Lord Randall of Uxbridge Portrait

Lord Randall of Uxbridge

Conservative - Life peer

Committee of Privileges
11th Sep 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Committee on Standards
11th Sep 2014 - 30th Mar 2015
Joint Committee on Security
1st Jun 2010 - 30th Mar 2015
Draft Modern Slavery Bill
9th Jan 2014 - 3rd Apr 2014
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
12th May 2010 - 7th Oct 2013
Opposition Assistant Chief Whip (Commons)
10th Dec 2005 - 6th May 2010
Members' Allowances
9th Feb 2009 - 6th May 2010
Administration Committee
12th Jul 2007 - 3rd Mar 2009
Opposition Whip (Commons)
30th Jun 2003 - 10th Dec 2005
Finance and Services Committee
17th Jul 2005 - 19th Jul 2005
Transport Committee
25th Mar 2003 - 12th Jul 2005
Opposition Whip (Commons)
1st Feb 2000 - 10th Mar 2003
Environment, Transport & Regional Affairs
20th Jul 1998 - 21st Feb 2000


There are no upcoming events identified
Division Votes
Tuesday 23rd November 2021
Armed Forces Bill
voted No - in line with the party majority
One of 178 Conservative No votes vs 0 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 210 Noes - 190
Speeches
Monday 1st November 2021
Farming Rules for Water

My Lords, I declare my interest as a member of the advisory board of River Action. Does my noble friend …

Written Answers
Friday 24th September 2021
UN Climate Conference 2021: British Overseas Territories
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to enable full (1) participation, and (2) attendance, by representatives of …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Thursday 10th June 2021
Game Birds (Cage Breeding) Bill [HL] 2021-22
A Bill to prohibit the use of raised laying or battery cages to keep certain game birds for the purpose …
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Randall of Uxbridge has voted in 188 divisions, and 28 times against the majority of their Party.

18 Mar 2021 - Heather and Grass etc. Burning (England) Regulations 2021 - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 217 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 252 Noes - 274
17 Mar 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 219 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 326 Noes - 248
10 Mar 2021 - Domestic Abuse Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 212 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 241
10 Mar 2021 - Domestic Abuse Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 219 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 283 Noes - 245
13 Jan 2021 - Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 13 Conservative Aye votes vs 208 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 339 Noes - 235
30 Nov 2020 - High Speed Rail (West Midlands–Crewe) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 217 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 276 Noes - 259
30 Nov 2020 - High Speed Rail (West Midlands–Crewe) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 198 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 57 Noes - 234
30 Nov 2020 - High Speed Rail (West Midlands–Crewe) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 5 Conservative Aye votes vs 185 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 38 Noes - 222
9 Nov 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 44 Conservative No votes vs 147 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 165 Noes - 433
9 Nov 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 38 Conservative No votes vs 134 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 148 Noes - 407
21 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 209 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 320 Noes - 242
21 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 197 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 166 Noes - 237
20 Oct 2020 - United Kingdom Internal Market Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 39 Conservative Aye votes vs 158 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 395 Noes - 169
20 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 11 Conservative Aye votes vs 183 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 278 Noes - 200
5 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 202 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 323 Noes - 227
5 Oct 2020 - Immigration and Social Security Co-ordination (EU Withdrawal) Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 8 Conservative Aye votes vs 174 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 298 Noes - 192
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 1 Conservative Aye votes vs 192 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 276 Noes - 228
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 6 Conservative Aye votes vs 185 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 307 Noes - 212
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 175 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 249 Noes - 200
22 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 9 Conservative Aye votes vs 145 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 266 Noes - 159
15 Sep 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 182 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 258 Noes - 208
24 Jun 2020 - Fisheries Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 205 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 289 Noes - 230
22 Jun 2020 - Fisheries Bill [HL] - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 3 Conservative Aye votes vs 219 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 310 Noes - 251
20 Apr 2021 - Fire Safety Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 2 Conservative Aye votes vs 213 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 322 Noes - 236
26 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Conservative Aye votes vs 178 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 114 Noes - 207
26 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 8 Conservative Aye votes vs 161 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 223 Noes - 172
26 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 7 Conservative Aye votes vs 158 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 207 Noes - 172
26 Oct 2021 - Environment Bill - View Vote Context
Lord Randall of Uxbridge voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Conservative Aye votes vs 59 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 213 Noes - 60
View All Lord Randall of Uxbridge Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(28 debate interactions)
Lord Bethell (Conservative)
(22 debate interactions)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(19 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Home Office
(42 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(18 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Lord Randall of Uxbridge's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Randall of Uxbridge, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Randall of Uxbridge has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Randall of Uxbridge has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

2 Bills introduced by Lord Randall of Uxbridge


A Bill to prohibit the use of raised laying or battery cages to keep certain game birds for the purpose of producing eggs; to set minimum space requirements for enclosures for such birds; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Thursday 10th June 2021
(Read Debate)

A Bill to repeal the Hares Preservation Act 1892 and to make provision to prohibit the killing or taking of hares during the breeding season.


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Thursday 23rd January 2020
(Read Debate)

Lord Randall of Uxbridge has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


26 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which of the British Overseas Territories have had (1) the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, and (2) the Paris Agreement, extended to them as of May 2021.

The UK Overseas Territories Bermuda, Gibraltar, the Cayman Islands and the Falkland Islands have had UK ratification of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change extended to them. Currently no UK Overseas Territories have had UK ratification of the Paris Agreement extended to them.

The Department is consulting with UK Overseas Territories as to whether they would like to have the UK’s ratification of the Paris Agreement extended to them.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans, if any, they have to extend the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change to the Cyprus Sovereign Base Areas.

The Sovereign Base Areas of Akrotiri and Dhekelia comprise a UK Overseas Territory on the island of Cyprus. UK ratification of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change has not been extended to the Sovereign Base Areas. The Department will consult with the Sovereign Base Areas should they formally request the extension.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower sailing from England to Cape Cod.

We welcome events which celebrate our rich global heritage, and the 400th anniversary celebrations of the Mayflower setting sail to the United States offers a unique opportunity to do this.

I am pleased that we have provided significant funding to the Mayflower 400 organisers, who are responsible for delivering the commemorations. This is demonstrated by the £750,000 of funding my Department has provided through VisitEngland, which will help to ensure a strong legacy for the commemorations across the UK and globally.

In 2015, DCMS provided £35,000 to invest in the Mayflower museum. Last year, we also awarded Plymouth £3.5m through the Cultural Development Fund - part of which will support digital product development for Mayflower’s programme.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to provide support to the theatre sector following the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government will continue to support theatres through the unprecedented financial measures we have announced. DCMS has also worked closely with its arm’s-length bodies to deliver tailored support packages at speed, including the £160m Emergency Funding Package announced by Arts Council England, made possible by Government funding.

Alongside this, DCMS continues to engage with the sector extensively in order to best understand the challenges faced. We are working closely with the Arts Council to consider the additional support that may be needed to support the long-term recovery of the cultural sector, including theatres.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
15th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration they will make to any disparities between the length of time schools have been closed closed as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak when implementing the timetable the 2020/21 GCSE and A-level exams.

The department recognises that students due to sit exams and assessments next year will have experienced disruption to their education due to the COVID-19 outbreak. The government is committed to working closely with Ofqual to ensure that next year’s exam series proceeds fairly, and students receive the qualifications they deserve. Ofqual has already consulted on a range of possible adaptations to GCSE, AS and A level exams and assessments next year on a subject-by-subject basis, and has announced some changes that will reduce pressure on teaching time, and help ensure those young people taking exams next year have the same opportunities to progress as the students before them.

As for the timing of exams next year, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education, asked Ofqual in June to consider a short delay to the GCSE, A and AS level exam timetable in 2021, to free up additional teaching time. We are continuing to work with Ofqual, the exam boards, regulators in the devolved administrations, and groups representing schools, colleges and higher education to consider the best approach, and decisions will be confirmed as soon as possible.

The government has also provided a £1 billion fund of catch up premium designed to support schools in making up for some lost learning time.

11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government to ask Her Majesty’s Government when they intend to launch the increased Darwin Plus project funding for the UK Overseas Territories, as announced in the Budget on 11 March 2020.

We expect the increased Darwin Plus scheme to be launched later in 2021 with the first payments being made in 2022. Because of the increased funding we also expect to support a greater number of projects under the current Darwin Plus round. These projects will be announced in due course.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have (1) to prevent, and (2) to monitor, fisheries bycatch to protect  (1) porpoises, (2) dolphins, (3) whales, (4) seabirds, and (5) other species sensitive to the effects of bycatch; and what methods they intend to use to monitor such bycatch.

The Government funds Clean Catch UK which is a collaborative research programme dedicated to better monitoring, reducing, and, where possible, eliminating bycatch of sensitive species in UK fisheries. We are taking a risk-based approach to implementing this, focussing on fisheries which experience the highest rates of bycatch in the first instance. As a known hotspot for bycatch, work is already underway in the South West of England. We are currently undertaking trials for a range of mitigation measures in different fisheries along Cornwall’s south coast and will be looking to include more fisheries in this over the next 12 months.

The Government remains committed to monitoring and enforcing our fisheries so that we can manage them sustainably. As part of this, we continue to explore the potential uses of Remote Electronic Monitoring alongside other tools such as observer coverage and self-reporting apps.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of fisheries bycatch on the welfare of (1) porpoises, (2) dolphins, (3) whales, (4) seabirds, and (5) other species sensitive to the effects of bycatch; and what steps they are taking to prevent any negative effects caused by such bycatch.

The UK Government funds a comprehensive and well-respected bycatch monitoring programme which helps to protect sensitive marine species and to monitor and reduce any potential fisheries impacts on these species. The UK has an additional observer programme which collects data on fisheries catch and bycatch for scientific advice and management.

The Government also funds Clean Catch UK which is a collaborative research programme dedicated to better monitoring, reducing, and, where possible, eliminating the bycatch of sensitive marine species in UK fisheries.

In addition, we also fund the Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme, which conducts research on threats facing cetaceans (dolphins, porpoises and whales) through carrying out post-mortems on stranded animals. We are about to let a new 10-year contract for this programme, which demonstrates our long-term commitment to monitoring and mitigating such threats, including bycatch.

These programmes all contribute to the assessment of bycatch on populations and associated welfare implications of sensitive marine species.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effect of bycatch on populations of (1) harbour porpoises, (2) common dolphins, (3) humpback whales, and (4) other species sensitive to the effects of bycatch.

The UK Government funds a comprehensive and well-respected bycatch monitoring programme which helps to protect sensitive marine species and to monitor and reduce any potential fisheries impacts on these species. The UK has an additional observer programme which collects data on fisheries catch and bycatch for scientific advice and management.

The Government also funds Clean Catch UK which is a collaborative research programme dedicated to better monitoring, reducing, and, where possible, eliminating the bycatch of sensitive marine species in UK fisheries.

In addition, we also fund the Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme, which conducts research on threats facing cetaceans (dolphins, porpoises and whales) through carrying out post-mortems on stranded animals. We are about to let a new 10-year contract for this programme, which demonstrates our long-term commitment to monitoring and mitigating such threats, including bycatch.

These programmes all contribute to the assessment of bycatch on populations and associated welfare implications of sensitive marine species.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 14 January (HL Deb, cols 874–7), what plans they have to publish (1) the full application made by the National Farmers’ Union in 2020 for an emergency authorisation of the use the neonicotinoid product 'Cruiser SB' to treat sugar beet in 2021, and (2) any advice they received from the UK Expert Committee on Pesticides and Natural England in regard to that application.

The process for considering an emergency authorisation for a pesticide is set out in the legislation and includes consideration of potential risks to people and to the environment. The process was followed for this application and the Secretary of State decided that the criteria for an emergency authorisation have been met in this case. His decision was informed by assessments and advice from the Health and Safety Executive, the Expert Committee on Pesticides (ECP) and Defra's Chief Scientific Adviser. Natural England is sighted on emergency authorisation applications. No advice was requested or received on this application.

The information contained in applications made for emergency authorisations is not normally published. The ECP publishes the minutes of its discussions, and its advice on the Cruiser SB application is contained in the minutes from the 24 November 2020 meeting (attached to this answer and also available online at the following link):

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/946083/ecp-201124-fullminutes.pdf.

15th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the level of demand for water abstraction.

On 16 March 2020, the Environment Agency published Meeting our Future Water Needs: a National Framework for Water Resources. The report is available on GOV.UK here. This report explores England’s long term water needs, setting out the scale of action needed to ensure resilient supplies and an improved water environment.

Key findings of the report show that if no action is taken between 2025 and 2050, around 3,435 million extra litres of water per day will be needed for public water supply. This includes:

  • 1,150 Ml/d to make water supplies more resilient to drought
  • 1,040 Ml/d to supply the growing population
  • 720 Ml/d to replace unsustainable abstractions and improve the environment
  • 400 Ml/d to address the impact of climate change on water availability – water companies have also allowed for 640 Ml/d in their plans to 2025 which is before the start date for this analysis
Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish details of the Nature for Climate fund announced in the 2020 Budget on 11 March.

We announced a £640 million Nature for Climate Fund and are developing plans to deploy that funding in England over this parliament.

We will shortly publish a new England Peat Strategy and are consulting on a new England Tree Strategy. These will set out policies and programs to meet our manifesto commitments, driving up tree-planting and peat restoration, working together to address the combined climate and biodiversity crises.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to legislate to define animal sentience.

The Government is committed to further strengthening our world-leading animal welfare standards. We have committed to bringing in new laws on animal sentience. Any necessary changes required to domestic legislation will be made in a rigorous and comprehensive way and will be brought forward when Parliamentary time allows.

Additionally, we have committed to ending excessively long journeys, and banning the keeping of primates as pets. We want to increase maximum sentences for animal cruelty, which is being taken forward as a Private Members Bill.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill 2019–21 sponsored by the Member of Parliament for West Dorset.

The Government is supporting the Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill as it makes its way through Parliament. The Bill will increase the maximum custodial penalty for animal cruelty from 6 months’ imprisonment to 5 years’ imprisonment.

The new maximum penalty of five years is in line with campaigns by key stakeholders such as Battersea Dogs and Cats Home, Dogs Trust and the RSPCA. This is a positive step forward in improving animal welfare and will act as a serious deterrent against cruelty and neglect. Northern Ireland has already set the maximum penalty for animal cruelty offences at five years’ imprisonment, and the Scottish Government introduced the Animals and Wildlife (Penalties, Protections and Powers) (Scotland) Bill on 30 September 2019. The Welsh Government have confirmed that the new maximum penalty being proposed should apply in Wales.

The increase to five years' imprisonment will provide one of the toughest sanctions in Europe, strengthening the UK's position as a global leader on animal welfare. This builds on recent positive action the Government has taken to improve animal welfare standards, such as a requirement for CCTV in all slaughterhouses and implementing one of the world's toughest ivory bans. For companion animals, we have introduced new updated minimum welfare standards for pet selling, dog breeding, riding schools, animal boarding and exhibiting animals; as well as a ban on the commercial third-party sale of puppies and kittens.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
30th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any damage caused by the construction of Phase 1 of HS2 on chalk aquifers; and what estimate they have made of the costs related to any such damage.

Where construction activities occur within a chalk aquifer, or any other designated aquifer, HS2 Ltd works closely with the Environment Agency and relevant third parties to ensure that any risks are identified and that the design and delivery of the scheme causes no damage to the aquifer. The Environment Agency, as the regulatory body responsible for managing groundwater resources, will not provide the necessary approvals for work to commence until it is satisfied that there will be no detrimental impact to the aquifer.

In order to provide all necessary protections and to mitigate identified risks, HS2 Ltd has produced comprehensive and detailed risk assessments for its activities which affect aquifers. The HS2 project is funded to ensure that works can progress with minimal impact on the water environment and no interruption to the continued provision of high-quality drinking water from aquifers. Protective measures include the selection of the cleanest tunnelling technologies and the enhancement of water treatment and supply capabilities.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any impact of the construction of Phase 1 of HS2 on the cost of public water supply.

There will be no increase in the cost of public water supply as a result of HS2 works. The HS2 project is funded to cover the cost of any actions required to ensure that the provision of high-quality drinking water is maintained. HS2 Ltd, not water companies or their customers, will therefore cover the costs of any mitigation or risk reduction measures that are implemented to maintain public water supplies.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have received any requests from Commonwealth countries to discuss reciprocal pension agreements in the last two years; and if so, which countries have made such requests.

The Department received a request from Canada in November 2020 to conclude a reciprocal agreement to state pension up-rating.

Baroness Stedman-Scott
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to allow virtual civil partnership registrations during the COVID-19 lockdown.

At present, only civil partnerships or marriages conducted under the special procedure, for those who are seriously ill and not expected to recover, are being conducted, and only where the Registrar General thinks it is safe to do so according to Public Health England guidelines. The Government has no plans to introduce virtual registration of civil partnerships.

We understand the frustration couples planning a civil partnership or a wedding must be feeling, and as with all coronavirus restrictions we will look to ease them as soon as it is safe to do so. As set out in our roadmap, those decisions will be based on scientific evidence.

10th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to enable full (1) participation, and (2) attendance, by representatives of each of the UK Overseas Territories at COP26.

The UK Government is working closely with the Overseas Territories to ensure that their valuable contribution to address the environmental issues they face is featured appropriately during COP26, including in the UK Pavilion. The Overseas Territories are collectively participating in COP26 to showcase their unique biodiversity, environments and marine protected areas.

Representatives of the Overseas Territories will attend COP26. However, the number of attendees from the Overseas Territories is not currently finalised.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
10th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the UK's exit from the EU on funding for conservation and biodiversity projects in the British Virgin Islands.

The UK Government continues to support conservation and biodiversity projects in the Overseas Territories following the UK's exit from the EU. The UK Government is monitoring the impact of EU Exit on the territories and taking action to mitigate against the impact of loss of EU environmental funding for the Overseas Territories including the British Virgin Islands, through initiatives such as Darwin Plus. Round 9 of Darwin Plus saw a record investment in 31 projects across the Overseas Territories, totalling more than £8m over three years.

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the merger of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Department for International Development on the delivery of (1) conservation, and (2) environmental, projects overseas.

Tackling climate change in collaboration with international partners remains a high priority for this Government. By aligning our efforts, the creation of the new Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office will allow us to seize the opportunities ahead, as we prepare to take on the G7 presidency and host COP26 next year. Further details on how the new Department's strategic priorities will be implemented, including through a blend of bilateral and multilateral assistance, will be set out in due course.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) financial, and (2) other, assistance they have offered each of the UK Overseas Territories as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The safety and security of those in the British Overseas Territories (OTs) is a UK Government priority. Multiple government departments, led by DFID and the FCO, have been working with OT Governments to respond to the pandemic.

It is first and foremost for the OTs to make full use of their financial resources in order to address their needs. The UK Government will consider requests for further support/funding on a case-by-case basis. All UK financial support is subject to robust governance and needs assessments.

To address immediate healthcare, access and security needs, FCO has reallocated £15m of 2020/21 CSSF and £5m of 2020/21 International Programme funds to COVID-19 support. DFID is providing an initial £10m from its budget to mitigate immediate non-health impacts in the three ODA-eligible OTs, and has earmarked an additional £20m to mitigate short to medium term impacts of the outbreak on these OTs.

To date, the UK Government has procured and delivered medical supplies to all the inhabited OTs (except Pitcairn, which has had no confirmed cases of COVID-19), delivered testing systems to 6 territories and boosted testing capabilities in three other OTs. Health professionals from Public Health England are providing advice and support to each OT, and the Government has supported OTs to recruit medical personnel.

MoD and Home Office have provided in-territory security support to Turks and Caicos Islands through a Security Assistance Team and an additional 29 military personnel have reinforced TCI's Maritime Police Unit to counter illegal migration. A further Security Assistance Team is supporting the Cayman Islands to assist planning on security, logistics, COVID-19 and hurricane response. RFA ARGUS arrived in the Caribbean earlier than planned to provide support to the OTs during the hurricane season; she could also provide support for COVID-19 impacts if required.

The UK Government has arranged four flights to the Caribbean, including two paid for by the Cayman Islands Government, and a flight to the South Atlantic, flying residents of the Overseas Territories home from the UK as well as repatriating British Citizens and other nationalities from the Bahamas, Bermuda, Turks and Caicos Islands, the Cayman Islands and St Helena. The Government has also repatriated people from Ascension and the Falkland Islands using regular RAF flights.

4th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the UK Overseas Territories' marine protected areas are part of the Blue Belt; if not (1) why not, and (2) what plans they have to include those areas in future.

The UK Overseas Territories' are constitutionally responsible for their marine environments. The Blue Belt programme has supported Territories to designate and manage large-scale protected areas around the British Indian Ocean Territory, South Georgia & the South Sandwich Islands, Pitcairn, St Helena, Ascension and within the British Antarctic Territory. The programme is on track to deliver over 4 million square kilometres of protected ocean during this year, with the anticipated future designation of a management regime across Tristan da Cunha's maritime area.

Other Territories indicated that they did not wish to pursue the development of large-scale marine protected areas within their waters though the Blue Belt programme. Many of these Territories have already implemented a range of marine management measures within their waters. Funding from the Blue Belt programme has been used to enhance the annual Darwin Plus initiative, to enable those Territories to bid for funding to undertake local marine projects, which many have done, including projects with the Blue Belt delivery partners.

The next phase of the Blue Belt programme, subject to the comprehensive Spending Review, will seek to expand engagement, and provide broader support for all Territories to protect their marine environment, while further developing sustainable marine economies.

30th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, what plans they have to extend the deadline for submitting personal tax returns beyond 31 January 2021.

The Government has carefully considered the arguments for extending the Self-Assessment filing date deadline from 31 January but presently has no plans to extend that deadline. The January deadline has been in place for many years and changing it could undermine taxpayer understanding and trust in how the Self-Assessment system works. However, the Government recognises that some taxpayers will have difficulty submitting their Self-Assessment return due to the impact that COVID-19 has had on their personal or business circumstances.

HMRC do not charge penalties for failure to submit a return on time where taxpayers have a reasonable excuse. HMRC’s guidance explains that they will accept the impact of COVID-19 as a reasonable excuse for submitting a return late, provided that taxpayers explain how they were affected and submit the return as soon as they can. More information is available in the HMRC online guidance covering the reasonable excuse provisions.

Once they have submitted their return, taxpayers who are unable to pay all of their Self-Assessment tax due on 31 January can then access HMRC’s enhanced online Time to Pay arrangements. This allows Self-Assessment liabilities of up to £30,000 – increased from £10,000 - to be paid in up to 12 instalments without having to contact HMRC beforehand. Taxpayers with Self-Assessment liabilities over £30,000 can contact HMRC directly to agree a Time to Pay instalment arrangement.

Lord Agnew of Oulton
Minister of State (HM Treasury)