Lord Teverson Portrait

Lord Teverson

Liberal Democrat - Life peer

Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Energy and Climate Change)

(since May 2022)
EU Energy and Environment Sub-Committee
26th May 2016 - 23rd Apr 2020
Economic Affairs Committee
8th Jun 2015 - 12th May 2016
Finance Bill Sub-Committee
8th Dec 2015 - 4th Mar 2016
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Energy and Climate Change)
7th Sep 2015 - 30th Nov 2015
Liberal Democrat Lords Spokesperson (Transport)
1st Jun 2015 - 7th Sep 2015
The Arctic
12th Jun 2014 - 11th Feb 2015
European Union Committee
9th Dec 2008 - 15th May 2013
Draft Climate Change Bill (Joint Committee)
23rd Apr 2007 - 3rd Aug 2007


Department Event
Tuesday 5th July 2022
Ministry of Defence
Orders and regulations - Main Chamber
Draft Armed Forces Act (Continuation) Order 2022
View calendar
Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 6th July 2022
10:30
International Relations and Defence Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Defence concepts and capabilities: from aspiration to reality
6 Jul 2022, 10:30 a.m.
At 10.30am: Oral evidence
Professor Jamie Shea - Professor at The University of Exeter
Professor Mark Webber - Professor at The University of Birmingham
At 11.30am: Oral evidence
Georgina Wright - Senior Fellow and Director, Europe Program at Institut Montaigne
Professor Christoph Meyer - Professor of European & International Politics at King's College London
View calendar
Division Votes
Tuesday 21st June 2022
Abortion (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2022
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 29 Liberal Democrat No votes vs 1 Liberal Democrat Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 28 Noes - 181
Speeches
Monday 20th June 2022
Warm Home Discount (England and Wales) Regulations 2022
My Lords, it is a great pleasure to follow both the noble Baroness and the noble Lord, who asked excellent …
Written Answers
Tuesday 21st June 2022
Fisheries: Fuels
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they will take to assist the under 10 metre fishing sector in meeting …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Monday 11th June 2012
European Parliamentary Elections Bill [HL] 2012-13
A Bill to amend the European Parliamentary Elections Act 2002 so as to alter the method used in Great Britain …
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Teverson has voted in 293 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

15 Jun 2020 - Abortion (Northern Ireland) (No. 2) Regulations 2020 - View Vote Context
Lord Teverson voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 8 Liberal Democrat No votes vs 67 Liberal Democrat Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 355 Noes - 77
6 Apr 2022 - Elections Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Teverson voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Liberal Democrat No votes vs 3 Liberal Democrat Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 24 Noes - 139
View All Lord Teverson Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(29 debate interactions)
Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park (Conservative)
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(23 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Lord Teverson's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Teverson, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Teverson has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Teverson has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

1 Bill introduced by Lord Teverson


A Bill to amend the European Parliamentary Elections Act 2002 so as to alter the method used in Great Britain and Gibraltar for electing Members of the European Parliament.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Monday 11th June 2012

Lord Teverson has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


39 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what mechanism they plan to use to off-set the carbon footprint of the G7 conference in Cornwall; and what plans they have to apply those off-sets in Cornwall.

The Cabinet Office is currently investigating a baseline estimate for carbon emissions for the G7 Summit. We are committed to ensuring that as much as is practical will be offset in Cornwall. We are also in discussions with partners across Cornwall to consider plans on how to apply those offsets for example looking at biodiversity recovery, sustainable travel, tree planting and other options.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
8th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to come forward with proposals following their Offshore Transmission Network Review.

We aim to consult on proposals from the Offshore Transmission Network Review later this year.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
24th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how with the future development of Celtic Sea wind power they will ensure that power lines to shore are shared to prevent excess damage to the seabed and minimise costs.

The Government has launched the Offshore Transmission Network Review to ensure that the transmission connections for offshore wind generation are delivered in the most appropriate way, considering the increased ambition for offshore wind to achieve net zero. This will be done with a view to finding the appropriate balance between environmental, social and economic costs.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 4 January (HL11621), what is the absolute number of TrustMark registered businesses now certified to install insulation measures in park homes under the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme; and where those installers are located.

As of 10:00 on 7 January, we can confirm there were 8 businesses which are TrustMark registered and certified to install insulation measures in park homes under the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme.

TrustMark registered installers can offer their services in multiple locations. Every Local Authority in England has at least one TrustMark registered park homes installer available, 126 have at least two and five Local Authorities have at least three.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the progress in increasing the number of businesses which are TrustMark registered and certified to install insulation measures in park homes under the Green Homes Grant Voucher Scheme; and what steps they are taking to ensure an appropriate geographic distribution of such registered and certified businesses to enable comprehensive access to their services.

Over the last two months, we have seen a 350% increase in the number of TrustMark registered park homes installers, with respect to the figure stated in the answer given by my Hon. Friend the Minister of State for Business, Energy and Clean Growth to my Hon. Friend the Member for Christchurch on 23rd October 2020 to Question 106216.

BEIS officials have been working with the park homes industry, United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS) and TrustMark to clarify what is required and encourage businesses to obtain Publicly Available Specification (PAS) certification to install insulation in park homes, and register as an installer for the Green Homes Grant.

As part of the £6.9 million Green Homes Grant Skills Competition, we have taken steps to ensure comprehensive access to training for measures offered under the scheme, including for park homes. This includes ensuring good coverage of training providers, as well as retrofit coordinators and assessors required to support park home retrofits, across all regions in England.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
23rd May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they will take to assist the under 10 metre fishing sector in meeting its increased fuel costs.

Defra will continue to support the fishing sector through the £100 million UK Seafood Fund, which as one of its main objectives seeks to increase the sustainability of the sector, including through investing in the transition to renewable energy.

Defra is also making £32.7 million in annual funding available across all four nations of the UK, which last year enabled grant schemes to be opened in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland, benefiting hundreds of UK businesses. The grant scheme for England, the Fisheries and Seafood Scheme, delivers investment to safeguard the long-term sustainability, resilience and prosperity of the seafood sector. This includes a wide range of support aimed at fishing vessels, with enhanced funding rates of up to 80% made available to members of the small-scale coastal fleet.

In recognition of the challenges in the maritime sector, including the fishing industry, in the 2022 Spring Budget the Chancellor overturned the 2020 announcement to remove the red diesel entitlement for commercial boat operators, meaning the industry can continue to use red diesel, in addition to the Marine Voyages Relief, which gives 100% relief on fuel duty costs.

The increasing cost of fuel is affecting a wide range of sectors including the fishing industry and vessels of all sizes are being affected. Our primary focus is on analysing how the UK fleet is being affected by fuel and fish prices. Defra Ministers and officials are working with colleagues across government, along with a wide range of stakeholders, and are closely monitoring the situation.

The Government has shown long term commitment to the sector and will continue to do so in the future. As part of this long term commitment we are not planning to repurpose funds to mitigate the impacts of high fuel prices. We consider this is a cross cutting issue, and so are liaising with colleagues across government to determine the longer-term impacts and any mitigating actions.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to include in the Joint Fisheries Statement a date by which (1) the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs, and (2) the other devolved administrations, will publish a plan to roll out Remote Electronic Monitoring.

The draft Joint Fisheries Statement (JFS) has been developed jointly with the Devolved Administrations and is a significant step forward in our ambitions to ensure a vibrant, modern and resilient fishing industry and a healthy marine environment.

The draft commits the fisheries policy authorities to a wide-ranging and coordinated monitoring programme to underpin their approach to fisheries management. This includes a commitment to explore, where appropriate, the use of technologies such as vessel monitoring systems and Remote Electronic Monitoring (REM) for both their scientific purposes, and to aid the sustainable management and control of fisheries.

The public consultation on the JFS is open until 12 April. We will consider responses to that public consultation and any parliamentary scrutiny prior to the publication of the finalised JFS in November. In the meantime, Marine Scotland published a consultation on the use of REM on 16 March.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
14th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish a consultation on Remote Electronic Monitoring, following the call for evidence in 2020.

As part of our commitment to delivering a world class fisheries management system Defra is developing a set of proposals for expanding the use of Remote Electronic Monitoring (REM) in English waters.

Last year we published the results of our call for evidence on REM which indicated that there are differing views on the use of REM in fisheries. We have been engaging with stakeholders to understand their perspectives and explore their views on different approaches. We do intend to test our proposals through public consultation when they are sufficiently developed, but are conscious of stakeholder capacity to engage and want to ensure that we make the most of the opportunity offered by formal consultation.

Ultimately, we want to develop the right policy to maximise the potential of this exciting technology and ensure that it complements other marine and fisheries reforms, such as a future catching policy and the rollout of Fisheries Management Plans.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to prevent the landlords of those on farm business tenancies from serving notice to quit on those tenants, in order to participate in the Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery elements of the Environmental Land Management Scheme.

We are engaging with a wide range of farmers and land managers to inform the development of our Sustainable Farming Incentive, Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes, including tenant farmers and landlords. We want to ensure that the schemes are designed in a way that works for all, so all farmers and land managers can be supported to maximise the delivery of environmental outcomes while ensuring effective use of public money.

The Government is aware that a key concern for many tenant farmers is receiving payments for environmental benefits despite not owning the land. Our future schemes will put farmers, foresters and other land managers more in control of how they use their assets in order to deliver environmental outcomes. For the Sustainable Farming Incentive and Local Nature Recovery schemes we envisage that payments will be made to the person delivering the outcomes of the schemes. In Landscape Recovery we are exploring the role of bespoke agreements and payment approaches and tenancies will be considered as part of this.

Evidence shows that many landlords and tenants work together to find solutions to entering agri-environment schemes. To encourage this further the Tenancy Reform Industry Group have updated their best practice guide on how tenants and landlords can work together to deliver environmental schemes successfully. This includes encouraging a culture change within the sector to look at the opportunities that longer-term agreements offer in delivering productivity and environmental improvements which both landlords and tenants can benefit from.

We look forward to engaging further with stakeholders including tenant farmers and landlords as we develop the design of the three schemes.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Benyon on 29 June (HL1134), what plans they have to ensure that those with farm business tenancies will not be excluded from taking part in the long-term commitments for soil, biodiversity and landscape envisaged by the Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery elements of the Environmental Land Management Scheme where landlords are unwilling to grant consent.

We are engaging with a wide range of farmers and land managers to inform the development of our Sustainable Farming Incentive, Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes, including tenant farmers and landlords. We want to ensure that the schemes are designed in a way that works for all, so all farmers and land managers can be supported to maximise the delivery of environmental outcomes while ensuring effective use of public money.

The Government is aware that a key concern for many tenant farmers is receiving payments for environmental benefits despite not owning the land. Our future schemes will put farmers, foresters and other land managers more in control of how they use their assets in order to deliver environmental outcomes. For the Sustainable Farming Incentive and Local Nature Recovery schemes we envisage that payments will be made to the person delivering the outcomes of the schemes. In Landscape Recovery we are exploring the role of bespoke agreements and payment approaches and tenancies will be considered as part of this.

Evidence shows that many landlords and tenants work together to find solutions to entering agri-environment schemes. To encourage this further the Tenancy Reform Industry Group have updated their best practice guide on how tenants and landlords can work together to deliver environmental schemes successfully. This includes encouraging a culture change within the sector to look at the opportunities that longer-term agreements offer in delivering productivity and environmental improvements which both landlords and tenants can benefit from.

We look forward to engaging further with stakeholders including tenant farmers and landlords as we develop the design of the three schemes.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to improve security of tenure for farm business tenants occupying land under the Agricultural Tenancies Act 1995.

The Government recognises that longer-term tenancies can provide tenants with the security they need to invest in productivity and environmental improvements. However, feedback from industry stakeholders indicates that regulating for longer terms is not the right way forward as this could lead to landowners withdrawing from the let sector completely. A thriving let sector depends on landowners seeing the opportunity to let their land as a positive option. Also, some farm business models such as seasonal horticulture require shorter term lets.

Instead of regulation the Government is looking at ways in which we can encourage more landlords to consider offering longer-term tenancies while retaining the flexibility that the farm business tenancy framework currently provides. This includes continuing to work with the Tenancy Reform Industry Group, which includes representatives of tenants, landlords and professional advisors, on encouraging a culture change within the sector to look at the opportunities that longer-term agreements offer in delivering productivity and environmental improvements which both landlords and tenants can benefit from.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to prioritise reform of the Agricultural Tenancies Act 1995 to provide greater security for tenants occupying their farms on farm business tenancies.

The Government recognises that longer-term tenancies can provide tenants with the security they need to invest in productivity and environmental improvements. However, feedback from industry stakeholders indicates that regulating for longer terms is not the right way forward as this could lead to landowners withdrawing from the let sector completely. A thriving let sector depends on landowners seeing the opportunity to let their land as a positive option. Also, some farm business models such as seasonal horticulture require shorter term lets.

Instead of regulation the Government is looking at ways in which we can encourage more landlords to consider offering longer-term tenancies while retaining the flexibility that the farm business tenancy framework currently provides. This includes continuing to work with the Tenancy Reform Industry Group, which includes representatives of tenants, landlords and professional advisors, on encouraging a culture change within the sector to look at the opportunities that longer-term agreements offer in delivering productivity and environmental improvements which both landlords and tenants can benefit from.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
26th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of honey bee packages imported into the UK from Italy since 2014 have been inspected by bee inspectors for the presence of the small hive beetle.

Bee health is a devolved matter: inspections data held by the National Bee Unit cover England, Wales and Scotland.

Biosecurity is a priority for this Government and we recognise that small hive beetle would present a serious threat to our honey bees if it were to arrive in the UK.

The National Bee Unit's agreed inspection target for England and Wales is 50% of consignments of honey bees from Italy. In all years from 2014 to 2020 this figure was met or exceeded in relation to packages. In 2018 there were no packages from Italy imported by beekeepers in England and Wales.

The figures for checks on consignments containing packages of honey bees are:

2014 – 100%

2015 – 52%

2016 – 50%

2017 – 82%

2018 – Zero

2019 – 56%

2020 – 78%

No imports into any part of the UK are permitted from the area of Italy affected by small hive beetle.

Lord Benyon
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the occurrence of the small hive beetle in Europe on their Pest Risk Analysis; and further to the importation of bees from Italy, what plans they have to update the Pest Risk Analysis.

Biosecurity is a priority for this Government, and we recognise that Small hive beetle represents a serious threat to our honey bees.

Following the detection of Small hive beetle in the far south of Italy in 2014, Defra published a contingency plan and contingency exercises have taken place regularly so that inspectors from the National Bee Unit (NBU) are prepared to deal with any suspected occurrence of this invasive pest in England or Wales. To date, Small hive beetle has not been detected in Europe beyond the far south of Italy.

Exports of bees from the affected region of Italy are not permitted. Exports from other regions in Italy are subject to notification requirements and health certification to ensure freedom from key pests and diseases including Small hive beetle. Laboratory analysis and follow up checks are carried out by NBU inspectors.

We are working with the NBU, beekeepers and other stakeholders to stop Small hive beetle from entering the UK. An extensive surveillance programme is in place for exotic pests. NBU inspectors currently conduct around 6,500 apiary inspections each year. Our Sentinel Apiary Programme ensures that there is enhanced surveillance at high-risk apiaries near ports and airports. Inspectors also provide training and guidance on pest recognition to beekeepers.

Along with colleagues in the Devolved UK Administrations, we are monitoring the impact of the new trading arrangements with EU countries and our contingency protocols will be reviewed and updated accordingly.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Healthy Bees Plan 2030, what steps they plan to take to prevent the importation of package bees from Europe into Great Britain through Northern Ireland.

EU member states may export bees to Northern Ireland in line with intra-Union trade rules. This means that packages and colonies may be exported to Northern Ireland provided they have been notified in advance and are accompanied by a valid health certificate confirming that the consignment is free of key pests and diseases.

Movements of queens, packages and colonies from Northern Ireland to Great Britain remain permitted. There is, and will remain, unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods including honey bees to the rest of the UK market.

The Healthy Bees Plan 2030 describes how we will work in partnership with beekeepers and other stakeholders. This includes actions to stop Small hive beetle from entering the UK. An extensive surveillance programme is in place for exotic pests. National Bee Unit inspectors currently conduct around 6,500 apiary inspections each year. Our Sentinel Apiary Programme ensures that there is enhanced surveillance at high-risk apiaries near ports and airports. Inspectors also provide training and guidance on pest recognition to beekeepers.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the occurrence of the small hive beetle in Europe, what plans they have to ban the import of honey bee queens from Italy.

Small hive beetle was first detected in Europe in 2014, in the far south of Italy, and safeguard measures have been maintained by the Italian authorities since then. While further cases have occurred in the same area in subsequent years, Small hive beetle has not been detected outside the far south of Italy.

Exports of honey bees from the affected region of Italy are not permitted. The Government has no plans to ban imports of honey bee queens from unaffected regions of Italy.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish their response to the Remote Electronic Monitoring call for evidence; and what steps they intend to take following this.

Defra ran a call for evidence between 19 October and 30 November 2020. The responses are currently being analysed and a response will be published in due course.

27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential use of Remote Electronic Monitoring technology to monitor vessels using (1) bottom trawling, and (2) other fishing practices that may harm marine ecosystems, on England’s Marine Protected Areas.

Defra has not conducted an assessment of this nature. Defra did run a call for evidence to collect a range of evidence on the use of Remote Electronic Monitoring between 19 October and 30 November 2020. The responses are currently being analysed and a response will be published in due course.

30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the value of fish caught by Faroese registered vessels in the UK’s coastal waters and exclusive economic zone in (1) 2018, and (2) 2019; and what was the value of fish caught by UK vessels in Faroese waters in the same years.

In 2019, Faroese vessels landed fish valued at an estimated £25.5 million from UK waters. £21million of these landings were of mackerel and £4.5 million were of blue whiting. In comparison, the UK landed fish valued at £1.2 million from Faroese waters in 2019, of which £1 million was cod and haddock.

In 2018, the Faroese figure was an estimated £30.4 million. Of this, £26 million was comprised of mackerel landings and £4.4 million of blue whiting. The UK’s landings from Faroese waters in 2018 were valued at £2.2 million of which cod and haddock accounted for £1.7 million.

30th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the value of fish caught by Norwegian registered vessels in the UK’s coastal waters and exclusive economic zone in (1) 2018, and (2) 2019.

In 2019, Norwegian vessels landed approximately £248.9 million worth of fish from UK waters. The majority of this was mackerel, which made up £153.1 million of the catch, followed by herring and blue whiting. In contrast, the UK landed £31.0 million worth of fish from Norwegian waters in 2019, the majority of which was demersal species, such as cod and haddock.

In 2018, Norwegian vessels landed approximately £271.5 million worth of fish from UK waters, again with the majority of this made up of mackerel (£166.0 million), herring and blue whiting, while the UK landed £32.4 million from Norwegian waters.

26th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) advice they intend to provide to, and (2) advisory service they intend to set up for, those (a) people, (b) enterprises, and (c) organisations, eligible for funding under the Environmental Land Management Scheme; and how any such advice and services will be funded.

Evidence from Defra’s Environmental Land Management Tests and Trials and other sources shows that effective advice and guidance leads to better, more sustained environmental outcomes. For advice to be effective it needs to be trusted and based on expertise, credibility and local knowledge. This evidence has informed the approach to advice and guidance for the Environmental Land Management National Pilot, which will start in 2021 and run for three years.

The National Pilot will combine several elements of advice and guidance, working on the assumption that the scheme should, for the most part, be simple enough for a land manager to apply unassisted. Nevertheless, we assume many may still seek advice. We will use the National Pilot to learn from advisers and land managers what they require across all phases of the pilot, prior to full roll out of Environmental Land Management in 2024.

Firstly, there will be comprehensive guidance, developed by experts across Defra group, published on GOV.UK that covers how and why to apply and how best to deliver the environmental outcomes the scheme can pay for. Defra will improve guidance content and navigation using Tests and Trials and user feedback throughout the pilot.

Secondly, there will be a National Pilot Field Team to gather learning from land managers and advisers. This will be operated by Defra and advisers from its arm’s length bodies.

Thirdly, Defra’s arm’s length bodies will provide advice on statutory responsibilities and assisting regulatory permissions. They will also play a role in formally assessing outcomes and compliance, which will take a fairer more supportive and effective approach.

We also recognise the need to improve land managers’ skills and knowledge directly, to meet the challenges of agricultural transition and reduce reliance on advice. We will introduce learning and information sessions for participating land managers and will engage with agricultural training providers to explore how their courses can better support the industry for the future.

As announced in the Agricultural Transition Plan, the Government will contribute towards the establishment of a new professional body, the Institute for Agriculture and Horticulture, which will establish a professional framework, providing farmers with a recognised pathway for training.

We think land managers should pay for any additional on-farm advice when applying for the pilot and implementing their agreement, using either their existing trusted adviser or employing one from the advice market, and payment rates will need to allow for this cost.

The need to employ an adviser should be reduced if the scheme is demonstrably simpler and less risky than previous schemes and if published guidance is accessible and effective. This means when an adviser is employed they can be focused where they add most value.

As with land manager training, we will help advisers to upskill so that they can provide a high-quality service to land managers during transition. We are identifying the key skills and knowledge required for advisers to support applicants effectively. We will work with existing certification providers rather than launching a scheme-specific certification.

26th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to trial a protocol-type Environmental Land Management Scheme (ELMS) advisory service as a part of the piloting of ELMS.

We are developing our Environmental Land Management offer in partnership with farmers and other stakeholders, including representatives from some leading farm and land management advice providers. We are doing this through a series of tests and trials, 71 to date with more in preparation, which are already underway, and through a National Pilot which will start in 2021. Forty-three tests and trials have been providing findings on the role of and need for trusted, technically competent advisers with local knowledge, which have been and continue to be fed into the development of our approach. The National Pilot will be available for up to 5,500 farmers who want to be involved in helping us to learn and co-design the full ambition of our new schemes.

In line with our policy for on-farm advice to come largely from the marketplace, we will use the National Pilot to build skills and capacity in that market through training and learning from advisers as they support their clients. To support them in this we will provide introductory information sessions for advisers from early 2021 (online at first), ahead of applications for Phase 1 of the National Pilot being invited. As well as offering a reminder of the context of agricultural transition, they will go into more detail on the mechanics of the Sustainable Farming Incentive component, related regulations and consents and permissions. We intend these to be made available to participating land managers too.

Training content and delivery will be continuously improved throughout the National Pilot, applying established training evaluation methodology to learn from previous phases. Training 'top-ups' will be put in place to update those who participated in earlier sessions as the later components of the Pilot (and wider future farming and countryside programme schemes) are rolled out.

Defra's arms-length bodies will also help, drawing on their expertise to develop scheme guidance and training products as well as the supporting assessment for essential consents, permits that may be required by participants in the National Pilot. They are also likely to provide compliance checks, which will themselves be more focused towards advice and support where possible rather than just penalties.

We will develop through the pilot a fuller adviser and land manager training package with a stronger element of quality assurance in a way that can be scaled up to meet demand as we approach full roll-out in 2024. This may include potential for commercial delivery or other market provider solutions.

We will use the National Pilot to learn from advisers and land managers what they require across all Phases of the National Pilot.

In sum, the National Pilot will enable us to build on the findings of a range of Tests and Trials to co-design, learn and refine how advice is best delivered when Environmental Land Management is fully rolled out in 2024. The approach at that point will reflect the learning obtained and may differ from what I have set out.

15th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking to ensure the UK distant waters fishing fleet has access to fishing opportunities from the year 2021 in (1) the Norwegian exclusive economic zone (EEZ) north of 61 degrees latitude, (2) the Faeroe EEZ, (3) the Greenland EEZ, and (4) the seas around Svalbard.

On the 31st December 2020, the UK will leave the Common Fisheries Policy. As we become an independent coastal state, we are committed to working closely with our coastal partners including the EU, Norway and Faroe Islands to manage shared stocks in a sustainable way and share fishing opportunities based on the scientific principle of zonal attachment.

As part of these preparations, the UK has concluded fisheries framework agreements with Norway and the Faroes, the first of which was signed on 30 September and has now been laid before Parliament. These framework agreements will provide the basis for annual negotiations on fishing opportunities and access to waters. In the forthcoming annual negotiations, the UK will seek to ensure the best possible outcomes for the whole of the UK fishing industry and our marine environment.

In addition, Defra officials are engaging regularly with their Greenlandic counterparts on opportunities for enhancing bilateral fisheries cooperation between the UK and Greenland. The UK’s rights under the 1920 Treaty of Paris with regards to fishing opportunities in Svalbard waters remain unchanged.

15th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking (1) to improve, or (2) to restore, the UK’s former access after 31 December to fishing opportunities in Icelandic waters.

Defra officials are engaging regularly with their Icelandic counterparts across a wide variety of policy issues. Recent discussions have been very positive and have focused on enhancing bilateral fisheries cooperation between the UK and Iceland, building on the fisheries commitments within the UK-Iceland Joint Vision for 2030.

The discussions have also touched on other fisheries management matters within the North-East Atlantic. These have included the UK’s recent accession to Regional Fisheries Management Organisations such as the North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC).

The UK’s relationship with Iceland is likely to evolve further as the UK goes forward as an independent coastal State.

12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will classify the Eurasian beaver as a native species that can breed and live freely in Great Britain; and if so, (1) when, and (2) under what circumstances, they will do so.

The 25 Year Environment Plan sets out this Government’s commitment to providing opportunities for the reintroduction of native species where the benefits for the environment, people and the economy are clear.

We recognise the range of benefits that beavers may provide with regard to flood management, biodiversity, water quality and resilience to climate change. On the 8th of August the Government announced that beavers on the River Otter, the only licensed wild population, would be allowed to remain there permanently and will be allowed to continue to expand their range naturally.

We plan to hold a public consultation early next year on our national approach for beaver reintroduction, and our strategy for the management of the potential negative impacts of this native species in the wild. Natural England, with support from EA, are continuing work to help inform the Government’s national approach to the management and release of beaver in England and have been engaging with key stakeholders.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will fund the reintroduction of beavers into appropriate catchment areas of the South West of England in order (1) to improve local flood resilience, and (2) to promote biodiversity.

The 25 Year Environment Plan sets out this Government’s commitment to providing opportunities for the reintroduction of native species where the benefits for the environment, people and the economy are clear.

We recognise the range of benefits that beavers may provide with regard to flood management, biodiversity, water quality and resilience to climate change. On the 8th of August the Government announced that beavers on the River Otter, the only licensed wild population, would be allowed to remain there permanently and will be allowed to continue to expand their range naturally.

We plan to hold a public consultation early next year on our national approach for beaver reintroduction, and our strategy for the management of the potential negative impacts of this native species in the wild. Natural England, with support from EA, are continuing work to help inform the Government’s national approach to the management and release of beaver in England and have been engaging with key stakeholders.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to extend the reintroduction of beavers into the South West of England in order to encourage the use of natural solutions to improve flood management.

The 25 Year Environment Plan sets out this Government’s commitment to providing opportunities for the reintroduction of native species where the benefits for the environment, people and the economy are clear.

We recognise the range of benefits that beavers may provide with regard to flood management, biodiversity, water quality and resilience to climate change. On the 8th of August the Government announced that beavers on the River Otter, the only licensed wild population, would be allowed to remain there permanently and will be allowed to continue to expand their range naturally.

We plan to hold a public consultation early next year on our national approach for beaver reintroduction, and our strategy for the management of the potential negative impacts of this native species in the wild. Natural England, with support from EA, are continuing work to help inform the Government’s national approach to the management and release of beaver in England and have been engaging with key stakeholders.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
20th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they will ensure that Tier 2 and Tier 3 Environmental Land Management Schemes are complementary to, and coordinated with, Nature Recovery Networks at a local and regional level.

The Government is committed to establishing a Nature Recovery Network across the whole of England. This will restore habitat, creating an expanded and increasingly connected network of places that are richer in wildlife, more resilient to climate change, and which provides wider environmental benefits.

In the Environment Bill, we are legislating for Local Nature Recovery Strategies to provide the spatial mapping required to direct investment and action locally to help restore and create habitat and establish the Nature Recovery Network.

It is the Government’s intention to make the nature measures promoted by the new Environmental Land Management Scheme consistent with Local Nature Recovery Strategies. We are working closely with stakeholders to explore how best to do this.

We are exploring how the scheme could support the Nature Recovery Network through tests and trials. Five of the Tests and Trials are examining the Nature Recovery Network, including how a landscape scale plan could support the delivery of major habitat restoration.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the governments of Denmark and Greenland about a fisheries agreement with Greenland; and whether they intend to conclude any such agreement.

The UK Government engages regularly with the Greenlandic authorities across a variety of policy areas. Although Greenland remains a constituent part of the Kingdom of Denmark, Greenland enjoys full autonomy in respect of its fisheries, so the UK is able to discuss fisheries matters directly with the Greenlandic Government.

Defra fisheries officials have met with their Greenlandic counterparts this year. Discussions have centred on the UK's application for membership of the North East Atlantic Fisheries Commission (NEAFC), fishery issues within the North-East Atlantic, as well as long-term bilateral arrangements. The UK's relationship with Greenland is likely to evolve further and in a positive direction as the UK goes forward as a fully independent coastal State.

9th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Gardiner of Kimble on 27 February (HL1809), when they estimate their assessments of costs, benefits and practicalities and whether to extend the scope of existing inspectorates to carry out invasive non-native species functions will be completed.

This work is now underway. I anticipate that the majority of assessment and consideration of the findings will be completed this year.

24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to establish a dedicated inspectorate for invasive non-native species; and if so, when.

The Government is carefully considering the case for an invasive non-native species (INNS) inspectorate and the functions that it might carry out.

The Government will look to determine if a separate inspectorate is required based on an assessment of costs, benefits and practicalities. The Government will also assess whether existing inspectorates might be extended in scope to carry out INNS related functions.

24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish action plans for those pathways identified as priorities in their Comprehensive analysis of pathways of unintentional introduction and spread of invasive alien species, published in May 2019.

The development of Pathway Action Plans (PAPs) requires detailed consideration, involving extensive engagement with stakeholders to understand the pathways, to identify the key risks and to understand how they can best be mitigated.

To date the Government has completed one PAP on zoos and aquaria and a further two will be completed later this year covering recreational boating, which is relevant to hull fouling, and angling, which is relevant to stowaways on fishing equipment. Work is beginning imminently on two other PAPs, for horticultural escapes and contaminants of horticultural plants, and Defra is expecting to complete all the PAPs by the end of 2022.

24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to increase the funding they provide for tackling invasive non-native species.

Decisions on public funding for the environment will be taken as part of the next multi-year Spending Review when priorities can be looked at strategically across Government.

14th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with industry and other sector bodies about the role that decarbonising the maritime sector can play in achieving the UK's target to bring all greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050.

The domestic maritime sector falls under the UK’s national net zero target, and in common with the wider economy will need to be decarbonised by 2050 in order to achieve net zero.

The Department has regular meetings with industry and civil society representatives on the issue of decarbonisation, to discuss both domestic Net Zero and the international work to address greenhouse gas emissions being undertaken at the International Maritime Organization.

The Department has also established the Clean Maritime Council, a grouping of senior UK stakeholders who engage on environmental issues. This forms part of the Department’s Clean Maritime Plan.

Council members have provided input to the Departments plans on green recovery and decarbonisation and hope to be able to meet again soon.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the (1) number, and (2) composition, of experts that will be recruited to the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals Independent Scientific Expert Pool.

As set out in the statement on use of independent scientific knowledge and advice (Agency statement on transparency and the use of independent scientific knowledge and advice (ISA) (hse.gov.uk)) the secretariat for the REACH Independent Scientific Expert Pool (RISEP) will be provided by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) . However, the work of this secretariat is limited to organisation, and support of RISEP experts in administration and protocol matters. Agendas and notes of Challenge Panels involving RISEP members will be made public, with accredited stakeholders also in attendance to ensure transparency.

In establishing independent scientific knowledge and advice within the UK REACH system, experts from HSE (as the Agency with UK REACH) and the Environment Agency (EA) used experience and “hands-on” knowledge of their work within the EU REACH scientific expert process (on the Committee for Risk Assessment (RAC) and the Committee for Socio-Economic Analysis (SEAC)). This enabled HSE to define the skills and experience necessary to ensure robust independent scrutiny and challenge to produce high-quality opinions, to inform decisions by the Secretary of State for Defra with the consent of Ministers for Wales and Scotland. The REACH SI mandates the Agency to include information about the qualifications or relevant experience that are suitable in order to provide knowledge and advice to the Agency within the statement produced on the use of independent scientific knowledge and advice (Agency statement on transparency and the use of independent scientific knowledge and advice (ISA) (hse.gov.uk)).

The actual composition of experts used to help the Agency produce specific opinions will be dependent on the type of dossier – for instance for an environmentally driven restriction any Challenge Panel would be made up of more independent environmental scientists than human health. All opinions will be looked at on a case-by-case basis. We have not set a minimum number of experts, but as a contingency we have ensured that we are able to co-opt members of other committees should we need to so. However, due to the large response we have had to the recruitment it is thought that this will not be required.

HSE was also able to use discussions with stakeholders and prioritisation exercises with Defra, and officials from the Scottish and Welsh governments to inform decisions around the number of experts required within the process on the basis of estimates of the numbers of restrictions and applications for authorisation expected.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what safeguards exist to ensure the secretariat of the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals Independent Scientific Expert Pool is independent from the rest of the Health and Safety Executive.

As set out in the statement on use of independent scientific knowledge and advice (Agency statement on transparency and the use of independent scientific knowledge and advice (ISA) (hse.gov.uk)) the secretariat for the REACH Independent Scientific Expert Pool (RISEP) will be provided by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) . However, the work of this secretariat is limited to organisation, and support of RISEP experts in administration and protocol matters. Agendas and notes of Challenge Panels involving RISEP members will be made public, with accredited stakeholders also in attendance to ensure transparency.

In establishing independent scientific knowledge and advice within the UK REACH system, experts from HSE (as the Agency with UK REACH) and the Environment Agency (EA) used experience and “hands-on” knowledge of their work within the EU REACH scientific expert process (on the Committee for Risk Assessment (RAC) and the Committee for Socio-Economic Analysis (SEAC)). This enabled HSE to define the skills and experience necessary to ensure robust independent scrutiny and challenge to produce high-quality opinions, to inform decisions by the Secretary of State for Defra with the consent of Ministers for Wales and Scotland. The REACH SI mandates the Agency to include information about the qualifications or relevant experience that are suitable in order to provide knowledge and advice to the Agency within the statement produced on the use of independent scientific knowledge and advice (Agency statement on transparency and the use of independent scientific knowledge and advice (ISA) (hse.gov.uk)).

The actual composition of experts used to help the Agency produce specific opinions will be dependent on the type of dossier – for instance for an environmentally driven restriction any Challenge Panel would be made up of more independent environmental scientists than human health. All opinions will be looked at on a case-by-case basis. We have not set a minimum number of experts, but as a contingency we have ensured that we are able to co-opt members of other committees should we need to so. However, due to the large response we have had to the recruitment it is thought that this will not be required.

HSE was also able to use discussions with stakeholders and prioritisation exercises with Defra, and officials from the Scottish and Welsh governments to inform decisions around the number of experts required within the process on the basis of estimates of the numbers of restrictions and applications for authorisation expected.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will set out detailed plans for the (1) size, (2) geographical distribution, and (3) administrative implementation, of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

Government has committed to creating a UK Shared Prosperity Fund to succeed European structural funds and bind together the whole of the United Kingdom, tackling inequality and deprivation in each of our four nations. The 2019 Conservative Manifesto committed to targeting the UK Shared Prosperity Fund at the UK’s specific needs, and at a minimum match the size of European structural funds in each nation.

Final decisions on the design of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund will be taken after a cross-Governmental Spending Review. In the meantime, we will continue to work closely with interested parties whilst developing the fund.

Baroness Bloomfield of Hinton Waldrist
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
20th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to change the annual indexing of park home pitch fees from the Retail Price Index to the Consumer Price Index.

The Government will introduce the primary legislation necessary to change the inflationary index that is used to review pitch fees for park homes from the Retail Price Index (RPI) to the Consumer Price Index (CPI) as soon as parliamentary time allows


This commitment is part of a wider package of measures designed to improve protections for park home residents and increase professionalism in the sector.

Viscount Younger of Leckie
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)