Dave Doogan Portrait

Dave Doogan

Scottish National Party - Angus

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Agriculture and Rural Affairs)

(since January 2020)

Shadow SNP Spokesperson (Manufacturing)

(since October 2020)
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 5th Jan 2022


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 18th January 2022
14:00
Division Votes
Tuesday 11th January 2022
Household Energy Bills: VAT
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 34 Scottish National Party Aye votes vs 0 Scottish National Party No votes
Tally: Ayes - 229 Noes - 319
Speeches
Thursday 13th January 2022
Business of the House
It is telling, is it not, that the only Scottish Conservative willing to defend the Prime Minister is the Scottish …
Written Answers
Thursday 18th November 2021
Children: Maintenance
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 30th November 2021
Closure of TSB branch in Angus
That this House regrets the announcement by TSB that it intends to close its Forfar Branch and in so doing …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th July 2021
1. Employment and earnings
7 January 2021, received £75. Hours: 1 hr. (Registered 26 July 2021)
EDM signed
Monday 10th January 2022
ANM Group 150th anniversary
That this House notes that 2022 sees the 150th anniversary of the foundation of what is now the ANM Group …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Dave Doogan has voted in 259 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Dave Doogan Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Jacob Rees-Mogg (Conservative)
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons
(21 debate interactions)
Dominic Raab (Conservative)
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
(14 debate interactions)
Ben Wallace (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Defence
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Ministry of Defence
(14 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Dave Doogan's debates

Angus Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

Leading veterinary and welfare bodies are concerned by the alarming rise in ear-cropped dogs in the UK. Ear cropping is illegal in the UK and an unnecessary, painful mutilation with no welfare benefit. The practice involves cutting off part of the ear flap, often without anaesthesia or pain relief.

Plenty of dogs from UK breeders & rescues need homes. Transporting young pups long distances is often stressful, before being sold for ridiculous prices to unsuspecting dog-lovers. Government must adjust current laws, ban this unethical activity on welfare grounds & protect these poor animals ASAP.

Now that we have left the EU, the UK has the ability to finally stop the importation of Shark Fins. They had previously stated that 'Whilst in the EU, it is not possible to unilaterally ban the import of shark fins into the UK.'

The SNP government appears solely intent on getting independence at any cost.


Latest EDMs signed by Dave Doogan

5th January 2022
Dave Doogan signed this EDM on Monday 10th January 2022

ANM Group 150th anniversary

Tabled by: Richard Thomson (Scottish National Party - Gordon)
That this House notes that 2022 sees the 150th anniversary of the foundation of what is now the ANM Group Limited co-operative; recognises that North-east Scotland has been an area where, for centuries, livestock rearing and marketing has been a source of pride, prestige and considerable financial investment; acknowledges Aberdeen …
15 signatures
(Most recent: 11 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 14
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
5th January 2022
Dave Doogan signed this EDM on Monday 10th January 2022

Remembering Stephen Sutton MBE

Tabled by: Amy Callaghan (Scottish National Party - East Dunbartonshire)
That this House celebrates the life and legacy of the late Stephen Sutton MBE who was born on 16 December 1994; understands Stephen was a charity activist known for his blog and fundraising efforts for Teenage Cancer Trust; notes Stephen’s story continues to be a source of inspiration for thousands …
20 signatures
(Most recent: 13 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 19
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
View All Dave Doogan's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Dave Doogan, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Dave Doogan has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Dave Doogan has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Dave Doogan has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Dave Doogan has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


121 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that there are minimal delays at the border as a result of non-tariff barriers to trade.

The Government has provided comprehensive guidance on the new arrangements for trade with the EU. We are working closely with the devolved administrations, operational partners, industry groups and transporters to minimise any potential disruption. The Border Operating Centre is operating around the clock to pull together all the necessary sources of information to track what is happening at the border.

Penny Mordaunt
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the installation of smart meters is mandatory in private residences.

Smart meters are replacing traditional gas and electricity meters in Great Britain as part of an essential infrastructure upgrade to make the energy system more efficient and flexible, enabling the cost-effective delivery of net zero greenhouse gas emissions.

Smart meters also provide households with accurate, near-real time information about energy consumption in pounds and pence via an In-Home Display, so consumers can easily understand how to use less and save money on their bills.

Energy suppliers are required by licence conditions to take all reasonable steps to install smart meters in homes and small businesses. This obligation expires at the end of June 2021 and will be replaced with a new four-year policy framework from 1 July 2021 with fixed annual installation targets for energy suppliers to drive the consistent, long-term investment needed to ensure that everyone can benefit from smart meters.

Smart meters are not mandatory for energy consumers, but the Government wants all homes and small businesses to be able to benefit from the financial savings and greater convenience of digital energy services, and as such smart meters will become the default metering technology used in Great Britain.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Government is taking to support the higher education sector in England during the covid-19 outbreak; and what consequential effect that support has on the Scottish higher education sector.

On 4 May 2020, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, announced a package of measures to protect students and higher education providers in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. This package was designed to stabilise university finances, including tuition fee income resulting from admissions, and to support our world-class higher education system to continue to deliver for all students and the wider economy. Details of the package can be found at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-support-package-for-universities-and-students.

Furthermore, building on the stabilisation package and access to business support schemes, the government has also announced a further package of support to research within universities, including universities across Scotland. This includes £280 million of government funding as well as a package of low-interest loans with long pay-back periods, supplemented by a small amount of government grants. In sharing responsibility for the future of science and research with our world-leading university system, the government will cover up to 80% of a university’s income losses from international students for the academic year 2020/21, up to the value of their non-publicly funded research activity.

On 16 July, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, announced the higher education restructuring regime, of which details can be found at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/higher-education-restructuring-regime.

This will be deployed as a last resort, if a decision has been made to support a provider in England facing severe financial difficulties related to the COVID-19 outbreak, when other steps to preserve a provider’s viability and mitigate the risks of provider failure have not proved sufficient.

The UK government has invited ministers in the the Scottish government, the Welsh government and the Northern Ireland Executive to opt into the regime on behalf of higher education providers in their respective territories. Throughout the development of the higher education stabilisation package, we have shared our approach and thinking with the devolved administrations through regular engagement at a ministerial and official level.

There are several elements to the higher education stabilisation package which are applicable in Scotland, including temporary student number controls which apply to English-domiciled students studying at higher education providers in all devolved administrations; Clearing Plus, which applies to all UK higher education providers using UCAS; the International Education Strategy, including communications to prospective international students; and the Ministerial Taskforce on university research sustainability, which includes representation from the Scottish government. This is in addition to the UK-wide government support schemes such as the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CIBLS) and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS).

Education in the United Kingdom is a devolved matter, so England, Wales, Scotland, and Northern Ireland each have their own education system. The UK government is responsible for England, whilst the Scottish government, the Welsh government and the Northern Ireland Executive are responsible for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, respectively.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he has taken with Cabinet colleagues to expedite a resumption of pork exports from UK pig processing plants, whose export licenses to China were voluntarily surrendered due to the covid-19 pandemic.

Defra is working closely with the Department for International Trade (DIT) and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) at every level to utilise opportunities to press the General Administration of Customs China (GACC) for the re-listing of the three affected UK pork processing plants. As part of this Defra has taken a number of steps, including those summarised below.

Defra, in collaboration with DIT and FCDO, continues to monitor the situation and to do all it can to resolve this issue. However, re-listing these establishments is ultimately in the gift of the GACC.

  • The Defra Secretary of State wrote to GACC Minister Ni in March 2021 and again in May 2021 to raise this issue and request a meeting. GACC have not responded.
  • Defra has fulfilled all of China’s technical requests to enable the re-listing of these UK establishments. This includes the submission to GACC of extensive COVID-19 dossiers, countersigned by the relevant Food Safety Competent Authorities and Public Health Authorities, as well as completing virtual video inspections chaired and facilitated by Defra with GACC Officials, where requested.
  • A letter from the UK Chief Veterinary Officer was sent to GACC to highlight the latest UN Food and Agriculture Organisation’s guidance that was published in August 2021 on the risks COVID-19 transmission via food or food packaging.
  • Beyond direct engagement with GACC, Defra continues to engage with FCDO and DIT colleagues at different levels on a regular basis to ensure a consistent, joined up approach to UK Government pressing GACC for the re-listing of UK pork establishments.
  • Additionally, the UK raised concerns regarding these trade restrictive measures at the World Trade Organisation Sanitary Phytosanitary (WTO SPS) Committee in November 2020, March 2021, July 2021 and in bilateral discussions with China.
Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government's legislative proposals to ban the import and export of shark fins will include a ban on the import and export of shark fin products.

As set out in the recently published Action Plan for Animal Welfare we will be bringing in legislation to ban the import and export of detached shark fins.

We are making good progress with developing this legislation including consideration of the scope needed to ensure our measures are as effective as possible at delivering shark conservation benefits globally. These measures will demonstrate our continuing leadership on shark conservation issues and signal our strong opposition to any ongoing finning practices.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to review the restrictions placed on pigeon racing implemented by his Department due to the perceived transmission risk of bird flu by racing pigeons.

From 21 April 2021, low risk pigeon racing can take place from locations not on mainland Europe, provided organisers notify the Animal and Plant Health Agency at least seven days before the event and that they meet the requirements of the General Licence. For a full list of what is permitted see the guidance for bird gatherings on gov.uk. Definitive requirements are set out in the published General Licence for the relevant administration (England, Wales and Scotland)

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will publish the (a) selection criteria and (b) scoring mechanism for that criteria used by his Department when selecting which operators to licence to supply seasonal agricultural labour from abroad as part of the seasonal agricultural workers scheme.

Selecting the additional operators for the extended Seasonal Workers Pilot is a two-stage process. Defra conducted the first stage, which was the Request for Information (RFI) exercise inviting responses by 29 January 2021. Information on the selection criteria and scoring mechanisms is published online here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/seasonal-workers-pilot-request-for-information/seasonal-workers-pilot-request-for-information .

Defra has now completed the RFI exercise and in doing so proposed two additional operators to the Home Office, who are now conducting the second-stage of approval and licensing.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of whether export costs have increased and revenue has been lost due to the time taken to resolve export health certificate administrative problems for products of animal origin at Border Control Posts; and what plans he has to speed up the UK’s administrative processes to make the delivery of goods to the EU more efficient for UK distributors.

We do not routinely track the costs of export certification, which is a commercial matter between certifiers and exporters. We have always been clear that new processes would apply for exports of products of animal origin to the EU, from 01 January 2021. Before then we introduced efficiency measures for exporters, including guidance for logistics hubs and consolidation of loads. These measures have reduced exporters’ administrative requirements and through consolidation the total number of export health certificates required for EU exports. We are working to improve the online process of applying for export heath certificates to reduce errors and speed up certification.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to his Department's response to the consultation on ending live animal exports for slaughter, what assessment his Department has made of the requirements and needs of agri-food businesses whose export times necessarily exceed 24 hours.

The public consultation ended on 25 February and we are currently analysing all the responses we received; we will be publishing the Government response in due course.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with his counterparts in (a) France, (b) the Netherlands and (c) the EU to develop mutual understanding on the checks required on agri-food goods moving between the UK and the EU.

There is a constant engagement between Defra officials and our counterparts in the EU to discuss issues regarding agri-food goods at the borders as they are reported. Through these channels, and through our regular meetings with industry representatives, we’re closely monitoring live issues and working to resolve them. Officials also hold regular technical meetings with experts from the UK and Member States to ensure that border issues are quickly resolved, including multiple engagements between the UK’s Chief Veterinary Officer and their counterparts in EU Member States to further develop mutual understanding on controls and checks that are necessary at borders. The Secretary of State will also continue to engage directly with his counterparts in the EU and beyond.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 11 March to Question 164621 on Potatoes: UK Trade with EU, for what reasons a maximum residue level applies to EU imports but not to potatoes produced in England.

At the end of the EU Exit Transition Period, all extant EU maximum residue levels (MRLs) were carried over into the pesticides regulatory regime in place in Great Britain. These have not changed since and there is currently no difference between the EU and GB MRL for potatoes for 1,4-dimethylnaphthalene (1,4-DMN). The 1,4-DMN MRL therefore applies to both domestic produce and produce imported from the EU. The key difference is in which pesticides are authorised for use in each country.

As of 1 January 2021, there is an autonomous pesticides regime in Great Britain. This means that the UK Government and the devolved administrations take our own decisions about which pesticides to authorise for use, based on scientific assessment of the risks. We may therefore sometimes take different decisions to countries in the EU or elsewhere. Last year, our regulator, the Health and Safety Executive, passed concerns arising from their risk assessment for 1,4-DMN to the EU for them to take into account.

In the meantime, emergency authorisations have been granted by all four UK administrations allowing limited and controlled use of a 1,4-DMN product.

We aim to establish a formal MRL review programme in the next few years and we are able to review MRLs when necessary, for example, to protect public health.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect on domestic potato producers of banning the anti-sprouting component DMN while allowing EU potato producers using that component to import potatoes to the UK.

Before a pesticide can be used, its active substance must be approved and the pesticide itself must be authorised. Decisions on approval and authorisation are based on an assessment of the risks posed to people and to the environment. Such decisions are devolved and so are taken by the relevant government or by the Health and Safety Executive on its behalf. Decisions on the authorisation of pesticides for use in Scotland are not, therefore, taken by the UK Government.

The active substance 1,4-dimethylnaphthalene (1,4-DMN) is approved but at present there is no authorised product. All four UK governments have granted an emergency authorisation allowing the limited and controlled use until 31 May of a 1,4-DMN product to prevent sprouting of harvested potatoes. This emergency authorisation is granted in recognition of the need for sprout suppression and the lack, in certain circumstances, of alternative means of control.

Potatoes treated with 1,4-DMN are only permitted to be imported from the EU or elsewhere if the level of the chemical is below a statutory Maximum Residue Level of 15 mg/kg.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 28 January 2021 to Question 143107, when he plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Angus of 3 December 2020 on the potential revocation of Vydate for treatment of potato crops, reference DD526.

I apologise for the further delay in responding. A reply was issued to the hon. Member for Angus on 23 February 2021.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons the EU is allowed to export potato seed into Great Britain.

Defra ministers agreed a policy proposed by Defra officials and cleared with Devolved Administration (DA) colleagues to accept EU seed potatoes for 6 months beyond the end of the transition period, until 30 June. This policy was a change from an original policy to block EU seed potatoes entirely, to protect Scotland's specialist industry. The policy options regarding the import of seed potatoes from the EU were discussed between officials of all four administrations and industry organisations. In the absence of a reciprocal agreement with the EU, the original preference was to block EU seed potatoes immediately after the transition period. However, the coordinated request from three organisations representing interests across the potato industry, and the UK Government’s concern that entirely blocking EU potatoes, could prove detrimental to a reciprocal agreement in the longer term, led us to revisit the policy. The industry organisations expressed concerns that although the UK is broadly self-sufficient in the total quantity of seed potato production, it does not currently produce the range of varieties required by the UK market. They also explained that the transitional provisions in the Withdrawal Agreement for goods on the market were unhelpful for seed potatoes because of the need for specialist storage. To address both issues, their request was to allow EU seed potatoes to be imported for planting in spring 2021 to provide a further period of adaptation. This led to the final proposal to accept EU seed potatoes in England and Wales until June 2021, supporting the industry as it adapts.

Defra officials and the DAs re-visited the policy following a joint letter from industry organisations representing both seed and ware potato growers. They proposed a compromise policy to accept EU seed potatoes for a limited time to ensure supply for the Spring growing season. This policy was discussed and agreed with the DAs and a sixth month period of grace was proposed, in line with other 'standstill' policies.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Angus of 3 December 2020 on the potential revocation of Vydate for treatment of potato crops, reference DD526.

I apologise for the delay in responding. Defra is currently dealing with high volumes of correspondence due to Covid-19. A reply to the hon. Member is being prepared and will be issued very shortly.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 18 January 2021 to Question 137309 on Animal Products: UK Trade with EU, what new markets the Government has opened for processed animal proteins; what the barriers to access to those markets were prior to the end of the transition period; and what the estimated gross value is of those new markets.

Over the past two years, Defra has put in place new veterinary export health certificates to facilitate the export of processed animal proteins from terrestrial animals to Cambodia, Indonesia, Myanmar, Nigeria and Pakistan. We do not currently know the value of these new markets but the gross value of the annual trade to all non-EU markets is approximately £40million. There are now 23 veterinary export health certificates available to support this trade to countries outside the EU.

Defra is aware that UK renderers wish to export even further afield and that many of the authorities in those destination countries require consignments to be accompanied by a veterinary export health certificate and meet stringent import conditions. Defra continues to work with UK rendering companies to maintain and expand its range of veterinary export health certificates supporting the export of processed animal protein to their priority destination countries.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has received representations and information on businesses needing clarification of whether they require an EHC for exports to Northern Ireland and the EU which contain processed animal protein including milk products, gelatine, hydrolysed proteins, eggs, dicalcium phosphate and collagen; and whether he is taking steps to support those businesses.

Defra is in regular discussions with businesses on the Export Health Certificate (EHC) requirements for products sent to Northern Ireland and the EU which contain processed animal protein (PAP).

Mammalian PAP must have been processed in a region which is, under the international rules, in the negligible risk category for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). It must have been processed by pressure sterilisation (known as ‘Method 1’). This means mammalian PAP products from Great Britain cannot be certified for export to Northern Ireland or the EU.

This issue was raised in our discussions with the EU last year and we continue to look at options to negotiate a position on trade.

We continue to hold discussions regularly with the rendering industry. We have worked with other countries to obtain additional export health certificates for PAP, meaning we were able to open markets for these products elsewhere.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the additional cost to Scottish seafood and agricultural exporters per year of (a) customs documentation and (b) other non-tariff barriers to trade with the EU under the EU-UK trade and co-operation agreement.

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement delivers on the Government's promise to take the UK out of the EU's customs territory and to regain control of our borders. We have always been clear that this means there will be new customs processes on goods being moved from GB into the EU and vice versa. The Agreement will help to manage the burden of non-tariff barriers for businesses by supporting efficient customs arrangements covering all trade in goods, while ensuring that we will be free to regulate our own market as we see fit. In addition, the agreement enables both sides to further reduce costs in the longer term. For example, we have agreed to explore the possibility of sharing import and export declaration data, including by setting up pilot programmes, where appropriate, with a view to reducing administrative burdens on business.

Importantly, this Agreement ensures there will be zero tariffs or quotas on trade between the UK and the EU, where goods meet the relevant rules of origin, and includes provisions to facilitate trade and address non-tariff barriers for UK exports to the EU and vice versa. It will therefore provide Scottish businesses with exceptional access to the EU's market and help them continue to trade smoothly: it is the first time the EU has ever agreed a zero tariff, zero quota deal.

We have already struck deals with more than 58 countries around the world, worth £198 billion a year - including with Canada, Japan and Singapore, with many more to come. This will benefit Scottish businesses, and create new markets for Scotland's exporters. It allows us to continue to have a close relationship with our European friends and neighbours, while we take our place in the world with an independent trade policy, acting as a global force for good.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will (a) hold discussions with industry (i) bodies and (ii) leaders on the proportion of seasonal agricultural workers that were from the UK workforce and (b) use the results of those discussions when presenting proposals for the future of seasonal agricultural work to the Home Secretary.

Defra works closely with industry bodies and leaders, regularly speaking with recruiters, growers, unions and associations, and making use of all available information and evidence to understand the labour supply picture for the agri-food supply chain.

Industry reports that supply of seasonal labour has been sufficient across the main horticultural sectors so far this year. Through the ‘Pick for Britain’ campaign, Defra has collaborated with industry to raise the profile of seasonal work on farms. The Pick for Britain website has received nearly 2 million unique page views since its launch but Defra does not hold any information about specific vacancies, interviews or people in jobs as that information is held by individual companies.

The horticultural sector will continue to be able to rely on EU nationals living in the UK with settled or pre-settled status. Around 3.7 million EU citizens and their families have been granted settled or pre-settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme and the application deadline is not until 30 June 2021. EU nationals who have settled status can continue to travel to the UK to do seasonal work in 2021.

On 19 February, the Government announced that the annual quota for this second year of the?Seasonal Workers Pilot scheme would increase from 2,500 to 10,000 places. The Pilot has provided thousands of non-EU workers to farms across the UK this year to undertake seasonal employment in the edible horticulture sector.

Defra will continue to work closely with the Home Office on seasonal agricultural workers and the needs of the sector.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Angus dated 11 June 2020 on the future of the fishing industry.

A reply to the hon. Member’s correspondence is being prepared and will be sent out very shortly.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
4th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Angus dated 28 April 2020 on the potato industry.

I apologise for the delay in responding to the hon Member. Defra is currently dealing with unprecedented volumes of correspondence due to COVID-19. A reply to the hon. Member’s correspondence is being prepared and will be sent out very shortly.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2020
What discussions she has had with (a) her international counterparts and (b) international development non-governmental organisations on the planned merger of her Department with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

As with any government change like this, the announcement came first to Parliament. Baroness Sugg meets British Development Civil Society Organisations regularly. Strong consultation with a wide range of partners will continue to be a key component of our work to create the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she has taken with Cabinet colleagues to expedite a resumption of pork exports from UK pig processing plants, whose export licenses to China were voluntarily surrendered due to the covid-19 pandemic.

Ministers have raised this issue with their Chinese counterparts. The Department continues to press the Chinese authorities for a swift resolution and is working closely with affected UK pork processing plants.

9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the value of UK cod sales to Norway was in the most recent period for which that information is available; and what tariff will be imposed on future such sales under the terms of the new free trade agreement recently agreed between the UK and Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein.

Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein provide a preferential rate of 0% for cod imports from Britain. In 2020, we exported approximately £1 million (382 tons) of cod to Norway. British exporters of cod will not face tariff barriers in future trade with any of these countries.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what terms have been agreed in the free trade agreement between the UK and Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein on UK sales of cod to Norway.

Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein provide a preferential rate of 0% for cod imports from Britain. In 2020, we exported approximately £1 million (382 tons) of cod to Norway. British exporters of cod will not face tariff barriers in future trade with any of these countries.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
18th Jun 2020
What recent progress she has made on negotiating free trade agreements with (a) the US and (b) Japan.

We have launched negotiations with both the US and Japan and we want to secure ambitious trade deals that benefit every part of the UK. Scotland is expected to be a particularly strong beneficiary from both deals.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when the DVLA plans to substantively respond to the ongoing case of the constituent of the hon. Member for Angus, reference DD4418.

A reply to the correspondence referred to was sent by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency on 21 October. The reply included an apology for the delay in responding.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential economic development achievable by investing in maritime decarbonisation in the UK’s coastal communities; and what steps the Government will take to ensure that development is achieved equitably between all nations of the UK.

The Department has made no assessment of the level of economic development achievable by investing in maritime decarbonisation in the UK’s coastal communities. However, in 2019, alongside the Clean Maritime Plan, the Department published an assessment which identified that low and zero emissions shipping could result in potential economic benefits to the UK of around £360-£510 million per year by the middle of the century.

Maritime UK has published its views that investment in maritime decarbonisation could in future create jobs in all four nations of the United Kingdom, particularly in coastal communities with a tradition of maritime economic activity, including shipbuilding.

Industry research estimates that in 2017 the UK maritime sector as a whole directly supported more than 220,000 jobs for UK employees.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what functions national maritime operations centres perform; what resources and equipment are located at those centres; and how many staff are stationed at each of those centres.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard has one National Maritime Operation Centre (NMOC) which is based in Fareham in Hampshire. In addition to the National Maritime Operations Centre there are ten Coastguard Operations Centres (CGOCs) which are located at: Aberdeen; Belfast; Dover; Falmouth; Holyhead; Humber; Milford Haven; Shetland; Stornoway; and London.

The NMOC and the CGOCs form a fully integrated and flexible national network which allows Her Majesty’s Coastguard to fulfil its national and international functions, which includes the initiation and coordination of civil maritime and aeronautical search and rescue.

As defined by international convention the six key functions of the integrated national network are; search and rescue; pollution and response; vessel traffic management; maritime safety; maritime security and emergency; and disaster management. All centres are equipped to respond to such incidents 24/7/365.

In addition, the NMOC also incorporates the Aeronautical Rescue Coordination Centre and the Mission Control Centre, which are responsible for tasking of all Her Majesty’s Coastguard search and rescue aviation assets and the receipt and response to distress beacons respectively.

All Her Majesty’s Coastguard centres are equipped to receive, respond and coordinate all distress, urgency and alert situations within the UK Search and Rescue Region. This includes an integrated command and control system, search planning, integrated mapping and communications systems, including satellite-based services.

The below table demonstrates how many full-time equivalent operational staff, by job role, are expected to be at each location.

Maritime Operations Controllers

Team Leaders

Senior Maritime Operations Officers

Maritime Operations Officers

Aberdeen CGOC

1

4

12

4

Belfast CGOC

1

4

12

4

Dover CGOC

1

4

21

6

Falmouth CGOC

1

4

12

4

Holyhead CGOC

1

4

12

4

Humber CGOC

1

4

18

6

London

1

0

6

0

Milford Haven CGOC

1

4

18

6

NMOC

8

8

51

16

Shetland CGOC

1

4

12

4

Stornoway CGOC

1

4

12

4

Two Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Managers also work at the National Maritime Operation Centre. A further two full time equivalent staff work at the Mission Control Centre and thirty-two staff work at the Aeronautical Rescue Coordination Centre.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many staff are employed by (a) the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and (b) HM Coastguard in (i) England, (ii) Scotland, (iii) Northern Ireland and (iv) Wales.

As of 31 March 2021, the employees of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency are broken down as follows, this includes permanent and fixed term employees:

England - 926

Scotland -161

Northern Ireland - 41

Wales – 108

Her Majesty’s Coastguard is a Directorate within the Maritime and Coastguard Agency and therefore is included in the figures above. Disaggregating Her Majesty’s Coastguard figures from above, permanent and fixed term employees within Her Majesty’s Coastguard Directorate as of 31 March 2021 are:

England - 334

Scotland -114

Northern Ireland - 28

Wales – 57

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what types of (a) helicopter and (b) ships HM Coastguard has access to; and where those vehicles are stationed.

Her Majesty’s Coastguard has on contract two types of search and rescue helicopter. These are the Sikorsky S 92 and the AgustaWestland (Leonardo) AW189.

The dedicated search and rescue helicopters operate from the following locations:

Sikorsky S92 AgustaWestland 189

Sumburgh Inverness

Stornoway Prestwick

Humberside St Athan

Caernarfon Lydd

Newquay Lee on the Solent

Her Majesty’s Coastguard has on contract one Emergency Towing Vessel (ETV) – which is an Anchor Handling Tug. The ETV is permanently stationed off the northern coasts of Scotland.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the budget for HM Coastguard was in each of the last five years.

The budget for Her Majesty’s Coastguard for each of the last five years is as follows:

Financial Year Budget (£)

2016-17 242,355,780

2017-18 260,745,074

2018-19 248,005,106

2019-20 259,397,741

2020-21 271,058,746

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency has made of the potential merits of prioritising people who require a specific type of driving licence for employment for bookings for practical driving tests when they resume as covid-19 restrictions are eased; and if he will make a statement.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency is now planning to resume driver training and testing in line with the Prime Minister’s road map announcement. In England, this will be no earlier than 12 April 2021, providing the data shows it is safe to move on to this next step.

Dates for Scotland and Wales remain subject to agreement with the devolved administrations.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) does not hold data on a candidate’s occupation, or reason for taking a test, when they apply for a routine theory or practical test. The DVSA will be making tests available in all licence categories when it is safe to do so.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Covid-19 Response, Spring 2021 roadmap, published in February 2021, CP 398, when (a) bookings for driving theory tests and (b) driving theory test centres will be permitted to reopen.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency is now planning to resume driver training and testing in line with the Prime Minister’s road map announcement. In England, this will be no earlier than 12 April 2021, providing the data shows it is safe to move on to this next step.

Dates for Scotland and Wales remain subject to agreement with the devolved administrations.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) does not hold data on a candidate’s occupation, or reason for taking a test, when they apply for a routine theory or practical test. The DVSA will be making tests available in all licence categories when it is safe to do so.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of a modifying ​the Child Maintenance Service variation process in relation to mileage to ensure that the paying parent is able to claim mileage and travel costs without specifying distance to avoid the risk of the receiving parent becoming aware, through disputed mileage claim distances, of the area the paying parent resides in.

In order for a Paying Parent to claim mileage and travel costs through a variation, they must provide the Child Maintenance Service with the total distance in order for the Service to calculate the costs correctly. This ensures the calculation is a fair reflection of the additional costs incurred by the Paying Parent and meets the requirements set out in legislation. This also ensures transparency in decision making so that both parents are able challenge any decision that affects the child maintenance liability.

The safety of all customers is a priority for the Service and it will never share sensitive personal details that could reveal the location of either parent.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will work with (a) Australian, (b) Canadian and (c) other relevant overseas governments to establish a reciprocal social security agreement in order to end frozen pension policy.

The UK has no plans to change its longstanding policy position.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will extend personal independence payment claims by six months in line with the extension granted for the universal credit uplift.

Throughout the Covid-19 outbreak, we have been committed to making sure people can access financial support through Personal Independence Payment in a timely manner. To ensure continuity of payments to our customers, in the early stage of the pandemic we extended existing awards with a review date 9 months to ensure that a review could take place before the end of the award. Reviews are an integral part of PIP to ensure that our customers are receiving the correct level of award.

24th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, when she plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Angus of 14 December 2020, 28 January 2021 and 18 February 2021 on the Child Maintenance Service.

The Department responded by email to Dave Doogan MP, Scottish National Partly Angus, on 26 March 2021.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to improve the processing time of applications to the Kickstart scheme.

We have recently streamlined and improved the assessment process, to take a more nuanced view of applications while maintaining a high standard for Kickstart jobs. These changes mean that more applications are likely to be successful. We have also continued to improve and expand our guidance to help employers understand what we are looking for when assessing applications.

We aim to process all applications within four weeks, we recognise this may not always have been possible. We have reprioritised staff resources to deliver the DWP’s Kickstart Scheme to meet the demand from the large number of supportive employers.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans she has to work with organisations such as Gateway to agree a maximum time between submission and approval of applications for the Kickstart scheme.

The department has worked with a wide range of stakeholders, including gateway organisations since the scheme was announced and will continue to do so.

We have recently improved the assessment process to allow us to consider an application in full to make a decision. We have also continued to improve and expand our guidance to make sure employers know what we are looking for when assessing applications. Whilst maintaining a high standard for Kickstart jobs, these changes will mean that more applications are likely to be successful.

We aim to make a decision on an application within four weeks of receiving it, although this can take longer if more information needs to be gathered. Approved Gateways can get in touch with their local or national Kickstart scheme contact for information about how to add job placements or employers to their existing grant agreements.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what guidance she has issued for people who cannot (a) access a face to face assessment due to covid-19 restrictions and (b) conduct a phone consultation due to the nature of their disability.

The health and safety of our claimants and staff is our key priority. As a result, all face to face assessments for sickness and disability benefits have remained suspended since March 2020.

We are assessing as many people as we are able to on paper evidence or via telephone assessments. Individuals invited for a telephone assessment are encouraged to inform their assessment provider of any additional requirements they may have, and the provider will endeavour to meet any reasonable requests. This is explained to the individual in the initial invitation letter for all telephone assessments. For example, companions are able to join a telephone assessment, as they could for a face to face assessment.

There will be some claimants for whom unfortunately there is insufficient evidence to make a decision on paper and who are unable to undertake a telephone assessment because of their health condition. We continue to develop and implement ways in which we can safely assess these individuals. For example, we are currently testing ways of supporting claimants with speech and hearing difficulties to safely participate in telephone assessments and continue to test video assessments. Claimants who we are unable to assess by telephone or video because of their health condition, in particular those not entitled to UC, will be prioritised when we are able to safely resume face to face assessments.

18th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to support people with a recently diagnosed condition who as a result of their condition cannot undertake a telephone consultation.

The health and safety of our claimants and staff is our key priority. As a result, all face to face assessments for sickness and disability benefits have remained suspended since March 2020.

We are assessing as many people as we are able to on paper evidence or via telephone assessments. Individuals invited for a telephone assessment are encouraged to inform their assessment provider of any additional requirements they may have, and the provider will endeavour to meet any reasonable requests. This is explained to the individual in the initial invitation letter for all telephone assessments. For example, companions are able to join a telephone assessment, as they could for a face to face assessment.

There will be some claimants for whom unfortunately there is insufficient evidence to make a decision on paper and who are unable to undertake a telephone assessment because of their health condition. We continue to develop and implement ways in which we can safely assess these individuals. For example, we are currently testing ways of supporting claimants with speech and hearing difficulties to safely participate in telephone assessments and continue to test video assessments. Claimants who we are unable to assess by telephone or video because of their health condition, in particular those not entitled to UC, will be prioritised when we are able to safely resume face to face assessments.

9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether any applicant in receipt of universal credit who was previously in receipt of legacy benefits has successfully reapplied for universal credit.

Yes - claimants who were previously in receipt of legacy benefits who migrated to and were awarded Universal Credit can re-apply for Universal Credit if that award has ended. Universal Credit will then be re-awarded if they meet the conditions of entitlement.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
25th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people in receipt of universal credit who were previously in receipt of legacy benefits have successfully reapplied for universal credit in the last (a) six months, (b) 12 months and (c) 24 months.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans respond to correspondence from the hon. Member for Angus of 23 February 2021, followed up on 25 March 2021 and 9 April 2021 on the covid-19 vaccine concerns, case reference DD3069 and DD3079.

We replied to the hon. Member on 23 April.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what (a) support and (b) treatment is available to veterans for service-related PTSD in (i) prisons and (ii) the criminal justice system.

All patients in custody in England, including veterans, receive a range of services, including healthcare screening within 24 hours of reception and a follow up seven days later, as well as primary care, mental health, substance use, public health and secondary care services and support during the sentence or remand period.

In conjunction with Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service and armed forces charities, NHS England and NHS Improvement also commissions services for veterans in prisons, which includes the Veterans Regroup pathfinder service for veterans in the criminal justice system in the Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire areas.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department provides to children of armed forces personnel that have experienced PTSD.

In England, children of armed forces personnel are supported by mainstream National Health Service mental health services.

They also have access to support via the veterans mental health Transition Intervention and Liaison Service and Complex Treatment Services, who offer health assessments and signposting to local services.

To improve this offer, NHS England and NHS Improvement are currently preparing an England wide engagement to seek the views of armed forces families to help inform care and support for this group.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what processes his Department uses to monitory the adequacy of the provision of (a) support and (b) treatment for veterans.

In England the National Health Service continuously reviews the services it provides. Veterans are able to access all mainstream NHS services as well as the dedicated veteran specific services NHS England and NHS Improvement have set up. The assurance and quality of all NHS services is undertaken by the Care Quality Commission.

As a result of this ongoing review and feedback from veterans, their families and Service Charities, NHS England and NHS Improvement established two dedicated veteran’s mental health services, Transition, Intervention and Liaison Service and the Complex Treatment Service. NHS England and NHS Improvement are also in the process of developing a High Intense Service to help those individuals nearing crisis.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he has made to his Chinese counterpart on a resumption of pork exports from UK pig processing plants whose licenses were voluntarily surrendered due to the covid-19 pandemic.

The UK Government is committed to supporting the UK agricultural industry and restoring all exports of pork products to China. In July I [Minister Adams] met representatives from the relevant UK companies, and we understand that a number of companies, from a range of countries, share similar concerns. Foreign Secretary raises trade issues whenever he speaks to State Councillor Wang Yi, including most recently on 19 August. I [Minister Adams] made representations to the Chinese Ambassador on 8 September. In addition, the Secretary of State for International Trade and Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs have each written to their Chinese counterparts. Finally, Her Majesty's Ambassador to China and officials in the British Embassy in Beijing have lobbied repeatedly on this issue.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department can take to inform or resolve a dispute between an employee and their employer or former employer on payments made through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme where the payments from the employer to the employee or former employee are subject to dispute.

Since 25 February 2021, employees can check if their employer made a CJRS claim on their behalf for periods from December 2020 onwards through their online Personal Tax Account (PTA). Details of CJRS claims are updated monthly in PTAs.

If an employee thinks their employer is incorrectly claiming for them, they should talk to their employer about this in the first instance to rectify this if they feel comfortable doing so.

Anyone who suspects a fraudulent claim has been made can report it to HMRC’s Fraud Hotline. HMRC operates a Fraud Hotline service which allows members of the public to submit allegations of fraud relating to all of its COVID-19 schemes, including CJRS. The public can access this reporting service by searching 'report tax fraud' on GOV.UK or, for urgent and time critical matters, by telephone on 0800 788 887, Monday-Friday 9am-5pm. HMRC encourages the public to use its online form wherever possible as it remains the most efficient way of informing HMRC of potential wrongdoing.

HMRC will check claims made through the scheme. Payments may be withheld or need to be repaid in full to HMRC if the claim is based on dishonest or inaccurate information or found to be fraudulent.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
9th Jun 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assistance is available to exporters in the UK who are struggling to ship goods to individual customers in Northern Ireland due to (a) an increase in shipping costs, (b) customers not having an EORI number and (c) not being registered with the TSS.

The Northern Ireland Protocol entails some new administrative processes for traders, notably new digital import declaration requirements and digital safety and security information for goods entering Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK. Processes are fully digital and eligible to be facilitated by the Trader Support Service (TSS). There are no export or exit declarations needed for goods leaving Great Britain for Northern Ireland.

The TSS is a free, optional service which supports all businesses affected by the Protocol. It can complete declarations on behalf of traders so that they do not need to engage directly with new digital customs systems or processes and in most cases traders will not need their own XI EORI number. Traders can register by going to https://www.gov.uk/guidance/trader-support-service.

As well as the TSS, the Government has provided a range of support for traders affected by the Protocol, including:

  • Publishing a suite of new guidance to support Great Britain and Northern Ireland businesses engaging in new processes under the Protocol.
  • Creating the Movement Assistance Scheme, which provides support to traders moving agri-food commodities and equines from Great Britain to Northern Ireland.
  • Creating a £20 million SME Brexit Support Fund to support small and medium sized businesses (SMEs) adjust to new customs, rules of origin, and VAT rules.
  • Implementing a range of other support schemes, including the General Export Facility guarantee scheme aimed at SMEs, which means the Government can provide an 80% guarantee on financial support from lenders to help with general exporting costs, up to the value of £25 million.
  • Implementing the UK Trader Scheme, which ensures that authorised traders do not pay tariffs on the movement of goods into Northern Ireland from Great Britain, where those goods can be shown to remain in the UK customs territory.
  • Permitting waivers for duty on goods that traders bring into Northern Ireland from Great Britain that would normally be charged ‘at risk’ tariffs, up to a maximum allowance of €200,000 over three tax years.
  • A temporary extension of the period in which traders who do not have a fixed place of business in Northern Ireland can be authorised to declare their goods “not at risk” until 1 November 2021, providing they meet all other UK Trader Scheme eligibility requirements.
  • Establishing a specific taskforce working with businesses across Northern Ireland and Great Britain on issues related to the Protocol.
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the budgeted cost to the Exchequer is of the reduction to 5 per cent VAT for hospitality and tourism sales between 8 July 2020 and 31 March 2021; how much of that cost has been accrued; and what the projected final cost of that policy is.

The Exchequer cost of the temporary reduced rate of VAT for hospitality, accommodation and attractions until 31 March 2021 was set out at Spending Review 2020. The estimated cost is £2,540m, as shown in Table 1.1: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/spending-review-2020-documents.

This costing has been certified by the Office for Budget Responsibility.

The actual cost to date is not available owing to the lags in VAT reporting, and the final cost will depend on the level of demand and the extent of restrictions during the period of the relief.

30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many and what proportion of businesses are prepared for the completion of customs paperwork for export to the EU.

For over a year, the Government has been working to help businesses to understand and prepare for their new obligations, including customs paperwork for export to the EU. The Government will continue to assess carefully how traders are adapting to the new customs arrangements over the next few weeks and months.

The Government undertook significant readiness activity prior to 1 January, identifying key customer groups and delivering a high volume of targeted communications and engagement, including sending over 11 million letters and emails and hosting 50 webinars with over 30,000 attendees to date, preparing businesses for the new rules.

Through the cross-Government campaign since August the Government has reached 41m adults (15+) and 16m business decision makers through radio, and 18m adults (15+) and 3.5m business decision makers through print and digital articles, promoting key readiness messaging for importers and exporters.

The Government will continue to run this comprehensive engagement campaign with regular (and increasingly directive) letters to VAT registered traders, targeted phone calls and emails, events, webinars and video tutorials. Regular engagement with business representative organisations and devolved governments continues, with emphasis on trader readiness.

As well as providing extensive communications and guidance helping traders, the Government has made available grants of up to £1,000 per organisation for any importer and or exporter who is new to customs to support the cost of customs training. The grants have in particular helped small businesses to understand customs processes and to provide accurate information to intermediaries; for example, for entries into declarants’ records.

Recognising the impact of coronavirus on businesses’ ability to prepare, the Government has taken the pragmatic and flexible decision to introduce new border controls in three stages up until 1 July 2021, giving industry extra time to adjust to the new procedures. The priority from 1 January is reminding traders and the border industry about staged controls for imports and other temporary contingency milestones and supporting them to embed the new processes.

The Government will continue to provide support for the rest of this year.

3rd Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will (a) meet representatives of the private coach industry to discuss the financial effect of the covid-19 outbreak on and (b) provide additional financial support to that industry.

The Government recognises the challenging times facing the coach sector as a result of Covid-19, and firms experiencing difficulties are able to draw upon the unprecedented package of cross-economy measures the government has put in place, including Time to Pay flexibilities with tax bills, financial support for employees and tax deferrals. These measures have been designed to ensure that firms of any size receive the help they need to get through this difficult time.

As part of my regular engagement with industry leaders, I recently met with representatives of the coach sector to better understand their situation. I encourage the sector to continue to engage with the Department of Transport on the matters discussed.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
9th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the letters of (a) 31 July 2020, (b) 31 August 2020 and (c) 29 September 2020 from the hon. Member for Angus on financial support for dental laboratories.

The Treasury responded to the member’s letter on 9 October 2020.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
15th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when HMRC plans to respond to the letters dated 18 May 2020 and 10 July 2020 from the hon Member for Angus on the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme.

The HMRC Director responsible for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, Paul Riley, duly replied to the Honourable Member’s letter on 18 September 2020. HMRC apologise for the delay in responding.

8th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will reduce VAT on energy saving products after the end of the transition period.

VAT is a broad based tax on consumption and the twenty per cent standard rate applies to most goods and services.

Relief from the standard rate is already available on the sale and installation of certain energy-saving materials such as insulation, draught stripping and solar panels if certain conditions are met.

Although there are no plans to extend the scope of the relief already in place, the Government keeps all taxes under review.

22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making items of personal protective equipment exempt from VAT (a) in the short term to support businesses in protecting staff and customers as covid-19 lockdown restrictions are eased and (b) permanently to support health spending over the longer term.

A temporary zero-rate of VAT applies to sales of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for protection from infection from 1 May 2020 until 31 July 2020. The temporary relief has been introduced as an urgent response to the coronavirus emergency. Its main objective is to relieve businesses, particularly in the healthcare and residential care sectors, of the burden of tax on essential infection protection equipment needed to deal with the emergency.

All taxes are kept under review and Government will reassess the situation in the future.

19th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the 20 April 2020 correspondence on furlough from the hon. Member for Angus.

HM Treasury has received unprecedented amounts of correspondence since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, and apologises for the delay in responding to the Honourable Member. The Honourable Member’s correspondence is receiving attention and will be replied to as soon as possible.

12th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to reply to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Angus of 26 August 2021 regarding support for individuals in Afghanistan and the Afghan Citizens' Resettlement Scheme, reference DD4417LC.

Given the very difficult circumstances in Afghanistan, we cannot pursue cases concerning Afghan people in country in the usual ways. The Home Office logged all the cases but will not be providing individual replies.

Instead, please signpost individuals to gov.uk to check for the latest information about Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP) Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy: further information on eligibility criteria and offer details - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk) and the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) (Afghan citizens’ resettlement scheme - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)).

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
17th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason HMRC officers continue to seize imports of hemp product containing less than 0.2 per cent THC at UK airports and which comply with UK regulation and World Health Organisation and United Nation guidance on controlled substances; and what urgent steps he will take to ensure HMRC officers understand the law in this area to prevent ongoing delay and cost to UK hemp businesses.

Hemp products containing controlled cannabinoids are unlawful unless accompanied by the requisite Home Office licence and Border Force may seize and destroy them.

The only hemp items which can be imported without a licence are those which are not controlled by the Misuse of Drugs Act and derived from the fibre and seed of low THC EU approved seed varieties.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to publish details of the remaining two licenced operators for the seasonal agricultural workers scheme; and what steps she has taken to transfer allocations between licensed suppliers where any one supplier cannot fulfil their allocation of workers.

The Home Office does not provide ongoing updates regarding the consideration of specific sponsor licence applications. Any organisation applying for a sponsor licence will be notified of the outcome once their application has been fully considered.

The Home Office has established processes for managing the quotas granted to scheme operators.

We will continue to closely monitor uptake as the year progresses

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Angus of 21 October 2020 and 25 November 2020 on deportation.

I am sorry for the delay in responding. All correspondence related to the case of Mr Osime Brown is presently on hold awaiting medical reports. A response to your enquiry will be made once enquiries are complete.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
28th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to respond to the correspondence from the hon. Member for Angus of 7 August 2020 on biometric assessments.

A response was sent to the Hon. Member on 28 September 2020.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
19th Dec 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will review the seasonal agricultural workers scheme before the 2020 harvest; and if she will ensure that the parameters of any limit on the number of migrant workers employed under that scheme are based on (a) quantified and (b) evidenced priorities of the (i) farming and (ii) processing sectors.

The Government has committed to continue the Seasonal Workers Pilot and in our election manifesto we set out plans to increase the scheme to 10,000 places following the UK’s exit from the European Union.

Details will be set out in due course.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, at what stage plans are at to relocate a regiment of the Royal Engineers from Kinloss to England; and what consultation has taken place with stakeholders in Scotland on those plans.

There are no plans to relocate 39 Engineer Regiment from Kinloss in Scotland to any other base.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answers of 14 and 9 September 2021 to Questions 45921 and 37376 on Ajax Vehicles: Procurement, what (a) mechanisms are in place and (b) information is available to enable hon. Members and members of the public to establish how the financial costs of delays to the Ajax armoured fighter vehicle contract are shared between General Dynamics and his Department.

The Ministry of Defence has a firm price contract with General Dynamics Land Systems for equipment Demonstration and Manufacture, and extended initial in-service support solution for Ajax. General Dynamics are (inter alia) required to deliver 589 vehicles that meet the contractual specifications for £5.552 billion.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what (a) financial penalties or (b) liquidated damages General Dynamics are liable for as a result of the delays in the Ajax contract.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 9 September 2021 to question 37376 to the right hon. Member for Rayleigh & Wickford (Mr Francois).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
27th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of Price Waterhouse Cooper's assessment that project Tempest will add £1 billion to the economy of the East of England; and what estimate he has made of the contribution to the Scottish economy of that project.

The Tempest programme is expected to generate long-term high value employment which can make a significant contribution to the UK Government's levelling up priorities and the wider economy.

An independent report commissioned by industry and produced by professional services firm, PWC, provides an assessment of gross value added and employment contribution of the Tempest region, based on direct and first-tier supplier spending only through 2021 - 2050. It does not make an assessment of the additional GVA and employment contribution below the direct first-tier level.

In Scotland the PwC report outlines a contribution of at least £828 million gross value added with at least 15,000 job years. This will create high value jobs and skills for decades.

The Combat Air sector generates £6 billion a year and employs thousands of workers across the UK. Tempest will exploit our industrial base to create a next generation combat air enterprise centred in the UK. The early preparatory work of the FCAS Technology Initiative and Team Tempest expected to secure employment for 1,800 people directly supporting the programme. Industry now estimate that figure has been exceeded, with over 2,000 people now engaged in Tempest enterprise activities alone across 300 different companies. More than 90% of these people are highly skilled scientists and engineers.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th May 2021
What steps he is taking to promote economic development in the UK through his Department's operations.

Our spending review settlement will increase the defence budget by over £24 billion over the next four years. This includes at least £6.6 billion spent in research and development. These investments will modernise our Armed Forces and support jobs across the UK.

Defence spending benefits every part of the UK. In Scotland, shipbuilding jobs have increased significantly since 2018/19, Thales Glasgow is contributing to the Boxer programme, and Leonardo Edinburgh is supporting UK radar capability.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, where the new Challenger 3 tanks will be based.

The new fleet of Challenger 3 Main Battle Tanks will be predominantly based with the armoured regiments in Tidworth. Some of the fleet will be held in other Defence sites to support training.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of officers of the rank of Colonel and above in the British Army are stationed in Scotland.

Trade Trained Regular Army Strength and UK proportion of Paid Rank Colonel and above stationed in Scotland as at 1 January 2021

1 January 2021

Number

13

UK Proportion

2.1%

Source: Analysis (Army)

Notes/Caveats:

  1. The figures are for the Trade Trained Regular Army only and therefore exclude Gurkhas, Full Time Reserve Service, Mobilised Reserves, Army Reserve and all other Reserves, but includes those personnel that have transferred from GURTAM to UKTAP.
  2. The proportion refers to Colonels and above stationed in Scotland as a percentage of all Colonels and above in the UK. The percentage calculation excludes Colonels and above stationed overseas.
  3. The information is based on an individual’s stationed location. Where personnel are deployed on operations to an area away from their stationed location, the information above reflects their stationed location prior to this deployment. The same applies to those personnel who are administered by APC as a part of the Resilience Margin, but are not physically located in Scotland.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many and what proportion of paid Colonels in the British Army are stationed in Scotland.

Regular Trade Trained Strength of Paid Rank of Colonel stationed in Scotland as at 1 January 2021

1 January 2021

Number of Colonels in the British Army stationed in Scotland

9

Proportion of Colonels in the British Army stationed in Scotland

1.7%

Source: Analysis (Army)

Notes/Caveats:

  1. The figures are for the Trade Trained Regular Army only and therefore exclude Gurkhas, Full Time Reserve Service, Mobilised Reserves, Army Reserve and all other Reserves, but includes those personnel that have transferred from GURTAM to UKTAP.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many officers of Paid Rank Colonel and above there are in the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

As at 1 January 2021 there were no officers of Paid Rank Colonel and above in the Royal Regiment of Scotland, as those serving in the General Staff are no longer counted towards their previous Regiments. However, those whose previous Regiment was the Royal Regiment of Scotland total 30.

Notes/Caveats:

  • Figures provided by Defence Statistics (Army).
  • Figures have been rounded to 10 for presentational purposes.
  • Figures are for Trade Trained Regulars only.
  • Those serving in the General Staff are no longer counted towards their previous Regiments, however, data shows those personnel in the General Staff whose previous Regiment was the Royal Regiment of Scotland.
James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the tail numbers and corresponding airframe hours of each of the UK's C130 transport aircraft.

The tail numbers and corresponding airframe hours accrued for the UK's C-130 Hercules fleet are given in the table below:

Tail Number

Airframe Hours1

ZH865

13,860

ZH866

10,070

ZH867

13,980

ZH868

12,950

ZH869

13,860

ZH870

13,690

ZH871

9,240

ZH872

13,910

ZH874

14,240

ZH875

13,740

ZH877

13,740

ZH878

12,830

ZH879

13,140

ZH889

11,270

  1. Rounded to the nearest 10
Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel there were in the Royal Regiment of Scotland on 1 January 2020.

As at 1 January 2020, there were 1,970 Army personnel in the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Notes/Caveats:

  1. Figures provided by Defence Statistics (Army).
  2. Figures are for Trade Trained Regulars only.
  3. The above figures are for Infantry only.
  4. The above figures include all members within the Regiment regardless of whether they are serving at Regimental Duty.
  5. All Officers of Paid Rank Colonel and above are included in Staff regardless of late Arm/Corps and therefore have been excluded from the figures.
  6. Figures have been rounded to 10 for presentational purposes.
James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many personnel there are in the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

As at 1 January 2021, there were 2,060 Army personnel in the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Notes/Caveats:

  • Figures provided by Defence Statistics (Army).
  • Figures have been rounded to 10 for presentational purposes.
  • Figures are for Trade Trained Regulars only.
  • The above figures are for Infantry only.
  • The above figures include all members within the Regiment regardless of whether they are serving at Regimental Duty.
  • All Officers of Paid Rank Colonel and above are included in Staff regardless of late Arm/Corps and therefore have been excluded from the figures.
James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the nature is of Boeing's operations at RAF Lossiemouth in support of the Poseidon P8 aircraft; what the mix of civilian and military personnel employed at the Boeing facility is; and how much the funding the Government provided to support the creation of that Boeing facility.

Boeing provides aircraft maintenance and support services for the Royal Air Force P-8A Poseidon fleet under an Interim Aircraft Support contract. The P-8A Strategic Facility at RAF Lossiemouth is owned and operated by the Ministry of Defence (MOD), and currently there are some 385 staff working from the building, of which around 80% are military personnel. While the final cost for the construction of the facility is still to be determined, the cost to the MOD is likely to be in the region of £100 million (ex-VAT).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Airbus H135 helicopters operate within the Armed Forces.

The Ministry of Defence currently operates 29 Airbus H135 helicopters (in service as the Juno HT Mk1) for Rotary Wing training.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the UK's fleet of 60 Chinooks Helicopters, how many are there of each mark; and what is the average airframe hours of each mark.

The following table provides details of the numbers of each mark of the Chinook Helicopter fleet and their average airframe hours:

Mark

Mk6A

Mk5

Mk6

Total aircraft:

38

8

14

Average hours:

10,111

3,086

1,472

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Gazelle helicopters his Department has; what their role is; and when their out of service date is scheduled for.

The Gazelle helicopter fleet consists of 23 aircraft in a multi-purpose, lightweight utility role and operates in both the UK and Canada. The scheduled out of service date is 31 March 2025.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the gross value is of the work to manufacture the different components on the Typhoon Aircraft in Scotland as a percentage of the gross aircraft manufacturing cost.

The complexity of the international supply chain means that it is not possible to account for all the components used in the Typhoon aircraft that are manufactured in Scotland or to assess their overall value. However, the Leonardo MW facility in Edinburgh is the lead radar equipment supplier for Royal Air Force Typhoons.

In July 2020, the Ministry of Defence awarded a two-year contract worth £317 million to continue development of an electronically scanned Radar, known as the European Common Radar System (ECRS) Mk 2. This contract placed £140 million of work into Leonardo MW based in Edinburgh and represents the latest commitment to a development project which was first initiated in 2010.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
3rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many of the different components excluding weapons and weapon systems on the Typhoon Aircraft are manufactured in Scotland; and what the gross value of that work is to date in monetary terms.

The complexity of the international supply chain means that it is not possible to account for all the components used in the Typhoon aircraft that are manufactured in Scotland or to assess their overall value. However, the Leonardo MW facility in Edinburgh is the lead radar equipment supplier for Royal Air Force Typhoons.

In July 2020, the Ministry of Defence awarded a two-year contract worth £317 million to continue development of an electronically scanned Radar, known as the European Common Radar System (ECRS) Mk 2. This contract placed £140 million of work into Leonardo MW based in Edinburgh and represents the latest commitment to a development project which was first initiated in 2010.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 25 February 2021 to Question 156559 on European Fighter Aircraft, whose commercial interests would be compromised if an answer to the Question was provided.

If details of costs per flying hour were to be released it could prejudice the commercial interests of the Ministry of Defence when dealing with manufacturers that may wish to use its military aircraft, for example for training purposes or as part of sales demonstrators.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the Army bases and establishments in Scotland which are in use.

The hon. Member can find a list of the Army bases and establishments in Scotland listed in the tables below. This list does not include sites that are specifically for Cadet activities.

List of Army Bases and Establishments in Scotland, as at 26 February 2021.

Regular Army Bases and Establishments in Scotland

Kentigern House, Glasgow

Craigiehall (vacated but still Army owned)

Dreghorn Barracks, Edinburgh

Fort George

Forthside, Stirling

Glencorse Barracks, Penicuik

Inchdrewer House, Edinburgh

Kinloss Barracks

Leuchars Station

Redford Cavalry Barracks, Edinburgh

Redford Infantry Barracks, Edinburgh

Victoria Barracks, Ballater (used for Summer season only)

Joint Service Mountain Training Centre, Ballachulish

Reserve Army Bases and Establishments in Scotland

Area / Estate

Establishment / Army Reserve Centre (ARC)

Borders Volunteer Estate

Galashiels ARC

Central Scotland Volunteer Estate

Grangemouth ARC

Meadowforth ARC

Whiteston Rifle Range

Dumfries & Galloway Volunteer Estate

Dumfries ARC

Fife Volunteer Estate

Bothwell House ARC

Bruce House ARC

Cupar ARC

Glenrothes ARC

Kirkcaldy ARC

St Andrews ARC

Grampian Volunteer Estate

Aberdeen UOTC

Elgin ARC

Gordon Bks ARC

Keith ARC

Keith ARC Rifle Range

Peterhead ARC

Highlands & Islands Volunteer Estate

Dingwall TA Bungalow

Fort Charlotte ARC

Gordonville Rd ARC

Halkirk Indoor Range

Kirkwall ARC

Stornoway ARC

Wick ARC ACF Garage

Lothian Volunteer Estate

Alnwickhill Road ARC

Bathgate ARC

Beveridge Square ARC

Claverhouse ARC

Colinton Rd ARC

East Claremont St ARC

Lanark Rd ARC

Mcdonald Rd ARC

Southern Highlands Volunteer Estate

Cumbernauld ARC

Dumbarton ARC

Dunoon ARC

Strathclyde Volunteer Estate

Barnsford Bridge ARC

Chalmers Road ARC

Clydesmill Drive ARC

Corsehill Mount Road ARC

Crow Road ARC

Dechmont Rifle Range

Govan ARC

Glasgow and Strathclyde UOTC

Hatton House ARC

Hawkhead Road ARC

Houldsworth St ARC

Jardine St ARC

Motherwell ARC

Seaforth Road ARC

Walcheren Bks ARC

Whitemoss ARC

Tayside Volunteer Estate

Arbroath ARC

Forfar ARC

Invergowrie ARC

Newman Hse ARC

Oliver Bks ARC

Park Wynd ARC

Queens Barracks ARC

Red Lion Garage ARC

RFCA HQ Seathwood

Strathmore Avenue ARC

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the Royal Navy shore-based establishments in Scotland which are in use.

The Royal Navy shore-based establishments currently in use are listed below:

Establishment

Notes

HM Naval Base Clyde

Includes HMS NEPTUNE and Royal Naval Armament Depot Coulport

RM Condor, Arbroath

HMS Dalriada, Glasgow

Royal Naval Reserve (RNR)

HMS Scotia

RNR based within MOD Caledonia (Rosyth)

RMR Scotland

Based within MOD Caledonia

Garelochhead Oil Fuel Depot (OFD)

Administered by Oil and Pipelines Agency (OPA)

Campbeltown OFD

Administered by OPA

Loch Striven OFD

Administered by OPA

Loch Ewe OFD

Administered by OPA

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list the Royal Air Force bases and establishments in Scotland which are in use.

The hon. Member can find a list of the Royal Air Force bases and establishments in Scotland in the attached document. This list does not include sites that are specifically for Cadet activities.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the cost is per flying hour of operating the Typhoon aircraft.

I am withholding the information requested as its release would prejudice commercial interests.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what databases are kept on the location of his Department's UK base closures; and whether those databases are publicly available.

All publicly announced planned disposals are extracted from the Defence Infrastructure Organisation internal management system and can be found on the Defence Disposals Database which is publicly available at the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disposal-database-house-of-commons-report

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list his Department's operational establishments in Scotland.

Of the 110 establishments previously given in Question 134567, 83 are operational establishments, defined as having personnel permanently and routinely stationed at the establishment providing military capability.

These are listed in the attachment.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Typhoon aircraft are stationed at (a) RAF Conningsby, (b) RAF Akrotiri and (c) the detachment permanently deployed to the Falkland Islands at British Forces South Atlantic Islands, Mount Pleasant.

As at 1 February 2021 RAF Coningsby had 47 aircraft in the forward fleet, RAF Akrotiri had seven whilst British Forces South Atlantic Islands, Mount Pleasant had four.

The number of Typhoon aircraft in the forward fleet at any base can vary over time.

The forward fleet comprises serviceable and short-term unserviceable aircraft. Typically, short-term unserviceable aircraft are undergoing minor works, forward maintenance or any other unforeseen rectification or technical inspection that can arise on a day to day basis.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much and what proportion of his Department's annual budget is allocated to operating and supporting the Typhoon Aircraft in 2020-21.

The operating and support costs for Typhoon aircraft are spread over a number of business areas within the Department and therefore the information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much and what proportion of his Department's annual budget was allocated to operating and supporting the Typhoon Aircraft in 2019-20.

The operating and support costs for Typhoon aircraft are spread over a number of business areas within the Department and therefore the information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how much and what proportion of his Department's annual budget was allocated to operating and supporting the Typhoon Aircraft in 2018-19.

The operating and support costs for Typhoon aircraft are spread over a number of business areas within the Department and therefore the information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what bases his Department plans to close in Scotland.

Defence is committed to making best use of its estate to meet the requirements of the Armed Forces. Much of this work is being delivered by the Defence Estate Optimisation Portfolio, which is a 25-year portfolio announced in November 2016 of construction activity, unit and personnel moves, and site disposals that will deliver a better structured, more economical and modern estate that more effectively supports military capability.

As part of the optimisation process, defence will dispose of sites it no longer requires. These sites create opportunities for alternative use, resulting in regeneration, housing or business growth and job creation within the local area. Full details of the sites identified for disposal, subject to assessment, can be found on the regularly updated Defence Disposals Database:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disposal-database-house-of-commons-report

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many bases his Department has open in Scotland as of February 2021.

Whilst the time required to search legacy systems prevents this question being answered in full the hon. Member will be aware of the following major disposals in Scotland in the last 20 years:

RAF Pitreavie Castle

RAF Edzell

RAF Stornoway

RAF Machrihanish

Ministry of Defence present and future disposals can be found on the Defence Disposals Database at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disposal-database-house-of-commons-report

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many bases his Department had open in Scotland in 2010.

Whilst the time required to search legacy systems prevents this question being answered in full the hon. Member will be aware of the following major disposals in Scotland in the last 20 years:

RAF Pitreavie Castle

RAF Edzell

RAF Stornoway

RAF Machrihanish

Ministry of Defence present and future disposals can be found on the Defence Disposals Database at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disposal-database-house-of-commons-report

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many bases his Department had open in Scotland in 2000.

Whilst the time required to search legacy systems prevents this question being answered in full the hon. Member will be aware of the following major disposals in Scotland in the last 20 years:

RAF Pitreavie Castle

RAF Edzell

RAF Stornoway

RAF Machrihanish

Ministry of Defence present and future disposals can be found on the Defence Disposals Database at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disposal-database-house-of-commons-report

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
9th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many bases his Department had open in Scotland in 1990.

Whilst the time required to search legacy systems prevents this question being answered in full the hon. Member will be aware of the following major disposals in Scotland in the last 20 years:

RAF Pitreavie Castle

RAF Edzell

RAF Stornoway

RAF Machrihanish

Ministry of Defence present and future disposals can be found on the Defence Disposals Database at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/disposal-database-house-of-commons-report

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many Typhoon aircraft operate out of RAF Lossiemouth.

As at 1 February 2021 RAF Lossiemouth had 41 aircraft in the forward fleet. This comprised serviceable and short-term unserviceable aircraft.

Typically, short-term unserviceable aircraft are undergoing minor works, forward maintenance or any other unforeseen rectification or technical inspection that can arise on a day to day basis.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) civilian and (b) service personnel are based at RAF Lossiemouth.

The current number of Civil Servants based at RAF Lossiemouth is 255 and the number of Service personnel is 2,115.

*In accordance with the Data Protection Act and our obligations in relation to the protection of confidentiality when handling personal data, the data has been rounded to the nearest 5.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what RAF bases operate the Typhoon aircraft aside from RAF Lossiemouth.

RAF Typhoon aircraft are based at RAF Lossiemouth and RAF Coningsby in the UK with a detachment permanently deployed to the Falkland Islands at British Forces South Atlantic Islands, Mount Pleasant.

Additionally, a detachment of Typhoons are currently operationally deployed to RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus. Detachments also routinely deploy in support of NATO Air Policing in the Baltic and Black Sea regions.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) service and (b) civilian personnel operate and support the Typhoon aircraft platform.

The current strength of service personnel who operate and provide support to Typhoon aircraft across a range of roles and functions is approximately 1,670 and the number of Civil Servants is approximately 215.

.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the annual cost to the RAF is of operating the Typhoon aircraft.

The information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many establishments his Department operated in Scotland in (a) 1990, (b) 1995, (c) 2000, (d) 2005, (e) 2010, (f) 2015 and (g) 2020.

At the end of 2020 the Ministry of Defence operated 110 establishments in Scotland.

Historic information on the number of establishments operated could be provided only at disproportionate cost. This is because individual ‘establishments’ can range from small individual structures to large bases and past data records would require individual searches.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civilian and uniform personnel his Department employed in establishments in Scotland in (a) 1990, (b) 1995, (c) 2000, (d) 2005, (e) 2010, (f) 2015 and (g) 2020.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) has produced personnel statistics by region since 2010 but not by individual establishments. UK Service Personnel and MOD Civilians stationed in Scotland for 2015 and 2020 can be found in Table 5.1a of the MS Excel Annual Location Statistics publication published 1 April 2020 at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/location-of-uk-regular-service-and-civilian-personnel-annual-statistics-2020

UK Service Personnel and MOD Civilians stationed in Scotland for 2010 can be found in Table 5.1a of the MS Excel Annual Location Statistics index, at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/location-of-all-uk-regular-service-and-civilian-personnel-quarterly-statistics-index

8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the gross amount was of expenditure by his Department in Scotland in (a) 1990, (b) 1995, (c) 2000, (d) 2005, (e) 2010, (f) 2015 and (g) 2020.

The Ministry of Defence publishes annually the regional expenditure with UK industry and supported employment publication, available at

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/mod-regional-expenditure-with-uk-industry-and-supported-employment-index

In the 2014-15 financial year £1,505 million[1] was spent with Scottish industry The figures for 2019-20 are due to be published on 21 January 2021.

The Ministry of Defence previously provided estimates on both regional expenditure and employment within the UK Defence Statistics (UKDS) publication. However, within the UKDS bulletins, the inclusion of the regional breakdowns were not given in every year's release. Where they are present, due to differing methodologies used before and now, historic figures are also not directly comparable to more recent published figures.

In addition, Scotland is home for the Royal Navy’s entire submarine service, a significant RAF presence including the P8 maritime patrol aircraft at Lossiemouth where in due course they will be joined by our incoming E7 fleet. Half of the UK’s Typhoon’s are based in Scotland. A strong Army presence contributes to around 10,000 regular personnel based in Scotland.

[1] This figure is in constant 2018-19 prices and has been adjusted for inflation using GDP deflators from HM Treasury (September 2019).

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the gross amount is of expenditure by his Department in (a) 1990, (b) 1995, (c) 2000, (d) 2005, (e) 2010, (f) 2015 and (g) 2020.

The information requested is provided in the following table:

Financial Year

Expenditure (£billion)[1]

1989-1990

£20,755

1994-1995

£22,519

1999-2000

£22,572

2004-2005

£29,524

2009-2010

£37,425

2014-2015

£35,850

2019-2020

£41,024

The Net Cash Requirement (NCR) has been provided to give a consistent time series. Due to accounting processes changing overtime, the NCR is the most accurate way to give these figures allowing for comparison over time.

[1] These figures are in current prices and have not been adjusted for inflation.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
8th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what the gross figure was for his Department's expenditure on maintenance and support for the UK’s at sea nuclear deterrent at HMNB Clyde in (a) 1990, (b) 1995, (c) 2000 and (d) 2020.

The gross expenditure figure relating to the maintenance and support of the UK’s nuclear deterrent at Her Majesty’s Naval Base Clyde for the years in question are not held in the format requested and could only be provided at disproportionate cost, as they are made up of many components covered by different contracts from funding across several business units, and not held centrally.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many civilian employees with a permanent duty station recorded in Scotland were employed by his Department as at 31 December 1989.

The data for civilian employees with a permanent duty station within Scotland as at 31 December 1989 is not held.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what (a) screening, (b) support and (c) treatment services are provided to armed forces personnel in relation to the effects of trauma.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) worked closely with King's College London on a study (funded by the US Department of Defense) into the use of a screening tool for mental health issues. The results of the study were published in 'The Lancet' in 2017[1] and found that screening was not effective in reducing symptoms of mental health disorders or encouraging personnel to seek help, compared to the general mental health advice which is the standard of care in the UK military.

The single Services have long standing welfare structures in place for supporting personnel. Personnel can use, and Commanders can call on, this wide range of resources as and when required. These resources are diverse and for example include welfare officers, padres and support provided by charities such as SSAFA. Both SSAFA and MOD's Veterans UK have general helplines, however, when required they will signpost individuals to the Combat Stress 24hour mental health helpline.

For those personnel requiring medical intervention, MOD has its own well-established mental health service. Our mental health services are configured to provide community-based mental health care in line with national best practice. We do this primarily through our 11 military Departments of Community Mental Health across the UK, which provide out-patient mental healthcare. A wide range of psychiatric and psychological treatments are available, including medication, evidence-based talking therapies, and environmental adjustment where appropria

[1] Rona, R et al (2017) Post-deployment screening for mental health disorders and tailored advice about help-seeking in the UK military: a cluster randomised controlled trial

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many cases of domestic abuse within armed forces families were reported in each year since 2000; and how many of those cases resulted in criminal proceedings.

Domestic abuse is a very important issue and we treat allegations of domestic abuse very seriously. In July 2018, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) launched its first strategy to tackle domestic abuse within the Armed Forces and defence civilian communities. The strategy builds on existing work by the Armed Forces in this area, such as providing specialist training to welfare staff, and included the launch of a campaign to raise awareness of the issue. The MOD is a member of the cross-Government Violence against Women and Girls working group.

In the UK, the Service Justice System does not normally have jurisdiction for investigating, or prosecuting cases of domestic abuse, as that is normally the responsibility of the domestic Criminal Justice System, and as such the data held by the MOD is limited. Additionally, the MOD does not hold centralised records of reported cases of domestic abuse which did not result in a prosecution or which may involve minor violence in a domestic setting which were dealt with at a Summary Hearing.

The following table provides details of the number of Service personnel prosecuted for domestic abuse by the Service Prosecuting Authority (SPA) at a Court Martial:

Year

Cases directed for Court martial

2005

7

2006

3

2007

5

2008

4

2009

5

2010

9

2011

22

2012

11

2013

22

2014

36

2015

20

2016

19

2017

16

2018

11

2019

9

Notes:

Information before 2005 is not held.

2005 to 2008 – these years were prior to the creation of the SPA and the data held on the SPA’s case database was derived from the unique case management systems of the Army, Navy and RAF Prosecuting Authorities. These systems held varying levels of data and detail on the individual cases. Therefore, these figures should be regarded as estimated.

2007 – one case has yet to go to Court Martial – accused Absent Without Official Leave.

2009 – This was the year that the SPA came into being and was also the year that a new cases management system entitled “AXXIA DNA” was trialled in SPA. This new system wasn’t compatible with the UK “AXXIA” system and data has been lost as a result. Figures should, therefore, be regarded as an estimate.

2018 – one case has yet to go to Court Martial.

2019 – five cases have yet to go to Court Martial.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel have died in combat since 2000.

In the period 1 January 2000 to 11 March 2020, 545 UK Armed Forces personnel have died as a result of hostile action.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many armed forces personnel have died from suicide (i) in service and (ii) after leaving the armed forces.

The Government takes the welfare of Service personnel and veterans very seriously. As in society as a whole, the Armed Forces will never be able to eradicate the incidence of suicide, however we are not complacent; any suicide is one too many and a tragedy for the individual.

Defence Statistics (Health) produce an annual National Statistic on suicide in the UK Armed Forces which is released at the end of March every year and is available at the following website: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/uk-armed-forces-suicide-and-open-verdict-deaths-index. Between 1999 and 2018 there have been 310 suicides among UK Regular Armed Forces personnel: 292 among males, and 18 among females. There were five coroner-confirmed suicides in 2018 with an additional 16 awaiting verdicts that may result in a suicide verdict once coroner inquests are held.

Suicide data for all veterans of the UK Armed Forces is not captured by the Ministry of Defence (MOD). However, the MOD has commissioned a new study to investigate causes of death, including suicide, among all those who served in the UK Armed Forces from 2001, including those that deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. The study will include personnel who are still in service and veterans, including recent Service leavers, and will be updated on an ongoing basis and will compare findings with the general population during the same period: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-study-into-iraq-and-afghanistan-veterans-launched

The MOD also publishes studies on the causes of death, including suicide, of veterans from the 1982 Falklands Campaign (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/causes-of-deaths-among-the-uk-armed-forces-veterans-of-the-1982-falklands-campaign) and from the 1990/91 Gulf Conflict (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/causes-of-deaths-that-occurred-among-the-uk-veterans-of-the-199091-gulf-conflict). To date, both studies show that the suicide rates among veterans were lower than comparative rates in the general population when matched for age and gender.

10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many veterans are (a) in prison and (b) in the criminal justice system, as a result of violent crimes.

The Ministry of Justice publishes a yearly snapshot which estimates the number of former service personnel in the prison population. The second of these was published in October 2019, with the next estimate due in October 2020. Further details can be found at the following link -https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/842613/Ex-service_personnel_in_the_prison_population_Q2_2019.pdf

Our analysis of the prison population showed that as at 30 June 2019, 2,105 prisoners had declared as ‘ex-service personnel’ when they were first received into custody between January 2015 and June 2019. Of these, 448 have an offence of violence against a person. We do not hold the information requested in the criminal justice system for former service personnel.

We remain committed to ensuring that those who have served in the Armed Forces and who find themselves in the criminal justice system are able to access support, whether they are serving their sentence in custody or in the community. Through the Armed Forces Covenant Trust Fund, we have committed to support programmes worth £4.6 million targeted at former service personnel in the criminal justice system, and recently awarded an additional £1.1 million to continue supporting this cohort.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)