Eleanor Smith Portrait

Eleanor Smith

Labour - Former Member for Wolverhampton South West

Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee
25th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019


Division Voting information

Eleanor Smith has voted in 410 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Eleanor Smith Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Andrew Griffiths (Conservative)
(7 debate interactions)
Jackie Doyle-Price (Conservative)
(6 debate interactions)
Damian Hinds (Conservative)
(5 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Department of Health and Social Care
(38 debate contributions)
Home Office
(13 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(10 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Eleanor Smith's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Eleanor Smith

19th December 2017
Eleanor Smith signed this EDM on Tuesday 19th December 2017

NATIONAL SIKH WAR MEMORIAL

Tabled by: Tanmanjeet Singh Dhesi (Labour - Slough)
That this House appreciates the extraordinary bravery and sacrifices of Sikh soldiers in service of Great Britain, including during both World Wars, and supports the erection of a permanent national monument in a prime central London location to commemorate and highlight these contributions; notes that for over a decade there …
265 signatures
(Most recent: 2 Feb 2018)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 170
Conservative: 33
Scottish National Party: 25
Independent: 12
Liberal Democrat: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 9
Plaid Cymru: 3
Non-affiliated: 2
The Independent Group for Change: 2
Crossbench: 1
Green Party: 1
11th July 2017
Eleanor Smith signed this EDM as a sponsor on Tuesday 11th July 2017

SALE OF NHS PROFESSIONALS

Tabled by: Eleanor Smith (Labour - Wolverhampton South West)
That this House recognises the value and effectiveness of the NHS; notes the success of NHS Professionals in supplying short-term and flexible staff to NHS trusts with staffing gaps at a very low overhead cost; understands that private agencies perform the same function at a higher cost by charging expensive …
113 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Nov 2017)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 70
Scottish National Party: 16
Liberal Democrat: 12
Independent: 7
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Non-affiliated: 2
Plaid Cymru: 2
Green Party: 1
Crossbench: 1
View All Eleanor Smith's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Eleanor Smith, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Eleanor Smith has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Eleanor Smith has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Eleanor Smith


The Bill failed to complete its passage through Parliament before the end of the session. This means the Bill will make no further progress. A Bill to re-establish the Secretary of State’s legal duty as to the National Health Service in England and to make provision about the other duties of the Secretary of State in that regard; to make provision for establishing Integrated Health Boards and about the administration and accountability of the National Health Service in England; to make provision about ending private finance initiatives in the National Health Service in England; to exclude the National Health Service from international trade agreements; to repeal sections 38 and 39 of the Immigration Act 2014; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Commons
Wednesday 11th July 2018
(Read Debate)

73 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
25th Sep 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what estimate he has made of the number of deaths in England with a (a) primary and (b) secondary cause of malnutrition in each of the last 10 years.

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to ensure safeguarding measures are in place to ensure that hackers are unable to steal the personal details of customers.

We are committed including through the National Cyber Security Strategy to making the UK the safest place to live and work online and ensuring all organisations are secure and resilient to cyber threats. A wide range of Government guidance and support is available to help organisations protect themselves online and fulfil their data protection responsibilities. This includes the National Cyber Security Centre’s Cyber Security Small Business Guide, the Cyber Essentials scheme and guidance from the Information Commissioner’s Office. Under the existing Data Protection Act organisations must ensure appropriate cyber security measures are in place to protect personal data. The forthcoming Data Protection Bill will enhance the existing regime by requiring organisations to report data breaches quickly and through the introduction of higher fines for non-compliance.

24th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will allocate additional funding for ESOL to ensure that refugees have access to a minimum of eight hours a week of formal, accredited English language teaching in their first two years in the UK.

The government recognises that learning English is essential to enabling refugees to rebuild their lives. The Department for Education supports adults in England through the Adult Education Budget (AEB) to secure the English language skills they need.

The Home Office and the department have also provided £10 million to enable refugees resettled through the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme to access additional classes.

The government will publish a new strategy for English for speakers of other languages in 2019. Funding for all programmes beyond 2019-20, including any potential funding for this strategy, will be set during the upcoming Spending Review.

1st Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department has taken to respond to the particular needs of people affected by gender-based violence during the Rohingya crisis.

The UK is one of the largest donors to the Rohingya crisis, and is providing support for survivors and addressing the risk of gender-based violence (GBV). DFID is supporting the establishment of child friendly spaces and women and adolescent friendly spaces to provide protective services, and psychosocial and psychological support. Through UK funding to the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), UK support will reach over 10,000 women suffering from trauma, and over 2,000 survivors of sexual violence. This is part of a wider multi-agency effort. The UK is now planning to scale-up our GBV response.

15th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the number of deaths on UK roads.

The Department is constantly looking to build on the UK’s excellent national road safety record. The Department’s “British Road Safety Statement” published in December 2015 sets out measures to further improve safety of all road users.

23rd Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether his Department plans to uprate the 25 pence age addition for pensioners over 80 who are currently entitled to it; and whether the Government has any plans to provide further financial assistance to pensioners who are over 80 years old.

The age addition is paid with State Pension when individuals reach the age of 80. Although there are no plans to uprate the age addition amount, this should be considered alongside the range of other measures and benefits that are available to pensioners over age 80. This includes Pension Credit. People who are aged 80 and over receive a Winter Fuel Payment of £300, instead of the standard Winter Fuel Payment of £200 for pensioners below that age.

Additionally, the non-contributory Category D State Pension is available to those aged over 80 with either no entitlement to a basic State Pension or who are entitled to State Pension of less than £75.50 per week who meet the residency conditions.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to (a) encourage and (b) support people to enter the nursing profession.

Appropriate staffing levels are an important element of the Care Quality Commission’s registration regime. It is the responsibility of individual National Health Service health and care employers to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the staff needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

As part of the NHS People Plan, NHS Improvement and Health Education England are considering how best to support the NHS in ensuring it has access to the staff it needs across England. This has focused on areas such as retaining nurses already employed; supporting their existing nursing workforce in areas such as flexible working; investing in nursing staff’s Continuous Professional Development; and increasing undergraduate supply through attracting more students to study nursing.

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) reported that applicants to study nursing have increased by 4% compared to the same period last year.

NHS England and NHS Improvement working with Health Education England are also delivering a major communication campaign ‘We are the NHS’. The campaign aims to reduce vacancy rates across the NHS, with a focus on the nursing profession. There has been a strong focus on recruitment to courses starting in September 2019. From September 2019, a further campaign has been launched to encourage UCAS applications to the January 15 deadline for nursing courses starting in September 2020.

The NHS Ambassadors scheme encourages people working and/or studying in healthcare to volunteer one hour per year to speak in schools about their roles or participate in careers events and activities.

Through the interim People Plan, during 2019/20 we will focus on increasing applications to undergraduate AHP education, particularly in the shortage professions of therapeutic radiography, podiatry, orthoptics and prosthetics/orthotics, and developing Allied Health Professionals faculties to work with healthcare providers to identify how to expand clinical placement activity.

Our ongoing 25% expansion of medical school places in England will see an additional 1,500 new medical school places for United Kingdom domestic students. The extra places have been distributed in geographic areas where there have been fewer training places per unit population.

15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that adequate levels of staffing are maintained throughout the NHS to protect patient safety.

Appropriate staffing levels are an important element of the Care Quality Commission’s registration regime. It is the responsibility of individual National Health Service health and care employers to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the staff needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

As part of the NHS People Plan, NHS Improvement and Health Education England are considering how best to support the NHS in ensuring it has access to the staff it needs across England. This has focused on areas such as retaining nurses already employed; supporting their existing nursing workforce in areas such as flexible working; investing in nursing staff’s Continuous Professional Development; and increasing undergraduate supply through attracting more students to study nursing.

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) reported that applicants to study nursing have increased by 4% compared to the same period last year.

NHS England and NHS Improvement working with Health Education England are also delivering a major communication campaign ‘We are the NHS’. The campaign aims to reduce vacancy rates across the NHS, with a focus on the nursing profession. There has been a strong focus on recruitment to courses starting in September 2019. From September 2019, a further campaign has been launched to encourage UCAS applications to the January 15 deadline for nursing courses starting in September 2020.

The NHS Ambassadors scheme encourages people working and/or studying in healthcare to volunteer one hour per year to speak in schools about their roles or participate in careers events and activities.

Through the interim People Plan, during 2019/20 we will focus on increasing applications to undergraduate AHP education, particularly in the shortage professions of therapeutic radiography, podiatry, orthoptics and prosthetics/orthotics, and developing Allied Health Professionals faculties to work with healthcare providers to identify how to expand clinical placement activity.

Our ongoing 25% expansion of medical school places in England will see an additional 1,500 new medical school places for United Kingdom domestic students. The extra places have been distributed in geographic areas where there have been fewer training places per unit population.

15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to attract more people to work in the NHS.

Appropriate staffing levels are an important element of the Care Quality Commission’s registration regime. It is the responsibility of individual National Health Service health and care employers to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the staff needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

As part of the NHS People Plan, NHS Improvement and Health Education England are considering how best to support the NHS in ensuring it has access to the staff it needs across England. This has focused on areas such as retaining nurses already employed; supporting their existing nursing workforce in areas such as flexible working; investing in nursing staff’s Continuous Professional Development; and increasing undergraduate supply through attracting more students to study nursing.

The University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) reported that applicants to study nursing have increased by 4% compared to the same period last year.

NHS England and NHS Improvement working with Health Education England are also delivering a major communication campaign ‘We are the NHS’. The campaign aims to reduce vacancy rates across the NHS, with a focus on the nursing profession. There has been a strong focus on recruitment to courses starting in September 2019. From September 2019, a further campaign has been launched to encourage UCAS applications to the January 15 deadline for nursing courses starting in September 2020.

The NHS Ambassadors scheme encourages people working and/or studying in healthcare to volunteer one hour per year to speak in schools about their roles or participate in careers events and activities.

Through the interim People Plan, during 2019/20 we will focus on increasing applications to undergraduate AHP education, particularly in the shortage professions of therapeutic radiography, podiatry, orthoptics and prosthetics/orthotics, and developing Allied Health Professionals faculties to work with healthcare providers to identify how to expand clinical placement activity.

Our ongoing 25% expansion of medical school places in England will see an additional 1,500 new medical school places for United Kingdom domestic students. The extra places have been distributed in geographic areas where there have been fewer training places per unit population.

2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of patients readmitted to hospital were diagnosed with malnutrition in the last 12 months.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to NHS England’s Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015-2018 guidance, published on 8 October 2015, what progress he has made on the commissioning of a workforce to reduce the burden of malnutrition and dehydration through (a) identification, (b) prevention and (c) intervention.

Between November 2017 and March 2019, the NHS England Nursing Directorate delivered two nutrition improvement collaboratives which supported 50 National Health Service provider organisation to deliver improvements in the provision of nutritional care. The overall aims were to:

- Increase the proportion of patients with an accurate nutritional screen;

- Increase the proportion of patients receiving appropriate nutritional interventions; and

- Introduce or increase the use of quality improvement tools and techniques.

The organisations involved in the collaboratives had multi-professional teams including nurses, Allied Health Professionals and caterers. A range of interventions were introduced by the organisations to support improvements including education, training of staff, reviewing availability of equipment to support nutritional screening and assessment. Governance structures were implemented to enable reporting of nutritional care to the trust board. To further build on this a Nutrition Quality Improvement Toolkit is also being developed.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the answer of 6 August 2019 to Question 280423, what is the remit of the review of national standards for healthcare food for patients staff and visitors started by the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group in July 2018; when the review is intended to be completed; and whether the findings of the review will be publicly available.

The review of national standards for healthcare food for patients, staff and visitors is bringing together relevant food requirements and best practice from the National Health Service. The new standards will reflect Government nutrition advice, as outlined in Public Health England’s (PHE) Eatwell Guide.

The review of national standards for healthcare food is being developed alongside the Hospital Food Review and the new standards are expected to be published early next year.

The Hospital Food Review is being undertaken by a Panel chaired by Philip Shelley, Facilities Manager at Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust. The members of the Panel are:

- Emma Brookes, NHS Improvement;

- Michael Bellas, NHS Improvement;

- Tina Potter, Food Standards Agency;

- Rachel Manners, PHE;

- Martin Steele, NHS Property Services;

- Kerry Trunks, NHS/Ward Sister;

- Craig Smith, Hospital Caterers Association (HCA);

- Gail Walker, HCA/Open Door;

- Balwinder Dhoot, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs;

- Susannah McWilliam, Soil Association;

- Maxine Cartz, British Dietetic Association (BDA);

- Andy Burnham, BDA;

- Jason Yiannikkou, Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC); and

- William Vineall, DHSC.

Prue Leith has been appointed as an advisor to the review.

The review will also consult other key stakeholders, including NHS trusts, professional associations, patient representatives and commercial suppliers. Organisations involved in the provision of food to the NHS that will be consulted include:

- Apetito;

- Anglia Crown;

- Tillery Valley;

- Brakes;

- Bidfood; and

- Healthy Food Company.

This is not an exhaustive list and other organisations may be consulted.

The Hospital Food Review is scheduled for completion in January 2020.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the answer of 6 August 2019 to Question 280423, how the Hospital Food Review, announced on 23 August 2019, if he will take into account findings from the review by the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group into the national standards for healthcare food for patients staff and visitors.

The review of national standards for healthcare food for patients, staff and visitors is bringing together relevant food requirements and best practice from the National Health Service. The new standards will reflect Government nutrition advice, as outlined in Public Health England’s (PHE) Eatwell Guide.

The review of national standards for healthcare food is being developed alongside the Hospital Food Review and the new standards are expected to be published early next year.

The Hospital Food Review is being undertaken by a Panel chaired by Philip Shelley, Facilities Manager at Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust. The members of the Panel are:

- Emma Brookes, NHS Improvement;

- Michael Bellas, NHS Improvement;

- Tina Potter, Food Standards Agency;

- Rachel Manners, PHE;

- Martin Steele, NHS Property Services;

- Kerry Trunks, NHS/Ward Sister;

- Craig Smith, Hospital Caterers Association (HCA);

- Gail Walker, HCA/Open Door;

- Balwinder Dhoot, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs;

- Susannah McWilliam, Soil Association;

- Maxine Cartz, British Dietetic Association (BDA);

- Andy Burnham, BDA;

- Jason Yiannikkou, Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC); and

- William Vineall, DHSC.

Prue Leith has been appointed as an advisor to the review.

The review will also consult other key stakeholders, including NHS trusts, professional associations, patient representatives and commercial suppliers. Organisations involved in the provision of food to the NHS that will be consulted include:

- Apetito;

- Anglia Crown;

- Tillery Valley;

- Brakes;

- Bidfood; and

- Healthy Food Company.

This is not an exhaustive list and other organisations may be consulted.

The Hospital Food Review is scheduled for completion in January 2020.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will list the members of the task group undertaking the Hospital Food Review launched in August 2019.

The review of national standards for healthcare food for patients, staff and visitors is bringing together relevant food requirements and best practice from the National Health Service. The new standards will reflect Government nutrition advice, as outlined in Public Health England’s (PHE) Eatwell Guide.

The review of national standards for healthcare food is being developed alongside the Hospital Food Review and the new standards are expected to be published early next year.

The Hospital Food Review is being undertaken by a Panel chaired by Philip Shelley, Facilities Manager at Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust. The members of the Panel are:

- Emma Brookes, NHS Improvement;

- Michael Bellas, NHS Improvement;

- Tina Potter, Food Standards Agency;

- Rachel Manners, PHE;

- Martin Steele, NHS Property Services;

- Kerry Trunks, NHS/Ward Sister;

- Craig Smith, Hospital Caterers Association (HCA);

- Gail Walker, HCA/Open Door;

- Balwinder Dhoot, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs;

- Susannah McWilliam, Soil Association;

- Maxine Cartz, British Dietetic Association (BDA);

- Andy Burnham, BDA;

- Jason Yiannikkou, Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC); and

- William Vineall, DHSC.

Prue Leith has been appointed as an advisor to the review.

The review will also consult other key stakeholders, including NHS trusts, professional associations, patient representatives and commercial suppliers. Organisations involved in the provision of food to the NHS that will be consulted include:

- Apetito;

- Anglia Crown;

- Tillery Valley;

- Brakes;

- Bidfood; and

- Healthy Food Company.

This is not an exhaustive list and other organisations may be consulted.

The Hospital Food Review is scheduled for completion in January 2020.

25th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the intended timescale for the Hospital Food Review announced on 23 August 2019; and what organisations outside the NHS involved in the provision of food including medical foods will be consulted in the review.

The review of national standards for healthcare food for patients, staff and visitors is bringing together relevant food requirements and best practice from the National Health Service. The new standards will reflect Government nutrition advice, as outlined in Public Health England’s (PHE) Eatwell Guide.

The review of national standards for healthcare food is being developed alongside the Hospital Food Review and the new standards are expected to be published early next year.

The Hospital Food Review is being undertaken by a Panel chaired by Philip Shelley, Facilities Manager at Taunton and Somerset NHS Foundation Trust. The members of the Panel are:

- Emma Brookes, NHS Improvement;

- Michael Bellas, NHS Improvement;

- Tina Potter, Food Standards Agency;

- Rachel Manners, PHE;

- Martin Steele, NHS Property Services;

- Kerry Trunks, NHS/Ward Sister;

- Craig Smith, Hospital Caterers Association (HCA);

- Gail Walker, HCA/Open Door;

- Balwinder Dhoot, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs;

- Susannah McWilliam, Soil Association;

- Maxine Cartz, British Dietetic Association (BDA);

- Andy Burnham, BDA;

- Jason Yiannikkou, Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC); and

- William Vineall, DHSC.

Prue Leith has been appointed as an advisor to the review.

The review will also consult other key stakeholders, including NHS trusts, professional associations, patient representatives and commercial suppliers. Organisations involved in the provision of food to the NHS that will be consulted include:

- Apetito;

- Anglia Crown;

- Tillery Valley;

- Brakes;

- Bidfood; and

- Healthy Food Company.

This is not an exhaustive list and other organisations may be consulted.

The Hospital Food Review is scheduled for completion in January 2020.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that the findings and best practice of the Elective Care Transformation Programme are implemented in local services.

The Elective Care Transformation Programme has developed best practice tools from a number of workstreams from 2017. This includes service specifications and mobilisation plans alongside support events and tools to aid implementation at a local level.

The programme has established reporting systems with NHS England and NHS Improvement regional teams to provide assurance and support with implementation. The Elective Care Community of Practice enables local systems to share learning about Elective Care Transformation and provides a platform for further engagement and support for local implementation.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect of the Interim NHS People Plan’s conclusions on the recruitment of dermatologists in the NHS.

It is the responsibility of National Health Service trusts to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the appropriate professionals needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

Dermatology is a highly competitive specialty training pathway and often oversubscribed. Nationally and locally there has been a 100% fill rate in dermatology training for the past four years. Since 2010, the number of full-time equivalent dermatologists (doctors at the consultant grade) has increased by 26% rising from 464 in May 2010 to 584 in May 2019.

The interim NHS People Plan, published on 3 June 2019, puts the workforce at the heart of the NHS and will ensure we have the staff needed to deliver high quality care. In advance of publishing the final People Plan, the NHS will establish a national programme board to address geographical and specialty shortages in medicine.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 11 June 2019 to Question 259387, what support and guidance his Department is providing to Wolverhampton CCG and Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust on recruiting more dermatologists.

It is the responsibility of National Health Service trusts to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the appropriate professionals needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

Dermatology is a highly competitive specialty training pathway and often oversubscribed. Nationally and locally there has been a 100% fill rate in dermatology training for the past four years. Since 2010, the number of full-time equivalent dermatologists (doctors at the consultant grade) has increased by 26% rising from 464 in May 2010 to 584 in May 2019.

The interim NHS People Plan, published on 3 June 2019, puts the workforce at the heart of the NHS and will ensure we have the staff needed to deliver high quality care. In advance of publishing the final People Plan, the NHS will establish a national programme board to address geographical and specialty shortages in medicine.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the specialist dermatologist workforce in the NHS.

It is the responsibility of National Health Service trusts to have staffing arrangements in place that deliver safe and effective care. This includes recruiting the appropriate professionals needed to support these levels and meet local needs.

Dermatology is a highly competitive specialty training pathway and often oversubscribed. Nationally and locally there has been a 100% fill rate in dermatology training for the past four years. Since 2010, the number of full-time equivalent dermatologists (doctors at the consultant grade) has increased by 26% rising from 464 in May 2010 to 584 in May 2019.

The interim NHS People Plan, published on 3 June 2019, puts the workforce at the heart of the NHS and will ensure we have the staff needed to deliver high quality care. In advance of publishing the final People Plan, the NHS will establish a national programme board to address geographical and specialty shortages in medicine.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to increase the number of GPs with a special interest in dermatology.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans NHS England has to implement gene therapy treatments.

As set out in the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service is committed to supporting the timely introduction of the most clinically and cost effective treatments for patients. Cell and gene therapies have the potential to provide great benefits for patients, and the NHS is leading the world in creating access to these treatments.

For example, patients in England were among the first in the world to benefit from CAR T cell therapy, which uses their own immune system to fight cancers. The NHS will also now be funding voretigene neparvovec, also known as Luxturna, a revolutionary form of new treatment for blindness in children.

The NHS is working with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and other partners in the Accelerated Access Collaborative to take a proactive approach in preparing for cell and gene therapies and other innovative treatments.

2nd Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the appropriateness of the NICE criteria for assessing a patient's access to Spinraza.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to increase funding for research into the causes of obesity; and if he will make a statement.

The Department funds research through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The NIHR has a large programme of work to look at the causes of obesity, in addition to research on prevention and treatment. The NIHR has invested £5 million over five years in an Obesity Policy Research Unit which has a programme of work to provide robust evidence and a deeper understanding of the causes of childhood obesity, including research on marketing, food environment and behaviour change.

The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including obesity; it is not usual practice to ring-fence funds for particular topics or conditions. Applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to NHS England’s Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015-2018 guidance, what progress he has made on the commissioning of a workforce to undertake the (a) identification, (b) prevention and (c) intervention to reduce the burden of malnutrition and dehydration.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to encourage innovation in gene and cell therapies and ensure that such therapies reach those patients who will benefit from such therapies.

The United Kingdom is a global leader in providing access to pioneering cell and gene therapies for treating diseases such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart disease and diabetes. Indeed, 24% of developers of advanced therapy medicinal products in Europe are headquartered in the UK. Last year the National Health Service was the first health system in Europe to agree full access for a revolutionary new CAR-T treatment, representing one of the fastest funding approvals in the history of our health service.

Together with the Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult we have nine specialist hospitals delivering approved CAR-T therapies as well as three Advanced Therapy Treatment Centres across the UK. These centres have been assigned £30 million by UK Research and Innovation - including project funding and an Apprenticeship Training Scheme.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of NICE modifying its Single Technology Appraisal ICER thresholds to recognise the value of treatments for severe and rare conditions that are not put through NICE’s Highly Specialised Technology pathway.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is currently reviewing its technology appraisal and highly specialised technology evaluation methods. The methods review will include a review of a wide range of methods, including those relevant to severe and rare conditions.

The Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access 2019 - an agreement between the Government and the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry - states that the standard cost effectiveness threshold used by NICE will be retained at the current range (£20,000 - £30,000 per Quality Adjusted Life Year).

In the current Single Technology Appraisal process there are several factors that may currently be considered by NICE committees when deliberating, including some that may affect the value of a treatment. NICE’s methods review will explore if these factors are still relevant for patients and the National Health Service, whether there is a need to modify the approach and whether any additional factors should be taken into account when making a recommendation on a technology.

The review will also consider other methods that are important for rare and severe conditions, including methods for measuring and valuing the health-related quality of life for people with rare diseases, dealing with uncertainty and sourcing different types of evidence. Proposals will be presented for six weeks of public consultation in the summer of 2020.

Furthermore, in parallel with the methods review, NICE is reviewing its highly specialised technologies topic selection criteria – to make them clearer, more specific, and more transparent and predictable.

25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of NICE’s ability to offer interim conditional reimbursement decisions to gene therapies that would allow for real-world evidence generation to supplement the evidence base.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the implementation of the guidance on Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015 to 2018.

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the document entitled Guidance – Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015 – 2018, published by NHS England in October 2015, how many commissioners have identified a local senior or executive champion to drive local work on nutrition and hydration and to make improvements.

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of commissioners that (a) reviewed existing service provision and (b) agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the NHS England Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015 to 2018 guidance.

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to update the Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015-2018 NHS England guidance.

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of hospital admissions there were for adults with malnutrition as a (a) primary and (b) secondary condition in (i) England (ii) each Clinical Commissioning Group and (iii) each parliamentary constituency in each of the last ten years; and if he will make a statement.

NHS Digital has provided a count of finished admission episodes (FAEs) in each of the last 10 years with a primary or secondary diagnosis of malnutrition for adult and child patients resident in England. This information is provided in the attached tables.

Information by clinical commissioning group and parliamentary constituency is too small to be meaningful and has not been provided in order to protect patient confidentiality.

Activity for adults in English National Health Service Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Year

Total Admissions

Primary Diagnosis

Secondary Diagnosis

Admissions

Percentage

Admissions

Percentage

2008-09

11,953,809

348

0.0029%

2,545

0.0213%

2009-10

12,319,781

417

0.0034%

3,113

0.0253%

2010-11

12,629,229

485

0.0038%

3,843

0.0304%

2011-12

12,744,605

608

0.0048%

4,475

0.0351%

2012-13

12,837,889

626

0.0049%

4,564

0.0356%

2013-14

13,159,078

589

0.0045%

5,707

0.0434%

2014-15

13,554,017

683

0.0050%

6,268

0.0462%

2015-16

13,869,134

703

0.0051%

6,664

0.0480%

2016-17

14,078,269

732

0.0052%

7,132

0.0507%

2017-18

14,154,577

735

0.0052%

7,802

0.0551%

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), NHS Digital

Activity for children in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Year

Total Admissions

Primary Diagnosis

Secondary Diagnosis

Admissions

Percentage

Admissions

Percentage

2008-09

1,850,531

26

0.0014%

176

0.0095%

2009-10

1,894,664

40

0.0021%

134

0.0071%

2010-11

1,928,249

43

0.0022%

180

0.0093%

2011-12

1,449,122

38

0.0026%

157

0.0108%

2012-13

1,484,907

37

0.0025%

168

0.0113%

2013-14

1,964,359

25

0.0013%

185

0.0094%

2014-15

1,984,768

37

0.0019%

193

0.0097%

2015-16

2,038,411

29

0.0014%

267

0.0131%

2016-17

2,043,080

47

0.0023%

243

0.0119%

2017-18

2,020,591

57

0.0028%

263

0.0130%

Source: HES, NHS Digital

Notes:

1. A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.

2. The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the HES data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital.

3. ICD-10 codes used to define malnutrition are:


E40 Kwashiorkor;

E41 Nutritional marasmus E42 Marasmic kwashiorkor;

E43 Unspecified severe protein–energy malnutrition;

E44 Protein–energy malnutrition of moderate and mild degree;

E45 Retarded development following protein–energy malnutrition;

E46 Unspecified protein–energy malnutrition; and O25 Malnutrition in pregnancy.

5. Adult: the patient was 18 years old or greater at the start of the episode of care.

6. Child: the patient was under 18 years old at the start of the episode of care.

22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children were admitted to hospital with malnutrition as a (a) primary and (b) secondary condition in (i) England, (ii) each clinical commissioning group and (iii) each parliamentary constituency in each of the last 10 years; and if he will make a statement.

NHS Digital has provided a count of finished admission episodes (FAEs) in each of the last 10 years with a primary or secondary diagnosis of malnutrition for adult and child patients resident in England. This information is provided in the attached tables.

Information by clinical commissioning group and parliamentary constituency is too small to be meaningful and has not been provided in order to protect patient confidentiality.

Activity for adults in English National Health Service Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Year

Total Admissions

Primary Diagnosis

Secondary Diagnosis

Admissions

Percentage

Admissions

Percentage

2008-09

11,953,809

348

0.0029%

2,545

0.0213%

2009-10

12,319,781

417

0.0034%

3,113

0.0253%

2010-11

12,629,229

485

0.0038%

3,843

0.0304%

2011-12

12,744,605

608

0.0048%

4,475

0.0351%

2012-13

12,837,889

626

0.0049%

4,564

0.0356%

2013-14

13,159,078

589

0.0045%

5,707

0.0434%

2014-15

13,554,017

683

0.0050%

6,268

0.0462%

2015-16

13,869,134

703

0.0051%

6,664

0.0480%

2016-17

14,078,269

732

0.0052%

7,132

0.0507%

2017-18

14,154,577

735

0.0052%

7,802

0.0551%

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), NHS Digital

Activity for children in English NHS Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector.

Year

Total Admissions

Primary Diagnosis

Secondary Diagnosis

Admissions

Percentage

Admissions

Percentage

2008-09

1,850,531

26

0.0014%

176

0.0095%

2009-10

1,894,664

40

0.0021%

134

0.0071%

2010-11

1,928,249

43

0.0022%

180

0.0093%

2011-12

1,449,122

38

0.0026%

157

0.0108%

2012-13

1,484,907

37

0.0025%

168

0.0113%

2013-14

1,964,359

25

0.0013%

185

0.0094%

2014-15

1,984,768

37

0.0019%

193

0.0097%

2015-16

2,038,411

29

0.0014%

267

0.0131%

2016-17

2,043,080

47

0.0023%

243

0.0119%

2017-18

2,020,591

57

0.0028%

263

0.0130%

Source: HES, NHS Digital

Notes:

1. A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.

2. The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 20 (14 from 2002-03 to 2006-07 and seven prior to 2002-03) diagnosis fields in the HES data set and provides the main reason why the patient was admitted to hospital.

3. ICD-10 codes used to define malnutrition are:


E40 Kwashiorkor;

E41 Nutritional marasmus E42 Marasmic kwashiorkor;

E43 Unspecified severe protein–energy malnutrition;

E44 Protein–energy malnutrition of moderate and mild degree;

E45 Retarded development following protein–energy malnutrition;

E46 Unspecified protein–energy malnutrition; and O25 Malnutrition in pregnancy.

5. Adult: the patient was 18 years old or greater at the start of the episode of care.

6. Child: the patient was under 18 years old at the start of the episode of care.

22nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients readmitted to hospital within (a) zero to seven and (b) eight to 180 days were recorded as suffering malnutrition as a primary or secondary condition in each of the last ten years.

Information could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

16th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce obesity related stigma; and if he will make a statement.

Our focus is on tackling the causes of obesity, improving diets and preventing ill health. Many of the measures in the chapters of the childhood obesity plan will have an impact on tackling obesity and improving diets across all age groups.

In addition, Public Health England encourages the population to follow a healthy balanced diet through the 5 A Day campaign, Change4Life and OneYou social marketing campaigns.

2nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what cancer types will be offered whole genome sequencing through the Genomic Medicine Service as part of routine care in the next five years.

As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has committed to sequencing 500,000 whole genomes by 2023/24.

During 2019, whole genome sequencing will be available as part of routine NHS clinical care for some patients with rare disease and cancer, where there is evidence that it is clinically effective. The conditions are outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory which specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test. This is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/

2nd Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to consult with charities and patient organisations on whole genome sequencing.

Genomics England has consulted charities, patient groups and participants from the 100,000 Genomes Project during the development of consent materials for the use of data from whole genome sequencing in research. Genomics England has also engaged with and sought input from charities and participants as it explores how best to realise the ambition to sequence five million genomes.

The NHS Genomic Medicine Centres established by NHS England to support the delivery of the 100,000 Genomes project have engaged with patients, the public and the independent sector. In addition, as part of the development of the NHS Genomic Medicine Service, NHS England is working with charities and patient organisation to help develop patient facing materials and information that will be used to support the introduction of whole genome sequencing in the National Health Service.

The Government is committed to making the United Kingdom home of genomic healthcare and the National Genomic Healthcare Strategy, which we plan to launch in autumn 2019, will set out how the genomics community can work together to make the UK the global leader. The Government is consulting widely - including with charities and patient organisations - in the development of the National Genomics Healthcare Strategy.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to engage frontline staff in shaping the implementation and delivery of the Workforce Strategy; and what further work is planned to examine (a) dermatology and (b) other specific specialities as part of that strategy.

The National Health Service published its interim People Plan on 3 June. It sets out a plan of action to meet the long-term challenges of supply, reform, culture and leadership, and puts NHS people at the heart of NHS policy and delivery.

In developing this plan, the NHS has engaged widely with staff, patients, employers, professional organisations, regulatory bodies, voluntary sector, academia and other experts.

In advance of publishing the final People Plan, the NHS will establish a national programme board to address geographical and specialty shortages in medicine. We expect the final People Plan to be published soon after the Spending Review.

3rd Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department is providing to (a) Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust and (b) other local NHS Trusts who are exploring redesigning dermatology services towards the community; and what steps he will take to ensure patient access to dermatology services is maintained.

The commissioning and configuration of dermatology services in England is a local matter. The local National Health Service is best placed to make decisions that ensure services meet the needs of resident populations in the most appropriate way.

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are responsible for commissioning the vast majority of dermatology services. The majority of patients with dermatological disorders are managed in primary and community care. Wolverhampton CCG is currently re-procuring its community dermatology service which will encompass an extended range of services. This procurement has been undertaken with the knowledge and co-operation of Royal Wolverhampton Trust. The Royal Wolverhampton Trust is also exploring with other trusts how to make the best use of scarce dermatology staff by working with each other more closely.

14th May 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of adequate levels of NHS staff in cancer pathology units.

Health Education England (HEE) published the Cancer Workforce Plan for England in December 2017, which committed to the expansion of capacity and skills of the cancer workforce, including an ambition to attract and retain more cancer specialists, including histopathologists, by 2021. In 2019, 100% of specialist pathology training places, including histopathology, were filled.

Following the publication of the NHS Long Term Plan in January 2019, HEE is now working with NHS England and NHS Improvement to understand the longer-term workforce implications for the further development of cancer services.

Locally, responsibility for assessing and managing staffing levels, including specialty staff, rests with individual NHS trusts who are best placed to decide how many staff they need to provide a given service.

11th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on patients of the decommissioning of tier three and tier four weight management services by Clinical Commissioning Groups; and if he will make a statement.

The requested information is not held centrally. No assessment has been made of the effect on patients of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) decommissioning tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services. CCGs have a statutory responsibility to commission services which meet the healthcare needs of their local population.

10th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which Clinical Commissioning Groups include weight management services on their list of procedures of limited clinical value.

The requested information is not held centrally. No assessment has been made of the effect on patients of clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) decommissioning tier 3 and tier 4 weight management services. CCGs have a statutory responsibility to commission services which meet the healthcare needs of their local population.

10th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the number of people with obesity in (a) England and (b) each Clinical Commissioning Group area by (i) age and (ii) gender for each of the last five calendar years.

NHS Digital has advised that obesity data for children and adults in England by age and gender for each of the last five years is available in the Health Survey for England. This information is attached. Data is not available by clinical commissioning group.

10th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average waiting time was for bariatric surgery in each NHS trust in each of the last five calendar years; and how much has each trust paid in penalties incurred as a result of those waiting lists in each of those years.

The requested data is not centrally collected.

23rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will develop a national obesity strategy for adults and children.

There are no current plans to develop a national obesity strategy for adults and children. Many of the key measures in both chapters of our childhood obesity plan will have an impact on tackling obesity across all age groups. These include the soft drinks industry levy, sugar reduction and wider calorie reformulation programme, restricting promotions and calorie labelling in restaurants which will improve our eating habits and reduce the amount of sugar we consume.

23rd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make it his policy to mandate that obesity and weight management training is included in the curriculum for the education of every healthcare professional.

We want all health care professionals to feel confident utilising their skills and everyday opportunities to talk about weight and provide advice to support healthier weight. In Chapter 2 of the Childhood Obesity Plan, we outlined our commitment to provide health and care professionals with the latest training and tools to better support children, young people and families to reduce obesity.

It is the responsibility of Higher Education Institutes to set the curricula for the pre-registration training of healthcare professionals to standards set by the individual regulators of each profession.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
2nd Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many inguinal hernia repair procedures have been undertaken in each NHS trust in each of the last five years.

The information is shown in the attached table.

27th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether increasing the number of BAME (a) blood, (b) stem cell and (c) organ donations to the NHS would result in savings to the public purse; and if he will make a statement.

The Department has not assessed the cost effectiveness of increasing the number of donations from black, Asian and minority ethnic people of blood, stem cells and organs.

Information on the potential savings of reducing the number of people on dialysis is not available in the format requested.

An impact assessment prepared to support the consultation on proposed changes to consent for organ and tissue donation, which ran between December 2017 and March 2018, includes cost and benefit analysis information in respect of all organs, including kidney transplants. The impact assessment was limited to the cost/benefit analysis of changes to consent arrangements in England, and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/666518/Organ_Donation_Opt-Out_Consultation_Impact_Assessment.pdf

27th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average yearly cost per patient is of dialysis treatment and management.

This data is not available in the format requested. The following table shows the total activity, total cost and national average unit cost for all types of renal dialysis.

The activity count for renal dialysis is the number of sessions, not the number of patients. All data shown is for financial year 2016-17, the most recent year for which reference costs have been collected. National Health Service references costs data can be found at the following link:

https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/reference-costs/

Activity

National Average Cost for 2016/17

Total Cost

4,240,850

£133.88

£567,754,893

The individual Healthcare Resource Groups (HRGs) which make up these data can be found in the following table.

2016-17 HRGs for renal dialysis

HRG

HRG Description

LD01A

Hospital Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, 19 years and over

LD01B

Hospital Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, 18 years and under

LD02A

Hospital Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, 19 years and over

LD02B

Hospital Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, 18 years and under

LD03A

Hospital Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, with Blood-Borne Virus, 19 years and over

LD03B

Hospital Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, with Blood-Borne Virus, 18 years and under

LD04A

Hospital Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, with Blood-Borne Virus, 19 years and over

LD04B

Hospital Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, with Blood-Borne Virus, 18 years and under

LD05A

Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, 19 years and over

LD05B

Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, 18 years and under

LD06A

Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, 19 years and over

LD06B

Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, 18 years and under

LD07A

Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, with Blood-Borne Virus, 19 years and over

LD08A

Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, with Blood-Borne Virus, 19 years and over

LD08B

Satellite Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, with Blood-Borne Virus, 18 years and under

LD09A

Home Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, 19 years and over

LD09B

Home Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Haemodialysis Catheter, 18 years and under

LD10A

Home Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, 19 years and over

LD10B

Home Haemodialysis or Filtration, with Access via Arteriovenous Fistula or Graft, 18 years and under

LD11A

Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis, 19 years and over

LD11B

Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis, 18 years and under

LD12A

Automated Peritoneal Dialysis, 19 years and over

LD12B

Automated Peritoneal Dialysis, 18 years and under

LD13A

Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis, 19 years and over

LD13B

Assisted Automated Peritoneal Dialysis, 18 years and under

LE01A

Haemodialysis for Acute Kidney Injury, 19 years and over

LE01B

Haemodialysis for Acute Kidney Injury, 18 years and under

LE02A

Peritoneal Dialysis for Acute Kidney Injury, 19 years and over

LE02B

Peritoneal Dialysis for Acute Kidney Injury, 18 years and under

27th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential savings accrued to the public purse of reducing the number of people on dialysis by providing kidney transplants to those patients at the soonest available opportunity.

The Department has not assessed the cost effectiveness of increasing the number of donations from black, Asian and minority ethnic people of blood, stem cells and organs.

Information on the potential savings of reducing the number of people on dialysis is not available in the format requested.

An impact assessment prepared to support the consultation on proposed changes to consent for organ and tissue donation, which ran between December 2017 and March 2018, includes cost and benefit analysis information in respect of all organs, including kidney transplants. The impact assessment was limited to the cost/benefit analysis of changes to consent arrangements in England, and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/666518/Organ_Donation_Opt-Out_Consultation_Impact_Assessment.pdf

25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average cost to the NHS is of providing a kidney transplant.

NHS Improvement publishes reference cost data relating to kidney transplants, which can be found at the following link:

https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/reference-costs/

Reference costs are the average unit cost to the National Health Service of providing defined services to NHS patients in England in a given financial year. The information relating to kidney transplants is collected in two ways, the actual transplant episodes and the preparatory and follow-up screening and examinations in the case of live donor transplants. Reference costs for 2016-17 are given in the following tables.

Reference costs for kidney transplant episodes 2016-17

Total

HRG1 Description

Activity

Unit Cost

Total Cost

Kidney Transplant, 19 years and over, from Cadaver Non-Heart-Beating Donor

645

£12,167

£7,847,829

Kidney Transplant, 18 years and under, from Cadaver Non-Heart-Beating Donor

11

£5,780

£63,576

Kidney Transplant, 19 years and over, from Cadaver Heart-Beating Donor

1,171

£12,888

£15,092,002

Kidney Transplant, 18 years and under, from Cadaver Heart-Beating Donor

40

£15,157

£606,268

Kidney Transplant, 19 years and over, from Live Donor

708

£13,854

£9,808,873

Kidney Transplant, 18 years and under, from Live Donor

60

£15,149

£908,964

2,635

£13,028

£34,327,513

Source: NHS Improvement


Notes:

  1. Reference costs for acute care are collected by healthcare resource group (HRG).

Reference cost data for pre and post-transplant episodes for activities associated with kidney transplants 2016-17

Total

HRG1 Description

Activity

Unit Cost

Total Cost

Live Kidney Donor Screening

1,083

£215

£232,565

Kidney Pre-Transplantation Workup of Live Donor

2,422

£270

£654,200

Kidney Pre-Transplantation Workup of Recipient, 19 years and over

9,150

£271

£2,483,885

Kidney Pre-Transplantation Workup of Recipient, 18 years and under

27

£991

£26,750

Examination for Post-Transplantation of Kidney of Recipient, 19 years and over

75,261

£239

£18,010,518

Examination for Post-Transplantation of Kidney of Recipient, 18 years and under

396

£250

£99,024

Examination for Post-Transplantation of Kidney of Live Donor

2,809

£173

£487,293

91,148

£241

£21,994,236

Source: NHS Improvement


Notes:

  1. Reference costs for acute care are collected by HRG.

There are additional costs associated with a kidney transplant for immunosuppressant therapy, at an average cost of £6,000 per patient per year, and ongoing outpatient follow up but this information will depend on the individual patient and is not collected centrally.

Information on hospital bed days used by patients waiting for organ or stem cell transplants is not centrally collected.

25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospital bed days were used by patients waiting for (a) organ and (b) stem cell transplants in each of the last three years.

NHS Improvement publishes reference cost data relating to kidney transplants, which can be found at the following link:

https://improvement.nhs.uk/resources/reference-costs/

Reference costs are the average unit cost to the National Health Service of providing defined services to NHS patients in England in a given financial year. The information relating to kidney transplants is collected in two ways, the actual transplant episodes and the preparatory and follow-up screening and examinations in the case of live donor transplants. Reference costs for 2016-17 are given in the following tables.

Reference costs for kidney transplant episodes 2016-17

Total

HRG1 Description

Activity

Unit Cost

Total Cost

Kidney Transplant, 19 years and over, from Cadaver Non-Heart-Beating Donor

645

£12,167

£7,847,829

Kidney Transplant, 18 years and under, from Cadaver Non-Heart-Beating Donor

11

£5,780

£63,576

Kidney Transplant, 19 years and over, from Cadaver Heart-Beating Donor

1,171

£12,888

£15,092,002

Kidney Transplant, 18 years and under, from Cadaver Heart-Beating Donor

40

£15,157

£606,268

Kidney Transplant, 19 years and over, from Live Donor

708

£13,854

£9,808,873

Kidney Transplant, 18 years and under, from Live Donor

60

£15,149

£908,964

2,635

£13,028

£34,327,513

Source: NHS Improvement


Notes:

  1. Reference costs for acute care are collected by healthcare resource group (HRG).

Reference cost data for pre and post-transplant episodes for activities associated with kidney transplants 2016-17

Total

HRG1 Description

Activity

Unit Cost

Total Cost

Live Kidney Donor Screening

1,083

£215

£232,565

Kidney Pre-Transplantation Workup of Live Donor

2,422

£270

£654,200

Kidney Pre-Transplantation Workup of Recipient, 19 years and over

9,150

£271

£2,483,885

Kidney Pre-Transplantation Workup of Recipient, 18 years and under

27

£991

£26,750

Examination for Post-Transplantation of Kidney of Recipient, 19 years and over

75,261

£239

£18,010,518

Examination for Post-Transplantation of Kidney of Recipient, 18 years and under

396

£250

£99,024

Examination for Post-Transplantation of Kidney of Live Donor

2,809

£173

£487,293

91,148

£241

£21,994,236

Source: NHS Improvement


Notes:

  1. Reference costs for acute care are collected by HRG.

There are additional costs associated with a kidney transplant for immunosuppressant therapy, at an average cost of £6,000 per patient per year, and ongoing outpatient follow up but this information will depend on the individual patient and is not collected centrally.

Information on hospital bed days used by patients waiting for organ or stem cell transplants is not centrally collected.

25th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much his Department spent on public health campaigns to encourage BAME (a) blood, (b) stem cell, (c) living organ and (d) deceased organ donation in each of the last three years.

NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) is responsible for the collection, manufacturing and issuing of blood products to the National Health Service in England; for organ and tissue donation in the United Kingdom; and for the British Bone Marrow Registry (BBMR), to which it recruits registered blood donors to be potential stem cell donors.

NHSBT recovers its costs for collecting, testing, processing and supplying blood through the prices that are charged to NHS hospitals in England. Funding for organ donation and retrieval is provided by way of subsidy from the Department.

NHSBT organise campaigns to encourage living organ, deceased organ and blood donation by people from a black, Asian and minority ethnic background. NHSBT campaign spend is set out in the following table.

Living organ donation

Deceased organ donation

Blood donation

2015/16

£10,000

c£140,000

£279,000

2016/17

£76,000

c£140,000

£295,000

2017/18

£118,000

£95,000

£650,000

Source: NHS Blood and Transplant

In addition, this year there will be a new, extensive campaign focussed on increasing organ donors from black and Asian backgrounds.

NHSBT manage the NHS Cord Blood Bank and the BBMR which are part of the Anthony Nolan and NHS Stem Cell Registry.

NHSBT has not allocated a campaign spend specifically for stem cell donation in the last three years, all activity has been delivered in-house e.g. leaflets, letters. However, as individuals are approached to join the BBMR when they first donate blood, the blood campaign spend also contributes to stem cell recruitment.

15th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people from BAME backgrounds have died as a result of there not being a blood, organ or stem cell donor who is a match.

NHS Blood and Transplant is responsible for the collection, manufacturing and issuing of blood products to the National Health Service in England; for organ and tissue donation in the United Kingdom; and for the British Bone Marrow Registry, to which it recruits registered blood donors to be potential stem cell donors.

NHS Blood and Transplant does not collect data in the form requested. The following table shows the most recent annual data on the ethnicity of the patients who have died whilst they were on the waiting list for an organ transplant, but this does not include patients who have died after being removed from the transplant waiting list or patients who were too ill to be added to the waiting list.

2016/17

White

423

Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic

86

Not reported

1

Total

510

Source: NHS Blood and Transplant, 2018

The 2016 annual report of the independent UK haemovigilance scheme, Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT), shows no report of patients not being transfused or being under-transfused as a result of there not being a blood donor who was a match.

12th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to include differing (a) faith and (b) cultural perspectives in its consultation on opt-out organ donation.

The Department took a number of steps to raise awareness of the consultation on organ and tissue donation consent amongst different communities, which received over 17,000 responses.

- The consultation was publicised across various black and Asian media platforms, through Ministerial interviews on both national and regional black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) radio shows and editorials in prominent BAME publications, through television networks and editorials from faith leaders in popular religious publications;

- I wrote to faith leaders directly to encourage them to promote the consultation; and

- More widely, the consultation was promoted on social media and the Department worked with a number of organ donation-related organisations to highlight the consultation via their respective platforms.

In addition, NHS Blood and Transplant commissioned Ipsos MORI to conduct 26 focus groups across England with representatives from a number of BAME groups and faith groups. More recently, on 9 May, I hosted an event with faith leaders to discuss barriers to organ donation and to explore what more can be done to engage with the different communities.

12th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what targets had been set out for BAME (a) blood, (b) stem cell and (c) organ donation in each of the last five years; and to what extent each of those targets were met.

There are no targets published in relation to Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic blood, stem cell and organ donation.

12th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what targets there are for the amount of BAME (a) blood, (b) stem cells and (c) organs donated in (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19 and (c) 2019-2020.

There are no targets published in relation to Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic blood, stem cell and organ donation.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many patients underwent inguinal hernia surgery in each region of England in each of the last three years.

NHS England has advised that it does not collect data on the number of patients that underwent inguinal hernia surgery in each region of England.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many inguinal hernia repair procedures has NHS undertaken in each Clinical Commissioning Group in each of the last five years.

A table containing the number of inguinal hernia repair procedures undertaken by the National Health Service in England by clinical commissioning group of treatment for the years 2012/13 to 2016/17 is attached.

Steve Barclay
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will respond to the recommendations made in the Hernia Outcomes Campaign’s report, Inguinal Hernia Surgery: Improving Patient Outcomes and Reducing Variation published in November 2017, and will he make a statement.

NHS England has advised that the Patient Reported Outcome Measure (PROM) on hernia repair did not demonstrate significant improvements in quality of outcomes for many patients and was not implemented very widely.

The Hernia Outcomes Campaign team are in discussion with the Royal College of Surgeons of England, with the British Hernia Society, the Getting It Right First Time team and NHS England about potentially constructing and testing a more useful PROM for hernia outcomes.

NHS England has advised that no specific guidance is issued to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) regarding the development of commissioning policies for inguinal hernia repair.

It is up to CCGs to decide how services are delivered at a local level and to decide the criteria that they use to determine their commissioning policies for hernia repair. In doing so, they are expected to take account of any National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Quality Standards that are relevant to this.

Individual surgeons have a responsibility for assessing the outcomes of their operations and should make this information available in summary form to prospective patients to help them make effective decisions about whether or not to choose surgical treatment.

A representative of NHS England has met with members of the Hernias Outcomes Campaign and discussed the contents of their 2017 report. NHS England concur that for patients with few symptoms an effective process of shared decision-making between patient and surgeon may well result in a choice not to opt for immediate surgery.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, in what form will patient outcomes for inguinal hernia patients be recorded as a result of the decision by NHS England to discontinue the patient reported outcome measure for that treatment.

NHS England has advised that the Patient Reported Outcome Measure (PROM) on hernia repair did not demonstrate significant improvements in quality of outcomes for many patients and was not implemented very widely.

The Hernia Outcomes Campaign team are in discussion with the Royal College of Surgeons of England, with the British Hernia Society, the Getting It Right First Time team and NHS England about potentially constructing and testing a more useful PROM for hernia outcomes.

NHS England has advised that no specific guidance is issued to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) regarding the development of commissioning policies for inguinal hernia repair.

It is up to CCGs to decide how services are delivered at a local level and to decide the criteria that they use to determine their commissioning policies for hernia repair. In doing so, they are expected to take account of any National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Quality Standards that are relevant to this.

Individual surgeons have a responsibility for assessing the outcomes of their operations and should make this information available in summary form to prospective patients to help them make effective decisions about whether or not to choose surgical treatment.

A representative of NHS England has met with members of the Hernias Outcomes Campaign and discussed the contents of their 2017 report. NHS England concur that for patients with few symptoms an effective process of shared decision-making between patient and surgeon may well result in a choice not to opt for immediate surgery.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of the recommendation made by Hernia Outcomes Campaign on the introduction of a watchful waiting policy for inguinal hernia surgery in that organisations report, Inguinal Hernia Surgery: Improving Patient Outcomes and Reducing Variation, published in November 2017.

NHS England has advised that the Patient Reported Outcome Measure (PROM) on hernia repair did not demonstrate significant improvements in quality of outcomes for many patients and was not implemented very widely.

The Hernia Outcomes Campaign team are in discussion with the Royal College of Surgeons of England, with the British Hernia Society, the Getting It Right First Time team and NHS England about potentially constructing and testing a more useful PROM for hernia outcomes.

NHS England has advised that no specific guidance is issued to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) regarding the development of commissioning policies for inguinal hernia repair.

It is up to CCGs to decide how services are delivered at a local level and to decide the criteria that they use to determine their commissioning policies for hernia repair. In doing so, they are expected to take account of any National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Quality Standards that are relevant to this.

Individual surgeons have a responsibility for assessing the outcomes of their operations and should make this information available in summary form to prospective patients to help them make effective decisions about whether or not to choose surgical treatment.

A representative of NHS England has met with members of the Hernias Outcomes Campaign and discussed the contents of their 2017 report. NHS England concur that for patients with few symptoms an effective process of shared decision-making between patient and surgeon may well result in a choice not to opt for immediate surgery.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria is used by Clinical Commissioning Groups to determine commissioning policies for inguinal hernia repair.

NHS England has advised that the Patient Reported Outcome Measure (PROM) on hernia repair did not demonstrate significant improvements in quality of outcomes for many patients and was not implemented very widely.

The Hernia Outcomes Campaign team are in discussion with the Royal College of Surgeons of England, with the British Hernia Society, the Getting It Right First Time team and NHS England about potentially constructing and testing a more useful PROM for hernia outcomes.

NHS England has advised that no specific guidance is issued to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) regarding the development of commissioning policies for inguinal hernia repair.

It is up to CCGs to decide how services are delivered at a local level and to decide the criteria that they use to determine their commissioning policies for hernia repair. In doing so, they are expected to take account of any National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Quality Standards that are relevant to this.

Individual surgeons have a responsibility for assessing the outcomes of their operations and should make this information available in summary form to prospective patients to help them make effective decisions about whether or not to choose surgical treatment.

A representative of NHS England has met with members of the Hernias Outcomes Campaign and discussed the contents of their 2017 report. NHS England concur that for patients with few symptoms an effective process of shared decision-making between patient and surgeon may well result in a choice not to opt for immediate surgery.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance NHS England has issued to Clinical Commissioning Groups for the development of commissioning policies for inguinal hernia repair.

NHS England has advised that the Patient Reported Outcome Measure (PROM) on hernia repair did not demonstrate significant improvements in quality of outcomes for many patients and was not implemented very widely.

The Hernia Outcomes Campaign team are in discussion with the Royal College of Surgeons of England, with the British Hernia Society, the Getting It Right First Time team and NHS England about potentially constructing and testing a more useful PROM for hernia outcomes.

NHS England has advised that no specific guidance is issued to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) regarding the development of commissioning policies for inguinal hernia repair.

It is up to CCGs to decide how services are delivered at a local level and to decide the criteria that they use to determine their commissioning policies for hernia repair. In doing so, they are expected to take account of any National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Quality Standards that are relevant to this.

Individual surgeons have a responsibility for assessing the outcomes of their operations and should make this information available in summary form to prospective patients to help them make effective decisions about whether or not to choose surgical treatment.

A representative of NHS England has met with members of the Hernias Outcomes Campaign and discussed the contents of their 2017 report. NHS England concur that for patients with few symptoms an effective process of shared decision-making between patient and surgeon may well result in a choice not to opt for immediate surgery.

30th Apr 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment has his Department made of the effect of removing the Patient Reported Outcome Measure on hernia repair on the commissioning policies used by Clinical Commissioning Groups.

NHS England has advised that the Patient Reported Outcome Measure (PROM) on hernia repair did not demonstrate significant improvements in quality of outcomes for many patients and was not implemented very widely.

The Hernia Outcomes Campaign team are in discussion with the Royal College of Surgeons of England, with the British Hernia Society, the Getting It Right First Time team and NHS England about potentially constructing and testing a more useful PROM for hernia outcomes.

NHS England has advised that no specific guidance is issued to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) regarding the development of commissioning policies for inguinal hernia repair.

It is up to CCGs to decide how services are delivered at a local level and to decide the criteria that they use to determine their commissioning policies for hernia repair. In doing so, they are expected to take account of any National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Quality Standards that are relevant to this.

Individual surgeons have a responsibility for assessing the outcomes of their operations and should make this information available in summary form to prospective patients to help them make effective decisions about whether or not to choose surgical treatment.

A representative of NHS England has met with members of the Hernias Outcomes Campaign and discussed the contents of their 2017 report. NHS England concur that for patients with few symptoms an effective process of shared decision-making between patient and surgeon may well result in a choice not to opt for immediate surgery.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department is having discussions with the Bahraini Government on seeking the release of Hassan Mushaima on a humanitarian basis; and if he will make a statement.

​The Foreign and Commonwealth Office and our Embassy in Bahrain have raised the case of Hassan Mushaima with the Bahraini authorities at senior levels. The Bahraini authorities have assured us that Mr Mushaima has access to his medication and medical facilities. We continue to encourage those with concerns to report them to the appropriate human rights oversight body. We also continue to encourage the oversight bodies to carry out swift and thorough investigations into any such claims.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if his department will make representations to the Bahraini Government (a) to enable Hassan Mushaima to receive his full list of medications and (b) on making adaptions to his detention condition.

​The Foreign and Commonwealth Office and our Embassy in Bahrain have raised the case of Hassan Mushaima with the Bahraini authorities at senior levels. The Bahraini authorities have assured us that Mr Mushaima has access to his medication and medical facilities. We continue to encourage those with concerns to report them to the appropriate human rights oversight body. We also continue to encourage the oversight bodies to carry out swift and thorough investigations into any such claims.

14th Jun 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what representations he has received on the effect of the move of the HMRC Office in Wolverhampton to a new office in Birmingham on the (a) women and (b) other people who (i) work and (ii) use that office in Wolverhampton South West constituency.

HMRC has received representations from Wolverhampton Council, Coventry Council and the Mayor of the West Midlands about the closure of the HMRC offices in Coventry and Wolverhampton and relocation of the workforce to Birmingham. HMRC officials recently met with the Mayor and representatives from the two councils.

HMRC conducted high level People Impact and Equality Assessments to inform its initial planning and has already published a summary of this to its staff. It continues to undertake extensive work on people and equality impacts, including gender. Wolverhampton is included in impact work for the Birmingham Regional Centre.

15th Nov 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has estimated how many victims of rape, following a conviction, with a third child have been successful in claiming for child tax credits.

Statistics relating to exceptions to the limit on support to two children in Child Tax Credit will be published in due course.

Elizabeth Truss
Minister for Women and Equalities
11th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the maximum amount of time is that a person can be detained in an immigration removal centre.

Although there is no fixed time limit on immigration detention in the UK, case law is clear that, to be lawful, detention must last no longer than is reasonably necessary to achieve the purpose for which it was authorised, must not be unduly prolonged and, in relation to removal, there must be a realistic prospect of removal within a reasonable period of time. Published Home Office policy is clear that detention must only be used for the shortest period necessary.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/offender-management

6th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment she has made of the level of provision of exceptional case funding for immigration cases relating to children.

The Government is committed to the protection of vulnerable children, especially in cases where children lack adequate parental support. Changes to the availability of legal aid for civil legal cases were made in the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO) and as such a consideration of the effects of the changes will be made as part of our Post-Implementation Review of the Act, which will report later this year.

Support for children in non-asylum immigration cases remains available through the Exceptional Case Funding Scheme (ECF) in cases where failure to provide legal aid would breach their rights under the European Convention on Human Rights or EU law, subject to means and merits tests.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department plans for the review of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 to include an examination of the effect of that Act on non-asylum immigration cases involving unaccompanied and separated children.

The Government is committed to the protection of vulnerable children, especially in cases where children lack adequate parental support.

The Lord Chancellor has confirmed the start of the review into Part 1 of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012. The review will include an assessment of the changes to the scope of legal aid for immigration cases.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)