Craig Whittaker Portrait

Craig Whittaker

Conservative - Calder Valley

5,774 (10.0%) majority - 2019 General Election

First elected: 6th May 2010


Finance (No. 2) Bill
10th May 2023 - 18th May 2023
Workers (Predictable Terms and Conditions) Bill
1st Mar 2023 - 8th Mar 2023
Committee of Selection
11th Oct 2022 - 7th Nov 2022
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
7th Sep 2022 - 27th Oct 2022
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
8th Jul 2022 - 7th Sep 2022
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
20th Sep 2021 - 10th Feb 2022
Professional Qualifications Bill [HL]
12th Jan 2022 - 18th Jan 2022
Commercial Rent (Coronavirus) Bill
1st Dec 2021 - 14th Dec 2021
Nuclear Energy (Financing) Bill
9th Nov 2021 - 25th Nov 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill
20th Sep 2021 - 4th Nov 2021
Vice Chamberlain (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
16th Apr 2019 - 10th Sep 2019
Committee of Selection
5th Sep 2018 - 4th Sep 2019
Selection Committee
5th Sep 2018 - 4th Sep 2019
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
9th Jan 2018 - 16th Apr 2019
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
15th Jun 2017 - 9th Jan 2018
Education Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Able Marine Energy Park Development Consent Order 2014
11th Jun 2014 - 30th Oct 2014


Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Craig Whittaker has voted in 967 divisions, and 8 times against the majority of their Party.

4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
2 Sep 2020 - Recall of MPs (Change of Party Affiliation) - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Conservative No votes vs 47 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 52
24 Jun 2020 - Demonstrations (Abortion Clinics) - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative No votes vs 56 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 47
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 240 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 242
27 Apr 2021 - Delegated Legislation - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Conservative No votes vs 222 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 89
22 Jun 2022 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 61 Conservative No votes vs 106 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 70
18 Oct 2022 - Public Order Bill - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 113 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 297 Noes - 110
17 Oct 2023 - Levelling-up and Regeneration Bill - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 2 Conservative No votes vs 276 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 289 Noes - 136
View All Craig Whittaker Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Holly Lynch (Labour)
Opposition Deputy Chief Whip (Commons)
(27 debate interactions)
Neil Coyle (Labour)
(22 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(125 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(18 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(17 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Nationality and Borders Act 2022
(11,258 words contributed)
Tobacco and Vapes Bill 2023-24
(1,283 words contributed)
Renters (Reform) Bill 2022-23
(1,128 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Craig Whittaker's debates

Calder Valley Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Craig Whittaker has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Craig Whittaker

11th May 2021
Craig Whittaker signed this EDM on Monday 5th July 2021

At home abortions

Tabled by: Carla Lockhart (Democratic Unionist Party - Upper Bann)
That this House recognises that legalising the unsupervised self-administration of both sets of abortion pills at home following a telephone or digital consultation has placed women’s safety at risk by removing a routine in-person appointment which allows medical practitioners to certify gestation and potential coercion or abuse; expresses concern that …
22 signatures
(Most recent: 24 Jan 2022)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 7
Democratic Unionist Party: 6
Independent: 4
Labour: 2
Alba Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
15th June 2021
Craig Whittaker signed this EDM on Wednesday 23rd June 2021

Zero-carbon domestic renewables

Tabled by: Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat - Westmorland and Lonsdale)
That this House recognises the UK's legal commitment to reduce carbon emissions, including those from domestic dwellings, to Net Zero by 2050; further notes that 30% of UK carbon dioxide emissions are from domestic dwellings; recognises that micro-generation of home grown energy and heating is vital to reach the Net …
27 signatures
(Most recent: 18 Nov 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 7
Liberal Democrat: 6
Labour: 6
Alba Party: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Conservative: 2
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Independent: 1
View All Craig Whittaker's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Craig Whittaker, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Craig Whittaker has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Craig Whittaker has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Craig Whittaker has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


Latest 50 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
12th Apr 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy Security and Net Zero, whether she is taking steps to equalize the price of electricity with gas to encourage people to install Heat Pumps in their homes.

In ‘Powering Up Britain’, the Government committed to outlining a clear approach to gas and electricity price rebalancing – and will do so in due course. We are working to develop our approach to rebalancing to meet these commitments. No decisions have yet been taken on our approach, and fairness and affordability for consumers and taxpayers will be at the heart of our decision-making.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
31st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to improve communications on power failures on the low voltage network in the upland and wooded areas of the country with people living in those areas.

The Department is leading a review following Storm Arwen in 2021 into electricity network resilience during storm events. This includes identification of improvements to customer communications across Great Britain. Final recommendations will be published by the end of May.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to bring forward legislation to enable a financing mechanism for new nuclear power stations.

As we stated in our response to the consultation on a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) for nuclear published on 14th December 2020, we believe that a RAB remains a credible model for funding nuclear projects, as it should reduce the cost of finance and thereby reduce consumer bills. The Government is considering the model in detail and recognises the need for legislation to implement.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to page 70 of her Department's High Stakes: Gambling Reform for the Digital Age white paper published on April 2023, what progress her Department has made on undertaking a consultation into potential regulation for large prize draw competitions.

In recent weeks, I have met with the largest prize draw operators in the industry, in line with the gambling white paper's commitment to look at prize draws. The department has also commissioned independent researchers to gather evidence about the size and nature of the prize draw sector, including its role in charity funding, risks and player protection and understanding. The research consists of an AI-powered web scrape, together with industry surveys and operator engagement. The research will conclude in January and will inform a consultation on potential regulation in due course.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
7th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, whether she has considered making changes to the existing requirements for (a) full and (b) remote ancillary licences for society lotteries in the context of increases in the use of handheld electronic devices in recruiting subscribers.

I am aware of this issue, which was raised with me when I met with representatives of the Lotteries Council on 23 May.

Section 4 of the Gambling Act 2005 states that where a telephone (or other forms of electronic communication) are used to participate in gambling, it will be treated as remote gambling.

Under the Gambling Act all operators that offer remote gambling are required to hold a remote operating licence. This means that if a lottery sells tickets face to face and remotely by telephone or online it will need two licences. The holder of a non-remote lottery operating (society) licence pays an annual fee of only £50 for an ancillary licence, if its remote proceeds in that year do not exceed £250,000. Annual fees for standalone remote licences range from £400 to £796 depending on proceeds.

I therefore have no current plans to amend the society lottery licensing arrangements in the Gambling Act.

Stuart Andrew
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Government will take steps to ensure that potential proposed amendments to the Gambling Act in response to the Gambling Review do not adversely affect charity lotteries.

The Review of the Gambling Act 2005 was launched on 8 December with a wide-ranging Call for Evidence, which closed on 31 March. We received c.16,000 submissions to the Call for Evidence from a range of stakeholders and members of the public. We are considering all submissions carefully, including evidence relating to society or charity lotteries, and aim to publish a white paper outlining any conclusions and proposals for reform by the end of the year.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will consult on the potential merits of providing large society lotteries the choice of a £50 million or £100 million annual licence, as set out in the Response to the Consultation on Society Lottery Reform published on 16 July 2019.

In July 2020 the annual sales limit for society lotteries increased from £10 million to £50 million. This increase will enable us to monitor the impact on the sector and build a robust evidence base, particularly with regard to the impact on the proportion of proceeds being returned to good causes.

Any future change would need to increase good cause returns across the sector, and we wish to be confident that the regulatory framework is right for fundraising at this scale. We have no present plans to consult on making further changes to the annual sales limit.

27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the ban on online advertising of foods high in fat, salt or sugar on the (a) creative and digital advertising sector and (b) food and drink sector.

The Prime Minister has made it clear that tackling obesity is a priority for this Government. In July 2020 the Government outlined it’s Tackling Obesity strategy which details a host of measures aimed at improving the chances of citizens living a healthy lifestyle.

The Government proposed various options for restricting HFSS advertising in the 2019 and 2020 consultations targeted at protecting children from being exposed to advertising of unhealthy food products.

Balanced against the priority of protecting children and tackling obesity, we have carefully considered the impact that any restrictions will have on industry and in particular the potential for market distortion or disproportionate effects on key business sectors.

The final policy will be set out in our consultation response due to be published shortly. The Government is committed to acting collaboratively to prepare businesses, individuals and organisations for changes to the rules around HFSS advertising.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of proposed (a) advertising and (b) promotional restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar on (i) sponsorship (ii) outdoor advertising.

My department and the Department of Health and Social Care have carefully considered all views and potential impacts of advertising and promotional restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar, inclusive of sponsorship and outdoor advertising. This includes feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations.

The final impact assessment on mandating calorie labelling of food and drink in out-of-home sector is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/903712/Calorie_Labelling_-_Impact_Assessment.pdf

The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) by location and by volume is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

The developmental impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online was published alongside the 2019 consultation on this policy. This is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/786554/advertising-consultation-impact-assessment.pdf

An evidence note was published alongside the consultation on the proposal to introduce a total restriction of online advertising for HFSS products. This builds on the impact assessment that accompanied the 2019 consultation and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/evidence-note

A consultation proposing a total restriction of online advertising for products high in fat, salt and sugar closed on 22 December 2020 and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/introducing-a-total-online-advertising-restriction-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss

We will publish the final impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online alongside the full response to the consultations shortly.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of proposed (a) advertising and (b) promotional restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar on the structure of the UK advertising market.

My department and the Department of Health and Social Care have carefully considered all views and potential impacts of advertising and promotional restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar, inclusive of sponsorship and outdoor advertising. This includes feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations.

The final impact assessment on mandating calorie labelling of food and drink in out-of-home sector is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/903712/Calorie_Labelling_-_Impact_Assessment.pdf

The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) by location and by volume is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

The developmental impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online was published alongside the 2019 consultation on this policy. This is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/786554/advertising-consultation-impact-assessment.pdf

An evidence note was published alongside the consultation on the proposal to introduce a total restriction of online advertising for HFSS products. This builds on the impact assessment that accompanied the 2019 consultation and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/evidence-note

A consultation proposing a total restriction of online advertising for products high in fat, salt and sugar closed on 22 December 2020 and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/introducing-a-total-online-advertising-restriction-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss

We will publish the final impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online alongside the full response to the consultations shortly.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure a balance between people who enjoy gambling responsibly and protecting the vulnerable against gambling-related harm as part of the gambling review.

The gross gambling yield (GGY) of the gambling industry in Great Britain between April 2019 and March 2020 was £14.2bn (including the National Lottery). The industry contributed £8.3bn to the UK economy in 2019 (including lotteries), accounting for 0.4% of Gross Value Added (GVA), and paid £3bn in duties in 2019/20. It provides funding to sport in the UK via sponsorship, media rights and the horseracing betting levy.

The government launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 in December with a Call for Evidence, which runs until 31 March. The Review aims to make sure that the Act is fit for the digital age and that the balance is right between respecting the freedom of adults to choose how they spend their money and leisure time and protecting vulnerable people and communities from harm. More information about the Call for Evidence and how to make a submission is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the gambling review is evidence-led.

The gross gambling yield (GGY) of the gambling industry in Great Britain between April 2019 and March 2020 was £14.2bn (including the National Lottery). The industry contributed £8.3bn to the UK economy in 2019 (including lotteries), accounting for 0.4% of Gross Value Added (GVA), and paid £3bn in duties in 2019/20. It provides funding to sport in the UK via sponsorship, media rights and the horseracing betting levy.

The government launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 in December with a Call for Evidence, which runs until 31 March. The Review aims to make sure that the Act is fit for the digital age and that the balance is right between respecting the freedom of adults to choose how they spend their money and leisure time and protecting vulnerable people and communities from harm. More information about the Call for Evidence and how to make a submission is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the Gambling Commission to ensure their consultation on remote customer interaction is considered in parallel with the Government’s Review of the Gambling Act 2005.

Data released by the Gambling Commission in May 2020 suggested that the scale of the black market had remained low and stable, with little variation in the number of complaints it had received about illegal gambling websites over the previous 12 months. The Commission’s enforcement approach includes working with web hosting companies and search engines to remove sites or prevent them appearing on searches, and working with payment providers to prevent payments to unlicensed operators. It also has powers to prosecute or refer issues to partner agencies such as HMRC where necessary.

The government’s Review of the Gambling Act 2005 has called for evidence on issues around unlicensed gambling, and we are aware of the recent report commissioned by the Betting and Gaming Council. We are also consulting on a proposed uplift to Gambling Commission licence fees, which will strengthen the resources it has to identify the scale of and tackle illegal gambling.

The Gambling Commission requires operators to monitor play and to intervene where players may be at risk of harm. Its consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction is considering whether further requirements are needed for how operators identify and interact with customers who may be at risk.

The Commission will be led by the evidence it receives in deciding its next steps, and its findings may also inform its advice to government on the Gambling Act Review. Following a one month extension to allow extra evidence to be submitted, the deadline for submissions is now 9 February.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent estimate he has made of the financial contribution of the gambling industry to (a) the economy and (b) sport in the UK.

The gross gambling yield (GGY) of the gambling industry in Great Britain between April 2019 and March 2020 was £14.2bn (including the National Lottery). The industry contributed £8.3bn to the UK economy in 2019 (including lotteries), accounting for 0.4% of Gross Value Added (GVA), and paid £3bn in duties in 2019/20. It provides funding to sport in the UK via sponsorship, media rights and the horseracing betting levy.

The government launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 in December with a Call for Evidence, which runs until 31 March. The Review aims to make sure that the Act is fit for the digital age and that the balance is right between respecting the freedom of adults to choose how they spend their money and leisure time and protecting vulnerable people and communities from harm. More information about the Call for Evidence and how to make a submission is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate he has made of the size of the illegal gambling market in the UK.

Data released by the Gambling Commission in May 2020 suggested that the scale of the black market had remained low and stable, with little variation in the number of complaints it had received about illegal gambling websites over the previous 12 months. The Commission’s enforcement approach includes working with web hosting companies and search engines to remove sites or prevent them appearing on searches, and working with payment providers to prevent payments to unlicensed operators. It also has powers to prosecute or refer issues to partner agencies such as HMRC where necessary.

The government’s Review of the Gambling Act 2005 has called for evidence on issues around unlicensed gambling, and we are aware of the recent report commissioned by the Betting and Gaming Council. We are also consulting on a proposed uplift to Gambling Commission licence fees, which will strengthen the resources it has to identify the scale of and tackle illegal gambling.

The Gambling Commission requires operators to monitor play and to intervene where players may be at risk of harm. Its consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction is considering whether further requirements are needed for how operators identify and interact with customers who may be at risk.

The Commission will be led by the evidence it receives in deciding its next steps, and its findings may also inform its advice to government on the Gambling Act Review. Following a one month extension to allow extra evidence to be submitted, the deadline for submissions is now 9 February.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to tackle and reduce demand for illegal online gambling.

Data released by the Gambling Commission in May 2020 suggested that the scale of the black market had remained low and stable, with little variation in the number of complaints it had received about illegal gambling websites over the previous 12 months. The Commission’s enforcement approach includes working with web hosting companies and search engines to remove sites or prevent them appearing on searches, and working with payment providers to prevent payments to unlicensed operators. It also has powers to prosecute or refer issues to partner agencies such as HMRC where necessary.

The government’s Review of the Gambling Act 2005 has called for evidence on issues around unlicensed gambling, and we are aware of the recent report commissioned by the Betting and Gaming Council. We are also consulting on a proposed uplift to Gambling Commission licence fees, which will strengthen the resources it has to identify the scale of and tackle illegal gambling.

The Gambling Commission requires operators to monitor play and to intervene where players may be at risk of harm. Its consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction is considering whether further requirements are needed for how operators identify and interact with customers who may be at risk.

The Commission will be led by the evidence it receives in deciding its next steps, and its findings may also inform its advice to government on the Gambling Act Review. Following a one month extension to allow extra evidence to be submitted, the deadline for submissions is now 9 February.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what strategy his Department has developed to re-open indoor play centres during the covid-19 outbreak.

We are in discussions about a timeline for reopening the sector. We have also been working with BALPPA, the trade body that represents the industry. Officials in the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport most recently held a meeting with the body on Friday 24 July to discuss the next steps for developing the guidance and reopening the sector.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential impact of the proposal to ban disposable vapes on the illicit vape market.

On 29 January, a ban on the supply and sale of disposable vapes was announced as part of the Government’s response to its consultation on smoking and vaping that was launched in October last year. A ban on the supply and sale of these throwaway items will help to protect our environment, as well as future generations, from the harmful effects of disposable vapes. We will be working with the appropriate bodies to ensure that the ban, when introduced, is enforceable to minimise illicit vapes entering the market.

Robbie Moore
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make a comparative assessment of the wider economic benefits on alternative uses of moorland where grouse shooting (a) does and (b) does not take place.

Moorland soils and habitats provide a range of public goods. These include carbon storage, water storage, biodiversity, and heritage.

We introduced the introductory level of the Sustainable Farming Incentive moorland standard in 2022. This focuses on assessing moorland to identify which of these benefits the moorland already provides, and opportunities to maintain or enhance these benefits. ELM is currently developing additional options for moorland that build on the moorland assessment that we launched last year as part of SFI22.

25th Nov 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make a comparative assessment of the survival of heather on moorland where grouse shooting (a) does and (b) does not take place.

The Government is not currently considering conducting any such assessment

The land management of heather dominated habitats has been extensively studied. We do not believe there is a need for further Government funded research at this stage.

19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the potential effect of the proposed promotion restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar (HFSS) on reformulation work being undertaken by food and drink manufacturers.

Regular discussions take place between officials and Ministers at Defra and the Department of Health and Social Care on the obesity strategy, including the impact of restrictions for promoting products high in fat, sugar and salt on reformulation efforts. We welcome the achievements food and drink manufacturers have made in reformulating products, and want to support industry to go even further to help meet our shared ambition of tackling obesity.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of restrictions proposed by the Government on the promotion of foods that are high in fat, sugar or salt on (a) all and (b) SME manufacturers of those foods.

As a nation we are consuming too much sugar and too many calories. We are therefore encouraging industry to shift the balance of promotions and advertising to healthier options. The Government's response to the consultation on restricting promotions of products high in fat, sugar and salt and the accompanying impact assessments was published on 28 December 2020. The Government's response to the consultation on advertising restrictions for products high in fat, salt and sugar and accompanying impact assessment will be published shortly. Defra has not undertaken its own modelling or impact assessments to support the development of the obesity strategy policies, but we work closely with DHSC to ensure their evidence is robust.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the build back better Flood Re scheme on insurers' ability to make more homes resilient to future flooding.

We are considering the implications of all the proposals made by Flood Re as part of their July 2019 Quinquennial Review report. This includes the proposal that Flood Re be permitted to pay insurers over and above the cost of flood damage for a property to allow insurers to make it more resilient to future flooding (Build Back Better). We will respond formally to the report in due course.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether claimants of flood resilience grants can reapply if the measures installed by that grant are damaged in a subsequent flood.

Flooding has a devastating impact on people’s lives which is why we launched the Property Flood Resilience (PFR) grant in November 2019 and again in February this year.

The Defra PFR grants are intended as one-off payments to assist home or business owners in making their properties resilient to future floods as a part of the repair process. They are not intended as compensation or relief funding. To provide good value for public money, if a property has already been made more resilient through a previous PFR scheme, there should be no need for a further grant.

Home insurance policies generally put properties back to the state they were in before the flood. This should mean that those people who adapted their properties should be able to secure repairs from their home insurer. Similarly, some items may be covered by product guarantees.

The grant is therefore not available to repair damage caused to previous resilience measures.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Apr 2020
What steps the Government is taking to ensure that the UK maintains its expenditure of 0.7 per cent of GDP on development aid during the covid-19 pandemic.

There has never been a more important time to deliver on our 0.7% commitment, a commitment that this government has enshrined in law.

The UK has plans in place to meet this commitment whilst delivering value for money for the taxpayer and ensuring that we continue to support coronavirus response efforts.

James Cleverly
Home Secretary
3rd May 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress his Department has made on assessing the Motorcycle Industry Association’s proposal for assessors from approved training bodies to carry out licence upgrades for vehicles up to 22kw.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency is committed to reviewing all aspects of motorcycle training and testing, and is in the process of assessing the Motorcycle Industry Association’s proposals.

Officials met with key representatives of the motorcycle organisations on 4 December 2023 to discuss motorcycle safety. The next round table meeting, which is scheduled for 8 May 2024, will further consider the proposals and options including licence upgrades.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether her Department has made an assessment of the environmental impact of introducing paper inserts with quit information messages into (a) tobacco pouches and (b) cigarette boxes.

Smoking is the number one entirely preventable cause of ill-health, disability and death in this country. It is responsible for 80,000 yearly deaths in the United Kingdom and one in four of all UK cancer deaths. It costs our country £17 billion a year, £14 billion of which is through lost productivity alone. It puts huge pressure on the National Health Service and social care, costing over £3 billion a year.

Research suggests tobacco pack inserts can increase the likelihood of smokers making a quit attempt, by providing motivational messages and information on the benefits of quitting, in addition to the graphic health warnings already on tobacco products.

A UK wide consultation, Mandating quit information messages inside tobacco packs, was open for eight weeks from August 2023 to October 2023. As part of the consultation, respondents were asked to provide information on any environmental concerns about the use of inserts, and how these could be mitigated. We are considering feedback to the consultation and a consultation response will be published in due course.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether she has considered the potential merits of introducing a retailer licensing scheme for the sale of vapes.

The Government is concerned about the worrying rise in vaping among children. Youth vaping has tripled in the last three years, and one in five children now use a vape. To address this, we recently published our response to the smoking and vaping consultation, which sets out our plan to restrict vape flavours, point of sale display, and packaging. The response is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/creating-a-smokefree-generation-and-tackling-youth-vaping/outcome/creating-a-smokefree-generation-and-tackling-youth-vaping-consultation-government-response

We also set out our plans to introduce an age of sale requirement for non-nicotine vapes and other consumer nicotine products, as well as a £100 fixed penalty notice for underage sales of tobacco and vaping products. In addition, the consultation response announced that disposable vapes will be banned, which will be taken forward by the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs. The Government will introduce legislation as soon as possible.

Whilst there are no current plans to introduce a retail licensing scheme, we have announced £30 million of additional funding per year to tackle illicit and underage sales of tobacco and vape products. In April last year, we also provided funding for a new enforcement unit to tackle the illegal and underage sale of vapes, which has conducted targeted inspections in ports, upskilled trading standards officers, and piloted online underage test programmes.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the consultation entitled Creating a smokefree generation and tackling youth vaping, what steps her Department plans to take to enforce the proposals relating to (a) tobacco and (b) vape products bought from online retailers.

A strong approach to enforcement is vital if the smokefree generation and youth vaping policy is to have real impact. Underage and illicit sale of tobacco, and more recently vapes, is undermining the work the Government is doing to regulate the industry and protect public health. The sale of illicit products frequently targets children and young people in disadvantaged communities, widening health disparities.

For this reason, HM Revenue and Customs and Border Force published the joint illicit tobacco strategy, Stubbing Out the Problem, in January 2024. This sets out our plans to be at the forefront of tackling illegal activity and opportunities that criminals might seek to exploit. One of the strategies key aims is to reduce the demand for illicit tobacco, which will include tackling online sales of illicit tobacco on social media platforms, gathering intelligence on social media sales, and working with social media platforms to ensure we are effective in limiting criminal groups’ ability to sell illicit tobacco through these channels.

Additionally, the Department for Science, Innovation and Technology is creating a framework of standards and governance, underpinned by legislation, to enable the widespread use of trusted digital identity services. This will make it possible for people to prove things about themselves in a secure way without using paper documents.

The Government wants to make sure that those under the legal age of sale cannot buy tobacco products and vapes online, so we have committed to further enhance online age verification. As set out in the command paper, Stopping the start: our new plan to create a smokefree generation, we will work with retailers that sell tobacco products and vapes to produce good practice guidance to help retailers adopt online age verification, to address underage sales.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether additional support will be provided for Trading Standards to enforce the proposed generational ban on tobacco sales.

Smoking is the number one entirely preventable cause of ill-health, disability and death in this country. It is responsible for 80,000 yearly deaths in the United Kingdom and one in four of all UK cancer deaths. It costs our country £17 billion a year, £14 billion of which is through lost productivity alone. It puts huge pressure on the National Health Service and social care, costing over £3 billion a year. That is why we are introducing legislation to create the first smokefree generation, making it illegal to sell tobacco products to anyone born on or after 1 January 2009.

To ensure the law is enforced, the Government is providing an additional £30 million per year for enforcement agencies, including Trading Standards, to support work to tackle illicit and underage sales. The Government will also introduce a £100 fixed penalty notice for the underage sale of tobacco and vaping products. This will support Trading Standards to take quicker and more proportionate enforcement action against the irresponsible retailers who allow underage sales. We will continue to work closely with local trading standards and businesses to provide guidance on implementing and enforcing the Smokefree Generation policy.

Andrea Leadsom
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
16th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to launch its consultation on the products in scope for the upcoming restrictions on the advertising of less healthy food and drink.

The product categories in scope of the restrictions on less healthy food and drink advertising have been outlined in the Government’s consultation response published in June 2021. The upcoming consultation will focus on the clarity of the definitions included in the draft regulations and will be published shortly. The outcome of this consultation will not apply to the restrictions on the promotions of less healthy food and drink.

The products in scope of the promotions restrictions were determined following a public consultation. These regulations will require medium and large businesses, including those with 50 or more employees, to restrict promotions on less healthy food and drink by volume price, such as ‘buy one get one free’ or ‘3 for 2’ offers and in key locations, such as checkouts, store entrances, aisle ends and online equivalents. The restrictions will come into force in October 2022

6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of nutritional and consumer response evidence on the viability of Nutriscore as the UK’s preferred front-of-pack nutrition labelling.

We are considering the responses to the United Kingdom-wide public consultation on our current front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme including views and evidence on new international examples, specifically the Nutri-score label and Chile’s warning label. We chose to consider the Nutri-score and Chile’s warning label because they differ significantly from the UK’s multiple traffic light scheme and have evidence of the impact on public health in non-UK markets.

The consultation included a technical annex which provides a provisional commentary on the costs and benefits on the suggestions included in the consultation. We will publish a consultation response as soon as possible. If changes to the scheme are required, we will consult again on proposed policy changes and publish a full impact assessment.

Research was commissioned alongside the consultation to test which front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme supports people in Great Britain to identify healthier choices. This research tested the Government-recommended multiple traffic light, Nutri-score, Chile’s warning and Positive Choice Tick labels with a British population. The preliminary study was published 10 March 2021 and is available at the following link:

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/3/900

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has carried out a cost-benefit analysis of Nutriscore on its viability as the UK’s preferred front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme.

We are considering the responses to the United Kingdom-wide public consultation on our current front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme including views and evidence on new international examples, specifically the Nutri-score label and Chile’s warning label. We chose to consider the Nutri-score and Chile’s warning label because they differ significantly from the UK’s multiple traffic light scheme and have evidence of the impact on public health in non-UK markets.

The consultation included a technical annex which provides a provisional commentary on the costs and benefits on the suggestions included in the consultation. We will publish a consultation response as soon as possible. If changes to the scheme are required, we will consult again on proposed policy changes and publish a full impact assessment.

Research was commissioned alongside the consultation to test which front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme supports people in Great Britain to identify healthier choices. This research tested the Government-recommended multiple traffic light, Nutri-score, Chile’s warning and Positive Choice Tick labels with a British population. The preliminary study was published 10 March 2021 and is available at the following link:

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/3/900

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effectiveness of non-UK market use of Nutriscore as a front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme.

We are considering the responses to the United Kingdom-wide public consultation on our current front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme including views and evidence on new international examples, specifically the Nutri-score label and Chile’s warning label. We chose to consider the Nutri-score and Chile’s warning label because they differ significantly from the UK’s multiple traffic light scheme and have evidence of the impact on public health in non-UK markets.

The consultation included a technical annex which provides a provisional commentary on the costs and benefits on the suggestions included in the consultation. We will publish a consultation response as soon as possible. If changes to the scheme are required, we will consult again on proposed policy changes and publish a full impact assessment.

Research was commissioned alongside the consultation to test which front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme supports people in Great Britain to identify healthier choices. This research tested the Government-recommended multiple traffic light, Nutri-score, Chile’s warning and Positive Choice Tick labels with a British population. The preliminary study was published 10 March 2021 and is available at the following link:

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/3/900

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 28 April 2021 to Question 179006 on Food: Marketing and the statement in that Answer that his Department intends to lay secondary legislation before Parliament by mid-2021, by what date his Department plans to lay that secondary legislation.

We are awaiting confirmation of a laying date.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will meet with representatives of the food and drink industry who will be affected by the introduction of the Government's proposed restrictions on the online advertising of products that are high in fat, salt and sugar; and if he will provide those representatives with the Government's planned timelines for the implementation of those proposed restrictions.

The Government has committed to implementing restrictions for TV and online simultaneously and will aim to do so at the end of 2022. This will give industry time to prepare and understand any guidance published by the Government or by regulators. There has been extensive engagement with key stakeholders and industry throughout the consultation and publication process. This will continue from the introduction of the Bill through to implementation of the restrictions.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Integrated Care Systems (ICS) specifically cover prostate cancer as part of their local cancer recovery plans; and whether the (a) National Cancer Board and (b) Cancer Recovery Taskforce have plans to issue guidance to ICS on this matter.

Local systems, supported by Cancer Alliances, were asked to set recovery trajectories across all cancers and not for individual tumour types. Following NHS England’s publication of the 2021/22 Priorities and Operational Guidance in March 2021, Cancer Alliances have been asked to draw up a single delivery plan for all cancers, including prostate cancer, on behalf of their integrated care systems for April 2021 to September 2021.

The Cancer Recovery Taskforce met for the final time in March 2021 and therefore will not issue any further guidance. The National Cancer Board continues to oversee further recovery of cancer services alongside delivery of the NHS Long Term Plan for cancer.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data (a) his Department and (b) NHS trusts are collecting in order to monitor interruptions to prostate cancer treatment for existing patients during the covid-19 outbreak.

No data on prostate cancer treatment interruptions during the COVID pandemic is collected.

The NHS Cancer Programme is currently establishing a task and finish group to review alterations and/or disruptions to care pathways, including services for those with prostate cancer, during the pandemic. The group will consider the most appropriate data sources with which to make this assessment.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason his Department’s Tackling obesity strategy is using primary and secondary legislation to introduce proposed restrictions on advertising of products that are high in fat, salt and sugar, and promotion and placement of those products, respectively.

We have been careful to consider the views of stakeholders and experts as we developed our plans for implementing the healthy weight strategy, including restrictions on advertising and promotions. This process will continue as these measures pass through Parliament ensuring there is adequate time for scrutiny. Different legislative approaches being pursued reflect the current legislative framework and implementation routes available to the Government. For the promotions restrictions, we intend to use powers in the Food Safety Act (FSA) 1990 to lay secondary legislation before Parliament by mid-2021. The statutory instrument will be subject to the affirmative parliamentary procedure.

Subject to the outcome of the consultations on further advertising restrictions on TV and online, we intend to legislate through the Health and Care Bill. For online advertising restrictions primary legislation has to be used because there is no existing legislation on which to build. The decision was taken that the TV aspect should also be implemented through primary legislation because the two policies are closely aligned.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase the number of clinical nurse specialists working in (a) urology and (b) prostate cancer.

Specialist clinical nursing workforce working in urology and prostate cancer is a post registration qualification and it is the responsibility of individual employers to ensure they have the staff available to provide clinical services.

The Spending Review 2020 provided £260 million to continue to grow the National Health Service workforce and support commitments made in the NHS Long Term Plan, including continuing to take forward the Cancer Workforce Plan - Phase One commitment to expand education and training to increase the number of clinical nurse specialists by 250 and develop common and consistent competencies.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure adequate opportunity for parliamentary scrutiny of (a) proposed restrictions on promotion and placement of products that are high in fat, salt and sugar and (b) advertising restrictions on those products in the context of the differing proposed legislative vehicles for those policies.

We have been careful to consider the views of stakeholders and experts as we developed our plans for implementing the healthy weight strategy, including restrictions on advertising and promotions. This process will continue as these measures pass through Parliament ensuring there is adequate time for scrutiny. Different legislative approaches being pursued reflect the current legislative framework and implementation routes available to the Government. For the promotions restrictions, we intend to use powers in the Food Safety Act (FSA) 1990 to lay secondary legislation before Parliament by mid-2021. The statutory instrument will be subject to the affirmative parliamentary procedure.

Subject to the outcome of the consultations on further advertising restrictions on TV and online, we intend to legislate through the Health and Care Bill. For online advertising restrictions primary legislation has to be used because there is no existing legislation on which to build. The decision was taken that the TV aspect should also be implemented through primary legislation because the two policies are closely aligned.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many of clinical nurse specialists are focused solely on (a) urology and (b) prostate cancer in England.

The Department does not hold the data requested.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of NHS Cancer Recovery Funding his Department has allocated to tackle the backlog in prostate cancer services as a result of the covid-19 outbreak; and what comparative assessment he has made of how that allocation compares with such funding allocated to other cancers.

This information is not held centrally. Funding allocation is decided at a local service level and is dependent on the needs of these services.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on businesses of the policies proposed in the paper Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives; and if he will make a statement.

We carefully consider all views and potential impacts of our measures to reduce obesity. This includes ongoing engagement and feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders, including those from the food and drink manufacturing sector on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations. Introducing legislation across the market will ensure that a level playing field is created within the retail sector as well as across the wider food industry.

We have conducted two consultations on introducing further advertising restrictions for products that are high fat, salt or sugar (HFSS). We have considered the impact any restrictions will have on industry in terms of lost revenue and any business sectors that will see greater impacts. This has been balanced against the impact advertising of HFSS food and drink has on children’s consumption, preferences and ultimately their weight. We have kept these, along with other factors, in mind whist we develop our final policy position. More detail on any steps taken to protect industry will be outlined in our consultation response, due to be published later this year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has taken steps to protect (a) businesses and (b) jobs in the food and drink manufacturing industry from the potential effect of restrictions on the advertising, promotion and placement of products that are high in fat, salt and sugar.

We carefully consider all views and potential impacts of our measures to reduce obesity. This includes ongoing engagement and feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders, including those from the food and drink manufacturing sector on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations. Introducing legislation across the market will ensure that a level playing field is created within the retail sector as well as across the wider food industry.

We have conducted two consultations on introducing further advertising restrictions for products that are high fat, salt or sugar (HFSS). We have considered the impact any restrictions will have on industry in terms of lost revenue and any business sectors that will see greater impacts. This has been balanced against the impact advertising of HFSS food and drink has on children’s consumption, preferences and ultimately their weight. We have kept these, along with other factors, in mind whist we develop our final policy position. More detail on any steps taken to protect industry will be outlined in our consultation response, due to be published later this year.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2021 to Question 153180 on Food: Marketing, whether he has plans to introduce new incentives for food and drink manufacturers to continue to reformulate products that are high in fat, salt and sugar.

Incentives already exist for businesses to reformulate their products including reformulating to achieve the Nutrient Profiling Model threshold to become out of scope of the promotion restrictions, meeting Public Health England's reformulation programme guidelines, consumer demand for healthier products and the possibility of making nutrition claims.

As outlined in the ‘Restricting location promotions of high fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) products: impact assessment’, there would be non-monetised health benefits from manufacturers reformulating their HFSS products providing a reduction in fat, salt and sugar in products. In addition, preventing obesity related ill health will also result in a healthier workforce, which is likely to be more productive. The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar by location and by volume are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2021 to Question 153180 on Food: Marketing, what assessment has been made of the potential effect of policies in the Government’s strategy, entitled Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives, on the ability of food and drink manufacturers to promote reformulated products.

Incentives already exist for businesses to reformulate their products including reformulating to achieve the Nutrient Profiling Model threshold to become out of scope of the promotion restrictions, meeting Public Health England's reformulation programme guidelines, consumer demand for healthier products and the possibility of making nutrition claims.

As outlined in the ‘Restricting location promotions of high fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) products: impact assessment’, there would be non-monetised health benefits from manufacturers reformulating their HFSS products providing a reduction in fat, salt and sugar in products. In addition, preventing obesity related ill health will also result in a healthier workforce, which is likely to be more productive. The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar by location and by volume are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)