout Colombia. UK artists and writers participate in Colombian cultural events, notably through the Hay Festival Cartagena.

John Glen
Paymaster General and Minister for the Cabinet Office
14th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the potential improvements to mobile coverage resulting from imposing a 30 per cent cap on radio spectrum holdings in (a) Wales and (b) Montgomeryshire.

Ofcom is responsible for spectrum allocation, in line with its statutory duties. Ofcom is currently consulting on competition measures for the 2.3/3.4GHz auction. This will ensure that the UK continues to benefit from a competitive mobile market.

14th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions she has had with the Welsh Government on the forthcoming auction of 2.3GHz and 3.4GHz radio spectrum; and whether those discussions have covered the possibility of introducing a 30 per cent cap on spectrum holdings.

Ofcom is responsible for spectrum allocation, in line with its statutory duties. Ofcom is currently consulting on competition measures for the 2.3/3.4GHz auction. This will ensure that the UK continues to benefit from a competitive mobile market.

14th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, what competition measures will be promoted in the forthcoming auction of 2.3GHz and 3.4GHz spectrum in order to secure improved mobile coverage in rural areas.

Ofcom with conduct all forthcoming spectrum auctions in line with their published competition objectives, which can be found here: https://www.ofcom.org.uk/about-ofcom/latest/media/media-releases/2016/ofcom-outlines-rules-for-mobile-spectrum-auction.

9th Jun 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of progress in other countries on tackling bovine TB in cattle and wildlife.

The success of the bovine TB eradication policies pursued in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, the United States, the Republic of Ireland and France demonstrates the need to bear down on the disease effectively in both cattle and in wildlife.

There is no single solution.

28th Feb 2018
What steps her Department is taking to promote food security in developing countries by increasing crop yields.

DFID continues to invest in the development of crops that are more productive, that are resistant to diseases and able to withstand drought and flooding; and to get these into widespread use by farmers. Over 10 million farmers in developing countries have benefited from these investments.

28th May 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what priority she gives to promoting economic development in countries which receive UK aid.

Economic development is the only way we can ultimately defeat poverty. No country has been able to eradicate poverty without sustainable growth. Our work in this economic development is and will remain one of our highest priority areas over the next five years.

To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment she has made of the humanitarian situation in Syria.

The UN estimates that 9.3 million people are in dire need of humanitarian aid within Syria. At least 6.5 million people in Syria have been forced to flee their homes to other areas of the country and there are now over 2.6 million refugees in the region.

1st Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress has been made in increasing safety on rural roads in the last five years.

The Government’s priorities for improving road safety are set out in the British Road Safety Statement. We intend to publish a progress report towards the end of this year. Funding is being made available through the £175million Safer Roads Fund to improve the safety of the most dangerous local A-roads in England. The THINK! Country roads campaign targets improving safety on rural roads. Casualties on rural roads in 2016 were 6% lower than in 2012.

5th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps he is taking to support people with disabilities and health conditions who are looking for work.

This government is committed to halving the disability employment gap. In the spending review we announced a real terms spending increase on supporting disabled people into work.

In the last two years, 365,000 disabled people have entered employment. Our forthcoming Green Paper will set out our plans to support more disabled people into work.

8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the total number of altruistic kidney organ donations has been in each of the last 10 years.

Information on the number of altruistic donor kidney transplants from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2018 is available in the following table.

Number of altruistic donor kidney transplants in the United Kingdom

2009/10

15

2010/11

28

2011/12

34

2012/13

76

2013/14

118

2014/15

107

2015/16

83

2016/17

84

2017/18

89

This information has been taken from the annual report on living donor kidney transplantation (Figure 4.10), published by NHS Blood and Transplant in September 2018, which is available online at the following link:

https://nhsbtdbe.blob.core.windows.net/umbraco-assets-corp/12257/nhsbt-living-donor-kidney-transplantation-annual-report-2017-2018.pdf

7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the effect of the introduction of FIT testing on the capacity of the NHS to perform endoscopy procedures.

Public Health England, the Department and NHS England continue to work together to agree the thresholds at which faecal immunochemical testing should be set. The decision will consider a number of different factors, including how endoscopy capacity is affected.

7th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to assess future recruitment needs of the NHS diagnostic workforce to deliver adequate numbers of (a) endoscopists, (b) radiologists, (c) radiographers and (d) pathologists.

The National Cancer Strategy, published in 2015, outlines the need to expand the diagnostic workforce, as early diagnosis of cancer is crucial to positive patient outcomes. Health Education England has committed to publishing a cancer workforce plan before the end of the calendar year.

21st Feb 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what opportunity stakeholders will have to respond to the NICE's draft updated guideline on the management of Parkinson's disease.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) published its draft updated guideline on Parkinson’s disease for consultation on 4 October. Stakeholders had until 15 November to respond. Stakeholders’ consultation comments and NICE’s responses will be published on NICE’s website alongside the final guideline. NICE currently expects to publish its final updated guidance in April 2017.

7th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what comparative assessment he has made of the quality of acute stroke care in rural areas and in metropolitan areas.

The Department has made no assessment of the quality of acute, post and community stroke care in rural and metropolitan areas. However, the Sentinel Stroke National Audit programme reports the results of the quality of both hospital and community care quarterly at trust and clinical commissioning group level. These data are in the public domain and can be found at:

www.strokeaudit.org

NHS England’s Five Year Forward View sets out the healthcare strategy for the whole of England, including rural areas. Rural areas have their own health needs, which should be taken into account in planning and developing healthcare systems. It is for clinical commissioning groups to judge the needs of their local areas and make sure that they are reflecting the specific circumstances of those areas.

7th Jul 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what comparative assessment he has made of the quality of post-acute and community stroke care in rural and in metropolitan areas.

The Department has made no assessment of the quality of acute, post and community stroke care in rural and metropolitan areas. However, the Sentinel Stroke National Audit programme reports the results of the quality of both hospital and community care quarterly at trust and clinical commissioning group level. These data are in the public domain and can be found at:

www.strokeaudit.org

NHS England’s Five Year Forward View sets out the healthcare strategy for the whole of England, including rural areas. Rural areas have their own health needs, which should be taken into account in planning and developing healthcare systems. It is for clinical commissioning groups to judge the needs of their local areas and make sure that they are reflecting the specific circumstances of those areas.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people were admitted to hospital for falls and fractures associated with urinary incontinence in each of the last five years; and what the cost to the NHS was of treating people so admitted in each such year.

The Department does not hold information on the number of people admitted to hospital for falls and fractures associated with urinary incontinence and related costs.

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people were admitted to hospital for urinary tract infections in each of the last five years; and what the cost to the NHS was of treating people so admitted in each such year.

The Department does not hold information on the number of people admitted to hospital for a catheter-associated urinary tract infection, urinary tract infection or urinary incontinence.


The following table shows a count of finished admission episodes (FAEs) in the last five years with a primary diagnosis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.


YEAR

FAEs

2010-11

215

2011-12

294

2012-13

447

2013-14

641

2014-15

942


The following table shows a count of FAEs in the last five years with a primary diagnosis of urinary incontinence in England.


Year

FAEs

2010-11

27,797

2011-12

26,751

2012-13

24,938

2013-14

23,498

2014-15

20,969


The following table shows a count of FAEs in the last five years with a primary diagnosis of urinary tract infection in England


YEAR

FAEs

2010-11

168,581

2011-12

174,818

2012-13

184,924

2013-14

187,594

2014-15

195,282

Source: Hospital episode statistics (HES), Health and social care information centre



Notes:


A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.


The primary diagnosis provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital.


The costs to the National Health Service of treating people with urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence is not available centrally.


Such information as is available is from reference costs, which are the average unit costs of providing defined services to patients. Reference costs for acute care are published by Healthcare Resource Group (HRG), which are standard groupings of similar treatments that use similar resources. For example, costs relating to kidney or urinary tract interventions are assigned to the same HRGs.


Table: Estimated total costs of kidney or urinary tract interventions and urinary incontinence or other urinary problems reported by NHS trusts and foundation trusts, 2010-11 to 2014-15 (£ millions)


Kidney or urinary tract interventions

Urinary incontinence or other urinary problems

2010-11

370.5

28.2

2011-12

398.9

28.1

2012-13

432.4

27.8

2013-14

464.8

28.3

2014-15

506.5

27.6


Source: Reference costs, Department of Health

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people were diagnosed with urinary incontinence in each of the last five years; and what the cost to the NHS was of treating that condition in each such year.

The Department does not hold information on the number of people admitted to hospital for a catheter-associated urinary tract infection, urinary tract infection or urinary incontinence.


The following table shows a count of finished admission episodes (FAEs) in the last five years with a primary diagnosis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.


YEAR

FAEs

2010-11

215

2011-12

294

2012-13

447

2013-14

641

2014-15

942


The following table shows a count of FAEs in the last five years with a primary diagnosis of urinary incontinence in England.


Year

FAEs

2010-11

27,797

2011-12

26,751

2012-13

24,938

2013-14

23,498

2014-15

20,969


The following table shows a count of FAEs in the last five years with a primary diagnosis of urinary tract infection in England


YEAR

FAEs

2010-11

168,581

2011-12

174,818

2012-13

184,924

2013-14

187,594

2014-15

195,282

Source: Hospital episode statistics (HES), Health and social care information centre



Notes:


A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.


The primary diagnosis provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital.


The costs to the National Health Service of treating people with urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence is not available centrally.


Such information as is available is from reference costs, which are the average unit costs of providing defined services to patients. Reference costs for acute care are published by Healthcare Resource Group (HRG), which are standard groupings of similar treatments that use similar resources. For example, costs relating to kidney or urinary tract interventions are assigned to the same HRGs.


Table: Estimated total costs of kidney or urinary tract interventions and urinary incontinence or other urinary problems reported by NHS trusts and foundation trusts, 2010-11 to 2014-15 (£ millions)


Kidney or urinary tract interventions

Urinary incontinence or other urinary problems

2010-11

370.5

28.2

2011-12

398.9

28.1

2012-13

432.4

27.8

2013-14

464.8

28.3

2014-15

506.5

27.6


Source: Reference costs, Department of Health

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people were admitted to hospital for catheter-associated urinary tract infections in each of the last five years; and what the cost was of treating those people.

The Department does not hold information on the number of people admitted to hospital for a catheter-associated urinary tract infection, urinary tract infection or urinary incontinence.


The following table shows a count of finished admission episodes (FAEs) in the last five years with a primary diagnosis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.


YEAR

FAEs

2010-11

215

2011-12

294

2012-13

447

2013-14

641

2014-15

942


The following table shows a count of FAEs in the last five years with a primary diagnosis of urinary incontinence in England.


Year

FAEs

2010-11

27,797

2011-12

26,751

2012-13

24,938

2013-14

23,498

2014-15

20,969


The following table shows a count of FAEs in the last five years with a primary diagnosis of urinary tract infection in England


YEAR

FAEs

2010-11

168,581

2011-12

174,818

2012-13

184,924

2013-14

187,594

2014-15

195,282

Source: Hospital episode statistics (HES), Health and social care information centre



Notes:


A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.


The primary diagnosis provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital.


The costs to the National Health Service of treating people with urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence is not available centrally.


Such information as is available is from reference costs, which are the average unit costs of providing defined services to patients. Reference costs for acute care are published by Healthcare Resource Group (HRG), which are standard groupings of similar treatments that use similar resources. For example, costs relating to kidney or urinary tract interventions are assigned to the same HRGs.


Table: Estimated total costs of kidney or urinary tract interventions and urinary incontinence or other urinary problems reported by NHS trusts and foundation trusts, 2010-11 to 2014-15 (£ millions)


Kidney or urinary tract interventions

Urinary incontinence or other urinary problems

2010-11

370.5

28.2

2011-12

398.9

28.1

2012-13

432.4

27.8

2013-14

464.8

28.3

2014-15

506.5

27.6


Source: Reference costs, Department of Health

21st Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people were diagnosed with urinary incontinence in each clinical commissioning group area in each of the last five years; and what the cost was of treating that condition in each such area in each such year.

The Department does not hold information on the number of people admitted to hospital for urinary incontinence.


A count of finished admission episodes with a primary diagnosis of urinary incontinence, by clinical commissioning group of residence, 2010-11 to 2014-15 is provided in the attached table.


The costs to the National Health Service of treating people with urinary tract infections and urinary incontinence is not available centrally.


Such information as is available is from reference costs, which are the average unit costs of providing defined services to patients. Reference costs for acute care are published by Healthcare Resource Group (HRG), which are standard groupings of similar treatments that use similar resources. For example, costs relating to kidney or urinary tract interventions are assigned to the same HRGs.


Table: Estimated total costs of kidney or urinary tract interventions and urinary incontinence or other urinary problems reported by NHS trusts and foundation trusts, 2010-11 to 2014-15 (£ millions)



Kidney or urinary tract interventions

Urinary incontinence or other urinary problems

2010-11

370.5

28.2

2011-12

398.9

28.1

2012-13

432.4

27.8

2013-14

464.8

28.3

2014-15

506.5

27.6


Source: Reference costs, Department of Health




20th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people living with (a) urinary incontinence and (b) faecal incontinence in (i) Northern Ireland, (ii) Scotland and (iii) Wales.

NHS England has advised that according to a survey conducted in 2008, there are over 14 million adults who have bladder control problems and 6.5 million with bowel control problems in the United Kingdom.


The Department does not collect information on the number of people living with urinary and faecal incontinence specific to Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. This is a matter for devolved administrations.


The Healthcare Quality and Improvement Partnership (2010) established that in order to achieve the best clinical outcomes, continence services have to be integrated across primary and secondary care and care home settings.

They also concluded that ‘there is an urgent need for improved and equitable practice for all people with bladder and bowel problems’ through the development of commissioning frameworks, evidence-based training for health professionals and patient empowerment to increase their expectations of cure.

Improving continence care provision through integrated services brings many benefits including:


- a better quality of life and more independence through finding solutions appropriate to individual needs;

- less reliance on pads and products by using alternative treatments;

- a reduction in admissions to hospitals and care homes;

- fewer complications, such as urinary tract infections, faecal impaction and skin breakdown; and

- a reduction in costs.


NHS England’s Excellence in Continence Care guidance provides a framework that enables commissioners to work in collaboration with providers and others to make a step change to address shortfalls so that safe, dignified, efficient and effective continence care is consistently provided.


This guidance is aimed at commissioners, providers, health and social care staff and as information for the public and has been produced in partnership with patient and public advocates, clinicians and partners from the third sector. The roles of everyone involved in the care of people with continence needs are made clear in the guidance and publication via a launch is planned for ‘Self Care Week’ beginning 16 November. The launch will both raise awareness and promote understanding.


In addition the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a range of guidance for clinicians to support them in the diagnosis, treatment care and support and people with continence problems e.g. Urinary incontinence in women (September 2013), Faecal incontinence in adults (June 2007), Urinary incontinence in neurological disease: assessment and management (August 2012) and Lower urinary tract symptoms in men: management (May 2010).


20th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress his Department has made on raising awareness and promoting understanding of incontinence amongst (a) health and social care staff and (b) the general public; and if he will make a statement.

NHS England has advised that according to a survey conducted in 2008, there are over 14 million adults who have bladder control problems and 6.5 million with bowel control problems in the United Kingdom.


The Department does not collect information on the number of people living with urinary and faecal incontinence specific to Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. This is a matter for devolved administrations.


The Healthcare Quality and Improvement Partnership (2010) established that in order to achieve the best clinical outcomes, continence services have to be integrated across primary and secondary care and care home settings.

They also concluded that ‘there is an urgent need for improved and equitable practice for all people with bladder and bowel problems’ through the development of commissioning frameworks, evidence-based training for health professionals and patient empowerment to increase their expectations of cure.

Improving continence care provision through integrated services brings many benefits including:


- a better quality of life and more independence through finding solutions appropriate to individual needs;

- less reliance on pads and products by using alternative treatments;

- a reduction in admissions to hospitals and care homes;

- fewer complications, such as urinary tract infections, faecal impaction and skin breakdown; and

- a reduction in costs.


NHS England’s Excellence in Continence Care guidance provides a framework that enables commissioners to work in collaboration with providers and others to make a step change to address shortfalls so that safe, dignified, efficient and effective continence care is consistently provided.


This guidance is aimed at commissioners, providers, health and social care staff and as information for the public and has been produced in partnership with patient and public advocates, clinicians and partners from the third sector. The roles of everyone involved in the care of people with continence needs are made clear in the guidance and publication via a launch is planned for ‘Self Care Week’ beginning 16 November. The launch will both raise awareness and promote understanding.


In addition the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a range of guidance for clinicians to support them in the diagnosis, treatment care and support and people with continence problems e.g. Urinary incontinence in women (September 2013), Faecal incontinence in adults (June 2007), Urinary incontinence in neurological disease: assessment and management (August 2012) and Lower urinary tract symptoms in men: management (May 2010).


20th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to improve the quality of care provided for people with incontinence in the UK.

NHS England has advised that according to a survey conducted in 2008, there are over 14 million adults who have bladder control problems and 6.5 million with bowel control problems in the United Kingdom.


The Department does not collect information on the number of people living with urinary and faecal incontinence specific to Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. This is a matter for devolved administrations.


The Healthcare Quality and Improvement Partnership (2010) established that in order to achieve the best clinical outcomes, continence services have to be integrated across primary and secondary care and care home settings.

They also concluded that ‘there is an urgent need for improved and equitable practice for all people with bladder and bowel problems’ through the development of commissioning frameworks, evidence-based training for health professionals and patient empowerment to increase their expectations of cure.

Improving continence care provision through integrated services brings many benefits including:


- a better quality of life and more independence through finding solutions appropriate to individual needs;

- less reliance on pads and products by using alternative treatments;

- a reduction in admissions to hospitals and care homes;

- fewer complications, such as urinary tract infections, faecal impaction and skin breakdown; and

- a reduction in costs.


NHS England’s Excellence in Continence Care guidance provides a framework that enables commissioners to work in collaboration with providers and others to make a step change to address shortfalls so that safe, dignified, efficient and effective continence care is consistently provided.


This guidance is aimed at commissioners, providers, health and social care staff and as information for the public and has been produced in partnership with patient and public advocates, clinicians and partners from the third sector. The roles of everyone involved in the care of people with continence needs are made clear in the guidance and publication via a launch is planned for ‘Self Care Week’ beginning 16 November. The launch will both raise awareness and promote understanding.


In addition the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a range of guidance for clinicians to support them in the diagnosis, treatment care and support and people with continence problems e.g. Urinary incontinence in women (September 2013), Faecal incontinence in adults (June 2007), Urinary incontinence in neurological disease: assessment and management (August 2012) and Lower urinary tract symptoms in men: management (May 2010).


20th Oct 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people with (a) urinary incontinence and (b) faecal incontinence in England.

NHS England has advised that according to a survey conducted in 2008, there are over 14 million adults who have bladder control problems and 6.5 million with bowel control problems in the United Kingdom.


The Department does not collect information on the number of people living with urinary and faecal incontinence specific to Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. This is a matter for devolved administrations.


The Healthcare Quality and Improvement Partnership (2010) established that in order to achieve the best clinical outcomes, continence services have to be integrated across primary and secondary care and care home settings.

They also concluded that ‘there is an urgent need for improved and equitable practice for all people with bladder and bowel problems’ through the development of commissioning frameworks, evidence-based training for health professionals and patient empowerment to increase their expectations of cure.

Improving continence care provision through integrated services brings many benefits including:


- a better quality of life and more independence through finding solutions appropriate to individual needs;

- less reliance on pads and products by using alternative treatments;

- a reduction in admissions to hospitals and care homes;

- fewer complications, such as urinary tract infections, faecal impaction and skin breakdown; and

- a reduction in costs.


NHS England’s Excellence in Continence Care guidance provides a framework that enables commissioners to work in collaboration with providers and others to make a step change to address shortfalls so that safe, dignified, efficient and effective continence care is consistently provided.


This guidance is aimed at commissioners, providers, health and social care staff and as information for the public and has been produced in partnership with patient and public advocates, clinicians and partners from the third sector. The roles of everyone involved in the care of people with continence needs are made clear in the guidance and publication via a launch is planned for ‘Self Care Week’ beginning 16 November. The launch will both raise awareness and promote understanding.


In addition the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a range of guidance for clinicians to support them in the diagnosis, treatment care and support and people with continence problems e.g. Urinary incontinence in women (September 2013), Faecal incontinence in adults (June 2007), Urinary incontinence in neurological disease: assessment and management (August 2012) and Lower urinary tract symptoms in men: management (May 2010).


11th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment his Department has made of the effectiveness of the Anti-PD-L1 drug in treating bladder cancer.

Two Anti-PD monoclonal antibody products are being evaluated in clinical trials for various cancers, including bladder cancer.

MPDL3280A, an anti-PD-L1 antibody made by Roche/Genentech, is undergoing a phase I trial (NCT01375842) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumours. The estimated study completion date is November 2016. The product is also being tested in a phase II trial in in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial bladder cancer (NCT02108652). The estimated completion date for this Phase II trial is January 2016.

The second anti-PD antibody is Nivolumab produced by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Nivolumab on its own, or in combination with another monoclonal antibody ipilimumab (Yervoy®), is in a phase I/II trial in several cancers, including bladder cancer (NCT01928394). This trial is expected to be completed by March 2017.

No assessment of the data from any of these trials has been made to date.

8th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to promote awareness of bladder cancer to people under the age of 55.

Public Health England’s Be Clear on Cancer “Blood in Pee” campaign to raise awareness of the main symptom of bladder and kidney cancer targets people over the age of 50, as both of these cancers are more prevalent in people over that age. The campaign uses a wide range of media, including national television and radio advertising, to promote the key message “If you notice blood in your pee, even if it’s just the once, tell your doctor” and while this is targeted to an audience aged 50+ it is very likely that it will also be seen by the wider population.

The “Blood in Pee” campaign has run twice at a national level, following successful local and regional pilots. The national campaign ran in October – November 2013 and October – November 2014.

8th Dec 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he is taking to ensure that people with motor neurone disease have appropriate access to support and equipment in order for their communication needs to be met.

Since 1 April 2013 NHS England has been responsible for commissioning Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC) aids for patients with complex disability whose needs require specialised assessment, including for patients with motor neurone disease. Commissioning of non-specialised AAC aids is the responsibility of local clinical commissioning groups.

NHS England has identified an additional £22.5 million funding for AAC and Environmental Controls in 2014-15. A process to identify appropriate providers, and ensure they were able to meet the AAC service specification and standards began in April this year as soon as the budget was confirmed. The specification can be found at:

www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/d01-com-dis-equ-alt-aug-comm-aids.pdf

The identification of providers was completed in August, and just under £15 million specifically for AAC was transferred to Local Area Team commissioners to agree contracts. During this process, NHS England worked closely with the Motor Neurone Disease Association to ensure that funding was equitably distributed in a fair and consistent manner. The 13 AAC providers selected are in the process of recruiting the required additional specialist therapy staff. Services are already accepting referrals and patients are being prioritised according to their clinical need, with priority being given to patients with life limiting conditions.