Craig Whittaker Portrait

Craig Whittaker

Conservative - Calder Valley

Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)

(since September 2021)
3 APPG memberships (as of 6 Oct 2021)
Cleaning and Hygiene, ITV, Markets
3 Former APPG memberships
Libraries, Sexual Violence in Conflict, Street Children
Vice Chamberlain (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
16th Apr 2019 - 10th Sep 2019
Selection Committee
5th Sep 2018 - 4th Sep 2019
Committee of Selection
5th Sep 2018 - 4th Sep 2019
Lord Commissioner (HM Treasury) (Whip)
9th Jan 2018 - 16th Apr 2019
Assistant Whip (HM Treasury)
15th Jun 2017 - 9th Jan 2018
Education Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Able Marine Energy Park Development Consent Order 2014
11th Jun 2014 - 30th Oct 2014


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 19th October 2021
09:25
Nationality and Borders Bill - Debate
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
19 Oct 2021, 9:25 a.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 19th October 2021
14:00
Nationality and Borders Bill - Debate
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
19 Oct 2021, 2 p.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 21st October 2021
11:30
Nationality and Borders Bill - Debate
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
21 Oct 2021, 11:30 a.m. View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 21st October 2021
14:00
Nationality and Borders Bill - Debate
Subject: Further to consider the Bill
21 Oct 2021, 2 p.m. View calendar
Department Event
Tuesday 2nd November 2021
11:30
HM Treasury
Oral questions - Main Chamber
2 Nov 2021, 11:30 a.m.
HM Treasury (including Topical Questions)
Save to Calendar
View calendar
Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Wednesday 22nd September 2021
Compensation (London Capital & Finance plc and Fraud Compensation Fund) Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 286 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 52 Noes - 292
Speeches
Thursday 23rd September 2021
Nationality and Borders Bill (Fourth sitting)

Q I have a quick question on what you just said. For absolute clarity, are you saying that we should …

Written Answers
Monday 6th September 2021
Nuclear Power Stations: Construction
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to bring forward legislation to …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 26th July 2021
1. Employment and earnings
Payment of £275 expected from Ipsos MORI, 3 Thomas More Square, London E1W 1YW, for a survey completed on 23 …
EDM signed
Monday 5th July 2021
At home abortions
That this House recognises that legalising the unsupervised self-administration of both sets of abortion pills at home following a telephone …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Craig Whittaker has voted in 292 divisions, and 5 times against the majority of their Party.

4 Nov 2020 - Public Health - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 33 Conservative No votes vs 308 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 516 Noes - 38
2 Sep 2020 - Recall of MPs (Change of Party Affiliation) - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 41 Conservative No votes vs 47 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 55 Noes - 52
24 Jun 2020 - Demonstrations (Abortion Clinics) - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 43 Conservative No votes vs 56 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 47
2 Jun 2020 - Proceedings during the Pandemic - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 31 Conservative Aye votes vs 240 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 185 Noes - 242
27 Apr 2021 - Delegated Legislation - View Vote Context
Craig Whittaker voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 77 Conservative No votes vs 222 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 431 Noes - 89
View All Craig Whittaker Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(11 debate interactions)
Matt Hancock (Conservative)
(8 debate interactions)
Steve Barclay (Conservative)
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
(8 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(14 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(13 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(7 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Craig Whittaker's debates

Calder Valley Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with highest Calder Valley signature proportion
Craig Whittaker has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Craig Whittaker

11th May 2021
Craig Whittaker signed this EDM on Monday 5th July 2021

At home abortions

Tabled by: Carla Lockhart (Democratic Unionist Party - Upper Bann)
That this House recognises that legalising the unsupervised self-administration of both sets of abortion pills at home following a telephone or digital consultation has placed women’s safety at risk by removing a routine in-person appointment which allows medical practitioners to certify gestation and potential coercion or abuse; expresses concern that …
21 signatures
(Most recent: 13 Jul 2021)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 7
Scottish National Party: 2
Alba Party: 1
Labour: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
15th June 2021
Craig Whittaker signed this EDM on Wednesday 23rd June 2021

Zero-carbon domestic renewables

Tabled by: Tim Farron (Liberal Democrat - Westmorland and Lonsdale)
That this House recognises the UK's legal commitment to reduce carbon emissions, including those from domestic dwellings, to Net Zero by 2050; further notes that 30% of UK carbon dioxide emissions are from domestic dwellings; recognises that micro-generation of home grown energy and heating is vital to reach the Net …
23 signatures
(Most recent: 20 Jul 2021)
Signatures by party:
Scottish National Party: 7
Liberal Democrat: 5
Labour: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Conservative: 2
Alba Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Social Democratic & Labour Party: 1
Independent: 1
View All Craig Whittaker's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Craig Whittaker, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Craig Whittaker has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Craig Whittaker has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Craig Whittaker has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Craig Whittaker has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


76 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, when he plans to bring forward legislation to enable a financing mechanism for new nuclear power stations.

As we stated in our response to the consultation on a Regulated Asset Base (RAB) for nuclear published on 14th December 2020, we believe that a RAB remains a credible model for funding nuclear projects, as it should reduce the cost of finance and thereby reduce consumer bills. The Government is considering the model in detail and recognises the need for legislation to implement.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
22nd Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if the Government will take steps to ensure that potential proposed amendments to the Gambling Act in response to the Gambling Review do not adversely affect charity lotteries.

The Review of the Gambling Act 2005 was launched on 8 December with a wide-ranging Call for Evidence, which closed on 31 March. We received c.16,000 submissions to the Call for Evidence from a range of stakeholders and members of the public. We are considering all submissions carefully, including evidence relating to society or charity lotteries, and aim to publish a white paper outlining any conclusions and proposals for reform by the end of the year.

30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will consult on the potential merits of providing large society lotteries the choice of a £50 million or £100 million annual licence, as set out in the Response to the Consultation on Society Lottery Reform published on 16 July 2019.

In July 2020 the annual sales limit for society lotteries increased from £10 million to £50 million. This increase will enable us to monitor the impact on the sector and build a robust evidence base, particularly with regard to the impact on the proportion of proceeds being returned to good causes.

Any future change would need to increase good cause returns across the sector, and we wish to be confident that the regulatory framework is right for fundraising at this scale. We have no present plans to consult on making further changes to the annual sales limit.

27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the ban on online advertising of foods high in fat, salt or sugar on the (a) creative and digital advertising sector and (b) food and drink sector.

The Prime Minister has made it clear that tackling obesity is a priority for this Government. In July 2020 the Government outlined it’s Tackling Obesity strategy which details a host of measures aimed at improving the chances of citizens living a healthy lifestyle.

The Government proposed various options for restricting HFSS advertising in the 2019 and 2020 consultations targeted at protecting children from being exposed to advertising of unhealthy food products.

Balanced against the priority of protecting children and tackling obesity, we have carefully considered the impact that any restrictions will have on industry and in particular the potential for market distortion or disproportionate effects on key business sectors.

The final policy will be set out in our consultation response due to be published shortly. The Government is committed to acting collaboratively to prepare businesses, individuals and organisations for changes to the rules around HFSS advertising.

27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, on the effect of restrictions on online advertising of foods high in fat, salt or sugar on small businesses in the food and drink sector.

The Prime Minister has made it clear that tackling obesity is a priority for this Government. In July 2020 the Government outlined it’s Tackling Obesity strategy which details a host of measures aimed at improving the chances of citizens living a healthy lifestyle.

The Government proposed various options for restricting HFSS advertising in the 2019 and 2020 consultations targeted at protecting children from being exposed to advertising of unhealthy food products.

Balanced against the priority of protecting children and tackling obesity, we have carefully considered the impact that any restrictions will have on industry and in particular the potential for market distortion or disproportionate effects on key business sectors.

The final policy will be set out in our consultation response due to be published shortly. The Government is committed to acting collaboratively to prepare businesses, individuals and organisations for changes to the rules around HFSS advertising.

11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of proposed (a) advertising and (b) promotional restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar on the structure of the UK advertising market.

My department and the Department of Health and Social Care have carefully considered all views and potential impacts of advertising and promotional restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar, inclusive of sponsorship and outdoor advertising. This includes feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations.

The final impact assessment on mandating calorie labelling of food and drink in out-of-home sector is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/903712/Calorie_Labelling_-_Impact_Assessment.pdf

The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) by location and by volume is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

The developmental impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online was published alongside the 2019 consultation on this policy. This is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/786554/advertising-consultation-impact-assessment.pdf

An evidence note was published alongside the consultation on the proposal to introduce a total restriction of online advertising for HFSS products. This builds on the impact assessment that accompanied the 2019 consultation and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/evidence-note

A consultation proposing a total restriction of online advertising for products high in fat, salt and sugar closed on 22 December 2020 and is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/introducing-a-total-online-advertising-restriction-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss

We will publish the final impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online alongside the full response to the consultations shortly.

4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to ensure a balance between people who enjoy gambling responsibly and protecting the vulnerable against gambling-related harm as part of the gambling review.

The gross gambling yield (GGY) of the gambling industry in Great Britain between April 2019 and March 2020 was £14.2bn (including the National Lottery). The industry contributed £8.3bn to the UK economy in 2019 (including lotteries), accounting for 0.4% of Gross Value Added (GVA), and paid £3bn in duties in 2019/20. It provides funding to sport in the UK via sponsorship, media rights and the horseracing betting levy.

The government launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 in December with a Call for Evidence, which runs until 31 March. The Review aims to make sure that the Act is fit for the digital age and that the balance is right between respecting the freedom of adults to choose how they spend their money and leisure time and protecting vulnerable people and communities from harm. More information about the Call for Evidence and how to make a submission is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the gambling review is evidence-led.

The gross gambling yield (GGY) of the gambling industry in Great Britain between April 2019 and March 2020 was £14.2bn (including the National Lottery). The industry contributed £8.3bn to the UK economy in 2019 (including lotteries), accounting for 0.4% of Gross Value Added (GVA), and paid £3bn in duties in 2019/20. It provides funding to sport in the UK via sponsorship, media rights and the horseracing betting levy.

The government launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 in December with a Call for Evidence, which runs until 31 March. The Review aims to make sure that the Act is fit for the digital age and that the balance is right between respecting the freedom of adults to choose how they spend their money and leisure time and protecting vulnerable people and communities from harm. More information about the Call for Evidence and how to make a submission is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent estimate he has made of the financial contribution of the gambling industry to (a) the economy and (b) sport in the UK.

The gross gambling yield (GGY) of the gambling industry in Great Britain between April 2019 and March 2020 was £14.2bn (including the National Lottery). The industry contributed £8.3bn to the UK economy in 2019 (including lotteries), accounting for 0.4% of Gross Value Added (GVA), and paid £3bn in duties in 2019/20. It provides funding to sport in the UK via sponsorship, media rights and the horseracing betting levy.

The government launched the Review of the Gambling Act 2005 in December with a Call for Evidence, which runs until 31 March. The Review aims to make sure that the Act is fit for the digital age and that the balance is right between respecting the freedom of adults to choose how they spend their money and leisure time and protecting vulnerable people and communities from harm. More information about the Call for Evidence and how to make a submission is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence/review-of-the-gambling-act-2005-terms-of-reference-and-call-for-evidence

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to tackle and reduce demand for illegal online gambling.

Data released by the Gambling Commission in May 2020 suggested that the scale of the black market had remained low and stable, with little variation in the number of complaints it had received about illegal gambling websites over the previous 12 months. The Commission’s enforcement approach includes working with web hosting companies and search engines to remove sites or prevent them appearing on searches, and working with payment providers to prevent payments to unlicensed operators. It also has powers to prosecute or refer issues to partner agencies such as HMRC where necessary.

The government’s Review of the Gambling Act 2005 has called for evidence on issues around unlicensed gambling, and we are aware of the recent report commissioned by the Betting and Gaming Council. We are also consulting on a proposed uplift to Gambling Commission licence fees, which will strengthen the resources it has to identify the scale of and tackle illegal gambling.

The Gambling Commission requires operators to monitor play and to intervene where players may be at risk of harm. Its consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction is considering whether further requirements are needed for how operators identify and interact with customers who may be at risk.

The Commission will be led by the evidence it receives in deciding its next steps, and its findings may also inform its advice to government on the Gambling Act Review. Following a one month extension to allow extra evidence to be submitted, the deadline for submissions is now 9 February.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what estimate he has made of the size of the illegal gambling market in the UK.

Data released by the Gambling Commission in May 2020 suggested that the scale of the black market had remained low and stable, with little variation in the number of complaints it had received about illegal gambling websites over the previous 12 months. The Commission’s enforcement approach includes working with web hosting companies and search engines to remove sites or prevent them appearing on searches, and working with payment providers to prevent payments to unlicensed operators. It also has powers to prosecute or refer issues to partner agencies such as HMRC where necessary.

The government’s Review of the Gambling Act 2005 has called for evidence on issues around unlicensed gambling, and we are aware of the recent report commissioned by the Betting and Gaming Council. We are also consulting on a proposed uplift to Gambling Commission licence fees, which will strengthen the resources it has to identify the scale of and tackle illegal gambling.

The Gambling Commission requires operators to monitor play and to intervene where players may be at risk of harm. Its consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction is considering whether further requirements are needed for how operators identify and interact with customers who may be at risk.

The Commission will be led by the evidence it receives in deciding its next steps, and its findings may also inform its advice to government on the Gambling Act Review. Following a one month extension to allow extra evidence to be submitted, the deadline for submissions is now 9 February.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
4th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the Gambling Commission to ensure their consultation on remote customer interaction is considered in parallel with the Government’s Review of the Gambling Act 2005.

Data released by the Gambling Commission in May 2020 suggested that the scale of the black market had remained low and stable, with little variation in the number of complaints it had received about illegal gambling websites over the previous 12 months. The Commission’s enforcement approach includes working with web hosting companies and search engines to remove sites or prevent them appearing on searches, and working with payment providers to prevent payments to unlicensed operators. It also has powers to prosecute or refer issues to partner agencies such as HMRC where necessary.

The government’s Review of the Gambling Act 2005 has called for evidence on issues around unlicensed gambling, and we are aware of the recent report commissioned by the Betting and Gaming Council. We are also consulting on a proposed uplift to Gambling Commission licence fees, which will strengthen the resources it has to identify the scale of and tackle illegal gambling.

The Gambling Commission requires operators to monitor play and to intervene where players may be at risk of harm. Its consultation and call for evidence on Remote Customer Interaction is considering whether further requirements are needed for how operators identify and interact with customers who may be at risk.

The Commission will be led by the evidence it receives in deciding its next steps, and its findings may also inform its advice to government on the Gambling Act Review. Following a one month extension to allow extra evidence to be submitted, the deadline for submissions is now 9 February.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what strategy his Department has developed to re-open indoor play centres during the covid-19 outbreak.

We are in discussions about a timeline for reopening the sector. We have also been working with BALPPA, the trade body that represents the industry. Officials in the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport most recently held a meeting with the body on Friday 24 July to discuss the next steps for developing the guidance and reopening the sector.

Nigel Huddleston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care on the potential effect of the proposed promotion restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar (HFSS) on reformulation work being undertaken by food and drink manufacturers.

Regular discussions take place between officials and Ministers at Defra and the Department of Health and Social Care on the obesity strategy, including the impact of restrictions for promoting products high in fat, sugar and salt on reformulation efforts. We welcome the achievements food and drink manufacturers have made in reformulating products, and want to support industry to go even further to help meet our shared ambition of tackling obesity.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of restrictions proposed by the Government on the promotion of foods that are high in fat, sugar or salt on (a) all and (b) SME manufacturers of those foods.

As a nation we are consuming too much sugar and too many calories. We are therefore encouraging industry to shift the balance of promotions and advertising to healthier options. The Government's response to the consultation on restricting promotions of products high in fat, sugar and salt and the accompanying impact assessments was published on 28 December 2020. The Government's response to the consultation on advertising restrictions for products high in fat, salt and sugar and accompanying impact assessment will be published shortly. Defra has not undertaken its own modelling or impact assessments to support the development of the obesity strategy policies, but we work closely with DHSC to ensure their evidence is robust.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has provided modelling on recent trends in food consumption to support the development of (a) the Government’s obesity strategy and (b) plans for the restriction of the advertising and promotion of foods that are high in fat, salt and sugar.

As a nation we are consuming too much sugar and too many calories. We are therefore encouraging industry to shift the balance of promotions and advertising to healthier options. The Government's response to the consultation on restricting promotions of products high in fat, sugar and salt and the accompanying impact assessments was published on 28 December 2020. The Government's response to the consultation on advertising restrictions for products high in fat, salt and sugar and accompanying impact assessment will be published shortly. Defra has not undertaken its own modelling or impact assessments to support the development of the obesity strategy policies, but we work closely with DHSC to ensure their evidence is robust.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the build back better Flood Re scheme on insurers' ability to make more homes resilient to future flooding.

We are considering the implications of all the proposals made by Flood Re as part of their July 2019 Quinquennial Review report. This includes the proposal that Flood Re be permitted to pay insurers over and above the cost of flood damage for a property to allow insurers to make it more resilient to future flooding (Build Back Better). We will respond formally to the report in due course.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether claimants of flood resilience grants can reapply if the measures installed by that grant are damaged in a subsequent flood.

Flooding has a devastating impact on people’s lives which is why we launched the Property Flood Resilience (PFR) grant in November 2019 and again in February this year.

The Defra PFR grants are intended as one-off payments to assist home or business owners in making their properties resilient to future floods as a part of the repair process. They are not intended as compensation or relief funding. To provide good value for public money, if a property has already been made more resilient through a previous PFR scheme, there should be no need for a further grant.

Home insurance policies generally put properties back to the state they were in before the flood. This should mean that those people who adapted their properties should be able to secure repairs from their home insurer. Similarly, some items may be covered by product guarantees.

The grant is therefore not available to repair damage caused to previous resilience measures.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Apr 2020
What steps the Government is taking to ensure that the UK maintains its expenditure of 0.7 per cent of GDP on development aid during the covid-19 pandemic.

There has never been a more important time to deliver on our 0.7% commitment, a commitment that this government has enshrined in law.

The UK has plans in place to meet this commitment whilst delivering value for money for the taxpayer and ensuring that we continue to support coronavirus response efforts.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has carried out a cost-benefit analysis of Nutriscore on its viability as the UK’s preferred front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme.

We are considering the responses to the United Kingdom-wide public consultation on our current front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme including views and evidence on new international examples, specifically the Nutri-score label and Chile’s warning label. We chose to consider the Nutri-score and Chile’s warning label because they differ significantly from the UK’s multiple traffic light scheme and have evidence of the impact on public health in non-UK markets.

The consultation included a technical annex which provides a provisional commentary on the costs and benefits on the suggestions included in the consultation. We will publish a consultation response as soon as possible. If changes to the scheme are required, we will consult again on proposed policy changes and publish a full impact assessment.

Research was commissioned alongside the consultation to test which front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme supports people in Great Britain to identify healthier choices. This research tested the Government-recommended multiple traffic light, Nutri-score, Chile’s warning and Positive Choice Tick labels with a British population. The preliminary study was published 10 March 2021 and is available at the following link:

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/3/900

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effectiveness of non-UK market use of Nutriscore as a front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme.

We are considering the responses to the United Kingdom-wide public consultation on our current front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme including views and evidence on new international examples, specifically the Nutri-score label and Chile’s warning label. We chose to consider the Nutri-score and Chile’s warning label because they differ significantly from the UK’s multiple traffic light scheme and have evidence of the impact on public health in non-UK markets.

The consultation included a technical annex which provides a provisional commentary on the costs and benefits on the suggestions included in the consultation. We will publish a consultation response as soon as possible. If changes to the scheme are required, we will consult again on proposed policy changes and publish a full impact assessment.

Research was commissioned alongside the consultation to test which front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme supports people in Great Britain to identify healthier choices. This research tested the Government-recommended multiple traffic light, Nutri-score, Chile’s warning and Positive Choice Tick labels with a British population. The preliminary study was published 10 March 2021 and is available at the following link:

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/3/900

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of nutritional and consumer response evidence on the viability of Nutriscore as the UK’s preferred front-of-pack nutrition labelling.

We are considering the responses to the United Kingdom-wide public consultation on our current front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme including views and evidence on new international examples, specifically the Nutri-score label and Chile’s warning label. We chose to consider the Nutri-score and Chile’s warning label because they differ significantly from the UK’s multiple traffic light scheme and have evidence of the impact on public health in non-UK markets.

The consultation included a technical annex which provides a provisional commentary on the costs and benefits on the suggestions included in the consultation. We will publish a consultation response as soon as possible. If changes to the scheme are required, we will consult again on proposed policy changes and publish a full impact assessment.

Research was commissioned alongside the consultation to test which front-of-pack nutrition labelling scheme supports people in Great Britain to identify healthier choices. This research tested the Government-recommended multiple traffic light, Nutri-score, Chile’s warning and Positive Choice Tick labels with a British population. The preliminary study was published 10 March 2021 and is available at the following link:

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/3/900

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will meet with representatives of the food and drink industry who will be affected by the introduction of the Government's proposed restrictions on the online advertising of products that are high in fat, salt and sugar; and if he will provide those representatives with the Government's planned timelines for the implementation of those proposed restrictions.

The Government has committed to implementing restrictions for TV and online simultaneously and will aim to do so at the end of 2022. This will give industry time to prepare and understand any guidance published by the Government or by regulators. There has been extensive engagement with key stakeholders and industry throughout the consultation and publication process. This will continue from the introduction of the Bill through to implementation of the restrictions.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 28 April 2021 to Question 179006 on Food: Marketing and the statement in that Answer that his Department intends to lay secondary legislation before Parliament by mid-2021, by what date his Department plans to lay that secondary legislation.

We are awaiting confirmation of a laying date.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many of clinical nurse specialists are focused solely on (a) urology and (b) prostate cancer in England.

The Department does not hold the data requested.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase the number of clinical nurse specialists working in (a) urology and (b) prostate cancer.

Specialist clinical nursing workforce working in urology and prostate cancer is a post registration qualification and it is the responsibility of individual employers to ensure they have the staff available to provide clinical services.

The Spending Review 2020 provided £260 million to continue to grow the National Health Service workforce and support commitments made in the NHS Long Term Plan, including continuing to take forward the Cancer Workforce Plan - Phase One commitment to expand education and training to increase the number of clinical nurse specialists by 250 and develop common and consistent competencies.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Integrated Care Systems (ICS) specifically cover prostate cancer as part of their local cancer recovery plans; and whether the (a) National Cancer Board and (b) Cancer Recovery Taskforce have plans to issue guidance to ICS on this matter.

Local systems, supported by Cancer Alliances, were asked to set recovery trajectories across all cancers and not for individual tumour types. Following NHS England’s publication of the 2021/22 Priorities and Operational Guidance in March 2021, Cancer Alliances have been asked to draw up a single delivery plan for all cancers, including prostate cancer, on behalf of their integrated care systems for April 2021 to September 2021.

The Cancer Recovery Taskforce met for the final time in March 2021 and therefore will not issue any further guidance. The National Cancer Board continues to oversee further recovery of cancer services alongside delivery of the NHS Long Term Plan for cancer.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason his Department’s Tackling obesity strategy is using primary and secondary legislation to introduce proposed restrictions on advertising of products that are high in fat, salt and sugar, and promotion and placement of those products, respectively.

We have been careful to consider the views of stakeholders and experts as we developed our plans for implementing the healthy weight strategy, including restrictions on advertising and promotions. This process will continue as these measures pass through Parliament ensuring there is adequate time for scrutiny. Different legislative approaches being pursued reflect the current legislative framework and implementation routes available to the Government. For the promotions restrictions, we intend to use powers in the Food Safety Act (FSA) 1990 to lay secondary legislation before Parliament by mid-2021. The statutory instrument will be subject to the affirmative parliamentary procedure.

Subject to the outcome of the consultations on further advertising restrictions on TV and online, we intend to legislate through the Health and Care Bill. For online advertising restrictions primary legislation has to be used because there is no existing legislation on which to build. The decision was taken that the TV aspect should also be implemented through primary legislation because the two policies are closely aligned.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what data (a) his Department and (b) NHS trusts are collecting in order to monitor interruptions to prostate cancer treatment for existing patients during the covid-19 outbreak.

No data on prostate cancer treatment interruptions during the COVID pandemic is collected.

The NHS Cancer Programme is currently establishing a task and finish group to review alterations and/or disruptions to care pathways, including services for those with prostate cancer, during the pandemic. The group will consider the most appropriate data sources with which to make this assessment.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans he has to ensure adequate opportunity for parliamentary scrutiny of (a) proposed restrictions on promotion and placement of products that are high in fat, salt and sugar and (b) advertising restrictions on those products in the context of the differing proposed legislative vehicles for those policies.

We have been careful to consider the views of stakeholders and experts as we developed our plans for implementing the healthy weight strategy, including restrictions on advertising and promotions. This process will continue as these measures pass through Parliament ensuring there is adequate time for scrutiny. Different legislative approaches being pursued reflect the current legislative framework and implementation routes available to the Government. For the promotions restrictions, we intend to use powers in the Food Safety Act (FSA) 1990 to lay secondary legislation before Parliament by mid-2021. The statutory instrument will be subject to the affirmative parliamentary procedure.

Subject to the outcome of the consultations on further advertising restrictions on TV and online, we intend to legislate through the Health and Care Bill. For online advertising restrictions primary legislation has to be used because there is no existing legislation on which to build. The decision was taken that the TV aspect should also be implemented through primary legislation because the two policies are closely aligned.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on businesses of the policies proposed in the paper Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives; and if he will make a statement.

We carefully consider all views and potential impacts of our measures to reduce obesity. This includes ongoing engagement and feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders, including those from the food and drink manufacturing sector on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations. Introducing legislation across the market will ensure that a level playing field is created within the retail sector as well as across the wider food industry.

We have conducted two consultations on introducing further advertising restrictions for products that are high fat, salt or sugar (HFSS). We have considered the impact any restrictions will have on industry in terms of lost revenue and any business sectors that will see greater impacts. This has been balanced against the impact advertising of HFSS food and drink has on children’s consumption, preferences and ultimately their weight. We have kept these, along with other factors, in mind whist we develop our final policy position. More detail on any steps taken to protect industry will be outlined in our consultation response, due to be published later this year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has taken steps to protect (a) businesses and (b) jobs in the food and drink manufacturing industry from the potential effect of restrictions on the advertising, promotion and placement of products that are high in fat, salt and sugar.

We carefully consider all views and potential impacts of our measures to reduce obesity. This includes ongoing engagement and feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders, including those from the food and drink manufacturing sector on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations. Introducing legislation across the market will ensure that a level playing field is created within the retail sector as well as across the wider food industry.

We have conducted two consultations on introducing further advertising restrictions for products that are high fat, salt or sugar (HFSS). We have considered the impact any restrictions will have on industry in terms of lost revenue and any business sectors that will see greater impacts. This has been balanced against the impact advertising of HFSS food and drink has on children’s consumption, preferences and ultimately their weight. We have kept these, along with other factors, in mind whist we develop our final policy position. More detail on any steps taken to protect industry will be outlined in our consultation response, due to be published later this year.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2021 to Question 153180 on Food: Marketing, whether he has plans to introduce new incentives for food and drink manufacturers to continue to reformulate products that are high in fat, salt and sugar.

Incentives already exist for businesses to reformulate their products including reformulating to achieve the Nutrient Profiling Model threshold to become out of scope of the promotion restrictions, meeting Public Health England's reformulation programme guidelines, consumer demand for healthier products and the possibility of making nutrition claims.

As outlined in the ‘Restricting location promotions of high fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) products: impact assessment’, there would be non-monetised health benefits from manufacturers reformulating their HFSS products providing a reduction in fat, salt and sugar in products. In addition, preventing obesity related ill health will also result in a healthier workforce, which is likely to be more productive. The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar by location and by volume are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2021 to Question 153180 on Food: Marketing, what assessment has been made of the potential effect of policies in the Government’s strategy, entitled Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives, on the ability of food and drink manufacturers to promote reformulated products.

Incentives already exist for businesses to reformulate their products including reformulating to achieve the Nutrient Profiling Model threshold to become out of scope of the promotion restrictions, meeting Public Health England's reformulation programme guidelines, consumer demand for healthier products and the possibility of making nutrition claims.

As outlined in the ‘Restricting location promotions of high fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) products: impact assessment’, there would be non-monetised health benefits from manufacturers reformulating their HFSS products providing a reduction in fat, salt and sugar in products. In addition, preventing obesity related ill health will also result in a healthier workforce, which is likely to be more productive. The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar by location and by volume are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when he plans to introduce compulsory (a) calorie labelling and (b) nutritional information for foods purchased (i) from takeaway venues and (ii) via apps.

The Department has consulted on how the policy on calorie labelling for food and drink served outside of the home by large out-of-home sector businesses, with 250 or more employees, should be enforced and is considering what the final enforcement position should be. We will introduce legislation shortly.

There are no current plans to introduce further compulsory nutrition labelling on foods purchased in the out-of-home sector.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions he has has with the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on incentivising food and drink manufacturers to reduce the (a) fat, (b) salt and (c) sugar content of their products.

My Rt hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care has regular discussions with the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on improving the health and wellbeing of the nation including on measures set out in our healthy weight strategy and the Food Strategy White Paper.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that new regulations proposed by his Department on the promotion of foods that are high in fat, sugar or salt (HSFF) do not place different competitive advantages on (a) large and (b) SME manufacturers of those products.

We carefully consider all views and potential impacts of our measures to reduce obesity. This includes feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations.

The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar by location and by volume is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of proposed restrictions on (a) advertising and (b) promotion of on foods high in fat, salt or sugar on alcohol marketing and advertising.

Policies on advertising restrictions and restricting the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar by location and by volume are part of a package of measures with the primary aim of reducing childhood obesity. Our promotions policy is focused on food and non-alcoholic drinks.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of restrictions on the promotion of foods that are high in fat, salt or sugar on reformulation work being undertaken by food and drink manufacturers.

The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar by location and by volume, which include the potential effect of the policy on reformulation, is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

Encouraging the reformulation of food and drink high in fat, salt or sugar is part of our policy objective. There is incentive for businesses to reformulate their products to achieve the Nutrient Profiling Model threshold, and therefore be out of scope of the promotion restrictions. There are further incentives for reformulation including consumer demand for healthier products, the possibility of making nutrition claims and Public Health England's reformulation programme, which can encourage manufacturers to reduce the fat, salt and sugar levels in their products.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the proportion of food ordered on UK food delivery apps in the last 12 months that is classified as high in fat, sugar and salt.

No specific assessment has been made.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the Government has to exempt SME food and drink manufacturers from proposed restrictions on online advertising of foods high if fat, sugar and salt.

The consultation on the proposal to introduce a total restriction of online advertising for products high in fat, salt and sugar asked a question on the impact of the proposals on small businesses and we are engaging with industry to understand these in more detail to factor in the final policy decision. We will publish the response to the consultation shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of trends in the consumption of foods that are designated high in fat, salt or sugar over the last 18 months.

Public Health England monitors the diet and nutritional status of the population through the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS). The NDNS reports on the contribution of different food groups to consumption of fat, salt and sugar. For foods designated high in fat, sugar or salt, trend data is only available for certain high sugar foods. For children and adults aged 19-64 years old, data shows a reduction in the average consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks between 2014-2016 and 2016-2019 but no statistically significant changes for sugar or chocolate confectionery over this period. The most recent report was published in December 2020 and is available at the following link:


https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/ndns-results-from-years-9-to-11-2016-to-2017-and-2018-to-2019

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment he has made of the proportion of foods that are high in fat, salt or sugar that are consumed (a) in home and (b) out of home over the last 18 months.

Public Health England has made no such assessment.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including out of home food in his (a) obesity strategy and (b) plans for the restrictions of advertising and promotion of foods that are high in fat, salt and sugar.

There has been no central assessment of the levels of consumption of take-away food during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We carefully consider all views and potential impacts of our measures to reduce obesity. This includes feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations. The final impact assessment on mandating calorie labelling of food and drink in the out-of-home sector is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/903712/Calorie_Labelling_-_Impact_Assessment.pdf

The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) by location and by volume is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

The developmental impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online was published alongside the 2019 consultation on this policy. This is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/786554/advertising-consultation-impact-assessment.pdf

An evidence note was published alongside the consultation on the proposal to introduce a total restriction of online advertising for HFSS products. This builds on the impact assessment that accompanied the 2019 consultation. This is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/evidence-note

We will publish the final impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online alongside the full response to the consultation shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the implications for his (a) obesity strategy and (b) plans for the restriction of advertising and promotion of foods that are high in far, salt or sugar of the increased consumption of take-away food during the covid-19 outbreak.

There has been no central assessment of the levels of consumption of take-away food during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We carefully consider all views and potential impacts of our measures to reduce obesity. This includes feedback from a wide range of experts and stakeholders on specific policy proposals and in response to our public consultations. The final impact assessment on mandating calorie labelling of food and drink in the out-of-home sector is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/903712/Calorie_Labelling_-_Impact_Assessment.pdf

The final impact assessments on the proposals to restrict the promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS) by location and by volume is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/restricting-promotions-of-food-and-drink-that-is-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt

The developmental impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online was published alongside the 2019 consultation on this policy. This is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/786554/advertising-consultation-impact-assessment.pdf

An evidence note was published alongside the consultation on the proposal to introduce a total restriction of online advertising for HFSS products. This builds on the impact assessment that accompanied the 2019 consultation. This is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/evidence-note

We will publish the final impact assessment on further advertising restrictions on TV and online alongside the full response to the consultation shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the proposed ban on advertising online food and drink high in salt, fat and sugar, whether products designated as high in fat, salt or sugar will be re-categorised if the fat, salt and sugar content is reduced.

The current proposal for what food and drink is classed as in scope of further advertising restrictions online and on TV, is to use the categories originally put forward by Public Health England (PHE) as part of the calorie reduction programme, sugar reduction programme and the soft drinks industry levy overlaying this with the 2004/05 Nutrient Profiling Model. Officials are considering the final list put forward by PHE as well as views fed in as part of the consultation process to come to a final decision on what products are in scope and will publish our full response to the consultation shortly.

The Nutrient Profiling Model uses a simple scoring system where points allocated for ‘C’ nutrients (fruit, vegetables and nut content, fibre and protein) are subtracted from ‘A’ nutrients (energy, saturated fat, total sugar and sodium). Foods scoring four or more points, and drinks scoring one or more points, are classified as ‘less healthy’ and will be subject to the restrictions.

Products that are reformulated and achieve the Nutrient Profiling Model threshold will be out of scope of the restrictions and therefore able to advertise.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure elective surgery capacity and delivery is maintained through future waves of covid-19.

The Department has been clear that non-COVID-19 services such as elective surgery will be maintained as far as possible. This is the approach currently being taken, whilst also managing winter demand and COVID-19 pressures. We continue to work closely with the National Health Service and partners and are carefully monitoring progress to ensure normal levels of elective treatments are restored as soon as possible

The recent Spending Review provided £3 billion for 2021/22 to support the NHS in tackling the impact of COVID-19. This included £1 billion to tackle long waiting lists and address backlogs which would include elective surgery.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress NHS Trusts made towards the target of delivering 90 per cent of their last year’s activity for (a) overnight electives and (b) outpatient procedures by October 2020; and if he will make a statement.

On 31 July 2020, guidance was issued to local National Health Service providers and commissioners outlining the next phase of the NHS response to COVID-19 and concurrent non-COVID-19 activity. The guidance is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/07/Phase-3-letter-July-31-2020.pdf

The guidance set the ambition for recovery of elective services in October to 90% of 2019 levels for admissions, and 100% for outpatients taking into account the need to continue to operate in a COVID-19 environment, with all the necessary infection control measures to keep staff and patients safe. In October 80% of outpatient and 76% of elective activity was delivered.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department provided to NHS Trusts on delivering 90 per cent of their last year’s capacity for (a) overnight electives and (b) outpatient procedures by October 2020.

On 31 July 2020, guidance was issued to local National Health Service providers and commissioners outlining the next phase of the NHS response to COVID-19 and concurrent non-COVID-19 activity. The guidance is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/wp-content/uploads/sites/52/2020/07/Phase-3-letter-July-31-2020.pdf

The guidance set the ambition for recovery of elective services in October to 90% of 2019 levels for admissions, and 100% for outpatients taking into account the need to continue to operate in a COVID-19 environment, with all the necessary infection control measures to keep staff and patients safe. In October 80% of outpatient and 76% of elective activity was delivered.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the effect on (a) patients and (b) wider society of delayed or cancelled elective procedures in hospitals in England as a result of the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

Latest statistics show that, since the start of the pandemic, the elective waiting list increased from 4,235,970 in March 2020 to 4,442,107 in October 2020. This compares with a waiting list of 4,446,299 in October 2019. The number of patients waiting over 52 weeks for treatment has risen from 3,097 in March 2020 to 162,888 in October 2020.

NHS England has worked with patient groups and clinicians to ensure that patients who may be subject to delayed or cancelled procedures are provided with support. A national clinical stratification programme has been established to ensure that every patient waiting for surgery by the end of December has a shared decision-making discussion about their treatment.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure NHS Trusts make use of independent sector facilities to provide elective procedures

A national agreement is in place between NHS England and NHS Improvement in collaboration with the Independent Healthcare Providers Network and independent sector providers to ensure National Health Service patients benefit from an unprecedented partnership with private hospitals as we battle the COVID-19 outbreak.

The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked with the independent sector to secure all appropriate inpatient capacity and other resource across England.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the proposed online advertising restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar on reformulation work being undertaken by food and drink manufacturers.

We published an evidence note alongside the consultation on the proposal to introduce a total restriction of online advertising for products high in fat, salt and sugar. The note references non-monetised benefits as result of reformulation of products. This is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/evidence-note

This builds on the impact assessment that accompanied the 2019 consultation on further advertising restrictions on TV and online. This is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/786554/advertising-consultation-impact-assessment.pdf

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the compliance of the proposed restrictions to communication and marketing activities of foods high in fat, sugar and salt on brands’ and companies’ own websites and social media channels with intellectual property laws.

We published an evidence note alongside the consultation on the proposal to introduce a total restriction of online advertising for products high in fat, salt and sugar. The note references non-monetised benefits as result of reformulation of products. This is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/evidence-note

This builds on the impact assessment that accompanied the 2019 consultation on further advertising restrictions on TV and online. This is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/786554/advertising-consultation-impact-assessment.pdf

As with all Government policies, legal advice is provided by the Government Legal Department to inform Ministerial policy decisions.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of proposed (a) advertising and (b) promotional restrictions on foods high in fat, salt or sugar on (i) international businesses entering the UK market and (ii) inward investment.

‘Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives’, published in July, sets out our intention to restrict the advertising and promotion of foods high in fat, salt and sugar (HFSS).

An impact assessment was published alongside the 2019 consultation on further advertising restrictions on TV and online. This is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/786554/advertising-consultation-impact-assessment.pdf

We published an evidence note alongside the consultation on the proposal to introduce a total restriction of online advertising for HFSS products. This builds on the impact assessment that accompanied the 2019 consultation. This is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/total-restriction-of-online-advertising-for-products-high-in-fat-sugar-and-salt-hfss/evidence-note

A full public consultation and impact assessment has been carried out for the proposal to restrict the promotion of HFSS foods in stores. The Government’s response to the consultation and the impact assessment will be published shortly.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, if he will take steps in response to reports that financial institutions headquartered in the UK are preventing early withdrawal access of pension savings held by British Nationals (Overseas) who are seeking to leave Hong Kong and resettle in the UK.

The right of people to leave Hong Kong is guaranteed under the Basic Law and should be upheld. It is unacceptable for Hong Kong's Mandatory Provident Funds (MPF) Schemes Authority to declare that they will not accept the BN(O) visa as evidence in support of an application for early withdrawal of the MPF.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what assessment he has made of the accuracy of reports that the British National (Overseas) visa is not being recognised by the Hong Kong Government as valid proof of permanent departure from Hong Kong and that people holding that visa and seeking to leave Hong Kong for the UK are being denied early withdrawal of their pension savings as a result.

The right of people to leave Hong Kong is guaranteed under the Basic Law and should be upheld. It is unacceptable for Hong Kong's Mandatory Provident Funds (MPF) Schemes Authority to declare that they will not accept the BN(O) visa as evidence in support of an application for early withdrawal of the MPF.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
19th Jan 2021
What recent progress he has made on the next round of sanctions designations under the Magnitsky sanctions regime.

We recently announced designations on International Human Rights Day under the Global Human Rights sanctions regime against ten individuals and one entity for serious human rights violations in Venezuela, Pakistan, The Gambia and Chechnya.

We will continue to consider targets, guided by the human rights objectives of the sanctions regime and the evidence.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Cabinet Office) (Minister without Portfolio)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether businesses that do not pay business rates are eligible to apply for grants through the Covid-19 Business Grants Fund.

Only businesses which as of 11 March 2020 had their own rating assessment / rates valuation are eligible for the Business Grants Funds. The Small Business Grant Fund and the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund have been designed to support the smallest businesses, and smaller businesses in some of the sectors which have been hit hardest by the measures taken to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Both schemes have been tied to the business rates system because these businesses are likely to face particularly high fixed costs, such as fixed rents and other building-related costs. The grants schemes are already making a real difference to many thousands of businesses, which have received a total of over £1 billion since the schemes were launched.

Small businesses in shared offices / premises, where the overall building’s rates valuation is too big to qualify for a grant, and where the users of the shared space don’t have their own rating assessment, are not eligible for the grants’ scheme. However, small businesses which are not eligible for these schemes should be able to benefit from other measures in the Government’s unprecedented package of support for business, including:

  • An option to defer VAT payments by up to twelve months;
  • The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, now extended to cover all businesses including those which would be able to access commercial credit;
  • The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, to support businesses with their wage bills;
  • The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, to provide support to the self-employed.

The Business Support website provides further information about how businesses can access the support that has been made available, who is eligible, when the schemes open and how to apply - https://www.businesssupport.gov.uk/coronavirus-business-support/.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
23rd Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the guidance published by his Department on 23 March 2020, entitled Covid-19: support for businesses, what steps he is taking to ensure that businesses that (a) sub-lease space from others and (b) are run from home are able to access business grants.

Only businesses which as of 11 March 2020 had their own rating assessment / rates valuation are eligible for the Business Grants Funds. The Small Business Grant Fund and the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund have been designed to support the smallest businesses, and smaller businesses in some of the sectors which have been hit hardest by the measures taken to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Both schemes have been tied to the business rates system because these businesses are likely to face particularly high fixed costs, such as fixed rents and other building-related costs. The grants schemes are already making a real difference to many thousands of businesses, which have received a total of over £1 billion since the schemes were launched.

Small businesses in shared offices / premises, where the overall building’s rates valuation is too big to qualify for a grant, and where the users of the shared space don’t have their own rating assessment, are not eligible for the grants’ scheme. However, small businesses which are not eligible for these schemes should be able to benefit from other measures in the Government’s unprecedented package of support for business, including:

  • An option to defer VAT payments by up to twelve months;
  • The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, now extended to cover all businesses including those which would be able to access commercial credit;
  • The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, to support businesses with their wage bills;
  • The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, to provide support to the self-employed.

The Business Support website provides further information about how businesses can access the support that has been made available, who is eligible, when the schemes open and how to apply - https://www.businesssupport.gov.uk/coronavirus-business-support/.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of introducing a means-tested visa fee and immigration health surcharge waiver in response to financial obstacles being put in the way of British Nationals (Overseas) seeking to leave Hong Kong and come to the UK.

There are no plans to introduce a fee waiver or immigration health surcharge waiver on the British Nationals (Overseas) (BN(O)) route.

The cost of the BN(O) visa has been set at a lower level than many other routes to the UK. In setting the fee, we have looked at analogous routes, the principles for determining fees set out in the Immigration Act 2014 and the overall design of the new immigration system.

Like others coming to the UK, applicants to this route should contribute towards the cost of the NHS services they will be relying on when in the UK.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to ensure that British Nationals (Overseas) who are arriving in the UK are protected from intimidation and hostility from groups in the UK.

On 8 April, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government announced a new UK-wide Welcome Programme to support Hong Kong BN(O) status holders with a package worth £43.1 million.

The Government’s ambition is for Hong Kong BN(O)s to feel welcomed and supported and that is why, as a part of the integration package for Hong Kong BN(O) status holders, we have committed £300,000 to set up a new third party hate crime reporting service.

13th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the Law Commission is reviewing non-religious belief marriage as part of their review of marriage; and if he will use the powers that are available to him to legalise non-religious marriage ceremonies to help clear the backlog created by the covid-19 outbreak without waiting for that review to report.

The Law Commission report due later this year is expected to present options for wholesale reform to the law governing marriage ceremonies, which the Government will consider carefully. Options being explored by the Law Commission include offering couples greater flexibility to form their own ceremonies, allowing the ceremony to take place in a much broader range of locations and to provide a framework that could allow non-religious belief organisations (such as Humanists) and/or independent celebrants to conduct legally binding weddings.

The Government will decide on provision for non-religious belief marriage in the light of the Law Commission's recommendations and it is right for us to await these recommendations.

Delivery of registration services falls to local authorities who continue to manage the demand for civil marriage within their respective geographical areas during recovery from the pandemic.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will review the support available to victims of fraud involving a solicitor.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) regulates the conduct of solicitors and those who breach the conduct rules can be struck off or prosecuted before the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT). Whilst the SRA does operate a compensation fund, this is for those who have suffered financial loss caused by a solicitor, rather than for those who have lost funds by other means. In response to the question of reviewing these discretionary compensation payments made by the SRA I refer the honourable Member to the answer I gave on 29 April 2020 to question PQ38895.

Where fraud cases are prosecuted, the court has powers to award compensation. In other cases, the Financial Ombudsman Service is available for complaints between consumers and businesses that provide financial services.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what routes for compensation victims have when solicitors involved in fraud are struck off or jailed.

Under the framework established by the Legal Services Act 2007, the legal profession in England and Wales, and the bodies that regulate it, are independent from government. It is the responsibility of the Legal Services Board (LSB), as oversight regulator, to ensure that the approved regulators are complying with the regulatory objectives set out in the 2007 Act.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) regulates the conduct of solicitors and those who breach the conduct rules can be struck off or prosecuted before the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT).

The SRA has a discretionary compensation fund which is mainly for individuals where a solicitor’s firm owes them money. The SRA does not routinely compensate consumers and it is not the role of the SRA to pursue funds lost by clients from specific financial schemes.

In response to the question on the discretionary compensation payments made by the SRA I refer the honourable Member to the answer I gave on 29 April 2020 to question PQ38895.

The latest reports on regulatory performance by the LSB are available online here https://www.legalservicesboard.org.uk/our-work/regulatory-performance#regulatory-performance-reports.

There are no plans to review the Legal Services Act 2007. Arm’s Length Bodies of the Ministry of Justice are subject to a regular cycle of reviews as part of the Cabinet Office Tailored Review programme. A Tailored Review of the LSB was published in July 2017 which found that the LSB is generally effective both in promoting the regulatory objectives set out in the Legal Services Act and in delivering its functions.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the Solicitors Regulation Authority powers to compensate victims of land banking scams involving solicitors.

Under the framework established by the Legal Services Act 2007, the legal profession in England and Wales, and the bodies that regulate it, are independent from government. It is the responsibility of the Legal Services Board (LSB), as oversight regulator, to ensure that the approved regulators are complying with the regulatory objectives set out in the 2007 Act.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) regulates the conduct of solicitors and those who breach the conduct rules can be struck off or prosecuted before the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT).

The SRA has a discretionary compensation fund which is mainly for individuals where a solicitor’s firm owes them money. The SRA does not routinely compensate consumers and it is not the role of the SRA to pursue funds lost by clients from specific financial schemes.

In response to the question on the discretionary compensation payments made by the SRA I refer the honourable Member to the answer I gave on 29 April 2020 to question PQ38895.

The latest reports on regulatory performance by the LSB are available online here https://www.legalservicesboard.org.uk/our-work/regulatory-performance#regulatory-performance-reports.

There are no plans to review the Legal Services Act 2007. Arm’s Length Bodies of the Ministry of Justice are subject to a regular cycle of reviews as part of the Cabinet Office Tailored Review programme. A Tailored Review of the LSB was published in July 2017 which found that the LSB is generally effective both in promoting the regulatory objectives set out in the Legal Services Act and in delivering its functions.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
11th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the Solicitors Regulation Authority plans to change the discretionary status of compensations payments for victims of fraud involving a solicitor who has been struck-off.

Under the framework established by the Legal Services Act 2007, the legal profession in England and Wales, and the bodies that regulate it, are independent from government. It is the responsibility of the Legal Services Board (LSB), as oversight regulator, to ensure that the approved regulators are complying with the regulatory objectives set out in the 2007 Act.

The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) regulates the conduct of solicitors and those who breach the conduct rules can be struck off or prosecuted before the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT).

The SRA has a discretionary compensation fund which is mainly for individuals where a solicitor’s firm owes them money. The SRA does not routinely compensate consumers and it is not the role of the SRA to pursue funds lost by clients from specific financial schemes.

In response to the question on the discretionary compensation payments made by the SRA I refer the honourable Member to the answer I gave on 29 April 2020 to question PQ38895.

The latest reports on regulatory performance by the LSB are available online here https://www.legalservicesboard.org.uk/our-work/regulatory-performance#regulatory-performance-reports.

There are no plans to review the Legal Services Act 2007. Arm’s Length Bodies of the Ministry of Justice are subject to a regular cycle of reviews as part of the Cabinet Office Tailored Review programme. A Tailored Review of the LSB was published in July 2017 which found that the LSB is generally effective both in promoting the regulatory objectives set out in the Legal Services Act and in delivering its functions.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many investors in land banking investment scams have been compensated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority as a result of a solicitor being successfully prosecuted.

Under the framework established by the Legal Services Act 2007, the legal profession in England and Wales, and the bodies that regulate it, are independent from government. It is the responsibility of the Legal Services Board (LSB), as oversight regulator, to ensure that the approved regulators are complying with the regulatory objectives set out in the 2007 Act. Their latest reports on regulatory performance are available online here https://www.legalservicesboard.org.uk/our-work/regulatory-performance#regulatory-performance-reports. The role of the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) is as a regulator of solicitors. The SRA consulted between 21 January and 21 April on changes to its compensation fund. Details about the fund and this exercise are available online here https://www.sra.org.uk/sra/consultations/consultation-listing/access-legal-services/. Should the SRA proceed to change the rules of its compensation fund, it will firstly need to seek the approval of the LSB, and it will be matter for the LSB to determine whether or not to approve the new rules.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment his Department has made of whether the Solicitors Regulation Authority is effectively meeting its regulatory objectives.

Under the framework established by the Legal Services Act 2007, the legal profession in England and Wales, and the bodies that regulate it, are independent from government. It is the responsibility of the Legal Services Board (LSB), as oversight regulator, to ensure that the approved regulators are complying with the regulatory objectives set out in the 2007 Act. Their latest reports on regulatory performance are available online here https://www.legalservicesboard.org.uk/our-work/regulatory-performance#regulatory-performance-reports. The role of the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) is as a regulator of solicitors. The SRA consulted between 21 January and 21 April on changes to its compensation fund. Details about the fund and this exercise are available online here https://www.sra.org.uk/sra/consultations/consultation-listing/access-legal-services/. Should the SRA proceed to change the rules of its compensation fund, it will firstly need to seek the approval of the LSB, and it will be matter for the LSB to determine whether or not to approve the new rules.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reasons the Solicitors Regulation Authority has not attempted to recover proceeds of land banking investment scams in cases where solicitors have been successfully prosecuted.

Under the framework established by the Legal Services Act 2007, the legal profession in England and Wales, and the bodies that regulate it, are independent from government. It is the responsibility of the Legal Services Board (LSB), as oversight regulator, to ensure that the approved regulators are complying with the regulatory objectives set out in the 2007 Act. Their latest reports on regulatory performance are available online here https://www.legalservicesboard.org.uk/our-work/regulatory-performance#regulatory-performance-reports. The role of the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) is as a regulator of solicitors. The SRA consulted between 21 January and 21 April on changes to its compensation fund. Details about the fund and this exercise are available online here https://www.sra.org.uk/sra/consultations/consultation-listing/access-legal-services/. Should the SRA proceed to change the rules of its compensation fund, it will firstly need to seek the approval of the LSB, and it will be matter for the LSB to determine whether or not to approve the new rules.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of whether the Solicitors Regulation Authority is effectively meeting its regulatory objectives when compensating victims of land banking investment scams.

Under the framework established by the Legal Services Act 2007, the legal profession in England and Wales, and the bodies that regulate it, are independent from government. It is the responsibility of the Legal Services Board (LSB), as oversight regulator, to ensure that the approved regulators are complying with the regulatory objectives set out in the 2007 Act. Their latest reports on regulatory performance are available online here https://www.legalservicesboard.org.uk/our-work/regulatory-performance#regulatory-performance-reports. The role of the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) is as a regulator of solicitors. The SRA consulted between 21 January and 21 April on changes to its compensation fund. Details about the fund and this exercise are available online here https://www.sra.org.uk/sra/consultations/consultation-listing/access-legal-services/. Should the SRA proceed to change the rules of its compensation fund, it will firstly need to seek the approval of the LSB, and it will be matter for the LSB to determine whether or not to approve the new rules.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reasons the Solicitors Regulation Authority plans to change the rules of its compensation fund on fraud.

Under the framework established by the Legal Services Act 2007, the legal profession in England and Wales, and the bodies that regulate it, are independent from government. It is the responsibility of the Legal Services Board (LSB), as oversight regulator, to ensure that the approved regulators are complying with the regulatory objectives set out in the 2007 Act. Their latest reports on regulatory performance are available online here https://www.legalservicesboard.org.uk/our-work/regulatory-performance#regulatory-performance-reports. The role of the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) is as a regulator of solicitors. The SRA consulted between 21 January and 21 April on changes to its compensation fund. Details about the fund and this exercise are available online here https://www.sra.org.uk/sra/consultations/consultation-listing/access-legal-services/. Should the SRA proceed to change the rules of its compensation fund, it will firstly need to seek the approval of the LSB, and it will be matter for the LSB to determine whether or not to approve the new rules.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will investigate for what reasons the Solicitors Regulation Authority have compensated a small proportion of people who invested in land banking investment scams.

Under the framework established by the Legal Services Act 2007, the legal profession in England and Wales, and the bodies that regulate it, are independent from government. It is the responsibility of the Legal Services Board (LSB), as oversight regulator, to ensure that the approved regulators are complying with the regulatory objectives set out in the 2007 Act. Their latest reports on regulatory performance are available online here https://www.legalservicesboard.org.uk/our-work/regulatory-performance#regulatory-performance-reports. The role of the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) is as a regulator of solicitors. The SRA consulted between 21 January and 21 April on changes to its compensation fund. Details about the fund and this exercise are available online here https://www.sra.org.uk/sra/consultations/consultation-listing/access-legal-services/. Should the SRA proceed to change the rules of its compensation fund, it will firstly need to seek the approval of the LSB, and it will be matter for the LSB to determine whether or not to approve the new rules.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what processes are in place to ensure that the (a) Legal Services Board and (b) Solicitors Regulation Authority operate within the minimum expected standard of performance across their five regulatory performance standards.

The Legal Services Board (LSB) is responsible for monitoring, reviewing and assessing regulators – including the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) – to ensure they meet the minimum expected standard of performance across the regulatory performance standards. As the oversight body, the regulatory performance standards do not apply directly to the LSB itself. As an Arm’s Length Body, the LSB carries out its operational functions, including applying the performance standards, independently of the Department.

The Ministry of Justice monitors the performance of the LSB against its statutory responsibilities as set out in the Legal Services Act 2007 and the policy objectives set out in its annual business plans. Oversight of its performance is carried out through a partnership arrangement which includes assurance meetings between officials of the Department and senior LSB executives.

Alex Chalk
Solicitor General (Attorney General's Office)