Anthony Browne Portrait

Anthony Browne

Conservative - South Cambridgeshire

Treasury Committee Sub-Committee on Financial Services Regulations
20th Jun 2022 - 20th Jun 2022
Rating (Coronavirus) and Directors Disqualification (Dissolved Companies) Bill
30th Jun 2021 - 5th Jul 2021


Oral Question
Tuesday 28th June 2022
11:30
HM Treasury
Topical Question No. 7
If he will make a statement on his departmental responsibilities.
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Department Event
Tuesday 28th June 2022
11:30
HM Treasury
Oral questions - Main Chamber
28 Jun 2022, 11:30 a.m.
Treasury (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 29th June 2022
14:00
Treasury Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Appointment of Dr Swati Dhingra to the Monetary Policy Committee
29 Jun 2022, 2 p.m.
At 2.15pm: Oral evidence
Dr Swati Dhingra - Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics at London School of Economics (LSE)
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Select Committee Meeting
Monday 4th July 2022
15:00
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 7th July 2022
10:00
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 11th July 2022
15:00
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 13th July 2022
14:00
Select Committee Meeting
Monday 18th July 2022
15:00
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 20th July 2022
14:00
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 7th September 2022
14:00
Department Event
Tuesday 13th September 2022
11:30
HM Treasury
Oral questions - Main Chamber
13 Sep 2022, 11:30 a.m.
Treasury (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 13th September 2022
15:45
Division Votes
Monday 27th June 2022
Northern Ireland Protocol Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 283 Conservative Aye votes vs 0 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 295 Noes - 221
Speeches
Wednesday 15th June 2022
Genetic Technology (Precision Breeding) Bill
I want to speak in support of the Bill. Anyone who comes to the rural idyll of South Cambridgeshire and …
Written Answers
Tuesday 21st June 2022
Novel Foods
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Food Standards Agency has had recent meetings …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 20th June 2022
Hares (Close Season) Bill 2022-23
A Bill to create an offence of killing, injuring or taking hares at certain times of the year.
MP Financial Interests
Monday 14th March 2022
8. Miscellaneous
Since 16 December 2019, advisory role (unpaid) for Onward, a progressive think tank focussed on economic and social reform. I …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Anthony Browne has voted in 546 divisions, and 1 time against the majority of their Party.

17 Jun 2020 - Health and Personal Social Services - View Vote Context
Anthony Browne voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 104 Conservative Aye votes vs 124 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 253 Noes - 136
View All Anthony Browne Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Alan Whitehead (Labour)
Shadow Minister (Climate Change and Net Zero)
(15 debate interactions)
Rishi Sunak (Conservative)
Chancellor of the Exchequer
(10 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(10 debate interactions)
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View all Anthony Browne's debates

South Cambridgeshire Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petitions with most South Cambridgeshire signatures
Petition Debates Contributed

If nurseries are shut down in view of Covid-19, the Government should set up an emergency fund to ensure their survival and ensure that parents are not charged the full fee by the nurseries to keep children's places.

The prospect of widespread cancellations of concerts, theatre productions and exhibitions due to COVID-19 threatens to cause huge financial hardship for Britain's creative community. We ask Parliament to provide a package of emergency financial and practical support during this unpredictable time.

The cash grants proposed by Government are only for businesses in receipt of the Small Business Rates Relief or Rural Relief, or for particular sectors. Many small businesses fall outside these reliefs desperately need cash grants and support now.

For the UK government to provide economic assistance to businesses and staff employed in the events industry, who are suffering unforeseen financial challenges that could have a profound effect on hundreds of thousands of people employed in the sector.

After owning nurseries for 29 years I have never experienced such damaging times for the sector with rising costs not being met by the funding rates available. Business Rates are a large drain on the sector and can mean the difference between nurseries being able to stay open and having to close.

As we pass the COVID-19 Peak, the Government should: State where the Theatres and Arts fit in the Coronavrius recovery Roadmap, Create a tailor made financial support mechanism for the Arts sector & Clarify how Social Distancing will affect arts spaces like Theatres and Concert Venues.

As a result of the COVID-19 outbreak there are travel bans imposed by many countries, there is a disastrous potential impact on our Aviation Industry. Without the Government’s help there could be an unprecedented crisis, with thousands of jobs under threat.

To extend the business rate relief to all dental practices and medical and aesthetics clinics and any small business that’s in healthcare

Zoos, aquariums, and similar organisations across the country carry out all sorts of conservation work, animal rescue, and public education. At the start of the season most rely on visitors (who now won't come) to cover annual costs, yet those costs do not stop while they are closed. They need help.


Latest EDMs signed by Anthony Browne

Anthony Browne has not signed any Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Anthony Browne, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Anthony Browne has not been granted any Urgent Questions

1 Adjournment Debate led by Anthony Browne

Tuesday 3rd March 2020

1 Bill introduced by Anthony Browne


A Bill to create an offence of killing, injuring or taking hares at certain times of the year.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Commons)
Monday 20th June 2022
Next Event - 2nd Reading (Commons)
Friday 9th December 2022

Anthony Browne has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


73 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
29th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, with reference to South Cambridgeshire District Council not signing off its 2018-19 accounts and not publishing audited accounts for 2019-20 and 2020-21, what steps he is taking to help ensure that local councils are required to resource and prioritise the production of annual accounts within statutory deadlines.

It is vital that local authorities continue to fulfil their responsibilities in the timely completion of audits to maintain transparency and assurance of local authority accounts.

It is for local authorities to do all they can to clear the backlog of delayed audits. In the meantime, the Department continues to prioritise measures to improve timeliness of completed audits, and have taken several steps to improve the situation, including extending the publication deadline for 2019/20 accounts from July to November to ease pressures on councils and audit firms as a result of COVID19. We are also making available an additional £15 million in 2021/22 to help affected bodies meet the growing cost pressures in the audit market and will consider in due course funding arrangements for future years. In October 2021, we laid regulations to allow for greater flexibility around fee-setting and fee variations.

In its capacity as interim system leader for local audit, the Department recently wrote to s151 officers of local authorities to stress the need for local authorities to prioritise clearing outstanding audits and the timely completion of draft accounts going forward in preparation for external audit.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
14th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans he has to update the UK's Nationally Determined Contribution in advance of COP27.

The UK is encouraging all countries to revisit and strengthen their 2030 targets as necessary to align with the Paris Agreement temperature goal by the end of 2022, following the agreement reached in the Glasgow Climate Pact.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his Department's financial investment in (a) cancer research and (b) dementia research has been per year since 2015.

UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), a partner organisation of BEIS, funds research relating to cancer and dementia across all UKRI councils.

Spend data is presented instead of commitment data to avoid misrepresenting grants that are subject to multi-year funding that are allocated in a single year but spent across several years. This results in uneven distribution of the funding allocations data with apparent spikes and certain years followed by no funding allocation being recorded in subsequent years.

Cancer research

Year

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

UKRI spend £m

1.9

120.7

113.1

116.0

121.3

3.7

Dementia research

Year

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

UKRI spend £m

65.5

44.0

39.8

53.2

47.4

7.3

Notes on cancer research figures

  1. Spend figures include data provided by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and Medical Research Council (MRC).
  2. Spend data for Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), Innovate UK (IUK), Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), Research England (RE) and Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) are not provided.
  3. MRC and BBSRC spend data for 2015/16 is unavailable.
  4. MRC and BBSRC spend data for 2020/21 is not currently available.
  5. MRC and BBSRC spend is provided by the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI). Spend is based on the percentage of each research project that is relevant to cancer research.
  6. ESRC total spend for each relevant grant is included in the data above.
  7. The many funding mechanisms involved reflect a range of investments into projects, institutions and infrastructures. Currently, investment figures are calculated differently across UKRI councils. As such, the data provided across the UKRI Councils is collected from a range of measurement criteria.

Notes on dementia research figures

  1. Spend figures include data provided by BBSRC, ESRC and MRC.
  2. Spend data for AHRC, EPSRC, IUK, NERC, RE and STFC are not provided.
  3. BBSRC spend data for 2019/20 is based on an estimate of spend for that period.
  4. MRC and BBSRC spend data for 2020/21 is not currently available.
George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has any plans to mandate a reduction in (a) plastic and (b) other non-degradable content in fireworks sold in the UK.

Fireworks placed on the market must be safe. The Government welcomes the reduction of the use of plastics in fireworks and initiatives underway by the fireworks industry. We are not at present planning any other action to mandate a reduction in the use of plastic or other non-degradable content in fireworks sold in the UK.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has any plans for regulation by Ofgem of energy providers' purchase price from private solar export systems under the Smart Export Guarantee scheme.

The Smart Export Guarantee (SEG), introduced in January 2020, ensures that small-scale generators have a guaranteed access to the market while enabling electricity suppliers and other market participants to innovate in this area. To provide space for this small-scale export market to develop and to promote innovation, the legislation sets out no specified minimum tariff rate, other than that a supplier must provide payment greater than zero at all times of export.

The SEG has been successful in bringing forward a range of competitive and innovative offerings to the market, with small-scale renewable generators having several tariffs to choose from, including several that are higher than the fixed export rate mandated by the previous Feed-in Tariffs scheme.

Ofgem are to publish their first report on the provisions made by suppliers for smaller scale exports in the summer. We will review this to monitor whether the market is delivering an effective, competitive and innovative range of options.

Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Secretary of State for International Trade and President of the Board of Trade
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department are taking to ensure that the UK life sciences sector continues to have access to (a) research funding and (b) collaborative working opportunities with European partners after 31 December 2020.

The Government values the strong collaborative partnerships that we have across Europe and the globe in the areas of science, research and innovation and wants to continue to support these opportunities. My Rt. Hon. Friend Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer announced in the March Budget that Government investment in R&D will increase to £22bn by 2024/25, the biggest-ever absolute increase.

The UK is open to participation in Horizon Europe if we can agree a fair and balanced deal. We will make a final decision once it is clear whether such terms can be reached.

If we do not formally associate to Horizon Europe or Euratom R&T, we will implement ambitious alternatives as quickly as possible from January 2021 and address the funding gap. Alternatives to Horizon Europe will address discovery, or ‘curiosity-led’ research, global collaboration and innovation. Under all scenarios it is our aim that UK organisations and entities continue to participate in Horizon Europe collaborative projects open to third countries, as well as in wider international collaborations. This applies across all eligible R&D including life sciences. Funding for EU programmes or for alternatives would be subject to allocations at the Spending Review.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
22nd Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much funding each university in the UK has received from (a) the Chinese Government, (b) other Chinese state authorities and (c) companies based in China.

Universities in the UK are independent organisations. The Government does not collect data of this sort.

Higher education providers in the UK are required to submit certain categories of data to the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). This is published annually at https://www.hesa.ac.uk/data-and-analysis/finances. This includes their overall income from a variety of sources and for a range of different activities, including teaching, research and commercial. This includes research grant and contract income from business. However, HESA data does not indicate the individual businesses concerned.

Amanda Solloway
Government Whip, Lord Commissioner of HM Treasury
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, on what date his Department plans to withdraw the requirement on schools to complete the daily Educational Settings Status Form required by covid-19 regulations.

The request that schools complete the daily educational settings status form is kept under continuous review. The information supplied by schools has been valuable in enabling the Government to manage the COVID-19 outbreak. There is no requirement on schools to complete the daily educational settings status form in COVID-19 regulations – it is a voluntary collection. The Government is grateful to the large proportions of schools and colleges who respond every day to help us understand the impacts of COVID-19 on the education sector, both at a national and local level.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, from which date all university students and staff will return to campus in order to resume in-person teaching.

Following the review into when the remaining higher education students can return to in-person teaching and learning, the government has announced that the remaining students should return to in-person teaching no earlier than 17 May 2021, alongside Step 3 of the roadmap. Students and institutions will be given at least a week’s notice of any further return in accordance with the timing of Step 3 of the roadmap.

The government roadmap is designed to maintain a cautious approach to the easing of restrictions to reduce public health risks and ensure that we can maintain progress towards full reopening. However, the government recognises the difficulties and disruption that this may cause for many students and their families and that is why the government is making a further £15 million of additional student hardship funding available for this academic year 2020/21. In total we have made an additional £85 million of funding available for student hardship.

We are supporting universities to provide regular twice weekly asymptomatic testing for all students and staff on-site and, from May, at home. This will help break chains of transmission of the virus.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether it is the Government's policy that nannies should return to work to care for the children of (a) key workers who cannot work from home and (b) parents who remain at home.

Nannies are able to provide paid childcare in a child's home subject to meeting public health principle's set out in Annex A of 'Our plan to rebuild: The UK Government's COVID-19 recovery strategy':

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/our-plan-to-rebuild-the-uk-governments-covid-19-recovery-strategy/our-plan-to-rebuild-the-uk-governments-covid-19-recovery-strategy#annex-a-staying-safe-outside-your-home

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when his Department plans to respond to the consultation entitled Ending the retail sale of peat in horticulture in England and Wales, which closed on 18 March 2022.

The Government has always been clear about the need to end the use of peat and peat-containing products in horticulture in England. The Government therefore published a full consultation on banning the sale of peat and peat-containing products in the amateur sector by the end of this Parliament in England and Wales.

The Government also asked for any evidence stakeholders can provide on the impacts of ending the use of peat and peat-containing products. We received over 5000 individual responses to the consultation, many of which contained detailed data and supporting evidence. We are aiming to publish our formal response to the consultation as soon as possible.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that bonuses paid to senior water company management are aligned with their company’s requirements to meet environmental objectives.

The Board Leadership, Transparency and Governance principles issued by Ofwat set out expectations on transparency of executive pay (see link here: Board leadership, transparency and governance – Ofwat). Water companies are now required by their licence conditions to meet the objectives of the principles, and to demonstrate the link between their performance and performance-pay for executive teams.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will increase the fines permissible within Section 30 of the Game Act 1831 for hare coursing offences.

There are no current plans to amend the penalties in the Game Act 1831 for hare coursing offences.

The Government takes wildlife crime seriously and is committed to ensuring the protection this legislation offers wildlife is effectively enforced. It recognises the problems and distress which hare coursing causes for rural communities. Poaching (including hare coursing) is one of the UK’s six wildlife crime priorities, which are set by the UK Wildlife Crime Tasking and Co-ordination Group, supported by the Wildlife Crime Conservation Advisory Group, chaired by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee. The National Wildlife Crime Unit, funded partly by Defra and the Home Office, assists regional police forces in tackling these crimes by gathering and analysing intelligence, sharing this with the police and assisting police investigations.

A hare coursing roundtable meeting was held on 3 September between Defra, Home Office, police, National Farmers Union and other rural organisations to bring parties together to establish a shared understanding of the barriers to tackling hare coursing effectively and identify potential ways forward.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the level of farming income lost as a result of (a) illegal hare coursing and (b) damage to farmlands resulting from illegal hare coursing.

The Government has not made an estimate of the level of farming income lost as a result of hare coursing.

The Government recognises the problems and distress which hare coursing causes for rural communities. The Hunting Act 2004 bans all hare coursing in England and Wales, including both organised and unregulated events, and all participation in or attendance at such events.

We are working with the police and stakeholders to look at further ways this issue can be addressed.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent progress his Department has made on mandating disability awareness training for all private hire vehicle drivers.

Effective disability awareness training can help ensure that taxi and private hire vehicle (PHV) drivers have the knowledge, skills and confidence to provide passengers with appropriate assistance, so that they can travel independently and with confidence.

The Department wants every local licensing authority to require taxi and PHV drivers to complete this training and will make this clear in updated best practice guidance, due to be published for consultation later in the year.

The Government also remains committed to introducing mandatory disability awareness training for taxi and PHV drivers through new National Minimum Standards for licensing authorities when Parliamentary time allows.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to mandate the netting or sheeting of open (a) pick-up trucks and (b) small lorries to minimise litter on the highways.

When transporting loads, it is the operator’s and driver’s responsibility to make sure the vehicle’s load is secured safely. There is already legislation in place to ensure that vehicle loads are secure and do not cause a danger to other road users, but if a vehicle’s load is found to be unsafe, then the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) and the police can take enforcement action where appropriate.

The action taken will vary from encounter to encounter but generally will result in the driver receiving a prohibition preventing the continuation of a journey until such time as the load has been satisfactory secured. Where the driver is culpable of the offence, they will receive a fixed penalty (£100) or, in the most serious cases, can be prosecuted for using a dangerous vehicle. The DVSA will also follow up these incidents with the vehicle’s operator to establish the cause of the problem and to ensure that it does not happen again.

Guidance outlining the responsibilities of operators and drivers to ensure loads are secure, and further information about the use of netting and sheeting can be found online at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/load-securing-vehicle-operator-guidance/load-securing-vehicle-operator-guidance

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will extend the deadline for compliance with the obligation in the Public Service Vehicle Accessibility Regulations 2000 for coaches over 7.5 tonnes to have been fully accessible by 1 January 2020.

Operators, local authorities and education establishments have had almost twenty years to comply with the Public Service Vehicles Accessibility Regulations 2000.

Government has offered temporary exemptions for certain statutory and school procured services whilst compliant vehicles are procured, which will ensure that children are still able to get to and from their place of education.

We are currently liaising with stakeholders to understand the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the ability of operators to comply and what further support might be required.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of extending to all employers irrespective of staff numbers the obligation to undertake a work-related risk assessment.

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 requires all employers (irrespective of staff numbers) to make a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks to the health and safety of their employees to which they are exposed whilst they are at work. They also require employers to assess the risks to the health and safety of persons not in their employment arising out of the conduct of their undertaking, in order to identify the measures that are needed to comply with relevant health and safety regulations. Employers with five or more employees are required to record the significant findings of their assessment.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Food Standards Agency has had recent meetings with representatives of international peer regulators in relation to novel foods.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) regularly meets with its counterpart food safety regulators and discusses novel foods and food innovation.

In March 2022, the FSA’s Chief Executive participated in the third meeting of the International Heads of Food Agency Forum attended by food agency leaders and representatives of international food organisations. The meeting discussed new food sources and production systems and included novel food regulation. At working level, the FSA has participated in meetings with international peers, including with the British Embassy in Tel Aviv, Thailand, and Republic of Ireland.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the Food Standards Agency approvals process for alternative proteins.

The Foods Standards Agency (FSA) has committed to review the novel foods regulations. This will include identifying opportunities to streamline processes to support industry innovation, without detracting from the safeguards which support the United Kingdom’s food safety standards. The FSA is engaging with businesses, including the alternative proteins industry, on how the regulations could be improved.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
15th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the Food Standards Agency approvals process for novel foods.

The Foods Standards Agency (FSA) has committed to review the novel foods regulations. This will include identifying opportunities to streamline processes to support industry innovation, without detracting from the safeguards which support the United Kingdom’s food safety standards. The FSA is engaging with businesses, including the alternative proteins industry, on how the regulations could be improved.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to extend the obligation to provide calorie labelling on menus to catering venues with fewer than 250 employees.

Regulations on out-of-home calorie labelling for out of home food sold in large businesses of 250 or more employees, including restaurants, cafes and takeaways, came into force on 6 April 2022. We committed to review the policy within five years and will consider whether to extend the requirement to smaller businesses. We encourage smaller businesses to voluntarily comply with the calorie labelling requirements.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department assesses whether an area qualifies for a High Cost Area Supplement based on (a) travel to work area, (b) county council, (c) NHS commissioning authority or (d) another geographic basis.

High cost area supplements are included in Section 4 of the NHS Terms and Conditions, jointly agreed by employers and the National Health Service trade unions. Royston, Basildon, Harlow, Watford, Brentwood and Thurrock are all defined as fringe areas, therefore NHS staff working in these areas receive the fringe high cost area supplement at 5% of basic salary. Cambridgeshire is not defined as a zone for high cost area payments.

The high cost area zones are based on 2005 primary care trust geographical boundaries. It is open to the NHS Pay Review Body to make recommendations on the future geographic coverage of high-cost area supplements and on the value of such supplements. NHS employers or staff organisations in a specified geographic area can propose an increase in the level of high cost area supplement for staff in that area, or in the case of areas where no supplement exists, to introduce a supplement.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how often his Department reviews which administrative regions qualify for High Cost Area Supplements.

High cost area supplements are included in Section 4 of the NHS Terms and Conditions, jointly agreed by employers and the National Health Service trade unions. Royston, Basildon, Harlow, Watford, Brentwood and Thurrock are all defined as fringe areas, therefore NHS staff working in these areas receive the fringe high cost area supplement at 5% of basic salary. Cambridgeshire is not defined as a zone for high cost area payments.

The high cost area zones are based on 2005 primary care trust geographical boundaries. It is open to the NHS Pay Review Body to make recommendations on the future geographic coverage of high-cost area supplements and on the value of such supplements. NHS employers or staff organisations in a specified geographic area can propose an increase in the level of high cost area supplement for staff in that area, or in the case of areas where no supplement exists, to introduce a supplement.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which categories of NHS staff in administrative areas that qualify for the Fringe High Cost Area Supplement receive an uplift.

High cost area supplements are included in Section 4 of the NHS Terms and Conditions, jointly agreed by employers and the National Health Service trade unions. Royston, Basildon, Harlow, Watford, Brentwood and Thurrock are all defined as fringe areas, therefore NHS staff working in these areas receive the fringe high cost area supplement at 5% of basic salary. Cambridgeshire is not defined as a zone for high cost area payments.

The high cost area zones are based on 2005 primary care trust geographical boundaries. It is open to the NHS Pay Review Body to make recommendations on the future geographic coverage of high-cost area supplements and on the value of such supplements. NHS employers or staff organisations in a specified geographic area can propose an increase in the level of high cost area supplement for staff in that area, or in the case of areas where no supplement exists, to introduce a supplement.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will confirm that NHS staff in Cambridgeshire do not receive any level of the High Cost Area Supplement.

High cost area supplements are included in Section 4 of the NHS Terms and Conditions, jointly agreed by employers and the National Health Service trade unions. Royston, Basildon, Harlow, Watford, Brentwood and Thurrock are all defined as fringe areas, therefore NHS staff working in these areas receive the fringe high cost area supplement at 5% of basic salary. Cambridgeshire is not defined as a zone for high cost area payments.

The high cost area zones are based on 2005 primary care trust geographical boundaries. It is open to the NHS Pay Review Body to make recommendations on the future geographic coverage of high-cost area supplements and on the value of such supplements. NHS employers or staff organisations in a specified geographic area can propose an increase in the level of high cost area supplement for staff in that area, or in the case of areas where no supplement exists, to introduce a supplement.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether NHS staff in (a) Royston, (b) Basildon, (c) Harlow, (d) Watford, (e) Brentwood and (f) Thurrock receive the Fringe High Cost Area Supplement at 5 per cent of basic salary.

High cost area supplements are included in Section 4 of the NHS Terms and Conditions, jointly agreed by employers and the National Health Service trade unions. Royston, Basildon, Harlow, Watford, Brentwood and Thurrock are all defined as fringe areas, therefore NHS staff working in these areas receive the fringe high cost area supplement at 5% of basic salary. Cambridgeshire is not defined as a zone for high cost area payments.

The high cost area zones are based on 2005 primary care trust geographical boundaries. It is open to the NHS Pay Review Body to make recommendations on the future geographic coverage of high-cost area supplements and on the value of such supplements. NHS employers or staff organisations in a specified geographic area can propose an increase in the level of high cost area supplement for staff in that area, or in the case of areas where no supplement exists, to introduce a supplement.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which modifiable risk factors the Health Promotion Taskforce will focus on in the development of the forthcoming strategy for dementia in England.

The Department will set out our future plans on dementia for England later this year. The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities is contributing to the development of the new strategy, which will include a focus on prevention and risk reduction. The concept of brain health in encouraging people to reduce their dementia risk is also being explored. Officials are engaging with a range of stakeholders on the new strategy including members of the Dementia Programme Board and other Government departments.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what role the Health Promotion Taskforce will have in the development of the forthcoming strategy for dementia in England.

The Department will set out our future plans on dementia for England later this year. The Office for Health Improvement and Disparities is contributing to the development of the new strategy, which will include a focus on prevention and risk reduction. The concept of brain health in encouraging people to reduce their dementia risk is also being explored. Officials are engaging with a range of stakeholders on the new strategy including members of the Dementia Programme Board and other Government departments.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to NHS England data from March 2020 to September 2021 which shows that urgent suspected urology cancer referrals were at 83.5 per cent of the pre-covid-19 outbreak baseline, what steps his Department is taking to (a) raise awareness of prostate cancer amongst higher risk men and (b) help ensure that those missing from the treatment pathway are identified before their cancer has progressed to be non-curable.

The ‘Help us help you’ campaign has raised awareness of abdominal and urological symptoms and urged people to consult their general practitioner (GP). A new phase of campaign is planned for early 2022 to address some of the barriers which prevent people coming forward. The National Health Service is working with Prostate Cancer UK to raise awareness of prostate cancer risk and encourage men to use Prostate Cancer UK’s risk checker.

Primary Care Networks are working with GP practices to implement the 2021/22 Early Cancer Diagnosis Directed Enhanced Service Specification, to optimise suspected cancer referral practice, support earlier diagnosis of cancer, and identify people before their cancer has progressed to non-curable. The NHS is focusing on reducing the number of people waiting over 62 days on cancer pathways, particularly rescheduling diagnostic procedures or treatments for those whose care was delayed by the pandemic. An additional £1 billion has been made available to the NHS in 2021/22 to support the recovery of elective activity and cancer services.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department is taking steps to investigate the potential (a) acceptance of and (b) need for regulation on cultured meat as a food source.

In 2019, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) commissioned a study on consumer views towards emerging technologies including cultured meat. The FSA also plans further work on consumer perceptions of cultured meat, with the findings due in early 2022. Cultured meats would require pre-market authorisation as they are likely to be novel foods and any applications would need to be assessed for safety under the process required by the Novel Food Regulations 2015/2283. This authorisation process will take consumer views into account in any recommendations to the Government.

Maggie Throup
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the Government announcement in April 2018 of £75 million funding over five years for prostate cancer research, how much of that funding has been disbursed, broken down by project.

The Department funds research into all aspects of human health, including prostate cancer, through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) at the level of £1 billion per year. The following table shows the NIHR’s programme expenditure specifically prostate cancer since April 2018:

Award title

Total award budget

A randomised controlled trial of Partial prostate Ablation versus Radical Treatment (PART) in intermediate risk, unilateral clinically localised prostate cancer

£ 2,677,446

Enzalutamide for treating non-metastatic hormone-relapsed prostate cancer [ID1359]

£ 65,625

A randomised controlled trial of TRANSrectal biopsy versus Local Anaesthetic Transperineal biopsy Evaluation (TRANSLATE) of potential clinically significant prostate cancer

£ 1,072,414

Darolutamide with androgen deprivation therapy for treating non-metastatic hormone-relapsed prostate cancer [ID1443]

£ 65,625

Olaparib for previously treated, hormone-relapsed metastatic prostate cancer (ID1640)

£ 131,250

Perineal biopsy devices for diagnosis of prostate cancer in people with suspected prostate cancer

£ 175,219

A miniature tethered drop-in laparoscopic molecular imaging probe for intraoperative decision support in minimally invasive prostate cancer surgery

£ 869,105

Prostate Liquid Biopsy Test for Risk Stratification of Prostate Cancer, preparation for CE marking.

£ 205,098

Transforming management of advanced prostate cancer: Increasing clinical productivity and capacity and empowering men through digital health

£ 149,168

Further development of and evidence generation for a precision dosing tool for optimising chemotherapy dosing in advanced prostate cancer

£ 150,000

GlycoScore: Superior prostate cancer diagnosis using a simple blood test

£ 150,000

Integrating genetic testing into the prostate cancer pathway to more precisely guide care, treatment and accelerate clinical trials

£ 3,001,779

SUrvivors' Rehabilitation Evaluation after CANcer (SURECAN)

£ 2,447,636

Supported exercise TrAining for Men with prostate caNcer on Androgen deprivation therapy – STAMINA

£ 2,497,723

Endoscopically-delivered Purastat for the treatment of haemorrhagic radiation proctopathy: a randomised feasibility study

£ 225,720

Improving self and clinical management of comorbid diabetes during cancer treatments: a qualitative interview study with patients and clinicians to identify theory-based intervention targets, strategies and implementation options

£ 149,784

A multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a self-help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) intervention to reduce the impact of hot flush and night sweat (HFNS) symptoms in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT): MANaging symptoms during prostate CANcer treatment (MANCAN2)

£ 348,659

The Prostate Cancer Androgen Receptor Splice Variant 7 Biomarker Trial (The VARIANT trial) - A multicentre feasibility study of biomarker-guided personalised treatment in advanced prostate cancer.

£276,230

Improving outcomes for men undergoing surgery for prostate cancer. A study to evaluate the feasibility of a multicentre randomised controlled trial of frozen section technology to improve oncological and functional outcomes at robotic radical prostatectomy.

£ 249,302

Multimodal treatment for patients with prostate cancer: a national study using existing electronic data.

£ 257,830

Total

£15,165,614

The NIHR also supports the delivery in the health and care system of prostate cancer research funded by research funding partners in the charity and public sectors. The NIHR Clinical Research Network has supported over 90 prostate cancer related studies since April 2018, totalling £20.3 million.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether funding is available for the costs of (a) covid-19 testing and (b) quarantine for children who are required to travel internationally by custody order.

The Government does not provide funding for travel costs. We offer deferred payment plans and hardship support for people who cannot afford to pay for the cost of managed quarantine and testing up front. In some circumstances this may be available to those who are not in receipt of income related benefits.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
24th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress he has made on introducing the flexible training for healthcare professionals seeking to switch discipline announced on 9 February 2020.

The Department continues to work with Health Education England and other partners on a range of initiatives to reform the medical and nursing training systems to ensure that the National Health Service workforce aligns with patient and service need. This includes taking action to widen access into healthcare professions and increase the flexibility of training pathways.

As part of this work, the Government is considering opportunities as a result of the United Kingdom leaving the European Union to support healthcare professionals to switch disciplines. Any changes to training for regulated healthcare professions would be developed in conjunction with stakeholders and would be subject to full public consultation where appropriate. Approved education providers would need to consider prior learning to assess the flexibility of programmes or entry requirements and any individual training courses that arose from this work would need to be approved by the relevant regulator.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of offering mammography screening on a biennial basis instead of a three-year interval.

The United Kingdom National Screening Committee (UK NSC) is not currently considering the potential merits of offering mammography screening on a biennial basis instead of the current three-year interval. The NHS Breast Screening Programme is currently focussed on inviting all eligible women to participate in breast screening for screening that may have been delayed due to COVID-19.

A proposal to change the current screening interval from three yearly to biennial would be for the UK NSC to consider through its programme modification proposal process, which is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-nsc-evidence-review-process

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether funding is available for the costs of (a) covid-19 testing and (b) quarantine for children who are required to travel internationally by custody order.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the difference between the Public Health England and the World Health Organisation's classification of deaths from covid-19, if he will publish figures for deaths from covid-19 in the UK according to the WHO definition that Covid-19 should be recorded on the medical certificate of cause of death for all decedents where the disease caused, or is assumed to have caused, or contributed to death.

Public Health England (PHE) uses two definitions of a death in a person with COVID-19 in England. Firstly, the total number of deaths of people who received a positive test result for COVID-19 and died within 28 days of the first positive test reported on or up to the date of death or reporting date. People who died more than 28 days after their first positive test are not included, whether or not COVID-19 was the cause of death. Secondly, the total number of deaths of people who received a positive test result for COVID-19 and either died within 60 days of the first positive test or where COVID-19 was mentioned on their death certificate.

Data for both definitions of a COVID-19 death are available in PHE’s National COVID-19 surveillance reports which are available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-covid-19-surveillance-reports

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has plans to bring forward legislative proposals to regulate the (a) promotion and (b) sale of (i) unofficial and (ii) potentially harmful (A) thermography scans and (B) other diagnostics and treatments to people diagnosed with cancer.

Any equipment or diagnostic test that fits the definition of a medical device or in vitro diagnostic medical device must meet the requirements of the Medical Devices Regulations 2002 (the MDR).

Thermography scanning equipment for a medical purpose would be likely to meet the definition of a medical device and as such the manufacturer must hold clinical and scientific evidence to demonstrate the safety and performance of the device in relation to the claims being made for it. The manufacturer must CE mark the device in accordance with the MDR.

The MDR do not contain specific provisions dealing with promotion or advertising of medical devices. The general United Kingdom legislation for advertising applies to medical devices. In addition, the provisions of the Cancer Act 1939 prohibit the advertising of products to treat cancer. There are currently no plans to review the provisions around promotion of products laid down in the Cancer Act.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
26th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to establish a study into the treatment and care of patients experiencing prolonged symptoms of covid-19 infection.

The Department invests over £1 billion a year in health and care research through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The NIHR Recovery and Learning Call is currently open to researchers to submit proposals on the treatment and care of patients experiencing prolonged symptoms of COVID-19 infection.

The NIHR Recovery and Learning Call will fund research to better understand and manage the health and social care consequences of the global COVID-19 pandemic beyond the acute phase. The research will focus specifically on health outcomes, public health, social care and health service delivery and to mitigate the impact of subsequent phases and aftermath.

This follows on from the UK Research and Innovation-NIHR Rapid Response Rolling Call for COVID-19 research that closed on 30 June which funded projects that could make a significant contribution to the understanding, prevention and/or management of the COVID-19 outbreak within 12 months.

Helen Whately
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospital beds the NHS has reserved in the private sector; and what the occupancy data for those beds was at 8 June 2020.

National Health Service patients are benefitting from an unprecedented partnership with private hospitals in the United Kingdom as we battle the COVID-19 outbreak. The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked with the independent sector to secure all appropriate inpatient capacity and other resource across England. This has increased NHS capacity and ensured that more facilities are available for patients diagnosed with COVID-19.

It is not currently possible to provide data on the occupancy of those beds for the time frame asked for.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many hospital beds the NHS has reserved within the private sector; and if he will publish the occupancy data for those beds as at 8 June 2020.

National Health Service patients are benefitting from an unprecedented partnership with private hospitals in the United Kingdom as we battle the COVID-19 outbreak. The Department and NHS England and NHS Improvement have worked with the independent sector to secure all appropriate inpatient capacity and other resource across England. This has increased NHS capacity and ensured that more facilities are available for patients diagnosed with COVID-19.

It is not currently possible to provide data on the occupancy of those beds for the time frame asked for.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether her Department plans to support UK participation in any international observation mission for the Colombian presidential elections in 2022.

The UK is committed to building a Network of Liberty that will put us at the heart of economic, diplomatic and security partnerships. Promoting democratic values is a key part of this, and election observation allows us to support democracies and strengthen democratic electoral processes around the globe.

We are considering our approach for the Colombian Presidential elections, and will continue to support ongoing work by existing international election observation organisations, such as the Mission for Electoral Observation (MOE) in Colombia. We are clear that independent election monitoring is vital for credible and inclusive elections.

Vicky Ford
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, whether his Department has plans to support the safeguarding of historical British military artefacts, including the only surviving cannon of the Commonwealth of England, currently in Oman.

The UK and Oman enjoy a deep and historical relationship. We are committed to working together on areas of shared interest and common causes, including to protect and safeguard our shared heritage. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport will engage with their Omani counterparts about the British military artefacts.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
19th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department has plans to arrange a repatriation flight from Venezuela for UK residents that have been unable to secure a commercial flight to the UK via Mexico.

Helping British travellers who need and want to return to the UK is one of the Government's highest priorities. Since the outbreak in Wuhan, we estimate that over 1.3 million people have returned to the UK via commercial routes - the majority supported by our work to keep vital routes open. Additionally we have brought home over 32,000 people on 155 flights organised by the Foreign Office from 29 countries and territories.

The remaining British travellers in Venezuela have access to intermittent commercial flights via Mexico. In addition, our Embassy in Caracas has supported the return of British travellers requiring assistance through additional charter flights via Europe and Mexico operated by our international partners. Our travel advice and social media pages are also regularly updated to ensure that those wishing to return are aware of further developments: https://www.gov.uk/foreign-travel-advice/venezuela.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
7th Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the sunset clause stipulated in s. 261(3) (za) of the Income Tax Act 2007 (as amended by the Finance (No. 2) Act 2015 (c. 33), Sch. 6 para. 2(2)), whether his Department plans to extend income tax relief through venture capital trusts to subscriptions made on or after 6 April 2025.

Venture Capital Trusts, which were introduced in 1995, are designed to encourage individuals to invest indirectly in a range of unquoted smaller, higher-risk, trading companies.

The Government keeps this scheme under review to ensure that it continues to meet its policy objectives in a way that is fair and effective.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Feb 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to increase the competitiveness of the financial services sector.

In his Mansion House statement last July, the Chancellor set out the Government’s vision an open, competitive, green, and technologically advanced financial services.

A sweeping set of reforms to sharpen the UK’s competitive advantage in financial services is already underway; and in November the Government published the second consultation in its Future Regulatory Framework review, which provides a once in a generation opportunity to ensure that the UK maintains a coherent, agile, and internationally respected approach to financial services regulation.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
1st Dec 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what progress his Department has made in response to the recommendations of the Kalifa Review of UK Fintech.

The Government responded to the Kalifa Review of UK Fintech on 26 April 2021, setting out actions alongside regulators to ensure the UK remains at the global cutting edge of technology and innovation in financial services.

These actions include improved regulatory support for new and growing fintechs; initiatives to supercharge commercial support for UK fintechs seeking to expand internationally; and a new visa ‘scale up’ stream to attract global talent and boost the fintech workforce.

The Government’s full response is available at: https://questions-statements.parliament.uk/written-statements/detail/2021-04-26/hcws938.

On 29 October the Government announced £5 million of seed funding for a new Centre for Finance, Innovation and Technology (CFIT) as part for Spending Review 2021. CFIT was a central recommendation of the Kalifa Review, and it will focus on creating the right conditions for firms to scale, encouraging the mainstream adoption of fintech solutions, and fostering collaboration between growing regional fintech hubs.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
26th Oct 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of increasing the £450,000 maximum home purchase price allowed via a Lifetime ISA in line with the UK average year-on-year increase in house prices.

The Lifetime ISA is intended to support younger people saving for their first home or for later life by offering a generous government bonus of 25% on up to £4,000 of savings each year.

The Government maintains that the 25% bonus should be focused on those that need it most and who may find it more difficult to get onto the property ladder, while ensuring sustainable public finances. First-time buyers who can purchase a home valued over £450,000 are likely to have an income significantly above that of the average household in the UK and are therefore more likely to be able to purchase a first home without the support of this scheme.

The Government considers a property price cap of £450,000 appropriate to support the majority of first-time buyers across the UK. However, the Government keeps all aspects of savings policy under review.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of increasing the £50,000 maximum limit of investment in Premium Bonds to provide an additional incentive to invest and support the post-covid economy.

The current Premium Bond investment limit is £50,000, which is also set out in UK legislation. In line with NS&I’s operating framework, when setting the Premium Bond investment limit, HM Treasury and NS&I must strike a balance between the differing needs of savers, taxpayers and the wider financial sector. While some customers may wish to invest more than the current limit in Premium Bonds, raising the limit can lead to the scheme becoming dominated by a small number of people with large investments. Customers are sensitive to taking part in a prize draw in which some people hold a very large number of bonds. NS&I offer a number of other savings products with a higher investment limit than that of Premium Bonds.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on how many occasions the exemption in relation to the multiple dwellings relief for property transactions of six or more separate dwellings FA03/S116(7) was used in 2017-18; and what estimate he has made of the revenue foregone to the public purse as a result of that relief.

Information on multiple dwellings relief is available; this information available relates to two or more properties. The cost of this relief was published in the publication ‘Estimated cost of structural tax reliefs’ in October 2019. The number of cases claiming that relief is available in the Annual Stamp Taxes Publication which was also published in October 2019.

Specific information for six or more properties would only be available at disproportionate cost.

15th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, on how many occasions the exemption in relation to the multiple dwellings relief for property transactions of six or more separate dwellings FA03/S116(7) was used in 2019-20; and what estimate he has made of the revenue foregone to the public purse as a result of that relief.

This information on the number of relief claims will be published in the Annual Stamp Taxes publication at the end of September and the revenue forgone figure will be published in the Tax Relief publication in Autumn 2020.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to publish weekly statistics on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme for each (a) local authority and (b) parliamentary constituency.

Statistics on the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme are published on GOV.UK. The latest publication can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/coronavirus-job-retention-scheme-statistics-june-2020. This includes a breakdown of the total number of employments furloughed by local authority and by parliamentary constituency. HM Revenue and Customs are continuing to develop statistics on the CJRS and plan to publish monthly updates.

12th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of extending eligibility for the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund to coach operators.

The Government recognises that this is a very challenging time for businesses in a wide variety of sectors. Small businesses occupying properties for retail, hospitality or leisure purposes are likely to be particularly affected by Covid-19 due to their reliance on customer footfall, and the fact that they are less likely than larger businesses to have sufficient cash reserves to meet their high fixed property-related costs. The Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund is intended to help small businesses in this situation.

On 1st May the Government that it would allocate up to an additional £617 million to Local authorities to enable them to make discretionary grants to businesses which have been excluded from the existing grants schemes because of the way they interact with the business rates system. Local Authorities can also choose to make discretionary grants to other kinds of businesses, such as coach operators, if they feel there is a particular local economic need. However, the priority of all the grants schemes continues to be to help the smallest businesses, and small businesses which are facing significant property-related costs and operate in sectors which have been particularly hard hit by the steep decline in customer footfall.

Businesses that are not eligible for grants should still be able to benefit from other measures in the Government’s unprecedented package of economic support, including:

  • An option to defer VAT payments by up to twelve months;
  • The Bounce Back Loan Scheme, which will ensure that small and micro businesses can quickly access loans of up to £50,000 which are 100% guaranteed by the Government;
  • The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, now extended to cover all businesses including those which would be able to access commercial credit;
  • The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, to support businesses with their wage bill; and
  • The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme, to provide support to the self-employed.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
12th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to ensure that pub tenants are supported in meeting rent obligations and other payments to their landlords whilst they are unable to trade normally during the imposition of longer-term social distancing measures in response to the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises the current challenges facing commercial tenants and the significant impact on our communities, town centres and businesses. The Government will continue to work with and engage the sector to ensure that we are supporting the businesses that make our high street and town centres successful including pubs. The Chancellor has announced unprecedented support for businesses affected by Coronavirus such as pub tenants. This package includes grants for those occupying properties for retail, hospitality and leisure as well as business rates holidays. Building on this, the Government have also taken steps to protect commercial tenants from eviction as well as to safeguard UK high streets against aggressive debt recovery actions during the coronavirus pandemic.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, which City Deal areas fall wholly or in part within Combined Authority areas.

The Greater Cambridge City Deal was signed in 2014 to boost growth by investing in local infrastructure, housing and skills as one of the 26 City Deals agreed up to 2014. Since then, the government has also signed a number of Devolution deals, including with the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Combined Authority in 2016. A full list of city and devolution deals is given on the Gov.uk website.

Simon Clarke
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has a process for hon Members to forward cases for consideration by her Department under the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) commenced on 6th January and will provide up to 20,000 women, children and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK.

The scheme will prioritise those who have assisted UK efforts in Afghanistan and stood up for UK values such as democracy, women’s rights, freedom of speech and rule of law; and vulnerable people such as women and girls at risk, and members of minority groups (including ethnic / religious minorities and LGBT+).

Representations from Members of Parliament have raised the plight of a great number of people from Afghanistan who would wish to relocate to the UK.

These representations have helped to inform the design of the ACRS as a scheme that will help those in need who are particularly vulnerable, including women and children at risk, and minority groups; as well as those who have supported the UK mission in Afghanistan.

All referrals onto the ACRS will be through the three pathways set out in the statement to Parliament of 6 January, which is a fair and equitable way to identify those most in need.

As an additional verification step, we shall check names of eligible British Council and GardaWorld contractors, and Chevening alumni against the names of people referred to us by MPs during the evacuation.

Further detail on the three referral pathways can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/afghan-citizens-resettlement-scheme.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the process is for notifying her Department of people who are at risk of political persecution in Afghanistan and who are seeking support from the UK Government.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) commenced on 6th January and will provide up to 20,000 women, children and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK.

The scheme will prioritise those who have assisted UK efforts in Afghanistan and stood up for UK values such as democracy, women’s rights, freedom of speech and rule of law; and vulnerable people such as women and girls at risk, and members of minority groups (including ethnic / religious minorities and LGBT+).

Representations from Members of Parliament have raised the plight of a great number of people from Afghanistan who would wish to relocate to the UK.

These representations have helped to inform the design of the ACRS as a scheme that will help those in need who are particularly vulnerable, including women and children at risk, and minority groups; as well as those who have supported the UK mission in Afghanistan.

All referrals onto the ACRS will be through the three pathways set out in the statement to Parliament of 6 January, which is a fair and equitable way to identify those most in need.

As an additional verification step, we shall check names of eligible British Council and GardaWorld contractors, and Chevening alumni against the names of people referred to us by MPs during the evacuation.

Further detail on the three referral pathways can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/afghan-citizens-resettlement-scheme.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department plans for a process for hon Members to forward cases for consideration under the third referral pathway of the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme when eligibility widens after the first year of operation.

The third referral pathway will focus on those most at risk who supported the UK and international community effort in Afghanistan.

In the first year of this third referral pathway, the Government will offer ACRS places to the most at risk British Council and GardaWorld contractors and Chevening alumni. The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office will be in touch with those eligible to support them through the next steps. Beyond the first year of the ACRS, we will work with international partners and NGOs to welcome wider groups of Afghans most at risk.

Representations from Members of Parliament have raised the plight of a great number of people from Afghanistan who would wish to relocate to the UK.

These representations have helped to inform the design of the ACRS as a scheme that will help those in need who are particularly vulnerable, including women and children at risk, and minority groups; as well as those who have supported the UK mission in Afghanistan.

All referrals onto the ACRS will be through the three pathways set out in the statement to Parliament of 6 January, which is a fair and equitable way to identify those most in need. As an additional verification step, we shall check names of eligible British Council and GardaWorld contractors, and Chevening alumni against the names of people referred to us by MPs during the evacuation.

Further detail on the three referral pathways can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/afghan-citizens-resettlement-scheme.

Victoria Atkins
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will bring forward legislative proposals to enable magistrates to issue bans to individuals being on (a) certain lands and (b) county jurisdictions for the duration of the hare coursing season.

The Government supports the Rural Affairs Strategy, published by the National Police Chiefs’ Council in July 2018, which sets out operational policing priorities in respect of tackling crimes that predominantly affect rural communities.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
22nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department plans to close Bassingbourn Barracks.

Following the update to the House by the Secretary of State for Defence on 25 November, I am pleased to confirm that there are no plans to close Bassingbourn Barracks, and the Mission Training and Mobilisation Centre (MTMC) will continue to be based there.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
14th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 2.124 of the Budget 2021 Red Book, if he will provide an update on when the (a) bidding prospectus for the Community Ownership Fund will be published and (b) first bidding round is due to open.

The bidding prospectus for the Community Ownership Fund was published on 15 July and the first bidding round is now open. Applicants will be able to complete the online application form from 30 July and the first bidding round will close on 13 August. There will be future bidding rounds in December 2021 and May 2022.

Eddie Hughes
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure developers contribute financially to environmental and biodiversity improvements in the districts in which they are building.

The Planning for the Future White Paper sets out our intention to bring forward a quicker and simpler framework for assessing environmental implications which encourages opportunities for environmental enhancements to be identified and pursued early in the development process. The Environment Bill includes measures to make biodiversity net gain mandatory, requiring developers to ensure habitats for wildlife are enhanced.

Contributions from developers play an important role in delivering the infrastructure that new homes, and local economies, require. Local authorities can currently obtain these contributions by charging a Community Infrastructure Levy on new development, and by negotiating section 106 planning obligations with a developer. In 2018/19, local authorities negotiated over £150 million towards open space and the environment through section 106 planning obligations. The Planning for the Future White Paper proposes to reform the current approach to developer contributions by creating a new, single system, the Infrastructure Levy, which local authorities will be able to use towards open space and environment. The consultation on Planning for the Future closed on 29 October 2020, and we will be responding formally.

Christopher Pincher
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
19th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of allowing local authorities in seriously water-stressed areas scope to prioritise water supply constraints over housebuilding when considering their own local housebuilding targets above and beyond those mandated by national government.

The Government does not set housing targets, our standard method is only the starting point for determining need. Local authorities should already be considering water supply when planning for housing; a key part of preparing local plans is ensuring that development is supported by necessary infrastructure. Co-ordination with infrastructure providers and other statutory consultees is crucial to this process.

Christopher Pincher
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
19th Apr 2021
What steps he is taking to increase the supply of new homes.

This Government cares deeply about building more homes. We are working tirelessly with industry to keep the sector open safely through every level of restriction to continue building the new homes this country needs, support home movers, and sustain hundreds of thousands of jobs. I would like to pay tribute to the sector for their support.

We are investing in supply, with over £12 billion in affordable housing over five years, the largest investment in a decade; and £7.1 billion in the National Home Building Fund, including much-needed new homes on brownfield land.

Christopher Pincher
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to paragraph 2.129 of the Budget 2020 Red Book, what progress has been made on the development of a further new town in South Cambridgeshire.

The new town being proposed in South West Cambridgeshire is a private initiative being promoted by the developers Thakeham, and is a matter for the local planning authority. The Government has no plans for an additional new town in this location or elsewhere in South Cambridgeshire beyond the commitment we announced in 2020 to explore opportunities at Cambourne and the sustainable and sensitive expansion of Cambridge. Government has not yet made any decision to take forward opportunities at Cambourne or Cambridge as part of this work and any potential future plans would be subject to all necessary and appropriate public consultation.

Christopher Pincher
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the potential for proposals in Planning for the Future White Paper, published on 6 August 2020 to tackle the issue of developers obtaining planning permission but not proceeding to build within a reasonable timeframe.

New homes should be built out as soon as possible once planning permission is granted. We are clear that where sites are stalled or experiencing delays to delivery, it is for local authorities and developers to work closely together at a local level to overcome these barriers.

To support build out through planning, we propose to make it clear in the revised National Planning Policy Framework that the masterplans and design codes for sites prepared for substantial development should seek to include a variety of development types by different builders which allow more phases to come forward together.

We will be exploring further options to support faster build out as part of our proposed planning reforms as outlined in the Planning White Paper.

Christopher Pincher
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
11th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the Planning for the Future White Paper, published on 6 August 2020 will take account of the limitations set by the availability of natural resources such as water in the allocation of growth zones.

The National Planning Policy Framework and its accompanying planning practice guidance expects local planning authorities to plan for the development and co-ordination of the infrastructure required in their area, including infrastructure for water. They should work with providers, such as water companies, to assess the quality and capacity of infrastructure and its ability to meet forecast demands. The water companies are already statutory consultees on local plan development and can be consulted on a non-statutory basis for individual planning applications.

In addition, the Building Regulations already provide a water use standard and a lower optional standard for water stressed areas, which a local planning authority can impose for new homes as a condition of planning permission. DEFRA led a consultation on measures to reduce personal water use in 2019, which included this standard. A formal government response will be published by the end of 2020.

The Planning for the Future White Paper includes proposals to ensure that all local development plans are assessed against a sustainable development test to ensure there is the right balance between environmental, economic and social objectives. Plans should be informed by appropriate infrastructure planning, and sites should not be included in the plan where there is no reasonable prospect of any infrastructure that may be needed coming forward within the plan period. Plan-making policies in the National Planning Policy Framework will make this clear.

Christopher Pincher
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
10th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many planning applications have been granted through the Permission in Principle application route to date.

We do not currently collect data on Permission in Principle applications. However, from April 2020 local planning authorities will be required to provide data on Permission in Principle applications which will be published as part of the national planning quarterly statistical release.

Christopher Pincher
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many city deal areas that fall (a) wholly and (b) partly within combined authority areas are (i) controlled by a combined authority, (ii) controlled by a local enterprise partnership and (iii) not controlled by a combined authority or a local enterprise partnership; and how those city deals not controlled by a combined authority or a local enterprise partnership are governed.

City Deals were bespoke negotiations between Government and Local Enterprise Partnerships conducted in England between 2011 and 2014. The only area at this time to have a Combined Authority in place was Greater Manchester, although Liverpool City Region, Sheffield City Region, North East, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire Combined Authorities were all established in 2014. City Deals aimed to help drive the growth of cities across the country: identifying barriers to growth and also investing to drive future economic growth on the basis of the specific economic strengths, assets and opportunities of places.

A list of all English City Deals and their relevant Local Enterprise Partnership and Combined Authority is available below:

City Deal

Local Enterprise Partnership

Combined Authority

Wave 1

Greater Birmingham

Greater Birmingham and Solihull

West Midlands (established 2016)

Bristol

West of England

West of England (established 2017)

Leeds

Leeds City Region

West Yorkshire (established 2014)

Liverpool

Liverpool City Region

Liverpool City Region (established 2014)

Greater Manchester

Greater Manchester

Greater Manchester (established 2011)

Newcastle

North East

North East (established 2014)

Nottingham

Derby, Derbyshire, Nottingham and Nottinghamshire (D2N2)

Sheffield

Sheffield City Region

Sheffield City Region (established 2014)

Wave 2

Black Country

Black Country

West Midlands (established 2016)

Greater Brighton

Coast to Capital (C2C)

Greater Cambridge

Greater Cambridge and Greater Peterborough

Cambridgeshire and Peterborough (established 2017)

Coventry and Warwickshire

Coventry and Warwickshire

West Midlands (established 2016)

Hull and Humber

Humber

Greater Ipswich

New Anglia

Leicester and Leicestershire

Leicester and Leicestershire

Greater Norwich

New Anglia

Oxford and Oxfordshire

Oxfordshire

Plymouth and the South West Peninsula

Heart of the South West LEP and Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP

Preston, South Ribble and Lancashire

Lancashire

Southampton and Portsmouth

Solent

Southend-on-Sea

South East

Stoke-on-Trent and Staffordshire

Stoke-on-Trent and Staffordshire

Sunderland and South Tyneside

North East

North East (established 2014)

Swindon and Wiltshire

Swindon and Wiltshire

Tees Valley

Tees Valley

Tees Valley (established 2016)

Thames Valley Berkshire

Thames Valley Berkshire