Lord Berkeley Portrait

Lord Berkeley

Labour - Life peer

EU Internal Market Sub-Committee
2nd Jul 2019 - 23rd Apr 2020
Administration and Works Committee (Lords)
17th Dec 1998 - 11th Nov 1999
European Union Committee
3rd Jun 1997 - 11th Nov 1999


Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 5th July 2022
09:45
Built Environment Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: Public transport in towns and cities
5 Jul 2022, 9:45 a.m.
At 10.00am: Oral evidence
The Baroness Vere of Norbiton - Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Transport at Department for Transport
View calendar
Select Committee Meeting
Tuesday 12th July 2022
09:45
Scheduled Event
Wednesday 13th July 2022
Oral questions - Main Chamber
Avoiding significant settlements, and consequent speed restrictions, on the route of HS2 rail line in the area above the Cheshire salt mines
View calendar
Division Votes
Tuesday 28th June 2022
Pharmacy (Responsible Pharmacists, Superintendent Pharmacists etc.) Order 2022
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 101 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 193 Noes - 119
Speeches
Thursday 30th June 2022
Airports: Delays
My Lords, is it not about time that the airlines stopped selling tickets that they cannot deliver? Should they not …
Written Answers
Tuesday 28th June 2022
High Speed 2 Line: Euston to Glasgow
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the current planned maximum speed of HS2 trains on the HS2 tracks (1) …
Early Day Motions
None available
Bills
Thursday 9th December 2021
Duchy of Cornwall Bill [HL] 2021-22
A Bill to Amend the succession to the title of Duke of Cornwall, to remove the presumption of Crown immunity …
MP Financial Interests
None available

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Lord Berkeley has voted in 232 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Lord Berkeley Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Baroness Vere of Norbiton (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
(86 debate interactions)
Lord Callanan (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
(27 debate interactions)
Baroness Williams of Trafford (Conservative)
Minister of State (Home Office)
(15 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
View all Lord Berkeley's debates

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Lord Berkeley, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Lord Berkeley has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Lord Berkeley has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

9 Bills introduced by Lord Berkeley


A Bill to amend the Sovereign Grant Act 2011; to amend the succession to the title of the Duke of Cornwall; to redistribute the Duchy of Cornwall estate; and to remove the requirement for a Parliament to obtain the Queen's or Prince's consent to consideration of Bills passing through Parliament.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Lords
Friday 8th November 2013

To establish a Marine Navigation Aids Commission; to establish an Office of Marine Navigation Aids Regulation; to amend the Merchant Shipping Act 1995; and for connected purposes.


Last Event - 2nd Reading: House Of Lords
Friday 21st January 2011

A Bill to Amend the succession to the title of Duke of Cornwall, to remove the presumption of Crown immunity applying to the Duke of Cornwall and Duchy of Cornwall; to remove certain exemptions and immunities from the Duke of Cornwall and Duchy of Cornwall; to allow the present Duke of Cornwall to purchase land and estates in land throughout the United Kingdom; to make provision about legal representation of and legal advice given to the Duke and Duchy of Cornwall; and to provide that the Duchy of Cornwall shall become subject to the Crown Estate Act 1961


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Thursday 9th December 2021
(Read Debate)

A bill to amend the succession to the title of Duke of Cornwall; to remove various powers, exemptions and immunities from the Duchy of Cornwall; to make provisions relating to the Treasury Solicitor and any solicitor or attorney appointed in the affairs of the Duchy; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading (Lords)
Monday 20th January 2020
(Read Debate)

A Bill to amend the succession to the title of the Duke of Cornwall, to remove the presumption of Crown Immunity applying to the Duchy of Cornwall, to remove various powers, exemptions and immunities from the Duchy of Cornwall, to confirm the right to Royal Mines within Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly vests in the Crown, to provide the right to Treasure Trove, bona vacantia and escheat within Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly lies with the Crown and to provide that any attorney or solicitor appointed in the affairs of the Duchy of Cornwall shall be called to the Bar or hold a practising certificate as appropriate; and for connected purposes


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Wednesday 10th June 2015

A Bill To amend the succession to the title of the Duke of Cornwall, to remove the presumption of Crown Immunity applying to the Duchy of Cornwall, to remove various exemptions and immunities from the Duchy of Cornwall, to confirm the right to Royal Mines within Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly vests in the Crown, to provide the right to Treasure Trove, bona vacantia and escheat within Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly lies with the Crown and to provide that any attorney or solicitor appointed in the affairs of the Duchy of Cornwall shall be called to the Bar or hold a practising certificate as appropriate. Lord Berkeley Ordered to be Printed, 10th June 2014


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Tuesday 10th June 2014

A bill to make provision about marine navigation.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Tuesday 15th May 2012

First reading took place on 26 March. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.Second reading - the general debate on all aspects of the Bill - is yet to be scheduled. A bill to amend the Sovereign Grant Act 2011; amend the succession to the title of the Duke of Cornwall; re-distribute the Duchy of Cornwall estate; and to remove the requirement for a Parliament to obtain Queen or Prince's consent to consideration of bills passing through Parliament.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Tuesday 26th March 2013

First reading took place on 5 July. This stage is a formality that signals the start of the Bill's journey through the Lords.The 2010-12 session of parliament has prorogued and this Bill will make no further progress.


Last Event - 1st Reading: House Of Lords
Tuesday 5th July 2011

Lord Berkeley has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


388 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
9 Other Department Questions
30th Mar 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker when the findings on the consultation of hybrid bill procedures will be published.

The consultation on Stage 2 of the review of hybrid bill procedure took place from 29 April to 23 July 2021. Forty-three responses were received, raising a range of issues. Some of these issues have been addressed in the preparations for the hearing of petitions against the High Speed Rail (Crewe-Manchester) Bill which was introduced in the House of Commons on 24 January 2022. A report, summarising the issues raised in the consultation responses and the steps taken so far to address them, will be published on the UK Parliament website in the near future. The report will also indicate how the longer-term work will be taken forward.

16th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to fund the cost of air or rail travel for refugees from Ukraine who are allowed to enter the UK.

Once within Great Britain, Ukrainian beneficiaries will be eligible for free onward travel via national rail, light rail, bus and coach, to their final destinations across England, Scotland and Wales. Further information on the scheme is available at: www.nationalrail.co.uk/ukraine.

We would not want the cost of travel to the UK to be a barrier and understand there are a number of schemes and offers that people can make use of. Some commercial operators have also offered free travel to Ukrainians including Eurostar.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
2nd Mar 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what limitations exist on the number of non-pass holders permitted in the Palace of Westminster to attend (1) All Party Parliamentary Group meetings, and (2) receptions which are funded by external sources.

The number of non-passholders who can attend All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) meetings and receptions is the responsibility of the Chair of the APPG and the sponsor of the reception, irrespective of how they are funded. The total number of people allowed in each meeting room or catering venue is limited by the capacity of each room. The limits differ from room to room depending on their size.

13th Jan 2022
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what assessment has been made of the demand for install electric vehicle charging points in the House of Lords car parks; what is the estimated cost of installing charging points; whether there are plans to install such charging points; and if so, when they are expected to be operational.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. A survey of all members in May 2021 identified 33 members who at that time expected they would make use of an electric vehicle charging facility for the House of Lords. Work to date has not identified a final, fully costed and value for money approach. Further work to identify, approve and set a delivery timescale for such an approach is ongoing.

16th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any grant from the Levelling Up fund (1) to the Council of the Isles of Scilly, or (2) to any other body, for new vehicle transport ships will (a) require those vessels to have roll-on roll-off capability, (b) need to demonstrate best value for money in accordance with the Fund’s rules, and (c) require a full competitive tendering process for the operation of the vessels.

Bids for the first round of the Levelling Up Fund are currently being assessed in line with the published assessment process. Whilst we are not able to answer project-specific questions, or provide advice on potential projects during this period of competition, I can confirm that value for money forms part of the criteria used to assess all bids. More information on the full assessment process, including the assessment of value for money, can be found (attached) in the Levelling Up Fund technical note - https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/992647/technical-note-for-application-form.pdf

Successful bidders will need to adhere to any legislation relevant to the delivery of the project, such as procurement. Outcomes from the first round of bids for the Levelling Up Fund will be announced later in the year and bidding authorities will be informed in due course.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
9th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Equality Act 2010 applies to the Sovereign in her private capacity; what are the reasons for any exemption; and whether the Government Equalities Office (1) reviewed any exemption during the passage of the Act, and (2) will now review any such exemption.

In common with other legislation, the Equality Act 2010 maintains the long standing principle that it is not appropriate for The Sovereign, personally, to be the subject of legal action in a Court or Tribunal. However, the Royal Household has formal arrangements in place that provide a means of hearing and remedying any complaint that might be raised under the Act.

There are no plans to review this position.

16th Mar 2021
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker whether he plans to initiate a review of hybrid Bill procedures; and if so, when he expects to start that review and when it will invite evidence.

In 2016, a review of hybrid bill procedure was commissioned by the Senior Deputy Speaker and the Chairman of Ways and Means in the House of Commons. It was planned to take place in two stages. The first stage was completed in 2017 and resulted in a number of changes to the Private Business Standing Orders in both Houses. On the 22 March, I wrote to the Leader of the House of Lords and Lord Privy Seal informing her that a consultation in relation to the second stage would begin soon. It will last for two to three months. It will be a public consultation and evidence will be invited. This is a joint review, and the Chairman of Ways and Means has written to the Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons in similar terms.

25th Nov 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what plans there are to install fire extinguishing systems which use water mist or water spray in (1) the roof, and (2) other inaccessible parts, of the Palace of Westminster.

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chair of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf. Both Houses recognise the value that suppression systems can add to an overall package of Fire Safety. A requirement to install suppression systems when major refurbishment works are undertaken in all Parliamentary buildings is part of our current fire safety strategy, any decision to use suppression assesses risks and takes account of the historic fabric of our buildings.


As part of the recent Fire Safety Improvement Works a High Pressure Water Mist suppression system was installed in the Palace basement, and the Elizabeth Tower refurbishment has included the installation of a full sprinkler system. Further works on the roof and other parts of the Palace are subject to future projects likely to be delivered through Restoration and Renewal. Design of the plans, including Fire Safety, is the responsibility of the Sponsor Board and Delivery Authority, with input from House Officials. I understand that suppression is being considered, as part of a suite of fire safety options, in the ongoing work to create the outline business case.

21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the role of Counsellors of State; who are the present holders of this office; under what legislation they operate; and how the current office holders can be changed.

Section 6 of the Regency Act 1937 provides for a power to delegate Royal functions to Counsellors of State in the event of the Sovereign being either overseas, or intended to be overseas, or in the event of illness (stopping short of incapacity).

The Regency Act itself specifies that the Counsellors of State shall be the wife or husband of the Sovereign (if the Sovereign is married), and the four persons who are next in the line of succession to the Crown.

Changes to the list of those who can be appointed as Counsellors of State would require amending the Regency Act.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
10th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks made by Lord True on 6 December (HL Deb, col 1640), what was the case that was determined relating to the operation of the Ministerial Code; which (1) ministers, and (2) officials, were involved; and what plans they have, if any, to place a copy of (a) a report by the independent advisor concerning the Transport Secretary's declaration of private interests, or (b) any other report, in the Library of the House.

My answer to the noble Lord’s question on 6 December 2021 referred to recent correspondence from the Rt Hon Member for Ashton-under-Lyne, in connection with the Government's policies towards General Aviation. The Minister for Aviation's response to the Opposition is a matter of public record.

The Independent Adviser, in relation to the question about the Secretary of State for Transport's interests, confirmed that he was content that the Transport Secretary had followed the process required under the Ministerial Code for the declaration of his private interests. It was this matter to which I was referring.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much was spent on consultancy services by the Cabinet Office and its related agencies in the 2019/20 financial year; and what was the (1) cost of, and (2) reason for, each such contract.

As set out on page 57, section 2.10 of the Cabinet Office Annual Account (2019-2020) and available on gov.uk, expenditure on consultancy reduced from £43.647 million in 2018-19 to £35.380 million in 2019-20.

Cabinet Office publishes all contracts over £10,000. Details of all consultancy contracts can be found on Contracts Finder.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority Annual Report on Major Projects 2019–20, published on 9 July, which categorised the HS2 project as a red risk, what recent assessment they have made of (1) the construction, and (2) the whole life costs, of the consented HS2 Phase One scheme at Wendover.

The Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) has not conducted a review of the Wendover area since its dedicated review in 2018. The review in 2018 of the Wendover area was of the process by which HS2 Ltd had considered and rejected the mined tunnel proposal. However, the IPA was not asked to review either the construction costs or the whole life costs, but whether HS2 Ltd had followed a competent process in making its decision. The review concluded that HS2 Ltd had followed a competent process in reaching its decision.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
20th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, when negotiating future trade arrangements with the EU, they plan to adopt a policy of linking greenhouse gas trading systems in relation to common operational procedures and technical standards, similar to that included in the proposed agreement between the European Union and the Swiss Confederation (COM (2020) 255).

As stated within the Government’s publication: The Future Relationship with the EU, The UK’s Approach to Negotiations, the UK is committed to carbon pricing as a decarbonisation tool. We will establish a UK system that supports our world leading climate ambition, including net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. This will enable UK energy generators, heavy industry and aviation to decarbonise their operations in an efficient and cost-effective manner.

In the context of our approach to carbon pricing, the UK remains open to considering a link between any future UK Emissions Trading System (ETS) and the EU ETS (as Switzerland has done with its ETS), if it suited both sides’ interests.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
16th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to include in the terms of reference for their commission on race and ethnic disparities the replacement of the references to the British Empire in the honours system with honours that recognise the UK’s multi-racial society.

The terms of reference will be announced in due course.

Lord True
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
15th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will publish (1) the list of consultees for the draft Construction Contracts (England) Exclusion Order 2022, and (2) the list of projects excluded by this draft Order and their respective cost estimates.

A consultation took place with relevant construction industry and water sector stakeholders. Those consulted included construction trade and legal associations, individual contractor companies, consultancies, water utility companies and other government departments. A number of individual responses were also received. Consultees included:

  • Addleshaw Goddard LLP
  • Ashurst LLP
  • Balfour Beatty
  • BAM Construction
  • Build UK
  • Civil Engineering Contractors Association
  • CMS LLP
  • Construction Law Society
  • Construction Leadership Council Business Models Contractual Working Group
  • Costain
  • Crown Commercial Services
  • Deloitte
  • Diamond Transmission
  • EY
  • Infrastructure Projects Authority
  • KMPG
  • National Grid ESO
  • Severn Trent Water
  • Southern Water
  • Transmission Investment / Amber Infrastructure
  • United Utilities
  • Water UK Roundtable – Yorkshire Water, South West Water, Welsh Water, United Utilities.

In addition, engagement was undertaken with each Devolved Administration.

No projects are either included or excluded by the design of this measure, but to benefit from the Exclusion Order they would need to be consistent with the provisions of the statutory instrument. Projects designated for delivery by way of Direct Procurement for Customers (DPC) need to satisfy various selection criteria including, that the estimated whole-life totex (i.e. capital expenditure plus operations and maintenance costs) of the project is likely to exceed a threshold (currently set at £100m), and that delivering the project via DPC has the potential to offer best value for money for customers compared to delivery by the relevant water undertaker.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 30 April (HL7617), whether (1) an impact assessment, and (2) a value for money assessment, on the role of EGNOS in the UK was undertaken prior to 31 December 2020; if so, whether they will place copies in the Library of the House; and if not, what were the reasons.

Further to the answer I gave the noble Lord on 20th April 2022 to Question HL7617, it would not be appropriate for the Department to comment on any impact assessment or value for money assessment due to the ongoing commercial sensitivity around EU space programmes.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what engagement took place with the (1) aviation, (2) maritime, (3) agricultural, and (4) chartered surveying industries, to assess the role of EGNOS in the UK prior to 31 December 2020.

The Department did engage with both internal and external stakeholders on the decision not to participate. It would not be appropriate for the Department to comment on any value for money assessment given the ongoing commercial sensitivity around EU Space Programmes.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many meetings with the (1) Civil Aviation Authority, and (2) UK Space Agency, were held with (a) ministers, and (b) officials, in (i) the Department for Transport, and (ii) the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, to discuss the role of EGNOS in the UK prior to 31 December 2020.

The Department did engage with both internal and external stakeholders on the decision not to participate. It would not be appropriate for the Department to comment on any value for money assessment given the ongoing commercial sensitivity around EU Space Programmes.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) an impact assessment, and (2) value for money assessment, on the role of EGNOS in the UK was undertaken prior to 31 December 2020; and if so, whether they will place copies in the Library of the House.

The Department did engage with both internal and external stakeholders on the decision not to participate. It would not be appropriate for the Department to comment on any value for money assessment given the ongoing commercial sensitivity around EU Space Programmes.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 11 February (HL5915), what steps the Office of Product Safety and Standards are taking to ensure that lithium ion batteries used in (1) e-bikes, (2) e-scooters, and (3) other mobility aids, are safe; what (a) national, (b) European, or (c) other standards, inform decisions on whether to permit their use in such vehicles, and whether they will publish the (i) battery types, and (ii) manufacturers, which are not permitted for use in such vehicles.

The UK Government is committed to ensuring that consumers are protected from unsafe goods. The General Product Safety Regulations 2005, and other product regulations, place obligations on manufacturers to ensure the safety of consumer goods including the batteries used to power them.

Manufacturers need to ensure that all products supplied meet the relevant product safety regulations before being placed on the market. In doing so, they may choose to apply standard EN 62133-2 which specifies requirements and safety tests necessary for the safe operation, including foreseeable misuse, of portable sealed secondary lithium cells and batteries.

The Office for Product Safety and Standards (OPSS) does not maintain a list of approved batteries for use in such vehicles, as the responsibility for the selection of such components rests with the manufacturer. However, OPSS works with Local Authorities and border authorities to help ensure that products imported and sold in the UK are safe and that action is taken against those who place unsafe or non-compliant products on the market, including their removal from the market.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in the Space Based Positioning, Navigation and Timing Programme to identify a replacement for the EGNOS navigation system; and when they expect a replacement to be operational.

The Space Based Positioning, Navigation and Timing Programme explored a range of innovative options for strengthening the resilience of PNT services from space. The scope of the programme did not include identification of a replacement for EGNOS.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Callanan on 28 April 2021 (HL15095), what financial contribution the EU requested for the UK to continue to access to the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service Safety of Life service; how the request compared with the UK’s previous contributions; how they assessed value for money in view of its impact on aviation; and whether they have any plans to renegotiate access to this service.

The UK sought to negotiate a service access agreement on the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) with the EU. However, the EU required participation in the programme along with the full associated costs of participation which would have equated to €30-€35 million per year. For all programmes under consideration, the Government was clear it would only participate where the terms were in the UK’s interests, and in this case, it was not considered value for money. The negotiations on EGNOS concluded in December 2020 and there are no plans to reopen the discussions on this matter.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
21st Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Airlander hybrid air vehicle and its potential impact on achieving net zero carbon emissions in the air transport sector; and what steps they plan to take, if any, to support the creation of a green aerospace cluster in south Yorkshire to deliver the Airlander hybrid air vehicle project to production stage.

Earlier this year the Department for Transport consulted on the Jet Zero Strategy, which will set out steps to reach net zero aviation emissions by 2050. Working towards this ambition, the Department is co-funding new, zero carbon UK aircraft technology through the Aerospace Technology Institute Programme. This is a commitment from both industry and the Government to co-invest £3.9 billion in aerospace research and development from 2013 to 2026.

This programme has agreed grants of £1.7 million to Hybrid Air Vehicles. The same programme has supported 343 aerospace technology projects, with total Government and industry funding of £3.2 billion across the UK, including the emerging green aerospace cluster in South Yorkshire.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to include minima for (1) volume, or (2) price, for geothermal energy in the next Contracts for Difference electricity auction.

On 13 September 2021 we published draft parameters ahead of the fourth Contracts for Difference (CfD) allocation round which did not include a minimum for geothermal energy. The final budget notice will be published ahead of the CfD round opening in December.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to include (1) an equivalent to, or (2) a replacement for, the Renewable Heat Incentive for large-scale renewable heat generation in their Heat and Buildings strategy.

Large scale renewable heat generation will be supported in a number of ways, including through the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme, the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund, the Green Heat Network Fund and the Green Gas Support Scheme. Further information on each of the schemes can be found on the GOV.UK website.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
16th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what date they applied to join the Horizon Europe programme; on what date the application was accepted; what were the reasons for the delay to the start of the UK’s participation in the programme; and what assessment they have made of the effects of that delay on research institutions in the UK.

The UK and the EU agreed the terms for our association to Horizon Europe under the Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA).

As the underpinning EU legislation was not yet adopted when the TCA was agreed, this was accompanied by a Joint Declaration on Participation in Union Programmes and Access to Programme Services, which set out the parties’ intention to formalise our participation at the earliest opportunity.

Now that the EU legislation underpinning the Horizon Europe programme is in force, the UK stands ready to formalise our participation.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure a zero emission vehicle mandate could be implemented with enough time to incentivise investment in zero emission vehicles and the charging industry before 2030.

The Government had already committed £1.5 billion to support the early market and remove barriers to ZEV ownership. Alongside the new phase out dates for new petrol and diesel cars and vans, we have pledged a further £2.8 billion package of measures to support industry and consumers to make the switch to cleaner vehicles. These ambitions will include up to £1 billion to support the electrification of UK vehicles and their supply chains, £1.3 billion to accelerate the roll out of charging infrastructure and £582 million for plug in vehicle grants.

The March 2020 Budget included the extension of favourable benefit in kind tax rates for zero emission vehicles out to 2025: company car tax is 1% in 2021/22 and 2% in 2022/23 through to 2024/25; and all zero emission cars are exempt from vehicle excise duty (VED)


We are currently consulting on the proposed regulatory framework for the UK with regard to all newly sold road vehicles which includes the option for a ZEV mandate. The consultation closes on 22 September.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential investments required in the electric vehicle manufacturing and charging industry in response to the introduction of a zero emission vehicle mandate.

The Government had already committed £1.5 billion to support the early market and remove barriers to ZEV ownership. Alongside the new phase out dates for new petrol and diesel cars and vans, we have pledged a further £2.8 billion package of measures to support industry and consumers to make the switch to cleaner vehicles. These ambitions will include up to £1 billion to support the electrification of UK vehicles and their supply chains, £1.3 billion to accelerate the roll out of charging infrastructure and £582 million for plug in vehicle grants.

The March 2020 Budget included the extension of favourable benefit in kind tax rates for zero emission vehicles out to 2025: company car tax is 1% in 2021/22 and 2% in 2022/23 through to 2024/25; and all zero emission cars are exempt from vehicle excise duty (VED)


We are currently consulting on the proposed regulatory framework for the UK with regard to all newly sold road vehicles which includes the option for a ZEV mandate. The consultation closes on 22 September.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the current costs of obtaining short-term work visas for UK nationals seeking to work in each of the EU member states.

As part of their domestic immigration rules, each EU Member State has the power to set the cost of visas and/or work permits. This has resulted in a wide range of costs that Member States can continue to change, and at a time of their choosing. Each Member State is responsible for communicating and updating such costs, and each remains the most accurate and applicable source of this information; the UK Government does not hold this information. We urge all UK nationals to check the rules in the country they are travelling to ahead of time. These rules will differ depending on length of stay and activities undertaken abroad.

The Government is committed to supporting individuals and businesses. We will continue to engage regularly with our embassies to better understand the requirements in Member States. We will also continue to enhance guidance for businesses to best support travel for work purposes under our new trading relationship with the European Union.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
17th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their current estimate for the (1) outturn cost, and (2) date to start exporting power to the National Grid, of Hinkley Point C.

Under the terms of the Contract for Difference, neither taxpayer nor consumer is liable to contribute to the construction cost of Hinkley Point C. The Contract for Difference defines a Commissioning Window for each of the two nuclear reactors. These are from 1st May 2025 to 30th April 2029 for Reactor One and 1st November 2025 to 31st October 2029 for Reactor Two.

In September 2019, the lead investor in Hinkley Point C published a statement on the project cost and schedule. This said that the capital cost is likely to be between £21.5Bn and £22.5Bn (these figures are in 2015 money). The developer is targeting power generation by the end of 2025.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
7th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Penn on 2 September (HL Deb, col 344), how much investment they have made in the last year in green industries which contribute to achieving the zero carbon target; and what is the comparable figure for their investment in industries that do not contribute to the zero carbon target.

In 2019, the UK became the first major economy in the world to legislate to end its contribution to global warming by 2050 by reaching net zero emissions.

This year, the Government has set out billions in support for our low-carbon economy. We are taking action in every sector including: over £3 billion to transform energy efficiency in homes and public buildings; £2 billion to kickstart a cycling and walking revolution; £1 billion support for ultra-low emission vehicles; £800 million to capture carbon from power stations and industry; a £640 million Nature Climate Fund; £350 million to cut emissions in heavy industry; and £100 million to research and develop Direct Air Capture technologies.

The transition to a low carbon economy constitutes one of the most significant challenges and opportunities for the UK and the world over the coming decades. In March, we published the first phase of our transport decarbonisation plan and will be setting our further plans over the coming months for other sectors of the economy including on energy, heat and buildings and the natural environment. Our forthcoming sector strategies, and wider plans to deliver a green economic recovery following the COVID-19 pandemic, will contain further proposals to put us on track to meeting our carbon reduction obligations which are among the most ambitious in the world

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
1st Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the letter sent by the Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Labour Markets to the House of Lords EU Internal Market Sub-Committee on 15 May which stated that the “UK’s position on subsidies for the trade agreement negotiations with the EU … does not necessarily require a domestic regulator”, whether they could provide state aid or subsidies to any UK company without any independent UK scrutiny or enforcement; and if so, what assessment they have made of the impact on the wider UK business sector of any uncertainty about the rules and criteria used to decide which companies can receive such support.

The Government has been clear that, after the end of the transition period, the UK will have its own domestic subsidy control regime. This will not align with EU State Aid rules. Work is ongoing to devise a modern system for supporting British business in a way that fulfils our interests. As part of this, consideration will be given on how to ensure compliance with the new regime. There are a number of possible options , of which an independent regulator is one. We will discuss these options with key stakeholders in due course..

However, as the Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Labour Markets has previously set out, the UK’s position on subsidies for the trade agreement negotiations with the EU does not necessarily require a domestic regulator (as demonstrated by other countries, like Canada, that do not maintain a domestic subsidy control regulator to fulfil their trade agreement obligations with the EU).

The Government recognises the importance of providing clarity to businesses. In advance of the introducing the domestic subsidy control regime, we will be seeking the views of business on the best approach to ensure we continue to have fair and open competition across the UK.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to engage with the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership to ensure that the proposed floating offshore windfarms are built off the coast of Cornwall.

Floating offshore wind presents an exciting opportunity to support the UK’s low carbon ambitions, whilst maintaining a leadership position in offshore innovation. The Department, alongside the Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government are in regular contact with the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership, including in regard to their plans to transform the existing Wave Hub asset, off the coast of Cornwall, into a test site for floating offshore wind technologies.

The Government recently consulted on the forthcoming Contracts for Difference allocation round, due to open in 2021, and included questions on measures to support floating offshore wind. The Contracts for Difference approach could support the commercial build out of offshore zones in the Celtic Sea.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
9th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have assessed their advice that people use their cars and avoid public transport during the COVID-19 pandemic to be (1) compatible with their target for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and (2), if not, whether they would withdraw the advice.

The Government’s top priority is to ensure we protect people and businesses throughout the present health crisis. The Government’s advice to avoid using public transport where possible, and instead try to walk, cycle, or drive is based on the present concern for public health.

Covid-19 has meant people have had to profoundly change the way they live, work and travel. Many people have rediscovered walking and cycling, and their benefits to both air quality and health. We are supporting that through the £225 million Emergency Active Travel Fund, which was announced on 9 May, and is the first stage of a £2 billion investment in active travel. We are also encouraging local authorities to consider rapid changes to road layouts such as pop up cycles lanes to make cycling safer and more attractive.

The COVID-19 crisis has not diminished the Government’s determination to meet our net zero target and we are committed to going further and faster to tackle climate change. Transport has a central role to play in decarbonising our economy whilst delivering growth. At the end of March, we published “Decarbonising Transport: Setting the Challenge” kicking off our work on preparing a Transport Decarbonisation Plan to ensure we meet the challenge of reaching net zero transport emissions by 2050.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what (1) business rates, (2) grants, and (3) loan schemes, are available to pubs to help ensure their financial health; what steps they are taking to ensure that the tenants or landlords receive the full benefit of any such support during the current COVID-19 related restrictions; what steps they are taking to ensure any such financial support continues once those restrictions are lifted; and whether any such steps include a suitable transition period to ensure those businesses are able to recover from any losses incurred.

The Government has introduced a number of support measures available to pubs during the current COVID-19 outbreak. These include a retail, hospitality and leisure business rates holiday scheme and grants scheme for these sectors, business interruption loans schemes, as well as job retention and self-employed income support schemes. The full details of all these measures have been published, and can be viewed on the GOV.UK website

The Government’s decisions on when and how to amend the current social distancing measures will be guided by the scientific advice.

Lord Callanan
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
22nd Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with the Imperial War Museum about (1) returning its research facilities to their opening hours from before the COVID-19 pandemic, (2) providing more research spaces, and (3) its response times to enquires, compared to those of similar institutions.

Imperial War Museums (IWM) is an arm’s-length body of DCMS, so it operates independently on matters such as this.

IWM intends to return its research facilities to pre-COVID-19 opening times as soon as staff vacancies have been filled. Recruitment is currently underway and, once completed, IWM also intends to expand its research spaces. IWM aims to answer enquiries within 10 days, but this can take longer depending on the complexity of the enquiry.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
17th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to encourage the Royal Parks to close permanently the South Carriageway and the North Carriageway in Hyde Park to vehicular traffic in order to improve the quality of the environment and safety of pedestrians and cyclists in Hyde Park.

The Royal Parks manages Hyde Park on behalf of HM Government, and is responsible for decision-making about operational matters.

This is therefore an operational matter for The Royal Parks. We understand, however, that South Carriage Drive has been closed since March 2020 as part of a trial to reduce through-traffic in Hyde Park. Whilst the original trial was focused on weekend restrictions, the road has also been closed for safety reasons on weekdays during this period due to the introduction of a temporary cycle path, immediately outside the park, by Transport for London.

We understand that The Royal Parks is currently assessing evidence of the trial on the weekend restrictions, and plans to make an announcement about the closure later this year.

Lord Parkinson of Whitley Bay
Lord in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support is available for small businesses in the holiday lets sector who have been unable to continue their businesses due to the restrictions in place to address the COVID-19 pandemic on customers (1) travelling to, or (2) hiring, accommodation and who (a) have lost income from hire charges for holiday lets, or (b) need to return deposits in order to comply with the advice from the Competition and Markets Authority.

We recognise that COVID-19 has significantly impacted many holiday accommodation businesses. We continue to engage with holiday rentals stakeholders to assess how we can most effectively support the sector through this crisis.

Holiday lets businesses can access the Government’s comprehensive economic support package. This includes the recently extended the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme, VAT payment deferrals for firms and various loan schemes. In particular, the Bounce Back Loan Scheme helps small businesses access loans of up to £50,000, with a 100% government-backed guarantee for lenders.

We have also allocated additional funding to Local Authorities in England in the form of a discretionary grant fund of up to £617m. This is aimed at certain small businesses who were not eligible for the existing business grants fund schemes.

We understand the significant disruption and personal impact that results from the cancellation of holiday and travel bookings and we will continue working with businesses, consumers and everyone concerned.

Baroness Barran
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
27th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support they provide to enable local authorities to improve the quality of their air and reduce pollution through the introduction of Clean Air Zones.

The Government has ring-fenced £880 million to help local authorities tackle NO2 exceedances through the development and implementation of local air quality plans and through funding to support those impacted most by these plans.

Local authorities introducing a Clean Air Zone as part of a local air quality plan can bid for Clean Air Fund funding. The Clean Air Fund can support a range of measures such as vehicle upgrade grants to individuals and businesses along with bus retrofit schemes, improvements to bus fleets, installation of electric chargepoints, provision of park and ride services, concessionary travel schemes and freight consolidation centres.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what conditions the Environment Agency has imposed on HS2 in connection with the construction of the Chiltern Tunnel; and whether they will publish copies of all documents issued by the Environment Agency in connection with their consent to construction of the Chiltern tunnel.

The conditions imposed on the construction of the Chiltern Tunnel are within the relevant consents that have been issued by the Environment Agency. The consent for the construction of the tunnel (HS2/P10191) will be deposited in the Library of the House. The related consents for water discharge (EPR-QB3092NR) and waste treatment (FB3709KP) at the Chilterns Tunnel South Portal are held on the public register.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park on 17 February (HL12930), whether they will place a copy of the correspondence between the Department and the European Commission in the Library of the House.

A copy of the correspondence between the Department and the European Commission has been deposited and has been available to Members since 17 February.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they plan to make to the EU, if any, to remove its ban on the import of live molluscs from the UK.

It is wholly unacceptable that the European Commission has changed its position regarding the export of live bivalve molluscs from Class B waters. There is no scientific or technical justification for this, and it is already impacting businesses on both sides of the channel. We are publishing a series of correspondence between Defra and the European Commission, which clearly reinforces our position.

The Secretary of State has written to Commissioner Kyriakides. We continue to seek urgent resolution with the European Commission, and we have offered to provide reasonable additional reassurances to demonstrate shellfish health, on the understanding that the Commission must recognise the existing high standards and history of UK-EU trade.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Greenhalgh on 29 January (HL 12331), whether the Department for Transport has provided a demonstration of need for an Inland Border Facility at Dover; and whether any alternative sites have been considered.

Further to the Written Answer provided by Lord Greenhalgh on 29 January, I can confirm that the Department for Transport (DfT) is progressing plans for the White Cliffs Inland Border Facility. The site will act as a location for starting and ending the transit of goods to and from the UK for Department of Environmental, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) and Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC).

Several other sites were considered but White Cliffs was the only one that met the requirements of my department and HMRC. Official Controls Regulations state that inbound consignments requiring Sanitary and Phytosanitary checks must be carried out at a Border Control Post (BCP) located either at the port or point of entry, or at the nearest site suitable for the provision of all infrastructure and facilities required to comply with the official controls regulations governing BCP functions for the commodities to be controlled there.

White Cliffs Inland Border Facility will include a BCP to support the Port of Dover where inbound consignments to the UK may be inspected in a bio secure facility, such as plants, animals and products of animal and plant origin (e.g. food). It will include parking areas for Heavy Goods Vehicles, while waiting to be processed, and other vehicles as well as security measures and facilities to enable the checking of vehicles and goods entering and exiting the site.

DfT’s proposed use of the site will require approval, which is being sought by the Government under the requirements of a Special Development Order (SDO). The White Cliffs Inland Border Facility proposals are planned for temporary use and are designed to ensure that there are no significant or long-term environmental effects. DfT does not expect to use this site as a temporary lorry holding facility. DfT, alongside other Government departments, has undertaken a review of options for the use and layout of the site and based on current planning, expect the site to be needed for up to five years. The terms of the SDO require the development to end by December 2025 and reinstatement works to be completed by December 2026.

Government recognises the importance of engagement and we will continue to engage with the community and relevant stakeholders throughout the process to ensure transparency. Details can be found on the Inland Border Facilities website at: https://inlandborderfacilities.uk

8th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by advising officials that rail travel should be the preferred option for business trips if the journey is less than six hours; and what assessment they have made of the impact of the introduction of such measures in Switzerland.

As part of the current Greening Government Commitment targets, the Government as a whole has reduced the number of domestic flights its staff took by 28% in 2018/19 compared with the baseline of 2009/10. This shows good progress towards the target reduction of 30%, which the Government is on course to exceed by the target date of 2020. As part of this commitment, many departments have revisited their travel service arrangements to reduce domestic flights and have introduced initiatives to increase electronic operations. However, we acknowledge that there is still more to be done.

The Government is currently developing an ambitious, updated set of Greening Government Commitment targets for 2021-2025, with travel as an area in which we are looking to improve. We are committed to setting new targets that will be consistent with a trajectory to achieving net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and will continue to look at further measures to encourage lower emissions travel options for Government officials.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what arrangements they have agreed with the government of Romania about Romanian agricultural workers coming to the UK; what checks for COVID-19 were required on such workers before they joined outbound flights; what social distancing arrangements were required on the flights in terms of  the number of (1) passengers, and (2) seats; whether such workers in the UK have access to health services in the same way as UK workers; whether those workers are covered by national minimum wage rules; whether such Romanian workers will be required to leave the UK at the end of the summer harvest period; and if so, who will fund their return travel costs.

Workers are able to continue to come to the UK under the key worker category “Food and other necessary goods”.All flights coming to the UK must follow the current UK policy relating to the delay phase of the current COVID-19 outbreak. All passengers on entry to UK must follow the government’s social distancing guidance as per GOV.UK website available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/full-guidance-on-staying-at-home-and-away-from-others/full-guidance-on-staying-at-home-and-away-from-others

Various airlines and airports have implemented social distancing measures, by making reasonable adjustments. For example the following social distance adjustments are in the process of implementation at many airports, wherever possible: opening additional staff search areas; altering security lane opening plan to leave space between lanes; ensuring only one passenger at a time waiting to go into the body scanners; floor markings placed at bag search areas to ensure people maintain a safe distance whilst their bag is being searched; more colleague parking to reduce the number of people on public transport.

Any individual who is ill and showing signs of COVID-19 should not be allowed to board a flight to the UK.

All flights to the UK are required to provide health announcements to passengers relating to the current COVID-19 outbreak. In the event that there is a seriously unwell passenger, information must be reported to the relevant airport in line with standard operating procedure, and to the PHE (Public Health England) Health Control Unit at London Heathrow (LHR). If the unwell passenger has COVID-19 like symptoms then on arrival they will be advised to self-isolate for 7 days and if symptoms worsen to call NHS 111. All passengers will be provided with information leaflets on arrival in the UK about following government's social distancing guidance.

Employers of those travelling on flights are applying additional measures for workers prior to and following arrival into the UK, including isolation, temperature checks and social distancing during travel.

In accordance with transition arrangements with other EU countries on healthcare, workers are able to access medical assistance during their time in the UK should this be required. If migrant workers from EU countries fall ill with coronavirus (COVID-19) while in the UK they will not have to pay for diagnosis or treatment, this includes if they are tested and the result is negative.

Businesses must comply with current UK employment law, including pay for workers in line with National Minimum Wage rules.

Any individuals working in the UK will be able to return home at any time, subject to the home country border restrictions. Flight costs will be paid for by the worker and in line with Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA) regulations.

18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to establish a national environment day; and whether the Keep Britain Tidy campaign will be part of any such plans.

The Government has no current plans to declare a National Environment Day. There are already a number of established initiatives that encourage care for the environment, including World Environment Day. Defra is working with Keep Britain Tidy to deliver the “Keep it, Bin it” campaign. We are also pleased to support their “Great British Spring Clean” campaign, which has now been rescheduled for the autumn.

The Government made a commitment through the 25 Year Environment Plan to be the first generation to leave the environment in a better state than we found it. 2019 was designated the Year of Green Action in support of the 25 Year Environment Plan goal to connect people with the environment to improve health and well-being.

Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
19th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether their (1) trade envoys, and (2) special representatives for Trade and Investment, are required to declare any (a) gifts they receive, and (b) conflicts of interest they may have, in the course of their duties; whether they will publish a list of all such gifts and conflicts of interest for the last 10 years; and what sanctions apply to any envoys or special representatives who fail to make the appropriate declarations.

Trade Envoys and Special Representatives appointed by the Department are required to declare gifts and hospitality that they receive in their roles. Trade Envoys and Special Representatives are also required to declare any interests (perceived or actual). The Department for International Trade (DIT) considers if any mitigations are needed on a case-by-case basis. We have no plans to publish a list of all such gifts and conflicts of interest for the last 10 years. It is the responsibility of the Trade Envoy to inform the Department of any change in their circumstances, and the Government can terminate any appointment where appropriate declarations have not been made.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) Her Majesty The Queen, (2) His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, or (3) their representatives, relating to their Consent to the Trade Bill; what changes were made to the Bill as a result of any such discussions; and for what purpose were such changes made.

Queen’s Consent is required for provisions affecting the Royal Prerogative, as well as the hereditary revenues, the Duchy of Lancaster or the Duchy of Cornwall, and the personal property or personal interests of the Crown.

Foreign affairs including trade have historically been carried out through the Royal Prerogative. Queen’s Consent was sought for the provisions of the Trade Bill insofar as they affected the Royal Prerogative.

No changes were made to the Bill as a result of the process of obtaining Queen’s consent.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the suspension in arms sales to Saudi Arabia for offensive use in Yemen by the government of the United States; and what plans they have to implement a similar suspension in arms sales.

The US announced it would end support to Saudi-led offensive operations in Yemen, including relevant defence exports. This is entirely a matter for the US Government.

Our position on arms exports to Saudi Arabia – as with all countries – is that such exports require an export licence and that all export licence applications are carefully assessed against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria (the “Consolidated Criteria”) on a case-by-case basis. A licence would not be granted if to do so would be inconsistent with the Consolidated Criteria.

Lord Grimstone of Boscobel
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
22nd Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 21 June (HL860), how many times the Secretary of State for Transport as opposed to the courts was asked to decide whether a driver should be disqualified from driving in the last 10 years; and in how many of those cases the drivers were disqualified from driving as a result.

The Secretary of State for Transport is not involved in making decisions on driving disqualifications. Only a court can order that an individual is disqualified from driving.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the current planned maximum speed of HS2 trains on the HS2 tracks (1) in the open, and (2) in tunnels; and what is the expected journey time from London Euston to Glasgow Central of HS2 trains, without using the Golborne Link.

The HS2 Rolling Stock will have a maximum speed of 360km/h but will run slower on certain parts of the infrastructure, including some tunnels, due to specific geographic constraints.


In the current planning assumptions, used to inform the business case for HS2, the journey time from London to Glasgow will be 3 hours 48 minutes once Phase 2a is operational.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to reduce the instances of number plate cloning.

The law requires that anyone who supplies number plates for road use in the UK must be registered with the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA). It is a legal requirement for suppliers to carry out checks to ensure that number plates are only sold to those who can prove they are entitled to the registration number. Number plate suppliers must also keep records of the plates they have supplied.

The DVLA visits number plate suppliers to monitor compliance with the legal requirements and works closely with the police and trading standards to share intelligence and support investigations and prosecutions of suppliers who do not comply.

Anyone who suspects that their number plate has been cloned should report this to the police, who are responsible for on road enforcement. Any fines or correspondence received for offences which have not been committed should be returned to the issuing authorities for investigation. Vehicle keepers can also write to the DVLA, who will consider issuing a new registration number for a vehicle if it is believed that a number plate has been cloned.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish (1) a progress report, and (2) a detailed assessment, of the progress made in implementing each of the 78 commitments set out in their report Decarbonising Transport: A Better, Greener Britain, published on 14 July 2021 and updated on 29 July 2021.

The Department has made significant progress implementing the commitments set out in Decarbonising Transport: A Better, Greener Britain in the year since its publication. As set out in that document, we will regularly review progress against our targets, continue to adapt and take further action if needed to decarbonise transport. We will publish our progress and review our pathway at least every five years.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many times in the last 10 years the Secretary of State for Transport has been asked to decide whether a driver should be disqualified from driving; and in how many of those cases the drivers were disqualified from driving as a result.

Her Majesty’s Courts and Tribunal Service (HMCTS) and the Scottish Courts and Tribunal Service (SCTS) are responsible for convicting and sentencing individuals for road traffic offences. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency’s (DVLA) role in this process is to maintain and update the driving licence database with endorsement information, including penalty points and disqualifications.

The table below shows the number of disqualifications that were ordered by a court and notified to the DVLA in each of the last ten years. This information is held on the driving licence database for either four or 11 years and then removed in line with the law. The figures provided are a snapshot of the driving licence database at the time the information was retrieved and there may be instances where an endorsement that included an order for disqualification will have been removed from the database and is not included in the figure provided.

Year

Disqualifications

2012

56,693

2013

52,093

2014

48,992

2015

50,543

2016

57,536

2017

58,055

2018

94,589

2019

133,995

2020

117,235

2021

152,194

2022 (to 27 May)

62,468

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the estimated cost saving if the Golborne Link was removed from the High Speed Rail Phase 2b Western Leg project.

As part of its work on the Economic Case for the January 2022 Update on the Strategic Outline Business Case, Government undertook a sensitivity for the removal of the Golborne Link. This estimated that the removal of the Golborne Link would be expected to reduce the overall cost range for HS2 Crewe-Manchester to £13bn to £19bn (Q3 2019 prices), a cost range reduction of £2bn to £3bn.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what passenger data informed the new railway timetable service from 16 May for (1) Welwyn Garden City to London, (2) Huddersfield to Wakefield, and (3) Ilkley to Bradford, services.

Like other train operators, Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) and Northern are continuously reviewing services to achieve the best possible balance between passenger demand and the resources available. A range of data sources is used by the operators to build up a holistic picture of customer demand.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their latest estimate of the overall cost of the Crossrail project; what is the cost attributed to Network Rail; and what is the latest estimate of its economic benefit.

The latest estimate of the overall cost for completing Crossrail is £18.9 billion. This includes Network Rail on Network Works at a total estimate cost of £3.0 billion.

Analysis in the 2010 Business Case stated that the Crossrail programme will add an estimated £42 billion to the UK economy. This is a forecast and will be assessed in planned work to evaluate the impact of Crossrail post opening on 24 May 2022.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to counter the practice of vehicle number plate cloning.

The law requires that anyone supplying number plates for road use in the UK must be registered with the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA). It is a legal requirement for suppliers to carry out checks to ensure that number plates are only sold to those who can prove they are entitled to the registration number. Number plate suppliers must also keep records of the plates they have supplied.

The DVLA visits number plate suppliers to monitor compliance with the legal requirements and works closely with the police and trading standards to share intelligence and support investigations and prosecutions of suppliers who do not comply.

Anyone who suspects that their number plate has been cloned should report this to the police, who are responsible for on road enforcement. Any fines or correspondence received for offences which have not been committed should be returned to the issuing authorities for investigation. Vehicle keepers can also write to the DVLA, who may issue a new registration number for a vehicle if there is evidence that a number plate has been cloned.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by Lord Greenhalgh on 11 May (HL Deb col 98) on the £5 billion delivery of an underground station in Manchester, how many platforms the plan includes; what are the length of the tunnels connecting to the station platforms in both directions; whether any non-HS2 trains could use the underground station; what are the lengths of the platforms; and what is the overall cost estimate for the underground station and its tunnels.

The High-Speed Rail (Crewe-Manchester) Bill deposited in parliament on 24 January set out the Government’s commitment for a surface station. The Bill does not contain plans for an underground station and the Government continues to consider that an enlarged (6-platform) surface station can meet requirements at substantially lower cost and construction impact than underground alternatives. These views are reflected in the Bill that has been deposited in parliament.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are their latest estimates for the cost of the station serving Great Western, Heathrow Express and TfL train services at Old Oak Common; how many station platforms are planned; when development approval will be sought; and whether these costs related to Old Oak Common station are included in the Government’s cost estimate for HS2.

Old Oak Common will contain 14 platforms: 6 subterranean High Speed platforms and 8 conventional rail platforms for services on the Great Western Main Line.

Within the Target Cost for Phase One, the budget allocated by HS2 Ltd for the Old Oak Common station, including contingency for risk, is £1.67bn (2019 prices). A more detailed breakdown of costs cannot be provided as this information is commercially sensitive.

The High Speed Rail (London to West Midlands) Act provides the necessary powers for the station.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the overall cost for the construction of the proposed Manchester HS2 (1) surface station, (2) rail-related buildings, (3) tunnels, (4) portals, and (5) track and signalling.

The High-Speed Rail (Crewe-Manchester) Bill Business Case and Overarching Estimate of Expense provide key cost estimates for the Phase 2b Western Leg.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the (1) development, (2) construction, and (3) commissioning (a) times, and (b) costs, for the proposed underground Manchester HS2 station project; and what closures of the tram services in Manchester will be required during the construction.

The Manchester HS2 station project is for a surface station located on the same level as the existing Piccadilly Network Rail station. The HS2 surface station is based on a 6-platform surface station and will be accessed by a tunnelled route until the station approach. The Government is intent on working with HS2 Ltd to limit the level of disruption throughout construction.

HS2 Ltd expect the disruption to the Metrolink Ashton Line to last for around two years during which a bus replacement service will be provided between Ashton Cole and Manchester Piccadilly.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the (1) legal limits, (2) the existing levels, (3) maximum daily mean averages, and (4) maximum hourly mean levels, for (a) NO2, (b) PM10, (c) PM2.5, and (d) O3 levels, for each of the routes being taken or planned by trucks moving spoil and material to or from the HS2 Euston sites; and, in each case, what are the expected values after HS2 has stopped using rail freight for moving spoil and materials.

No decisions have been made in relation to the removal of spoil and material from Euston by rail.

Once a decision is determined, an assessment on the potential impacts (including air quality) will be undertaken. Any decision that is made will need to comply with the Environmental Minimum Requirements that apply to the HS2 scheme.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the announcement by HS2 that spoil and materials for the construction of Euston station will be moved by road, what assessment they have made of how this complies with their response to the Select Committee on the High Speed Rail (London - West Midlands) Bill (Session 2016-17, Cm Paper 9396) and their “overarching commitment to continue to seek to maximise, as far as reasonably practicable, the amount of material that can be moved by rail”.

No decisions have been made in relation to the removal of spoil and material from Euston by rail.

As reported in the October 2021 HS2 6-monthly report to Parliament, in response to a recommendation from the Oakervee Review about looking into the efficiency of the Euston station, the move to a smaller, simpler 10-platform station design at Euston has been confirmed.

Following the move to the more affordable 10 platform station design, the original plans for the removal of a proportion of construction spoil by rail are no longer possible. In response, HS2 Ltd has been working, in close liaison with colleagues from Network Rail, to consider alternative options for how to remove spoil from the construction of HS2’s Euston station and how it can minimise impacts. The outcomes of this work will be reported to the Euston Partnership Board, which has been established to facilitate cooperation and collaboration between key stakeholders at Euston, for consideration. HS2 Ltd will continue to use reasonable endeavours to maximise the use of material by rail and reduce the effect on local communities.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will publish the evidence to support their decision to reject the Commons Transport Select Committee’s recommendation to explore options for extending the ban on driving while using a mobile phone to include the use of hands-free devices, as made in its report, Road safety: driving while using a mobile phone (12th Report, Session 2019–21, HC Paper 237).

The Government’s response to the Transport Select Committee’s recommendation to explore options for banning hands-free use of mobile phones while driving was based on our view that this was a longer-term project with links to automation. The Government’s more immediate priority at that time, as stated in the response, was to review the offence of using a hand-held mobile phone while driving with a view to making it more comprehensive. We tightened up the law in March 2022.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will publish the data from the e-scooter trials before reaching conclusions on their policy on e-scooters.

The Department for Transport recognises the need to address concerns relating to e-scooter safety. My officials are in regular contact with PACTS and we are considering options for how best to regulate e-scooters to improve safety and crack down on their illegal use.

These options are being informed by evidence from national trials of rental e-scooters and wider sources, including data from STATS19, international comparisons, academic studies and the PACTS reports. A report summarising findings from the evaluation of e-scooter trials is due to be published in late spring 2022.

The Department will consult on new regulations for e-scooters before any are introduced. However, as primary legislation will be required, we cannot commit to a more specific timetable.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Apr 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by PACTS The Safety of Private E-scooters in the UK, published on 19 March; and what steps they will take in response to its recommendations on the safety of e-scooters.

The Department for Transport recognises the need to address concerns relating to e-scooter safety. My officials are in regular contact with PACTS and we are considering options for how best to regulate e-scooters to improve safety and crack down on their illegal use.

These options are being informed by evidence from national trials of rental e-scooters and wider sources, including data from STATS19, international comparisons, academic studies and the PACTS reports. A report summarising findings from the evaluation of e-scooter trials is due to be published in late spring 2022.

The Department will consult on new regulations for e-scooters before any are introduced. However, as primary legislation will be required, we cannot commit to a more specific timetable.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a ship is classed as a passenger ferry (1) with or without a carriage of vehicles, and (2) whether or not it contains freight.

A passenger ferry, also known as a roll on-roll off (ro-ro) passenger ship is a ship capable of carrying more than 12 passengers and having ro-ro cargo, or freight, spaces. Ships defined as a ro-ro passenger ship do not always have to carry passengers and/or ro-ro cargo; the ship is certificated to have the capability to carry passengers, vehicles and cargo.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which employment legislation applies to people employed on ships (1) that are registered (a) in the UK, (b) in the EU, and (c) elsewhere in the world, and (2) which operate (i) between UK ports, (ii) between UK and EU ports, and (iii) between the UK and rest of the world.

The international principles derive from the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 1982. The first general principle is that a ship registered in the UK remains subject at all times, wherever it is located, to domestic UK law. This principle will be the case for any flag State whether it be the UK, an EU member State or another member State in the world. Hence, in broad terms, a person upon a UK flagged ship never leaves the UK’s legal jurisdiction whilst on board that ship. As the flag State, the UK is under a duty to “effectively exercise its jurisdiction and control in all administrative, technical and social matters”. Hence the UK as flag State has primary responsibility for the ship, including criminal jurisdiction, even when the ship is outside the UK’s territorial waters.

If the ship leaves UK territorial waters and enters the high seas (international waters), the UK as flag State retains exclusive jurisdiction (subject to limited exceptions) for so long as the ship remains on the high seas. The position becomes more complicated if the ship enters the territorial waters of another State, either for transit purposes or to visit a port in the other State. This is because international law recognises that different domestic jurisdictions may apply concurrently. In consequence, the UK ship, together with its crew, passengers and contents, may become subject to the domestic laws of the other State, as well as those of the UK.

Within that, the application of UK employment law may depend on where the vessel is working - domestic or deep sea, for how long or on the residency or nationality of the individual seafarer.

There are currently no agreed domestic employment provisions for any vessels not registered in the UK and/or the EU that are operating to or from the UK to the EU or the rest of the world. With the exception of those vessels operating on the Dover Strait, all of these vessels will enter the high seas as part of the voyage and therefore fall under the provisions previously described.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to standardise employment (1) rates, and (2) conditions, for staff working on ships.

The pay and conditions are a matter for each operator to determine provided they meet the minimum legal requirement. Provisions already exist to provide national minimum wage to domestic routes such as Cairnryan to Larne or Belfast.

As part of our nine-point plan to protect seafarers rights, we will introduce new laws to amend the Harbours Act 1964, to penalise ferries operating from British ports which do not pay at least the minimum wage to their workers in British waters.

The extension will bring into scope the relevant parts of international ferry operations such as the Dover straits and Irish Sea routes.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they will take to reduce train noise that is measured independently during the initial operation and testing of trains on HS2 phase one, if it is found to be in excess of Environmental Minimal Requirements.

To avoid a scenario where railway noise would lead to a non-compliance with the project’s Environmental Minimum Requirements, HS2 Ltd is developing integrated requirements, specifications and tests for each component of the railway that contributes to the end-state noise. As part of these integration activities, HS2 Ltd monitors planned performance against requirements and compliance against its noise commitments.

HS2 Information Paper F4 explains the project’s framework for monitoring operational noise and vibration from the railway. This framework includes commitments to monitor the performance of noise and vibration control measures applied to the operational phase of the railway, and to share information with Local Authorities. Information Paper F4 includes a commitment to undertake corrective action, if necessary, to improve performance and prevent future loss of performance where required to achieve the project’s operational noise performance objectives (as set out in Information Papers E20, E21 and E22).

The steps that would be taken if performance did not meet expectations would depend on the specific causes. However, in line with HS2 noise policy, all reasonable and practicable mitigation measures would be considered, with specific regard to acoustic performance, value for money, engineering practicability, impacts on other environmental disciplines and stakeholder engagement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they intend to publicise the changes in the law on driving while using a mobile phone which commence on the 25 March; and in particular the law that drivers must not use a handheld phone when they are stationary in a traffic queue.

The Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) (Amendment) (No 2) Regulations 2022 will broaden the offence of using a hand-held mobile phone while driving to cover offline use of phones as well as the interactive communication functions covered now. The Government plans to accompany the law change with a THINK! campaign to remind drivers not to use a hand-held phone at the wheel and to highlight the penalties of choosing to ignore this new law.

Nothing in the new Regulations alters the position on what constitutes driving; it has been, and will remain, an offence to use a hand-held mobile phone while stationary in traffic. However, the Government is taking this opportunity to amend Rule 149 of The Highway Code to emphasise this fact.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many HS2 station platforms are currently planned for its Euston station; how many trains per hour they can accommodate; and what plans they have to release any land no longer required.

As set out in the October 2020 Report to Parliament on HS2, in response to a recommendation from the Oakervee Review about looking into the efficiency of the Euston station, the move to a smaller, simpler 10-platform station design at Euston has now been confirmed. Moving to this revised HS2 Euston station design maintains the station infrastructure capacity to run 17 trains per hour. The space released from the removal of platform 11 will be made available to Network Rail for railway operations and development.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the stability of Parkway Tunnel and of the approach tracks to the Network Rail Euston station during the construction of the HS2 caverns and tunnels directly underneath; and what steps they have taken to guarantee that there will be no disruption to the rail services into and out of the Network Rail Euston station during the construction of these HS2 works.

The Network Rail approach lines into Euston, including the Parkway Tunnels are located directly above the HS2 tunnels. Working in partnership with Network Rail, the Parkway Tunnels and Network Rail's railway tracks and systems have been the subject of Ground Movement Assessments by the HS2 Main Works Civils Contractor. The output of this assessment is currently being reviewed.

The design of the HS2 tunnels is being refined to minimise ground movement and settlement mitigation measures are being developed that will be compatible with the operation of the existing railway. The tunnelling is undertaken incrementally in small stages, which limits risk and means any settlement occurs in small stages allowing the existing railway infrastructure to be adjusted, as necessary.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the latest design for the HS2 tracks and approach tunnels for Euston station.

The HS2 infrastructure forming the approaches to Euston station consists of (from south to north): a portal structure leading to three sprayed concrete lined tunnels (two Up Line tunnels either side of a single Down Line tunnel). The two Up Lines converge into a sprayed concrete lined cavern and then merge into a single bored tunnel. The Down Line passes underneath one of the Up Line tunnels to merge into a bored tunnel adjacent to the cavern.

A sprayed concrete lined crosscut tunnel, perpendicular to the running tunnels is constructed from a shaft adjacent to Park Village East to facilitate construction of the cavern and provide a permanent intervention facility.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 9 March (HL6487), how many pedestrians were knocked over by motor vehicles in each of the last three years; and of those, how many sustained serious injuries or were killed.

The number of reported pedestrian casualties, including killed or seriously injured (adjusted) casualties, in collisions where the pedestrian was hit by a known motor vehicle in each of the last three years is shown in the below table.

Year

Killed

Serious
(adjusted)

Total pedestrian casualties hit by
a motor vehicle

2018

437

6,386

21,445

2019

453

6,116

20,982

2020

333

4,081

14,133

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the latest budget estimate for the Old Oak Common station on the Great Western Main Line; how many platform faces are included; and whether this is included in the overall HS2 budget as set out in the integrated Rail Plan.

Old Oak Common will contain 14 platforms: 6 subterranean High Speed platforms and 8 conventional rail platforms.

Within the Target Cost for Phase One - which is included in the Integrated Rail Plan (IRP) - the budget allocated by HS2 Ltd for Old Oak Common station, including contingency for risk, is £1.67bn (2019 prices). A more detailed breakdown of costs cannot be provided as this information is commercially sensitive.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 20 December 2021 (HL4859), whether HS2 trains will be capable of using the standard UK Network Rail station platforms without modification.

The rolling stock currently procured by HS2 Ltd will be capable of using the standard British Network Rail station platforms without modifications.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 20 December 2021 (HL4859), whether conventional UK passenger trains will be able to use the same platforms without modification.

It is unlikely that existing conventional British passenger trains would be able to use the HS2 platforms. HS2 platforms are offset further from the track than the conventional network and trains will therefore need a deployable step to bridge the gap from the train to the platform. The HS2 rolling stock, which is being procured to be compatible with the conventional network, has such a step. The only British trains with similar deployable steps (built for Merseyrail, Greater Anglia and Transport for Wales) are designed for a 915mm platform, so would have a step up to an HS2 platform. All other conventional trains would have an unacceptably large horizontal gap to an HS2 platform. Existing conventional compatible stock is unlikely to comply with other HS2 standards which might prevent access to the HS2 network. Future procurements of rolling stock on the conventional network could be compatible with HS2 infrastructure and platforms if the train is specified to meet HS2 standards and has a deployable step.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 20 December 2021 (HL4859), what is the expected time saving for (1) boarding, and (2) disembarking, at an HS2 station for similar door widths and passenger numbers between (a) an HS2 train, and (b) a standard UK train, using a station with a platform height of 1115mm above rail.

An existing, standard British train would not be compatible with HS2 platforms due to the larger offset and height. Future procurements of ‘standard’ trains would need to adopt the same deployable step arrangement as HS2’s rolling stock to be compatible with both platform positions. If comparing (a) an HS2 train at an 1115mm HS2 platform and (b) a standard train at a 915mm conventional platform, HS2 Ltd predicts that boarding and disembarking for the HS2 train at the 1115mm platform would be up to 30% quicker than the standard train at the 915mm platform given comparable intercity rolling stock and door arrangements. This is because existing intercity trains require two steps upwards from platform to step, and step to vestibule. HS2 trains and platforms will have near-level boarding with only a shallow ramp from platform to vestibule.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 20 December 2021 (HL4859), which stations (1) on HS2 lines, or (2) elsewhere, will have platform heights of 1115mm above rail.

(1) The following HS2 stations will have a platform height of 1115 mm: Euston, Old Oak Common, Birmingham Interchange, Curzon Street. Subject to Royal Assent of draft legislation currently before Parliament, Manchester Airport and Manchester Piccadilly will have the same height.

(2) On the conventional network the Rail Safety and Standards Board (RSSB) standards specify a nominal height of 915mm. Platform heights may vary due to maintenance and historic reasons. Please note that the Crossrail central core and the Heathrow Express both have platforms at 1100mm to facilitate level boarding.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 3 March (HL6222 and HL6223), what are the 18 airports affected by the cancellation of European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Services (EGNOS).

The airports are:

  1. Barra,
  2. Barrow,
  3. Bristol,
  4. Campbelltown,
  5. Cardiff,
  6. Doncaster,
  7. Dundee,
  8. Exeter,
  9. Islay,
  10. Kirkwall,
  11. Lands-End,
  12. Newcastle,
  13. Prestwick,
  14. Southampton,
  15. Sumburgh,
  16. Tiree,
  17. Wick,
  18. Yeovil.
Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 3 March (HL6222 and HL6223), which space-based augmentation systems they are investigating as an alternative to European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Services (EGNOS).

The Government is exploring the possibilities for alternatives to EGNOS, including investing in the initial research and development for a potential UK system. However, it is too early to determine the suitability of a specific solution as a long-term replacement for EGNOS.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will place in the Library of the House a copy of the Terms of Reference for the Independent Examination of the mbpc Wendover Mined Tunnel proposal that was commissioned by the Department for Transport on 3 April 2018.

The independent assessment of the Wendover mined tunnel proposal, and its terms of reference, are not intended for publication and are internal to the Department for Transport.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to prevent Russian (1) registered, or (2) owned, ships from entering or leaving UK ports.

The Secretary of State for Transport wrote to all UK ports on 28 Feb 2022 asking them not to provide access to any Russian flagged, registered, owned, controlled, chartered, or operated vessels.

Legislation has followed this and the Government made Regulations (The Russia (Sanctions) (EU Exit) (Amendment) (No.4) Regulations 2022) on 1 March 2022 which restrict any Russian flagged or registered ship, or any ship owned, operated, controlled or chartered by a person connected to Russia, arriving at a UK port. This was a vital measure to take in response to Russia’s actions in Ukraine and the Government has acted accordingly.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Mar 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that no employers take action against employees with historical or family links with (1) Ukraine, or (2) Russia, and who have a conscientious objection to working on Russian owned or operated ships within any UK port or pilotage area.

The UK recognises that the current situation in Ukraine may raise additional wellbeing issues for some seafarers.

Russian owned or operated vessels are currently prohibited from entering UK ports. In regard to seafarers, Russia has ratified the Maritime Labour Convention and seafarers working on vessels registered with Russia will be protected by its requirements. The Convention provides that notice periods in which an employment agreement may be terminated should be clearly set out. It also requires for provisions to be made where that notice period may be shorter which include for compassionate reasons.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 24 March 2021 (HL14132), when they will announce the process for securing a private sector development partner for the Southern Railway Link to Heathrow Airport.

Government intends to provide an update alongside publication of the Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline, which is expected shortly.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, what assessment they make of the (1) risks, (2) benefits, and (3) timing, when a private sector contribution to a funding bid is offered under the Levelling Up Fund for large transport projects; whether they require the project for which Fund finance is being sought to be delivered through competitive tendering; and where tendering is required, what weighting they give to balancing the outcomes of the tendering processes.

The Department will assess the business cases for all the Levelling Up Fund large transport projects in the same way as we do with other large schemes. This includes an assessment of the risks, benefits and timing of the proposed scheme. The proposed method of procurement will also be assessed; however, procurement is the responsibility of the scheme promoter. Any private sector contribution will need to be underwritten by the scheme promoter.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish the findings of their consultation on Key Route Networks, which ran from 30 July 2021 to 24 September 2021.

On 2 February 2022, the initial outcome of the consultation was announced in the Levelling Up White Paper, which stated that in Mayoral Combined Authority areas, “the UK Government will provide new powers of direction to increase mayors’ control over Key Route Networks.” In addition to this announcement, it is the Department’s plan to publish a summary of responses and Government response in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment have they made of the economic effect on businesses and the local economy in the areas around airports affected by the cancellation of European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Services; and whether they will place a copy of any such assessment in the Library of the House.

The Government’s policy on the UK’s membership of the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) took account of the likely safety and operational impacts on the UK’s aviation sector if the UK withdrew from the EGNOS programme set against the expected cost of more than £30million per annum to the taxpayer of remaining within it.

Whilst there may be operational impacts for operators – such as landing at airports in certain weather conditions - it was assessed that the safety impacts of removal of EGNOS would be minimal given the availability of alternative landing procedures and the requirement for pilots to fly in accordance with the established regulations at the time of their flight.

Although no specific assessment of the possible impact on the wider impact on business and the local economy was undertaken, it was considered that the overall impact on the operations of the 18 UK airports affected, and the communities they serve, would be marginal.

The UK Government is currently exploring the potential options for future participation in space-based augmentation systems which have the potential to cost far less than EGNOS membership.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 11 February (HL5963), what assessment they made of the value of safety of life when deciding not to participate in the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) project.

The Government’s policy on the UK’s membership of the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) took account of the likely safety and operational impacts on the UK’s aviation sector if the UK withdrew from the EGNOS programme set against the expected cost of more than £30million per annum to the taxpayer of remaining within it.

Whilst there may be operational impacts for operators – such as landing at airports in certain weather conditions - it was assessed that the safety impacts of removal of EGNOS would be minimal given the availability of alternative landing procedures and the requirement for pilots to fly in accordance with the established regulations at the time of their flight.

Although no specific assessment of the possible impact on the wider impact on business and the local economy was undertaken, it was considered that the overall impact on the operations of the 18 UK airports affected, and the communities they serve, would be marginal.

The UK Government is currently exploring the potential options for future participation in space-based augmentation systems which have the potential to cost far less than EGNOS membership.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which passenger train operators have prohibited the carriage of e-bikes; when such prohibitions came into effect; and for what reasons.

We are not aware of any current passenger train operators contracted by the Department for Transport prohibiting the carriage of e-cycles, beyond restrictions that apply to all cycles. In the Williams-Shapps Plan for Rail the Government committed to increasing space for cycles on existing trains wherever practically possible and that all future train fleets will need to include more cycle spaces relevant to the markets served. The Government also committed to making it easier to reserve cycle spaces on trains online.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will place a copy of the Environmental Impact Assessment for the proposed HS2 Bromford tunnel extension, currently the subject of a Transport And Works Act Order, in the Library of the House.

HS2 Ltd proposes to take forward the Bromford tunnel extension under powers provided by the High Speed Rail (London to West Midlands) Act 2017. HS2 Ltd has undertaken an environmental screening assessment which has concluded that there are no new or different significant adverse effects resulting from extending the tunnel, beyond those previously assessed in the Phase One Environmental Statement, which can be found online. By placing more of the route underground, there will be a reduction in environmental effects, including reduced impacts on ancient woodland, Park Hall Nature Reserve and the River Tame. There will also be fewer lorry movements. In order to resolve a potential legal inconsistency, HS2 Ltd has recently applied for a Transport and Works Act Order to remove three words from Schedule 1 of the Act.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they will ensure that the (1) noise, (2) dust, and (3) other emissions, from the proposed slurry treatment plant using lime and ferric chloride to process the spoil from the extended HS2 Bromford tunnel, currently the subject of a Transport And Works Act Order application, are (a) fully monitored, and (b) comply with relevant standards as a condition of this work proceeding.

The slurry treatment plant at the Bromford East Portal is subject to an environmental permit application. This permit application sets out how potential impacts associated with noise, dust and vibration will be managed. Once approved, the implementation of this approach, together with the controls set out in the HS2 Code of Construction Practice, will ensure any impacts associated with the activities are appropriately controlled.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultation they undertook on the economic and safety impact of the cancellation of EGNOS; how they assessed these impacts; and whether they will place in the Library of the House any reports and conclusions relating to this cancellation.

During the negotiations leading to the 24 December 2020 EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement, the Government’s policy on the UK’s future membership of the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) was informed by discussions with the UK’s independent airspace and safety regulator, the Civil Aviation Authority. These discussions included considering the likely impacts on the UK’s aviation sector if the UK withdrew from the EGNOS programme set against the costs to the taxpayer of remaining within it. The Government concluded that on balance, continued UK membership of EGNOS represented poor value for the taxpayer.

There are no relevant reports and the Government’s conclusion on participation in EGNOS was set out in the “Guidance on UK involvement in the EU Space Programme” which was published by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy on 31 December 2020.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the banning of (1) e-bikes, and (2) e-scooters, from some train services; what assessment they have made of the impact of such bans on the use of public transport; and what steps they intend to take to ensure that such products using lithium ion batteries sold in the UK are safe.

The carriage of e-bikes, and e-scooters on the National Rail Network is a matter for individual train companies. The Office of Product Safety and Standards at BEIS is responsible for ensuring that imported goods meet safety requirements

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether people who use mobility aids with lithium ion batteries are permitted to travel with them on trains.

Train Operators are required to state in their Accessible Travel Policies, which set out the level of services and facilities disabled passengers can expect, whether they allow the carriage of mobility scooters on their trains. Information on all train operators’ policies on the conveyance of mobility scooters can be found on the National Rail Enquiries website.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 31 January (HL5657), whether they will publish (1) the cost/benefit analysis, and (2) the additional independent analyses, on which they and HS2 Ltd based their decision to build a viaduct rather than a tunnel at Wendover.

The decision to adopt a majority surface route in the Wendover area was supported by the House of Commons Select Committee during the passage of the High Speed Rail (London to West Midlands) Act 2017, who were fully presented with the costs and benefits of the presented options.

The alternative Wendover Mined Tunnel Proposal was subsequently assessed by HS2 Ltd and by independent consultants as being harder and more expensive to construct than the consented scheme. This assessment was provided to the constituency MP and local councillors at the time, and again in February 2020.

The Department does not release information provided in confidence by external suppliers or consultants.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what factors affected their decision to authorise an application for a Transport and Works Act Order to extend Bromford Tunnel as part of Part 1 of HS2, given they have denied a similar request to build a tunnel in place of a viaduct at Wendover on the same route; and whether an independent process is in place to determine if such an application can be made.

The decision to promote an extended tunnel at Bromford, and the decision not to promote a bored tunnel at Wendover, were taken by HS2 Ltd, as scheme developer, based on an analysis of the costs and benefits of each option, and in consultation with the Department for Transport as project sponsor. In the case of Wendover, this decision has been supported by additional independent analyses. The decision to apply for a Transport and Works Order (TWAO), as a legislative vehicle for enabling the extended tunnel at Bromford, was taken by HS2 Ltd and did not require specific authorisation from the Department. The Bromford Tunnel TWAO application was received by the Secretary of State on 20 January 2022 and will now be assessed in accordance with standard TWAO processes and relevant legislation.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to implement the plan they announced on 19 November 2021 to expand the circumstances in which it is illegal to use a hand-held mobile phone while driving.

The Government’s response to the consultation on using a hand-held mobile phone while driving was published in November 2021. The response confirmed that the Government would be implementing the change proposed in the consultation document to broaden the offence of using a hand-held mobile phone while driving so that it captures standalone functions (such as taking a photo or scrolling for music stored on the phone) as well as the interactive communication functions covered now. The Government intends to make the change later this year.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when local authorities who have applied for Mini-Holland funding will be informed whether their applications have been successful.

The Department intends to make an announcement on this matter shortly.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the strengthening of existing laws making it illegal to use a hand-held mobile phone while driving will come into force.

The Government’s response to the consultation on using a hand-held mobile phone while driving was published in November 2021. The response confirmed that the Government would be implementing the change proposed in the consultation document to broaden the offence of using a hand-held mobile phone while driving so that it captures standalone functions (such as taking a photo or scrolling for music stored on the phone) as well as the interactive communication functions covered now. The Government intends to make the change later this year.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will publish the findings of their Pavement parking: options for change consultation, which ran from 31 August 2020 to 22 November 2020.

Ministers are now actively considering the options for addressing pavement parking. We will publish the formal consultation response and announce next steps as soon as possible.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to bring into effect Part 6 of the Traffic Management Act 2004 to allow local authorities outside London to enable school street schemes to be enforced by cameras.

We plan to introduce the regulations early this year, to come into force in the summer. Once the powers are commenced, local authorities wanting to undertake civil enforcement of moving traffic contraventions, including prescribed traffic signs for use at school street schemes, will need to apply to the Secretary of State for an Order to be made designating the council as the enforcement authority in their area.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in developing a cost-effective alternative to the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service to deliver similar or better poor visibility navigational operation.

The exact landing procedures in place at each licensed UK aerodrome can be found in the UK’s Aeronautical Information Publication which is available on the “nats-uk.ead.it” website at no cost.

There are no UK heliports operating scheduled services which have Point in Space approach navigation procedures, but several helicopter operators are in discussions with the Civil Aviation Authority about establishing such procedures.

The UK’s participation in the EGNOS programme ended on 25 June 2021. Since that date no UK airports, other than the three Channel Islands airports, have any arrival procedures in place linked to EGNOS Working Agreements or should be preparing to use them.

There has been no such assessment of the costs to the aviation industry of establishing the EGNOS procedures.

The Government is continuing to assess the impact on the aviation sector of the UK’s withdrawal from the EGNOS programme but has yet to determine whether there needs to be any UK-led EGNOS replacement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the costs incurred by UK airports and operators of installing the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service system.

The exact landing procedures in place at each licensed UK aerodrome can be found in the UK’s Aeronautical Information Publication which is available on the “nats-uk.ead.it” website at no cost.

There are no UK heliports operating scheduled services which have Point in Space approach navigation procedures, but several helicopter operators are in discussions with the Civil Aviation Authority about establishing such procedures.

The UK’s participation in the EGNOS programme ended on 25 June 2021. Since that date no UK airports, other than the three Channel Islands airports, have any arrival procedures in place linked to EGNOS Working Agreements or should be preparing to use them.

There has been no such assessment of the costs to the aviation industry of establishing the EGNOS procedures.

The Government is continuing to assess the impact on the aviation sector of the UK’s withdrawal from the EGNOS programme but has yet to determine whether there needs to be any UK-led EGNOS replacement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which airports have the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) system installed and operational; and which airports are preparing to use EGNOS.

The exact landing procedures in place at each licensed UK aerodrome can be found in the UK’s Aeronautical Information Publication which is available on the “nats-uk.ead.it” website at no cost.

There are no UK heliports operating scheduled services which have Point in Space approach navigation procedures, but several helicopter operators are in discussions with the Civil Aviation Authority about establishing such procedures.

The UK’s participation in the EGNOS programme ended on 25 June 2021. Since that date no UK airports, other than the three Channel Islands airports, have any arrival procedures in place linked to EGNOS Working Agreements or should be preparing to use them.

There has been no such assessment of the costs to the aviation industry of establishing the EGNOS procedures.

The Government is continuing to assess the impact on the aviation sector of the UK’s withdrawal from the EGNOS programme but has yet to determine whether there needs to be any UK-led EGNOS replacement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which heliports operating scheduled flights have Point in Space approach navigation aids.

The exact landing procedures in place at each licensed UK aerodrome can be found in the UK’s Aeronautical Information Publication which is available on the “nats-uk.ead.it” website at no cost.

There are no UK heliports operating scheduled services which have Point in Space approach navigation procedures, but several helicopter operators are in discussions with the Civil Aviation Authority about establishing such procedures.

The UK’s participation in the EGNOS programme ended on 25 June 2021. Since that date no UK airports, other than the three Channel Islands airports, have any arrival procedures in place linked to EGNOS Working Agreements or should be preparing to use them.

There has been no such assessment of the costs to the aviation industry of establishing the EGNOS procedures.

The Government is continuing to assess the impact on the aviation sector of the UK’s withdrawal from the EGNOS programme but has yet to determine whether there needs to be any UK-led EGNOS replacement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Jan 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government which UK airports that operate scheduled flights have operational instrument landing systems, either using (1) Global Navigation Satellite System, or (2) land based Instrument Landing Systems; and which have neither system.

The exact landing procedures in place at each licensed UK aerodrome can be found in the UK’s Aeronautical Information Publication which is available on the “nats-uk.ead.it” website at no cost.

There are no UK heliports operating scheduled services which have Point in Space approach navigation procedures, but several helicopter operators are in discussions with the Civil Aviation Authority about establishing such procedures.

The UK’s participation in the EGNOS programme ended on 25 June 2021. Since that date no UK airports, other than the three Channel Islands airports, have any arrival procedures in place linked to EGNOS Working Agreements or should be preparing to use them.

There has been no such assessment of the costs to the aviation industry of establishing the EGNOS procedures.

The Government is continuing to assess the impact on the aviation sector of the UK’s withdrawal from the EGNOS programme but has yet to determine whether there needs to be any UK-led EGNOS replacement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what commitment they have received from Manchester Airport to fund the proposed HS2 station for that city.

The Government remains supportive of a HS2 station at Manchester Airport, however the construction of this station and its inclusion in the final scheme remains subject to agreeing an appropriate local funding contribution. The Department have been, and continues to, work positively with Greater Manchester Local Authorities and Manchester Airport Group (MAG) on this matter.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the importance of retaining the sleeper train between Penzance and London to the economy of the South West.

The Department for Transport last sought the public’s views on the Great Western franchise in the consultation starting in November 2017. The response, published in August 2018, did not identify specific issues or concerns about the London-Penzance sleeper service.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the estimated cost of the Western Rail Link to Heathrow; and how much of that cost will be contributed by Heathrow Airport.

The total nominal capital cost for the Western Rail Link to Heathrow, in 2018 prices, is estimated at around £1.5bn to construct the rail link between Heathrow Airport Station and the Great Western Main Line. For the scheme to proceed, the Government has been clear that Heathrow Airport Limited would need to secure and provide an acceptable financial contribution.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the HS2 contract awarded to a Hitachi and Alstom joint-venture, (1) what estimate they have made of the number passenger seats that will be provided in each train, and (2) what provision there will be for passengers travelling with bicycles.

The number of seats and other interior provisions were described in the Invitation to Tender documentation published in April 2017. The exact details will be refined over the next year before the detailed design commences in conjunction with the West Coast Partner.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the HS2 contract awarded to a Hitachi and Alstom joint-venture, whether there will be two separate types of train, (a) classic compatible trains, and (b) trains dedicated to high-speed lines.

The 54 trains contracted from the Joint venture are conventional compatible trains only.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the HS2 contract awarded to a Hitachi and Alstom joint-venture, which stations the trains delivered by that contract will serve; which platforms within these stations will also be served by trains operating on Network Rail tracks; and what station platform heights will be used for trains delivered from the contract.

The 54 trains contracted will be able to operate on the HS2 infrastructure as well as the conventional network primarily to serve the routes on the West Coast.

The exact train service will be defined at a later date by the West Coast Partner.

The stations on the HS2 infrastructure will offer street to train seat step free, with a platform height of 1115mm.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial checks they made before awarding grants to each of the cross-Solent ferry operators during the temporary suspension of competition law due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

From April 2020 – April 2021 the Government made a series of grant payments to the Isle of Wight Council and Council of the Isles of Scilly to safeguard lifeline services. In total over £8 million of funding was provided to the Isle of Wight Council for the cross-Solent ferry operators and over £7.5 million to the Council of the Isles of Scilly for Isles of Scilly operators. These grants were paid to the local authorities for the provision of lifeline services, as set out within the conditions of the Memorandum of Understanding agreements made between the individual Councils and the Department for Transport. They were returnable under specific conditions being met.

Before grant payments were provided to the Councils, the Department, alongside external financial advisors, undertook rigorous financial checks to ensure the levels of funding were appropriate. This included analysis of the operator’s financial reports, which included data on the revenue and costs of operating the agreed routes to the minimum service level. Throughout the duration of the scheme, regular checks and monitoring took place to ensure the continued need for support.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what grants were made to each of the (1) cross-Solent ferry operators, and (2) Isles of Scilly operators, during the temporary suspension of competition law due to the COVID-19 pandemic; what restrictions, if any, were placed on the grants; and whether they were non-returnable.

From April 2020 – April 2021 the Government made a series of grant payments to the Isle of Wight Council and Council of the Isles of Scilly to safeguard lifeline services. In total over £8 million of funding was provided to the Isle of Wight Council for the cross-Solent ferry operators and over £7.5 million to the Council of the Isles of Scilly for Isles of Scilly operators. These grants were paid to the local authorities for the provision of lifeline services, as set out within the conditions of the Memorandum of Understanding agreements made between the individual Councils and the Department for Transport. They were returnable under specific conditions being met.

Before grant payments were provided to the Councils, the Department, alongside external financial advisors, undertook rigorous financial checks to ensure the levels of funding were appropriate. This included analysis of the operator’s financial reports, which included data on the revenue and costs of operating the agreed routes to the minimum service level. Throughout the duration of the scheme, regular checks and monitoring took place to ensure the continued need for support.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that South West Trains provide passengers with the ability to buy all types of train tickets from Ryde Pierhead station.

Ryde Pierhead station is not subject to Schedule 17 of the Ticketing and Services Agreement and ticketing provision remains a matter for South Western Railway. Rail ticketing for Ryde Pierhead station is currently carried out by South Western Railway through their partnership with WightLink, with a range of tickets available to passengers. My officials are working closely with South Western Railway to ensure that passengers travelling from stations on the Isle of Wight have access to a range of fare types.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what information they hold on the (1) frequency, (2) cost, and (3) reliability, of cross-Solent ferry services for each of the last five years.

The Department for Transport, alongside the Isle of Wight Council, monitors the performance of the cross-Solent ferry operators. The operators frequently publish their own data on reliability of their services, which the Department reviews. The frequency and cost of their services can also be seen from their publicly accessible timetables.

The Department’s analysis has consistently found that the three cross-Solent operators offer a good range of services at effective prices, including for those travelling for NHS treatments on the mainland. During the pandemic, a key reason behind the Department providing financial support to safeguard lifeline services was to ensure that residents could continue to travel for mainland NHS treatment. An example of effective services for those needing urgent medical treatment on the mainland can be found with Hovertravel’s rapid NHS transfer. This service, established during the lifeline support scheme alongside the Isle of Wight Ambulance Service and the Isle of Wight NHS Trust, continues to support those needing medical care on the Mainland.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations, if any, they have made to the three cross-Solent ferry operators, to ensure that Isle of Wight residents travelling for NHS treatment on the mainland are able to book ferry travel at relevant and convenient times.

The Department for Transport, alongside the Isle of Wight Council, monitors the performance of the cross-Solent ferry operators. The operators frequently publish their own data on reliability of their services, which the Department reviews. The frequency and cost of their services can also be seen from their publicly accessible timetables.

The Department’s analysis has consistently found that the three cross-Solent operators offer a good range of services at effective prices, including for those travelling for NHS treatments on the mainland. During the pandemic, a key reason behind the Department providing financial support to safeguard lifeline services was to ensure that residents could continue to travel for mainland NHS treatment. An example of effective services for those needing urgent medical treatment on the mainland can be found with Hovertravel’s rapid NHS transfer. This service, established during the lifeline support scheme alongside the Isle of Wight Ambulance Service and the Isle of Wight NHS Trust, continues to support those needing medical care on the Mainland.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the estimated cost of (1) electrification, and (2) other improvements, for projects included in the Integrated Rail Plan relating to the (a) Midland Main Line, and (b) TransPennine, line upgrades.

Within the £96 billion set out in the Integrated Rail Plan, £1.4 billion has been allowed for electrifying the Midland Main Line; £5.4 billion has been allowed for the Transpennine Route Upgrade (TRU) base scope, including full electrification; £17.2 billion has been allowed for the Northern Powerhouse Rail core network from Liverpool to York which includes the TRU Option G enhancement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the (1) ownership, and (2) sponsoring, structure for the improvements outlined in the Integrated Rail Plan; and what is the involvement of (a) Network Rail, (b) HS2 Ltd, (c) The Northern Powerhouse, and (d) Transport for the North; and what consultation they intend to undertake on the Plan.

The Department will ask Network Rail to lead work, with input from HS2 Ltd, on schemes to upgrade the conventional existing rail network and option assessment on how best to take HS2 trains to Leeds.

HS2 Ltd is progressing the Western Leg hybrid Bill and will prepare legislation for the proposed high speed route from the West Midlands to the East Midlands. It is also expected to lead the next stages of work on the new line sections of Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR).

Transport for the North will continue to fulfil an important role on the NPR programme providing strategic advice and direction to the programme in line with their core statutory function through a joint sponsor role.

The Department will seek to engage representatives from the North and Midlands, including the Northern Powerhouse Partnership, throughout the development of the work outlined in the Integrated Rail Plan.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will place in the Library of the House a comparison of journey times for travel between Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, York and Hull, using the options included in the Integrated Rail Plan.

The Integrated Rail Plan (IRP) includes journey time information between Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, York and Hull and has been stored in the Library of the House. IRP proposals will reduce journey times between Manchester and Leeds by 22 minutes, Liverpool and Manchester by 15 minutes and Liverpool and Leeds by 33 minutes. Trains from Hull and York to Manchester and Liverpool will also see faster journey times.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government which parts of HS2 Phase 2B have been cancelled.

As set out in the Integrated Rail Plan we will take forward the Phase 2b Western Leg. We will also progress a new high speed line to the East Midlands and electrify the Midland Mainline, enabling HS2 trains reach Nottingham, Derby and Sheffield. We are investing £100 million in development work on the West Yorkshire mass transit system, as well as looking at the most effective way to run HS2 trains to Leeds.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the latest (1) capital cost, (2) revenue forecasts, and (3) Benefit-Cost Ratio, assumed in the continuing use of HS2 Phase 1 and 2A, (a) with, and (b) without, the inclusion of HS2 Phase 2B West.

As noted in the most recent Parliamentary Report, the overall Phase One cost is estimated in the range of £35bn to £45bn, with a Target Cost established of £40.3bn (2019 prices). The overall Phase 2a cost is currently estimated as in the range of £5-7bn (2019 prices). The Department will be updating the Strategic Outline Business Case for Phase 2b Western Leg which will include a refresh of the Phase 1 and 2a assessment published in April 2020. This will be published alongside the deposit of the Western Leg hybrid bill.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the forecast of passenger demand growth used in the preparation of the Integrated Rail Plan for (1) local, and (2) long, distance services; and what account have they taken of the changes in demand caused by COVID-19.

The Government’s key assumption is that rail demand will continue to grow but passenger demand over the period between now and 2050 is inevitably uncertain. However, the Government agrees with the NIC that the pandemic is unlikely to put an end to the need to travel between our towns and cities over the longer term. Our adaptive approach towards the core network enables us to respond to any future uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and the investments being considered here are long term, and typically take a decade or more to deliver.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 22 November (HL3917), whether they will place in the Library of the House a copy of the Options Assessment Report produced by the Council of the Isles of Scilly regarding passenger and freight vehicles.

The Council of the Isles of Scilly scheme is a larger transport scheme (over £20m) and so is subject to further business case requirements, as set out in the Levelling Up Fund Technical Note. Officials from the Department for Transport have been in contact with the Council of the Isles of Scilly to discuss further business case requirements which will involve development of the business case over the coming months. It would not be appropriate for the Department to publish specific elements of this bid at this time due to the ongoing development of the Council of the Isles of Scilly business case, as disclosure could prejudice the commercial interests of any party.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Phase One HS2 enabling works covering (1) gas, (2) water, (3) telecommunications, and (4) electricity, have been (a) approved in principle, (b) approved in full, and (c) completed.

HS2 Ltd has advised that out of 912 overall diversions on Phase One, 526 are (a) agreed in principle, 221 (b) approved in full, and 128 (c) complete. These figures can be broken down into (1) gas, (2) water, (3) telecommunications, and (4) electricity as per the below.

Agreements in Principle

  1. Gas 47
  2. Water 190
  3. Telecommunications 166
  4. Electricity 123

Total 526

Approved in full

  1. Gas 34
  2. Water 80
  3. Telecommunications 33
  4. Electricity 74

Total 221

Works complete

  1. Gas 31
  2. Water 29
  3. Telecommunications 19
  4. Electricity 49

Total 128

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment has been made of the impact of Ultra Low Emissions Zones towards meeting climate change targets; and whether any such assessments have been broken down into individual zones.

Local Authorities have the powers to implement charging zones in order to achieve environmental objectives, but the Government has not carried out an assessment of the impacts of implementing such zones to meet climate change targets.

The Government is working with a number of local authorities to bring local roads to within legal limits for NO2 pollution. A number of these local authorities are implementing Clean Air Zones to achieve this aim, but the primary objective of these zones is to reduce localised NO2 concentrations rather than specifically targeting greenhouse gas emissions reductions. The Government’s assessment of the impact of Clean Air Zones in 2017 estimated a reduction in CO2 emissions of 0.2 MtCO2 over the life of the programme. Where Local Authorities are implementing a Clean Air Zone they are carrying out their own assessment.

The Low Emission Zones and Ultra Low Emission Zones in London were implemented by the Mayor of London, who is therefore responsible for estimating and assessing its impacts.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the announcement of a £48 million award to the Council of the Isles of Scilly for passenger and freight vessels, what assurances, if any, have been made by the Council to the Government on (1) the operating timetables for the vessels, (2) the passenger fares, and (3) freight charges; and what remedies are available if any such assurances are not achieved.

The Council of the Isles of Scilly submitted a full application which included an Options Assessment Report. The Department for Transport reviewed these documents through a detailed assessment process. The process was set out in full in the Fund’s Technical and Explanatory Notes published on GOV.UK. Officials from the Department for Transport will be writing to the Council of the Isles of Scilly to discuss further business case requirements, as set out in the Fund’s technical note and FAQs published on GOV.UK.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the announcement of a £48 million award to the Council of the Isles of Scilly for passenger and freight vessels, who will own the vessels; how much private sector finance has been committed; whether the Council had to put the operation of the vessels out to competitive tender; whether an Option Assessment Report was provided; and, if such a report was provided, whether they will place a copy in the Library of the House.

The Council of the Isles of Scilly submitted a full application which included an Options Assessment Report. The Department for Transport reviewed these documents through a detailed assessment process. The process was set out in full in the Fund’s Technical and Explanatory Notes published on GOV.UK. Officials from the Department for Transport will be writing to the Council of the Isles of Scilly to discuss further business case requirements, as set out in the Fund’s technical note and FAQs published on GOV.UK.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what precedents, if any, there are for capital cost awards of over £25 million for publicly-funded transport operations.

The Department’s capital budget is for spend on transport infrastructure and is therefore not spent on the costs of operating the transport system. However, the Department does provide some capital funding to transport operators, such as train operating companies, to spend towards infrastructure investments such as depots and car parks.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their announcement that UK drivers who passed their test after 1 January 1997 will no longer be required to take a specialist test to tow a trailer of up to 3,500 kilograms, what were the reasons for this change; and what assessment have they made of the safety implications of the change.

In September, the Government implemented changes to streamline the HGV driver testing process and free up more examiner capacity. With regards to the removal of B+E requirement, car drivers will no longer need to take another test to tow a trailer or caravan which will allow around 30,000 extra HGV driving tests to be conducted every year.

Road safety remains of paramount importance, and we are already working with training providers developing options for an industry-led accreditation scheme for trailer training. This could offer a standardised training and assessment approach for any driver wishing to tow a trailer, keeping driving and towing skills current and of a high standard. There is insufficient evidence to demonstrate that competence and skills will worsen if drivers do not take a statutory test to tow a trailer.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 4 November (HL3335), what are the reasons for the reduction in the number of HS2 platforms at Euston Station from 11 to 10.

As stated in the latest HS2 six-monthly report to Parliament published on 20 October 2021, in response to a recommendation from the Oakervee Review about looking into the efficiency of the Euston station, the move to a smaller, simpler 10-platform station design at Euston will provide a more efficient design and delivery strategy, and play a significant role in mitigating the affordability pressures recently identified.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 4 November (HL3335), how many trains per hour are planned from Euston to operate on HS2 Phase (1) 1, (2) 2a, and (3) 2b east.

No decisions have yet been taken on the train services that will operate after HS2 services start running. These decisions will be taken nearer the time, drawing on advice from West Coast Partnership Development and Network Rail, and will be subject to public consultation.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 4 November (HL3335), how many deep piles from buildings on the line of HS2 tunnels between Euston and Old Oak Common have been identified.

Studies completed have not identified any deep piles from buildings in direct conflict with the HS2 tunnels between Old Oak Common and Euston. The tunnels between Old Oak Common and Euston will be constructed using tunnel boring machines designed to minimise any impact on buildings and monitoring of the buildings will be undertaken during the tunnelling works.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 4 November (HL3335), whether a grade separation design on the Euston approaches is still required; and if so, which one.

A grade separated junction is required on the approach to the Euston HS2 Station. The grade separation is achieved by the provision of a tunnelled Crossover Cavern on the Euston approaches which allows the Upline trains to pass under the Downline trains in separate tunnels.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Nov 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 4 November (HL3335), whether the total number of trains planned for HS2 at Euston has changed since the publication of High Speed Two: From Concept to Reality on 17 July 2017.

No decisions have yet been taken on the train services that will operate after HS2 services start running. These decisions will be taken nearer the time, drawing on advice from West Coast Partnership Development and Network Rail, and will be subject to public consultation.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to meet parliamentarians to discuss the construction of a viaduct rather than a tunnel for HS2 in Wendover.

The scheme at Wendover is being constructed as set out in the High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) Act 2017. The scheme design and plans were subject to significant Parliamentary scrutiny through the hybrid Bill process and include two viaducts to the south of Wendover and a tunnel to the west of the village itself.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many station platforms are planned at Euston Station within the revised station design for (1) Network Rail Services, and (2) HS2 services.

The HS2 Station at Euston is planned to have 10 platforms.

The Network Rail Station at Euston currently has 16 platforms.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many cyclists who do not have a vehicle driving licence participate in e-scooter trials.

In the UK, e-scooters are classed in law as a type of motor vehicle, therefore, all users of e-scooters in approved rental trial areas are required to hold a driving licence (a provisional as a minimum).

When hiring an e-scooter, the user is required to demonstrate that they are eligible to ride and do so by showing relevant identification.

E-scooters in approved rental trial areas are permitted in geographical areas agreed between the local authority, operator and the Department. They are permitted on roads and in cycle lanes within that area but not on the pavement. Local authorities and operators are able to add additional local controls, using geofencing technology, to exclude e-scooters from places considered inappropriate for their use, such as pedestrianised areas. Shared bike and electric bike schemes in England are largely unregulated and are able to operate across a larger geographical area.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the difference between (1) the locations where e-scooters are permitted to be ridden, and (2) locations where electric or non-electric cycles are allowed to be ridden.

In the UK, e-scooters are classed in law as a type of motor vehicle, therefore, all users of e-scooters in approved rental trial areas are required to hold a driving licence (a provisional as a minimum).

When hiring an e-scooter, the user is required to demonstrate that they are eligible to ride and do so by showing relevant identification.

E-scooters in approved rental trial areas are permitted in geographical areas agreed between the local authority, operator and the Department. They are permitted on roads and in cycle lanes within that area but not on the pavement. Local authorities and operators are able to add additional local controls, using geofencing technology, to exclude e-scooters from places considered inappropriate for their use, such as pedestrianised areas. Shared bike and electric bike schemes in England are largely unregulated and are able to operate across a larger geographical area.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why people hiring an e-scooter are required to show (1) a passport, or (2) other approved identity, when this is not a requirement for those hiring electric cycles.

In the UK, e-scooters are classed in law as a type of motor vehicle, therefore, all users of e-scooters in approved rental trial areas are required to hold a driving licence (a provisional as a minimum).

When hiring an e-scooter, the user is required to demonstrate that they are eligible to ride and do so by showing relevant identification.

E-scooters in approved rental trial areas are permitted in geographical areas agreed between the local authority, operator and the Department. They are permitted on roads and in cycle lanes within that area but not on the pavement. Local authorities and operators are able to add additional local controls, using geofencing technology, to exclude e-scooters from places considered inappropriate for their use, such as pedestrianised areas. Shared bike and electric bike schemes in England are largely unregulated and are able to operate across a larger geographical area.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government why people hiring an e-scooter are required to have a valid driving licence for a motor vehicle.

In the UK, e-scooters are classed in law as a type of motor vehicle, therefore, all users of e-scooters in approved rental trial areas are required to hold a driving licence (a provisional as a minimum).

When hiring an e-scooter, the user is required to demonstrate that they are eligible to ride and do so by showing relevant identification.

E-scooters in approved rental trial areas are permitted in geographical areas agreed between the local authority, operator and the Department. They are permitted on roads and in cycle lanes within that area but not on the pavement. Local authorities and operators are able to add additional local controls, using geofencing technology, to exclude e-scooters from places considered inappropriate for their use, such as pedestrianised areas. Shared bike and electric bike schemes in England are largely unregulated and are able to operate across a larger geographical area.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what, if any, funding (1) they, or (2) the EU, have (a) provided to, or (b) earmarked for, the Isles of Scilly Steamship Group in connection with its work on developing plans for a new shipping vessel.

The Department for Transport is not aware of any UK Government or EU funding which has been provided or earmarked for the Isles of Scilly Steamship Group, in connection with developing plans for a new shipping vessel.

The Council of the Isles of Scilly have submitted a bid through the Levelling Up Fund, which includes the replacement of the existing freight and passenger vessels operated by the Isles of Scilly Steamship Group. Bids are currently undergoing assessment, with Ministers expected to announce successful bids in the autumn.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have (1) to reduce kilometres travelled by car by 20 per cent by 2030, (2) to end the sale of fossil fuel-powered cars and vans by 2030, (3) to end the sale of fossil fuel HGVs by 2035, and (4) to introduce road user charges.

Our recently published ‘Decarbonising Transport: A Better, Greener Britain’ committed to delivering the necessary emissions reductions in road transport to reach net zero by 2050. It is not about stopping people doing things. Rather, we want to drive the transition to electric vehicles and put in place a range of alternatives for people to make more sustainable journeys.

As part of this, we are phasing out the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans by 2030, and, from 2035, all new cars and vans must be zero emissions at the tailpipe. We are also consulting on phase out dates for the sale of new non-zero emission HGVs, which includes all fossil-fuelled HGVs, to ensure that our road freight fleet will be zero emission by 2050. The consultation closed on 3rd September and we are now considering responses.

Government has no current policy on introducing road user charges. As stated in the Transport Decarbonisation Plan, as we move forward with the transition to zero emission vehicles, we will need to ensure that the tax system encourages the uptake of EVs and that revenue from motoring taxes keeps pace with this change, to ensure we can continue to fund the first-class public services and infrastructure that people and families across the UK expect.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have (1) to decarbonise the rail network by 2035, (2) to shift 25 per cent of freight from road to rail by 2030, and (3) to end the sale of fossil fuel-powered ships and decarbonise existing ships by the mid-2030s.

Our recently published ‘Decarbonising Transport: A Better, Greener Britain’ committed to delivering a net zero rail network by 2050, with sustained carbon reductions in rail along the way, and stated our ambition to remove all diesel-only trains (passenger and freight) from the network by 2040.

The Government continues to support the modal shift of freight from road to rail due to rail freight’s better environmental performance and its contribution to alleviating congestion on Britain’s roads. The Government committed to setting a growth target in its Transport Decarbonisation Plan, and in the Williams-Shapps Plan for Rail, however there is no specific target for moving freight from road to rail by 2030. Further details about the rail freight growth target, including timings, will be confirmed in due course and Government will be working closely with industry partners to develop the target.

The Government continues to incentivise modal shift through the Mode Shift Revenue Support scheme, a £20 million scheme in 2021/22, which supports the carriage of freight by rail and water on routes where road haulage has a financial advantage. Additionally, the Government invests significantly in the rail network to improve its capability and capacity for freight. Between 2014-2019, the Government invested over £235 million in the Strategic Freight Network and further infrastructure funding is being made available going forward through the Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline (RNEP).

The Transport Decarbonisation Plan also sets out our commitment to consult on potential measures to phase out the sale of new, non-zero emission domestic vessels, building on the pathway set out in the 2019 Clean Maritime Plan. Internationally, the UK has played a key role in the development of the International Maritime Organization’s strategy for climate change, and we will be pushing for a zero emissions international shipping industry by 2050 in future negotiations.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the Scottish Government's Mission Zero for transport decarbonisation policy; and what plans they have, if any, to implement similar policies.

Our Transport Decarbonisation Plan explores many similar themes to the Scottish Government’s Mission Zero and sets out a credible, deliverable pathway to net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, as well as delivering transport’s contribution to demanding carbon budgets along the way. We will continue to review the Plan’s progress in light of emerging evidence and have committed to updating it every five years.

We will engage closely with Devolved Administrations in delivery of the Plan, respecting areas of devolved competency, as we jointly work towards our shared goals of decarbonising transport across the UK and achieving net zero UK-wide.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
4th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the Department for Transport Acceleration Unit’s (1) current work programme, (2) staffing number, and (3) annual budget; and what are its achievements to date.

Since its launch in October 2020, the Acceleration Unit has supported programme and policy teams to speed up the delivery of infrastructure projects and the implementation of new policy initiatives. The work of the Acceleration Unit is driven by the need to build back better, to level up the country and to decarbonise transport.

Key achievements to date have included challenging delivery of the Restoring Your Railways programme, including the Dartmoor Line reopening and Northumberland Line; supporting the development of the National Bus Strategy, published on time in March 2021; working with DfT’s arms-length bodies on the development of modal acceleration programmes.

The currently work programme includes acceleration oversight on a portfolio of 112 projects in the north through the Northern Transport Acceleration Council; ongoing challenge on the Restoring Your Railways programme; and supporting acceleration of the Manchester & Northwest Rail Transformation Programme to bring forward benefits to passengers in the north earlier.

The Acceleration Unit is currently made up of three members of staff.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Sep 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, with respect to vehicles colliding with railway bridges, (1) how many instances were reported in the last five years, (2) how many reported instances resulted in delays to trains of (a) up to six, (b) up to 12, and (c) over 24, hours, (3) what overall compensation was due to operators and passengers, (4) in how many instances the vehicle operator was prosecuted, (5) what was the range of penalties imposed, and (6) what plans they have to review the related liabilities and offences.

The total number of bridge strikes in past 5 years can be found in the table below:

Financial Year

Number of bridge strikes

2015/16

1863

2016/17

1878

2017/18

2019

2018/19

1937

2019/20

1728

2020/21

1624

Network Rail’s statistics report all delay and cancellation minutes for all the services affected by a specific bridge strike; they are not divided up for delays on individual journeys. The average delay and cancellation minutes attributed to bridge strike events for 2020/21 is 42 minutes, down from 273 minutes in 2019/20, partly due to reduced network operations. The Schedule 8 compensation costs for delays and cancellations due to bridge strikes are £5.5 million for 2020/21, down from £11.5 million in 2019/20, again due in part to reduced network operations.

Information pertaining to prosecutions and the range of penalties imposed upon prosecuted drivers are not held by the Department for Transport. Any plans to review the related liabilities and offences would be a matter for the Ministry of Justice.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to changes to travel patterns caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, what plans they have to review the forecasts in their report HS2 Phase One full business case, published on 15 April 2020, specifically the findings that (1) passenger demand between (a) London and Birmingham/Coventry, and (b) London and Manchester/Stockport/Manchester Airport would grow by over 80 per cent, and (2) passenger demand between London and Glasgow would more than double, by 2036–7.

The impact of COVID on demand for travel continues to unfold, and the Department is undertaking research and surveys to develop demand scenarios and understand possible impacts on business cases across the transport portfolio.

The Phase 2b Western Leg strategic outline business case, due to be published in early 2022, will use demand scenarios that explore the impact of COVID to inform the business case. This will be the first time an initial assessment of the pandemic’s impact on the HS2 project will have been undertaken.

HS2 is a long-term project and delivers travel opportunities over a long period of time (i.e. in excess of 100 years), limiting any shorter-term effects of COVID on travel patterns. The project will open up new employment and regeneration opportunities for millions of people, contribute to regional and national economic development, and have long-lasting impacts which we are not able to fully model or appraise.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Aug 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether in their regular updates to Domestic transport use by mode: Great Britain, since 1 March 2020 they will provide separate data for the rail sector on passenger and freight traffic to match the data on cars, light commercial vehicles, HGVs, London buses, and buses outside London, provided for the road sector.

This publication table makes public the high-level metrics used by the Cabinet Office for monitoring COVID-19 response which focus on the behaviour of the travelling public. These metrics do not include rail freight. Road goods vehicles are included in these metrics as they contribute to total road transport demand, and thereby impact upon car users’ experience of the transport network.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the current percentage of carbon dioxide emissions attributed to (1) road, (2) rail, (3) air, and (4) shipping, including any UK share on international routes.

The most recent confirmed greenhouse gas statistics, for transport in 2019, attribute 66% of emissions to road transport, 1% to rail, 23% to domestic and international aviation, and 8% to domestic and international shipping.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they plan to deliver for each mode of transport their commitment to Net Zero Carbon outlined in their Transport Decarbonisation Plan, published on 14 July.

The Transport Decarbonisation Plan – “Decarbonising transport: a better, greener Britain” sets out the Government’s commitments and a series of actions and timings, to achieve net zero emissions across all modes of transport by 2050. We will continue to work with stakeholders across the sector, devolved administrations, local authorities and other regions as we implement the plan.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the delays of Crossrail 1, (1) what were the reasons that the delay announced in August 2018 was not sufficient to prevent the subsequent announcement in July 2021 of a further delay to the opening date of the railway, (2) what assessment they have made of the capacity of Crossrail and its owners to provide reliable forecasts for the project, (3) what was the estimated total cost of the project in April 2019, (4) what estimate they have made of the expected cost of the project by June 2022, (5) what lessons they have learned with regard to the timely forecasting of completion dates, and (6) how they are applying any lessons learnt to other major transport projects, such as HS2.

In October 2020, the governance of Crossrail transferred over to Transport for London (TfL). As part of the governance transition, the Crossrail Sponsor Board was replaced and the Mayor of London, who chairs the TfL Board, established a new Special Purpose Committee of the TfL Board, called the Elizabeth Line Committee (ELC). The ELC is chaired by the Deputy Mayor for Transport and provides high-level oversight of the Crossrail project. DfT remains a joint sponsor and retains oversight of and scrutiny of the programme and DfT has a Special Representative on the ELC.

The Transport Commissioner is responsible for delivering the project and intended benefits. TfL is responsible for providing reliable forecasts for the project. Crossrail Limited remains a wholly owned subsidiary of TfL.

In August 2018, Crossrail Limited announced a delay to the opening of the Elizabeth line. CRL stated that the reasons for this delay was due to more time being needed by contractors to complete fit-out activity in the central tunnels and the development of railway systems software, and that testing had started but further time was required to complete the full range of integrated tests.

The most recent announcement was in August 2020, when Crossrail Limited stated that the central section between Paddington and Abbey Wood would be ready to open the first half of 2022. Crossrail announced that the schedule delay was due to lower than planned productivity in the final completion and handover of the shafts and portals and revisions to the schedule assumptions for the completion of the new stations. Crossrail also incurred additional costs and delays as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic.

In April 2019, Crossrail Limited’s total estimate costs for the project was £17.6 billion. Crossrail Limited’s current forecast cost of completing the programme is up to £18.9 billion. This includes Network Rail On-Network Costs for the surface works but excludes the cost of procuring new trains and depot.

The Department is committed to applying the lessons learned on Crossrail to other major projects, including HS2. In April 2019, the Department co-published a report with the Infrastructure and Project Authority (IPA). This identified a number of practical lessons, building on the experience of Crossrail, across five major themes.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether all new motor vehicles will be sold with automatic speed limiters from 2022.

There are no proposals for mandating speed limiters on all new vehicles in the UK. Vehicles sold in Northern Ireland will be required to have speed warning systems, known as Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA), installed on all new registrations from July 2024. The Department for Transport is currently considering a package of new vehicle technologies, which includes ISA, that are designed to aid road safety. We will consider whether to make these technologies compulsory in new vehicles sold here once the new GB type approval scheme is in place. This is scheduled to be ready by mid-2022.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Vehicle speed compliance statistics for Great Britain: 2020, published on 13 July, which found that 56 per cent of car drivers and 58 per cent of van drivers broke the 30mph speed limit, what steps they intend to take to reduce levels of speeding.

The Government believes that any form of dangerous or inconsiderate driving behaviour is a serious road safety issue. All available research shows a link between excessive speed and the risk of collisions.

We expect all drivers to observe the speed limit, and enforcement is a matter for the police. Policing of our roads, and how available resources are deployed, is the responsibility of individual chief officers, taking into account the specific local issues.

Last July, the Department for Transport launched a Call for Evidence, as part of a wider Roads Policing Review, a thorough examination of roads policing in England and Wales and its relevance to road safety. Responses to the Call for Evidence have been analysed and the Government response is currently being prepared for publication. The response will address the key points raised by respondents, including feedback on speed enforcement.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans, if any, they have to inform drivers who have stopped in the emergency area of a motorway of the requirement to use the emergency phones to ask permission to re-join the carriageway; and what penalties, if any, may be applied to drivers who fail to notify the appropriate body of their intention to re-join the motorway.

When a driver stops in an emergency area on an All Lane Running (ALR) motorway, Highways England provide an emergency roadside telephone and information on seeking assistance. This information is provided on a sign located next to the emergency telephone in every emergency area on the ALR sections of the Strategic Road Network (SRN). The updated Highway Code due to be published later this year will include reference to this sign for the first time (Rule 278).

There is no specific statutory offence linked to the content of the sign, that is, it is not mandatory for drivers to phone Highways England and ask permission before re-joining the main carriageway.

When re-joining the motorway from an emergency area, it is a driver’s responsibility to do in an appropriate manner, when safe to do so. However, Highways England operators can provide advice and practical support to drivers in re-joining the main carriageway, including monitoring CCTV, setting a red X lane closure and if necessary, dispatching Traffic Officers to assist on scene.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what analysis, if any, they have undertaken in the last five years on the number of people who read the Highway Code; and how many rules are contained in the most recent version of the Code.

The Department for Transport has not conducted any dedicated analysis in the last 5 years on the number of people who read the Highway Code.

Other organisations publish the Highway Code under The National Archives’ open Government Licence. Each year 2.1 million people study and are tested on driving theory, which requires a thorough knowledge of the Highway Code, Know Your Traffic Signs and Driving – The Essential Skills. There are many resources to educate learners from a range of providers, but a survey by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency in 2019 found that 84% of the 16-24 years olds asked said they had read the Highway Code as part of their study.

Sales of official publications of the Highway Code as a book, app or download record 1,313,438 copy sales and downloads in the past 5 years, each of which might be read, passed on or lent out in the case of library copies a number of times.

In the same period 3,673,515 driving theory product sales and downloads were recorded, educating people in the Highway Code and the other official sources. Analytics for the Highway Code on gov.uk show 18,189,854 page views for this period.

There are currently 307 rules contained within the Highway Code.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 25 March (HL14250), why the Department for Transport's Permanent Secretary, Bernadette Kelly, stated in a letter to the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee of 22 June, "we do not recognise the £1.7 billion figure"; what is the new recognised figure; and what are the reasons for this change.

The Department’s second bi-annual update to Parliament on 23 March 2021 provided an update on the progress of HS2 including the current cost pressures and the contingency that is available to accommodate them if they do materialise. We will provide a further update in the next bi-annual report.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the reply by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 15 June (HL Deb col 1767), what plans they have to compensate suppliers and customers, including in the air travel and holiday let sectors, who lost money because of changes to COVID-19 restrictions made at short notice which prevented delivery of the service without breaking the law.

The Government recognises the challenging times the air transport and tourism, leisure and hospitality sectors have faced due to COVID-19. The industries have drawn on an unprecedented package of economic measures which we have put in place. We estimate that by the end of September 2021, the air transport sector (airlines, airports and related services) will have benefitted from approximately £7bn of Government support since the start of the pandemic. Over £25bn has been provided to the tourism, leisure and hospitality sectors, which includes holiday lets, in the form of grants, loans and tax breaks.

Consumers are legally entitled to a refund within a reasonable time when operators cancel.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the legislation required to implement the Williams-Shapps Plan for Rail will repeal the (1) Railways Act 1993, (2) Railways Act 2005, and (3) Railways (Access, Management and Licensing of Railway Undertakings) Regulations 2016.

There is much we can do to progress implementation of the Williams-Shapps Plan for Rail without needing or amending legislation, such as the introduction of flexible season tickets and the development of a Whole Industry Strategic Plan.

To be successful, we know that Rail Transformation Programme will need to be co-designed and co-delivered with the bodies that make up the rail sector. We will engage with the industry to design and implement this major project.

We will undertake detailed engagement and consultations on implementing the proposals in the Williams-Shapps plan and where legislative changes are required, we will introduce these when the Parliamentary timetable allows.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many staff from (1) the Department for Transport, (2) Network Rail, (3) the Rail Delivery Group, and (4) the Office of Rail and Road, are expected to transfer to Great British Railways.

The government will work closely with industry to develop detailed plans for implementation.

We recognise the significant amount of work which happens across the industry to facilitate the running of the railways and the expertise required to achieve this. Retaining that expertise will be crucial to ensuring the futures success of the railways.

This is the biggest change to the railways in three decades and transformation on this scale will not happen overnight. Government is setting up a Rail Transformation Programme within the Department for Transport and working with the rail sector to ensure a common understanding of our vision for the railway, working collectively with the sector to design how this major project will be delivered. The Government will make an announcement on next steps in relation to implementation in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government in which city the headquarters of Great British Railways will be located.

We are still in the early stages of the Rail Transformation Programme and will consider options for the location of Great British Railways’ headquarters in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Department of Transport Great British Railways: The Williams-Shapps Plan for Rail, published on 20 May, in respect of the UK’s railways over the past decade, how much have wages increased; how much inflation has occurred; and what was the increase in (1) passenger numbers, (2) passenger kilometres, and (3) freight kilometres.

UK rail wage figures are available by sector. The table below provides the median wage increase for the period 2010 to 2020:

Rail Construction and Maintenance Operatives

Rail Transport Operatives

Rail Travel Assistants

Train and Tram Drivers

13%

51%

39%

35%

During this period, prices increased (as measured by retail price index) by 31.1%.

ORR publish statistics on passenger journeys and kilometres. In the decade 2009/10 to 2019/20 (prior to the coronavirus pandemic) passenger journeys increased by 29% and passenger kilometres increased by 23%. In the last year (since government measures were introduced to minimise coronavirus impact) passenger journeys and kilometres have decreased by 78% and 81% respectively compared to the previous year.

Freight kilometres for the period 2010/11 to 2020/21 decreased by 23%. Please see attached documents for supporting tables.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the possible (1) advantages, and (2) disadvantages, of introducing a licensing system for cyclists.

The Government considered this matter carefully as part of the cycling and walking safety review in 2018, and has no plans to introduce such a system. Cycling brings many benefits, particularly in terms of health and the environment, and the Government is keen to encourage rather than restrict it. Cyclists must respect the rules of the road as set out in The Highway Code and enforcement of cycling offences is a matter for the police. The introduction of a licensing system would be likely to deter many people from cycling and the costs and complexity of introducing and administering such a system, would be likely to outweigh any road safety or other benefits.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their Great British Railway white paper (CP423), published on 20 May, what annual savings they expect to make in respect of (1) delay attribution, (2) franchise agreements, (3) key train requirements, (4) ticketing and settlement agreements, (5) any other benefits.

One of the major benefits of bringing the railways together will be to reduce fragmented decision-making. Great British Railways will be able to make substantial net savings without detriment to service or fare levels by reducing duplication, interface costs and complexity. This will include better planning of track and infrastructure works and many other operations currently subject to negotiation between Network Rail and train operating companies.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their Great British Railway white paper (CP423), published on 20 May, how will their plan incentivise train operators to improve their services; and what is their estimate of the costs of (1) preparing, and (2) managing, agreements with train operators.

New Passenger Service Contracts will be designed to cut through the complexity and cost of procuring passenger services, open up more effective competition and attract new bidders.

They will be a mix of both commuter and long-distance services with mixed incentives to reflect the different risks and commercial opportunities to reflect the regional divisions in Great British Railways.

All Passenger Service Contracts will incentivise operators to run reliable, competitive, high-quality services and grow passenger numbers.

We expect to launch initial competitions for Passenger Service Contracts by the time the emergency recovery agreements end in 2022. Further detail on how the new contracts will be managed will be announced in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their Great British Railway white paper (CP423), published on 20 May, what role they see for private sector open access operators in the new structure for the passenger railway; and who will decide (1) whether such operators will be permitted, (2) the timetable to which they will operate, and (3) the fares they can charge.

Establishing Great British Railways will enable open access operators to benefit from national co-ordination and new safeguards.

The government will consult and work with partners, including open access operators, on the development and implementation of a new rules-based access system, underpinned by legislation.

The Office of Rail and Road will also act as an appeals body for operators. It will be able to direct Great British Railways to change its decision where it has not applied its track access and charging policies fairly.

New and existing open access services will be able to operate in the future. As now they will be able to apply for train paths and set their own fares.

We will make an announcement on next steps in relation to how GBR manages the infrastructure including the processes it will undertake when making access decisions in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the terms of the Levelling Up Fund allow for the direct award of contracts without competitive tender for (1) harbour alterations, (2) the purchase of new vessels, (3) the ownership of new vessels, (4) the operation of passenger and freight maritime services, and (5) other maritime works; and if so, what are the circumstances in which such contracts may be awarded without competitive tender.

It is for local areas to decide what bids they submit into the Levelling Up Fund, but any investment from the Fund must be compliant with the UK’s obligations on subsidy control (or State Aid in Northern Ireland) and other relevant procurement legislation and regulations. This will be tested as part of the appraisal process and monitored thereafter.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government for what reasons the estimated cost of the West Midlands HS2 station has increased to £370 million.

The Interchange station cost estimate has not increased and remains within the allocated budget, as confirmed when the HS2 project was reset in February 2020 following conclusion of the Oakervee Review and the adoption of an updated cost baseline (Baseline 7.1).

At Baseline 7.1 adoption, the point estimate for Interchange station was £274m in Q3 2019 prices. This estimate excluded risk exposure and optional scope. The recently announced figure of £370m is the Baseline 7.1 estimate inflated to Q1 2022 prices (the date of Contract Award) with the addition of its contingency allowance, which is derived from the overall HS2 Ltd risk exposure allowance, also confirmed at Baseline 7.1 adoption. The £370m figure also contains provision for optional scope to maximise and facilitate local development plans around the station. This updated estimate does not affect the overall budget, or contingency, of the HS2 project and station delivery remains within its cost allocation and is proceeding to schedule.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 18 May (HL135), whether they intend to conduct another survey of hand-held mobile use by drivers; if so, when they will conduct such a survey; what evidence they have that hand-held mobile phone use while driving is worse amongst young men; and whether they will consider a public information campaign aimed at all drivers including information that using a hand-held phone in stationary traffic is also illegal

The Department is planning to conduct a further observational survey of hand-held mobile phone use later this year.

There is evidence from the Department’s own observational survey, from the perception of risk work carried out by THINK!, and from external self-reporting surveys that young males constitute the biggest risk in respect of hand-held mobile phone use. The Department has commissioned further research to understand what drives these attitudes and behaviours; the report will be published in due course.

I understand the importance of conveying to drivers the message that they must not use a hand-held mobile phone while stationary in traffic and our recent consultation proposed a change to the Highway Code to make that point. THINK! will consider options for incorporating this message into future campaigns.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they intend to reduce the numbers of speeding drivers following the data published by the Department for Transport that showed that 56 per cent of drivers broke the 30mph speed limit between January and March 2021.

The Government believes that any form of dangerous or inconsiderate driving behaviour is a serious road safety issue. All available research shows a link between excessive speed and the risk of collisions.

We expect all drivers to observe the speed limit, and enforcement is a matter for the police. Policing of our roads, and how available resources are deployed, is the responsibility of individual chief officers, taking into account the specific local issues.

Last autumn, the Department for Transport launched a Call for Evidence, as part of a wider Roads Policing Review, a thorough examination of roads policing of roads policing in England and Wales and its relevance to road safety. Responses to the Call for Evidence will inform the action plan that is being developed by the roads policing review governance board. This is jointly chaired by officials from the Home Office and the Department for Transport. The Call for Evidence closed in October 2020 and we are planning to publish our response this summer.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many 'Fix Your Bike vouchers' were distributed (1) in total, and (2) in each region, in the four releases; and what is the total cost of the scheme to date.

The Department has now released over 400,000 Fix Your Bike vouchers, as well as fixing many more bikes via the Dr Bike pop-up maintenance stations which it funded. This is consistent with the Secretary of State’s commitment that the Government would help fix up to half a million bikes.

The regional distribution of vouchers is as set out in the table below. In a small number of cases, an invalid or unmatched postcode was given when registering, meaning that vouchers cannot be assigned to a region. There are also some vouchers waiting to be redeemed by customers.

A total of just over £20 million was allocated to the Fix Your Bike voucher scheme and Dr Bike "pop-up" cycle maintenance initiatives in 2020/21. Over half of this has already been spent. The final total spend will depend on how many of the remaining vouchers are redeemed over the coming months.

Region

Number of vouchers

East Midlands

33,107

East of England

43,406

London

67,097

North East

17,653

North West

53,503

South East

68,239

South West

42,504

West Midlands

36,940

Yorkshire and Humberside

34,106

Total

396,555

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data they hold on the use of hand-held mobile phones by drivers; and what public information programmes, if any, they are planning to remind drivers of the laws on mobile phone use.

Drivers who use a hand-held mobile phone constitute a serious danger both to themselves and to other road users. According to the Department’s most recent observational survey in 2017, 1.1% of drivers were observed using a hand-held mobile phone while driving on weekdays in Great Britain. The Government has consulted on changing the law to broaden the offence and make it easier for the police to enforce it.

It is important that we get the message across that using a hand-held mobile phone while driving is unacceptable. This summer THINK! will launch a large-scale campaign which will highlight the respect young men have for their friends who don’t take risks when driving; they are planning a mobiles-specific campaign based on this theme later in the year.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th May 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 29 April (HL15320), how many times the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency revoked the driving licence of a driver who reached 12 points on their driving licence in each of the last 10 years.

Only a court can disqualify an individual from driving under the “totting up” provisions whereby a driver can be disqualified by accruing 12 or more penalty points. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency’s role is to update the drivers' database with endorsement information received from courts.

The table below shows the number of totting up disqualifications since 2017. Information is not available for the full period requested as endorsements are removed from drivers’ records after set periods of time in line with the requirements set out in law. As such, records for 2017 and 2021 are partial years.

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Total

17,326

38,867

39,205

34,020

15,690

145,108

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many times the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency has overturned a decision to grant an exemption from disqualification on the grounds of exceptional hardship to a driver who incurred 12 or more points on their driving licence in each of the last five years.

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) cannot overturn a court’s decision to apply exceptional hardship where a driver has accrued 12 or more penalty points. The DVLA’s role is purely to record the decision made by the court.

If the DVLA receives a notification for a driver with 12 or more penalty points who has not been disqualified, the DVLA will alert courts to this. This enables the courts to consider re-opening cases and disqualifying drivers where appropriate.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their announcement on 20 April that international shipping emissions will be included within UK net zero targets, whether they will make a similar commitment in relation to international aviation emissions.

As announced on 20 April, we have set the Sixth Carbon Budget to include both international aviation and shipping emissions, as recommended by our independent climate advisors, the Climate Change Committee.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any increased risk to the safety of (1) pedestrians, and (2) other road users, due to delays in the completion of the Transport and Works Act 1992 order process to modify or close level crossings.

The Department does not carry out any assessment of risks associated with level crossings that are applied for either modification or closure under the Transport and Works Act 1992. It is for Network Rail to manage the risk at crossings owned by them, in its capacity as the duty holder. This risk must be managed and mitigated regardless of the length of time it takes for an application under the Transport and Works Act to complete and for the level crossing to be modified or closed.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the distraction of drivers using in-vehicle infotainment systems.

We have not undertaken an assessment of the distraction of drivers using in-vehicle infotainment systems.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many applications under the Transport and Works Act 1992 order process to modify or close level crossings have been (1) received, (2) approved, and (3) rejected, per region in each of the last five years; and how many are completed within each yearly timeframe.

Since 2016, seven applications have been received under the Transport and Works Act 1992 for powers relating to the very purpose of modifying or closing level crossings. The table below provides details on each of these applications including the year they were received, the region they are in and whether they were approved or rejected.

The implementation of modifications or closures to level crossings, approved by a Transport and Works Act Order, is a matter for the applicant, which in the case of all those listed in the table below is Network Rail.

Year application received

Name of Application

Region

Application approved or rejected

2016

The Network Rail (Northumberland Park Level Crossing and Coppermill Lane Level Crossing Closure) Order

London

Approved

2017

Network Rail (Felixstowe Branch Line Improvement -Level crossing closure) Order

East

Approved

2017

Network Rail (Abbots Ripton Level crossing) Order

East

Approved

2017

Network Rail (Kingsmill No.1 Level Crossing (Land Acquisition and Closure) Order

East Midlands

Approved

2017

Network Rail (Suffolk Level Crossing Reduction) Order

East

Partially Approved

2017

Network Rail (Cambridgeshire Level Crossing Reduction) Order

East

Partially Approved

2017

Network Rail (Essex Level Crossing Reduction) Order

East

This application is to be decided

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will correct the figure for the estimated cost of the works for HS2 Phase 2a on their website page HS2 Phase 2a: High Speed Rail (West Midlands to Crewe) Act 2021; why other documents on this page have been updated but this figure has not; and whether they will place in the Library of the House the most recent comparable figures.

The estimated cost of works on the gov.uk web page is the Estimate of Expense as required by Standing Order 45 of the House, when the High Speed Rail (West Midlands to Crewe) Bill was deposited in July 2017. There is no requirement for the Estimate of Expense to be updated, although other documents linked on the web page have been updated when required by Standing Orders. The Government committed to regularly update Parliament on the progress of the HS2 programme by issuing reports twice a year, with the most recent on 23 March and contains updated cost figures.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the latest estimated costs of the portions of Old Oak Common station attributable to (1) HS2, (2) Crossrail 1, and (3) Great Western services; and what are the other costs for Old Oak Common station which make up the total estimated cost.

Within the Target Cost for Phase One, the budget allocated by HS2 Ltd for Old Oak Common station, including contingency for risk, is £1.67bn (2019 prices). A more detailed breakdown of costs cannot be provided as this information is commercially sensitive.

Old Oak Common is being designed and delivered as a single, integrated station and therefore costs cannot be neatly apportioned between the HS2 and conventional rail elements.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Environment Agency has given full approval for the construction works of the HS2 Chiltern Tunnel and, if so, when; what risk assessments have been made in connection with this approval in respect of the Chiltern Aquifer regarding, (1) the risk of pollution to the water supply for (a) local residents, and (b) residents of London, and (2) the loss or diversion of the River Misbourne; and whether they will place copies of any such assessments in the Library of the House.

Approval for the construction of the Chilterns Tunnel has not yet been granted, pending the finalisation of the necessary risk assessments and monitoring plans, which are in an advance stage of production and review.

The following assessments have been produced in respect of tunnelling through the Chalk aquifer:

- Groundwater Assessment for Construction Tasks: Tunnel and Cross Passages

- Chiltern Tunnel Construction Water Environment Assessment (currently in draft)

- Construction of Chiltern Tunnel Site Specific Groundwater Monitoring (currently in draft)

This work provides a full assessment of the risks to groundwater quality, groundwater flow, public water supplies and the River Misbourne. Such assessments are not routinely placed in the House Library as the work is ongoing, and they are updated as and when necessary. Individual assessments may be released upon request, subject to any required redactions.

HS2 Ltd manages all risks associated with the delivery of the railway through their Corporate Risk registers. As we [the Govt.] has made clear, they must demonstrate compliance with the requisite technical, safety and environmental standards at all times.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assurances have they received from HS2 Ltd that they will not seek to derogate responsibilities on noise limits set out in its information paper E20: Control of Airborne Noise from Altered Roads and the Operational Railway, published on 30 July 2014, should HS2 operational noise levels exceed agreed noise limits.

HS2 Ltd will build on the work of existing high speed networks, utilising best practice from other European high speed projects, and improving on those railways where it is possible to do so. HS2 Information Paper F4: Operational Noise and Vibration Monitoring Framework sets out HS2 Ltd’s commitments to monitor the noise and vibration performance of the operational railway. Paragraph 3.2 describes the actions to be taken where the performance deviates from the expected conditions:

a) If the measured performance is better than the expected conditions:

- A study to document the reasons why assets are achieving a higher performance than expected

- A review of further improvements to other assets that could potentially benefit from the technology transfer of the high performing assets

b) If the measured performance is worse than the expected conditions:

- A study to identify the root cause and all possible solutions to the low performance

- An investigation of other similar assets that could also be underperforming

- Corrective action to improve existing performance and prevent future loss of performance so far as this may be required to achieve the objectives set out in the Information Papers E20, E21 and E22

The relevant paragraphs of Information paper F4 are included as binding assurances (numbers 1041 and 1042) on the public register of HS2 Undertakings and Assurances.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the risk of HS2 train noise exceeding the limits set out in the information paper by HS2 Ltd, E20: Control of Airborne Noise from Altered Roads and the Operational Railway, published on 30 July 2014, as a result of (1) operational noise assumptions, and (2) noise prediction model uncertainty; and whether that risk has been recorded in the HS2 costs and risk estimates.

HS2 Ltd is integrating the design of HS2 by developing requirements and specifications for each of the of the parts of the railway that contribute to the end-state noise generated by operational services, so that the objectives set out in HS2 Information Paper E20 are delivered.

HS2 Ltd is continually monitoring planned performance against these requirements, and against the overall compliance with our noise commitments. HS2 Ltd manages all risks associated with the delivery of the railway through their Corporate Risk registers. This includes all risks relating to compliance with HS2 Information Paper E20, and includes the development of mitigation measures and treatment strategies intended to avoid or reduce the probability of the risk occurring and to reduce or control the impact of the risks should they occur.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 8 March (HL13565), whether they will place in the Library of the House a copy of the HS2 noise prediction model data from high speed trains in France.

Appendix SV‐001‐000: Annex D2 in Volume 5 of the publicly available HS2 Phase 1 Environmental Statement relates to the validation of the HS2 prediction methodology for operational noise from the railway, as set out in the attached document.

Figure 1 in Annex D2 presents measured maximum noise levels for French TGV and German ICE trains compared with the maximum level forecast using the original HS1 calculation method. These measurements were referenced in the Written Answer further to my last answer on 8 March. All Environmental Statement documents have been published online.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will announce the process for securing a private sector development partner for the Southern Railway Link to Heathrow Airport.

The Department remains committed that the Southern Access to Heathrow scheme, formerly known as Southern Rail Link to Heathrow, should be a ‘pathfinder’ project with increased levels of market involvement.

Government intends to provide further guidance to the market regarding the proposed commercial direction and next steps, including the process for selection of a development partner in Summer 2021.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to encourage investment in maritime decarbonisation.

The Clean Maritime Plan, published in 2019, represents the Government’s route map for achieving net zero emissions in domestic shipping by 2050. Alongside the plan, the Government launched a £1.5 million R&D competition, match-funding industry investment in zero emission marine technologies.

Building on the vision set out in the plan, in November 2020 the Government announced a £20 million Clean Maritime Demonstration Competition, which will encourage investment in the UK design and development of zero emission technology.

In parallel, the Government is developing a Transport Decarbonisation Plan (TDP) that puts transport on a path to delivering its contributions to carbon budgets and net zero by 2050. The plan will take a holistic and cross-modal approach to decarbonising the entire transport system for the first time, setting out a credible and ambitious pathway to cut emissions, including for maritime and we expect to publish it in Spring 2021.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether HS2 Ltd's Noise Prediction Model is more accurate than the Noise Prediction Model developed for HS1; and how this can be demonstrated.

High Speed 2 is currently using the prediction model originally developed for HS1 to predict noise from the operational railway. Input assumptions have of course been varied to reflect relevant differences, such as the higher speeds of HS2. As set out in the Environmental Statements for Phase 1 and Phase 2a of HS2, this prediction method has been shown to generate noise predictions that agreed well with actual measurements taken of high speed trains in France.

The hybrid Bill process intensively scrutinised how the HS1 noise model should be applied to HS2, and which input assumptions should be used. Where those input assumptions are further refined during the detailed design stage, for example as the performance of the track or rolling stock is refined/confirmed, the new assumptions and their evidence base is shared with local authorities through the relevant HS2 Planning Forum subgroup.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 9 February (HL12883), on what (1) dates, and (2) times, did EKFB contractors meet with (a) HS2 Ltd, and (b) officials at the Department for Transport, to provide advice on the scrutiny of the Wendover Mined Tunnel, as such scrutiny has developed.

Design contractors working on behalf of EK (as it was at the time) were present at one meeting between officials from the Department for Transport and HS2 Ltd to discuss the Wendover Mined Tunnel proposal. The meeting took place on 1 April 2019 at 3pm.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what independent assessment has been made of the management of the (1) water flow, (2) settlement, and (3) distribution, of the cut-and-cover tunnel on HS2 Phase One at Wendover; and whether construction of the tunnel will require additional land take.

Thorough assessments of a range of potential impacts from the HS2 Phase One green tunnel at Wendover continue to be made and assured by HS2 Ltd’s contractors. These utilise approaches such as numerical groundwater modelling, fluvial modelling and purpose-designed pumping tests in order to provide the most accurate information about water movement in this area and any potential for impact from the construction of the railway.

These assessments, and the ongoing liaison with independent experts from the Environment Agency (with respect to water and flood risks), the Canal and River Trust (with respect to the Grand Union Canal) and Natural England (with respect to Weston Turville Site of Special Scientific Interest), will continue to inform the detailed design of the railway and requirements for monitoring and mitigation. Works involving water courses, groundwater and/or flood risks are then subject to independent approval by the Environment Agency.

There is no further land outside of HS2 Phase One Act limits needed for construction of the Wendover green tunnel.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what independent assessment has been made of the impact of the HS2 Phase One cut-and-cover tunnel design at Wendover on (1) the sustainability of the Weston Turville Site of Special Scientific Interest, (2) the water flow in the Wendover Arm of the Grand Union Canal, and (3) flood risk to habitations at (a) Stoke Mandeville, and (b) Aylesbury.

Thorough assessments of a range of potential impacts from the HS2 Phase One green tunnel at Wendover continue to be made and assured by HS2 Ltd’s contractors. These utilise approaches such as numerical groundwater modelling, fluvial modelling and purpose-designed pumping tests in order to provide the most accurate information about water movement in this area and any potential for impact from the construction of the railway.

These assessments, and the ongoing liaison with independent experts from the Environment Agency (with respect to water and flood risks), the Canal and River Trust (with respect to the Grand Union Canal) and Natural England (with respect to Weston Turville Site of Special Scientific Interest), will continue to inform the detailed design of the railway and requirements for monitoring and mitigation. Works involving water courses, groundwater and/or flood risks are then subject to independent approval by the Environment Agency.

There is no further land outside of HS2 Phase One Act limits needed for construction of the Wendover green tunnel.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) powered, and (2) unpowered, ‘cargobikes’ using bus lanes; and whether they have issued guidance on the use of bus lanes by such vehicles.

Cargo bikes are considered a type of pedal cycle in law. Pedal cycles are allowed to use bus lanes by default, as indicated by the cycle symbol on bus lane signs. Electrically assisted cargo-bikes would be treated as pedal cycles provided they conform to the Electrically Assisted Pedal Cycles Regulations 1983 (as amended).

The Department is not aware of any particular concerns with the use of bus lanes by cargo bikes and has not issued any guidance to local authorities on this matter. The detailed design and provision of bus lanes are matters for individual local traffic authorities.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many motorway service stations (1) have, and (2) do not have, electric charging points for electric vehicles in England.

As of March 2020, there are 115 motorway service areas (MSAs) in England. Of these, 112 have at least one electric vehicle (EV) charging device.

The number of public charging devices in each region in England are presented in the table below. Figures are from 4 January 2021.

Region

Total Public Charging Devices

Charge all models of EVs1

Rapid charging devices2

East Midlands

1,090

1,068

261

East of England

1,289

1,229

300

London

6,155

6,090

515

North East

820

812

172

North West

1,410

1,372

323

South East

2,869

2,721

636

South West

1,555

1,499

344

West Midlands

1,215

1,125

352

Yorkshire and The Humber

1,056

1,028

311

England Total

17,459

16,944

3,214

  1. Tesla Supercharger devices are not counted as they cannot be used by other makes of EV.
  2. Rapid charging devices are defined as at 43kW and above and include Tesla Supercharger devices, which is consistent with DfT official statistics. All currently operational rapid devices can be used on any vehicle with rapid-charging capability.

The number of public charging devices located at MSAs in each region in England are presented in the table below. Figures are from March 2020.

Region

Located at MSAs excluding Tesla Superchargers

Located at MSAs - Tesla Superchargers only (March

East Midlands

19

0

East of England

17

16

London

8

0

North East

5

0

North West

41

28

South East

55

50

South West

25

16

West Midlands

31

52

Yorkshire and The Humber

14

8

England Total

215

170

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many public charging points for electric vehicles are operational in each region in England; and of these, how many (1) are able to charge all models of electric vehicle licensed for UK roads, (2) are located in motorway service stations, and (3) provide rapid charging to electric vehicles.

As of March 2020, there are 115 motorway service areas (MSAs) in England. Of these, 112 have at least one electric vehicle (EV) charging device.

The number of public charging devices in each region in England are presented in the table below. Figures are from 4 January 2021.

Region

Total Public Charging Devices

Charge all models of EVs1

Rapid charging devices2

East Midlands

1,090

1,068

261

East of England

1,289

1,229

300

London

6,155

6,090

515

North East

820

812

172

North West

1,410

1,372

323

South East

2,869

2,721

636

South West

1,555

1,499

344

West Midlands

1,215

1,125

352

Yorkshire and The Humber

1,056

1,028

311

England Total

17,459

16,944

3,214

  1. Tesla Supercharger devices are not counted as they cannot be used by other makes of EV.
  2. Rapid charging devices are defined as at 43kW and above and include Tesla Supercharger devices, which is consistent with DfT official statistics. All currently operational rapid devices can be used on any vehicle with rapid-charging capability.

The number of public charging devices located at MSAs in each region in England are presented in the table below. Figures are from March 2020.

Region

Located at MSAs excluding Tesla Superchargers

Located at MSAs - Tesla Superchargers only (March

East Midlands

19

0

East of England

17

16

London

8

0

North East

5

0

North West

41

28

South East

55

50

South West

25

16

West Midlands

31

52

Yorkshire and The Humber

14

8

England Total

215

170

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have asked Transport for the North to delay submitting their business plan for Northern Powerhouse Rail; and if so, why.

The Department has asked Transport for the North to submit the Strategic Outline Case for Northern Powerhouse Rail after the Integrated Rail Plan is published. A Strategic Outline Case which is consistent with the Government’s policy and funding framework, to be set out in the Integrated Rail Plan, will allow a more rapid alignment around single route options and quicker progress than envisaged in previous plans.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether HS2 has received a bat licence which permits the demolition of trees in Jones Hill Wood, Buckinghamshire; if so, what are the terms of the licence, and whether they will place a copy of it in the Library; and whether they have confirmed that HS2 or its contractors (1) will not demolish any trees in that wood prior to receiving a licence, and (2) will only demolish trees in that wood in compliance with the terms of any licence.

HS2 Ltd has undertaken surveys of the area of Jones’ Hill wood required for clearance and has sought a licence from Natural England to undertake associated works. This licence, and its associated terms, are still the subject of discussion between HS2 Ltd and Natural England. Tree clearance at the woodland area of Jones’ Hill Wood required for HS2 construction has not yet commenced but is authorised in accordance to the High Speed Rail (London-West Midlands) Act 2017. Works which are relevant to licenced approvals will only take place when those licenses and permission are in place.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 8 February (HL12929), what assessment the Highways Agency has made of imposing weight restrictions on historic railway estate structures as an alternative to demolition; and what plans they have to consult local authorities before deciding on demolition.

Pursuant to the answer to HL12929, Highways England’s existing procedures on Historical Railways Estate (HRE) structures are designed to keep the public safe and are underpinned by what is the safest and most appropriate option for a given structure. Local highway authorities have responsibility for applying weight restrictions, closing the roads, or restricting traffic. Approximately 200 of the public road bridges on the HRE managed by Highways England have failed their most recent structural assessment but Local Authorities have not had any restrictions implemented. Therefore, in these cases, Highways England’s planned infilling is the safest and most appropriate option and will maintain access across the structures. Although there are currently no plans to review existing procedures, this will be kept under review.

Highways England enjoys a strong working relationship with local councils, allowing for an open dialogue about local authority responsibilities and the potential future use or transfer of ownership of bridges, and has contacted all local authorities affected to advise them of its plans to see if they have any use for the structures. In addition, it has arranged for seven structures to be transferred to local authorities which aspire to use them for cycle routes.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in relation to the Clean Air Zones Central Services (Fees) (England) Regulations 2020 (SI 2020/1444), what restrictions there are on the amount that local authorities can charge different types of non-compliant vehicles which enter a clean air zone; whether local authorities can retain such charges; whether local authorities are required to use the central services set out in these regulations; and what is the charge per transaction for the use of these services payable to the Department of Transport.

The purpose of this instrument is to enable the Secretary of State to charge local authorities in England for using the Clean Air Zones Central Services (“CAZ Central Services”). The Government is creating the Services to support the practical implementation of Clean Air Zones (“CAZs”). A CAZ is an area where targeted action is taken to improve air quality, which can include a charging scheme. The CAZ Central Services are national infrastructure services that can be used to administer CAZ charging schemes and include a digital service (including the ability to make payments online) and technical and customer contact support.

a) What restrictions, if any, are there on the amount that local authorities can charge different types of non-compliant vehicles which enter a Clean Air Zone.

The ability for charging authorities to introduce a charging scheme, and therefore a Clean Air Zone, is set out in the Transport Act 2000. Part 3 of the Act empowers local authorities (as “charging authorities”) to make a local charging scheme in respect of the use or keeping of motor vehicles on roads.

Charge levels for non-compliant vehicles (those that do not meet the requirements of that particular Clean Air Zone) should be set appropriately based on the local circumstances of the local authority and should consider the behaviour change needed to deliver the ambitions for the zone; the local economic and social factors of the zone and surrounding areas; and the operational costs of running a scheme. There are no restrictions on the amount that local authorities can charge but local authorities should not set the level of charge as a revenue raising measure.

b) Whether local authorities can retain such charges.

Under the Transport Act 2000 the net proceeds of any charging schemes made under the Act can be retained but are only available to the local authority for the purpose of facilitating the achievement of its local transport policies. This can include the promotion of cycling and walking and other sustainable transport alternatives. A local authority has to give an indication of their plans for use of net proceeds in the Charge Scheme Orders that establish their road user charging schemes. This is a legal requirement that comes from the Transport Act 2000 powers, where the local authority has to relate their decision back to the relevant Transport Plan.

c) Whether local authorities are required to use the Central Services set out in these Regulations, and what is the charge per transaction for the use of these services payable to the Department for Transport.

Local authorities are not required to use the CAZ Central Services and can choose to use an alternative service provider if it does not negatively impact upon the time in which it takes to achieve compliance with legal levels for air quality (value for money must also be considered). Local authorities that use the service, will be charged a transaction charge of £2 for each CAZ charge that is processed through the Services (when a motorist uses the CAZ Central Services to successfully pay a CAZ charge imposed by a charging scheme made by the local authority, for driving in a zone).

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish up-to-date forecasts of future demand for travel by rail; whether any such forecasts (1) will provide separate data for (a) commuting, and (b) long distance travel, and (2) will include reductions in peak and other passenger rail services; and what plans they have to ensure that any freed-up rail capacity will be made available to improve rail freight services.

The Department has not historically published forecasts of future rail demand.

The Department continues to actively work to understand the impact of coronavirus on rail demand, including close working with industry. As part of this we are ensuring that we use a range of rail demand scenarios based on a series of factors that could drive rail demand over the short and long term to influence decisions, and which does consider the impact on commuting and long-distance travel. These scenarios do not consider reductions in peak and other passenger services.

Given the considerable uncertainty that the pandemic has caused, these scenarios cannot be used as forecasts. However, they do reflect some of the possible impacts of the pandemic on future rail demand.

Network Rail (NR) has enabled Freight Operating Companies (FOCs) to run longer and heavier trains on the network in light of the reduced passenger timetable during the COVID-19 pandemic, delivering environmental and efficiency benefits. The Department continues to work closely with NR and FOC’s to explore further opportunities.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of Highways England's plans to use emergency powers to infill or demolish unused bridges without (1) seeking planning permission, or (2) providing information about an urgent need to take action.

Highways England has no plans to use emergency powers on Historical Railways Estate structures, which it maintains on behalf of the Secretary of State for Transport, across England, Scotland and Wales. To maintain the safety of both the communities living close to them and the drivers who use the roads that cross them, Highways England is planning to infill 115 bridges and remove 15 structures over the next five years. Most of the bridges earmarked for infilling are over 100 years old and were never designed to carry the weight of modern traffic.

Highways England’s planned infilling is the safest and most appropriate option and will maintain access across the structures, and its works are in accordance with The Town & Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (England) Order 2015, to keep the public safe. Highways England has contacted all local authorities affected to advise them of its plans. In addition, it has arranged for seven structures to be transferred to local authorities which aspire to use them for cycle routes.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 18 December (HL11112), why a tunnel cannot be granted at Wendover for HS2 using a Transport and Works Act 1992 Order; and what are the criteria for deciding whether to propose a Transport and Works Act 1992 Order.

As I made clear in my answer of 18 December, a Transport and Works Act Order could, in principle, be used to secure the powers for a tunnel at Wendover. However, there are no plans to change the consented scheme at Wendover and this means that no new powers are being sought there. The criteria for deciding whether to seek new powers for an adjusted scheme at Wendover have always been, and remain, rooted in an assessment of the pros and cons of the proposal being put forward, particularly in regard to feasibility, value for money and schedule impact.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the current cost of the tunnel proposal at Bromford on HS2 Phase One; and what assessment they have made of the impact of the Transport and Works Act 1992 Order procedure used for its construction on the time it will take to introduce HS2 Phase One services.

The proposed tunnel extension at Bromford is estimated to result in a net saving of £70 million (base date 2018) compared to the original surface route. HS2 Ltd plans for finalising the Transport and Works Act Order are proceeding to schedule and the consent procedure is not expected to have any adverse impact on the introduction of HS2 Phase One services.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to order that operational noise surveys are conducted by an independent body or the Nominated Undertaker in accordance with the requirements of HS2 Information Paper F4: Operational Noise and Vibration Monitoring Framework, published on 23 February 2017.

HS2 Phase One Information Paper F4 sets out the Government’s current plans for monitoring operational noise from HS2. The paper includes commitments to monitor the performance of noise and vibration control measures applied to the operational phase of the railway and to share information with Local Authorities. With HS2 operations still some years away, the detailed methodology for delivering the commitments contained in Information Paper F4, including the type of monitoring to be undertaken and who it will be done by, is yet to be determined.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the HS2 Phase One main works contractor for the section of the line past Wendover has produced any assessment of the Wendover Mined Tunnel Proposal; and if so, whether they will place a copy of any such assessment in the Library of the House.

The Wendover Mined Tunnel Proposal was assessed by HS2 Ltd and by independent consultants as being harder and more expensive to construct than the consented scheme. A decision was taken in 2018 to not divert Eiffage Kier (EK) resources to additionally assess the proposal, and this decision was communicated to the constituency MP and local councillors at the time.

Since then, EK (now EKFB) contractors have been involved in providing advice to the Department in relation to its ongoing scrutiny of the proposal as it has developed. In any event, the Department does not release detailed breakdowns of our commercial information nor information provided in confidence from our suppliers and subcontractors.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to limit the number of petrol and diesel cars sold ahead of the implementation of the 2030 total ban on the sale of such cars.

The Prime Minister’s Ten Point Plan committed Government to work with industry to accelerate the shift to zero emission vehicles, which includes ending the sale of new petrol and diesel cars and vans from 2030, ten years earlier than planned. We will publish a Green Paper on the options available for UK’s post EU emissions regulations in this area, by the spring.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
1st Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to adopt the existing EU vehicle fleet targets and regulatory targets for CO2 emissions.

The EU regulatory regime for vehicle CO₂ emissions was retained in UK law following the end of the transition period. Two SIs, the Road Vehicle Carbon Dioxide Emission Performance Standards (Cars and Vans) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 and the New Heavy Duty Vehicles (Carbon Dioxide Emission Performance Standards) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2020, entered into legal effect at that same point, correcting the EU legislation to work in a UK-only scenario.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of HS2 seeking access to undertake works on properties in Park Village East before (1) approval, and (2) independent auditing, of access tunnels at Euston Station; and whether HS2 has plans to fund an independent survey of (1) the property owners, and (2) the leaseholders, of Park Village East before work starts.

HS2 Ltd has issued notices under Schedule 2 of the High Speed Rail Act 2017 for planned works beneath the properties on Park Village East. The planned works, which relate to the installation of ground anchors beneath the properties concerned, do not include any works on or to the properties on Park Village East.

At this time HS2 Ltd are not seeking access to undertake works on the access tunnels to Euston, which are currently still in the design phase. Construction of the first tunnels is not planned until summer 2022 and will not proceed until the detailed design is completed and has been audited by an independent design organisation. The purpose of the currently planned works (i.e. the installation of ground anchors) is to ensure stability of the existing Network Rail retaining wall during the subsequent tunnel construction. The design of these works is nearing completion, which will be subject to independent auditing, including acceptance by Network Rail, prior to implementation.


In parallel, HS2 Ltd’s appointed contractor has requested access to undertake surveys for assessment of the structure and condition of the properties on Park Village East to further inform the ongoing design process. Enquiries have also been made with property owners, for any reports, sub-structure information or details relevant to the works to inform the assessment of the likely impact of installing ground anchors beneath the Park Village East facing properties.

and whether HS2 has plans to fund an independent survey of (1) the property owners, and (2) the leaseholders, of Park Village East before work starts.


HS2 Ltd is funding independent surveys of all potentially affected properties (within the criteria defined under the Act) and this is currently underway in a number of areas, including Park Village East, subject to access being granted by the leaseholders or owners.

HS2 Ltd’s appointed contractor is seeking to undertake these surveys as soon as possible, but it is not essential that they are completed prior to the installation of ground anchors. For properties that are eligible for a Settlement Deed and where the owner/leaseholder has requested one within the published timescales, this survey will be undertaken (and the Deed will be in place) before the commencement of works identified as potentially causing settlement, such as the tunnelling works in the case of Park Village East. For clarity, the installation of ground anchors does not trigger the eligibility for Settlement Deeds and HS2’s obligations with respect to the properties are not altered by the Deed.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) HS2, or (2) its contractors, have comprehensive insurance to cover the proposed ground anchor installation under properties in Park Village East in Camden.

The High Speed Rail Act 2017 includes provisions for the protection of the public in the unlikely event that a property is damaged by activities relating to the HS2 scheme. HS2 Ltd has a comprehensive construction insurance programme covering all construction activities relating to Phase 1 and 2a, including public liability insurance covering HS2 Ltd and its contractors’ legal liability for loss or damage to public property arising out of these activities. For the retaining wall support works Schedule 2, Part 2 of the Act makes clear that HS2 must compensate the owners and occupiers of the buildings or land on which the powers are exercised for any loss which they may suffer by reason of the exercise of the powers.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when it plans (1) to consult on, and (2) to adopt, a new Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy; and whether the new Strategy will contain a long-term cycling and walking programme and budget.

The first Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy was published in 2017 and set out the financial resources available for cycling and walking across Government between 2016/17 to 2020/21 during the Spending Review 2015 period.

On 28 July 2020 the Prime Minister launched ambitious plans to boost cycling and walking in England, so that half of all journeys in towns and cities are cycled or walked by 2030. This includes a £2 billion package of funding for active travel over the next 5 years.

It is expected that the second Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy (CWIS 2) will be published following the next Spending Review and will reflect the commitments outlined in the Prime Minister’s Cycling and Walking Plan as well as setting out the financial resources available and the other matters required by the Infrastructure Act 2015. The Department will consult on CWIS 2 ahead of its publication, as required by the legislation.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to provide support for cross-channel rail passenger services during the COVID-19 pandemic; and if so, whether that support will be conditional on surplus rolling stock being retained for future use through the Channel Tunnel.

Ministers and officials, working with other Government Departments, have engaged very regularly with international rail operators since March 2020 to discuss the financial impacts of Covid-19 on their businesses. This has included supporting companies to access Government support schemes, where eligible and appropriate, as part of the unprecedented package of financial support for businesses that has been made available by the Chancellor.

Officials will continue to engage very closely with international rail operators, monitoring closely the ongoing impacts of Covid-19 on their businesses and discussing the commercial financing options available to them.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many consultancy contracts relating to HS2 of over £5 million have been agreed since 2010; and to deposit the details of each such contract, including (1) the supplier, (2) a description of services, and (3) the spend to date, in the House of Lords library.

As HS2 Ltd do not categorise consultancy spend within their contracts this information is not easily available and could only be compiled at disproportionate cost. As part of the Government’s transparency agenda, a full list of awarded contract opportunities is available on HS2 Ltd’s website

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to provide financial support to Eurostar; and if they have any such plans, whether they will require Eurostar to make any surplus rolling stock available to other operators.

Ministers and officials, working with other Government Departments, have engaged very regularly with Eurostar since March 2020 in relation to their financial situation. The Department continues to work closely with Eurostar to consider all commercial financing options available to the company, which include drawing on existing support schemes where eligible and appropriate. We will also continue to discuss Eurostar’s financial situation with the French Government.

With regards to reallocation of surplus rolling stock, any such decision would be dependent on commercial demand, of which there is currently little or none for international services.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the proposed reduction in Network Rail’s enhancement budget announced in the Spending Review 2020 on 25 November 2020, which projects will be affected by this reduction; and for each such project, what assessment they have made of the effects that the reduction will have on (1) project budgets, (2) completion dates, and (3) passenger and freight traffic.

Network Rail’s operations, maintenance and renewals budgets have not been changed as a result of Spending Review 2020. Workbanks will continue to be based on the five-year regulatory funding settlement for 2019-2024.

The Spending Review confirmed that the Government will continue to support the railway, investing in ambitious improvements to modernise our railway.

In terms of impacts on individual schemes, it remains the case that no schemes have been cancelled nor formal investment decisions taken as a result of the Spending Review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact that the proposed reduction in the rail budget for Transport for the North will have on their levelling-up agenda.

The Rail North Partnership Grant that Transport for the North receives from the Department will continue unchanged in the next financial year. In addition, to date, over £100m has been spent on Northern Powerhouse Rail development, with at least another £75m next year. The Department and Transport for the North are currently working closely together to develop a revised Strategic Outline Case (SOC) for NPR, which is due to be submitted in 2021.

The most recent allocation of core funding to Transport for the North will enable the organisation to continue to play a valuable role in delivering its statutory functions of developing a transport strategy for the region and helping the Department to prioritise, bringing strength of partnership among members to speak to the government with one voice. The Department will continue to work with TfN to achieve our shared ambition of world-class infrastructure in the region.

The Spending Review settlement includes funding for key transport infrastructure projects and programmes in the North, and the Spending Review also demonstrated our commitment to accelerate projects in the North.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they made of the risk of COVID-19 infection arising from the use of refreshment trollies on Great Western Rail and other long distance trains before the Office of Rail and Road prohibited, or significantly reduced, the use of such trollies.

It is for train operators to institute safe methods of working for all aspects of their operations and to follow guidance and instructions from the relevant bodies, including the Office of Rail and Road. The Department has not undertaken its own assessment, but understands that the Office of Rail and Road is in discussion with Great Western Railway and others.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by the Chiltern Society Area of Neighbourly Behaviour? HS2 in the Chilterns since Notice to Proceed, published on 14 January; what plans they have to follow up the concerns raised in that report that HS2 has failed to comply with assurances given to petitioners during the Hybrid Bill process; and what plans they have to place a copy of their response to this report in the Library of the House.

At this stage of the HS2 construction programme, the Government appreciates that communities are mostly experiencing negative impacts from the project, such as road closures and other visible changes in their areas, like the removal of trees. A lot of effort has been invested in minimising these impacts, as well as in increasing the volume and quality of community engagement activity along the route. Further improvement is a key focus for the Government, and it is accepted that more can be done to ensure that local communities are given ample warning of significant changes in their area and that concerns are dealt with promptly and sensitively.

The Chiltern Society report referred to in the question contains an account of complaints, most of which have already been raised on an individual basis with HS2 Ltd or with the Department for Transport and are the subject of ongoing correspondence. For this reason, the Government has no plans to issue a formal response. The Government will however consider the contents of the report and work with HS2 Ltd to review and address the issues raised, where it is appropriate to do so.

On a project the size of HS2, it is inevitable that problems will arise and that contractors will sometimes get things wrong. Where this is the case, the Government expects HS2 Ltd to resolve matters swiftly. The Government is also committed to embedding a culture of continuous improvement in the way HS2 Ltd interacts with local communities.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what arrangements they have established with the EU, if any, to share data on (1) vehicle number plates, (2) vehicle owners, and (3) vehicle keepers, from EU member states, in order to enable UK enforcement authorities to impose penalties or charges relating to the use of such vehicles.

Following the end of the Transition Period, the UK has no formal arrangements with the EU or Member States for the automatic exchange of vehicle/driver information on road traffic offences. However, UK authorities may choose to make enquiries of EU motorists using the 1959 Convention on Mutual Legal Assistance, which allows UK officials to make requests and seek information where criminal activity has occurred. Any information received through this mechanism will inform further enforcement activity. The UK-EU Trade and Cooperation Agreement contains provisions for the fast and effective exchange of vehicle registration data in relation to criminal investigations.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they (1) have given, and (2) plan to offer, any support to companies providing lifeline services (a) to, and (b) within, the Isles of Scilly; if not, why not; and what is the funding source for any such support.

Since the start of the pandemic and through to March 2021, up to £9.7 million has been made available by the Government to support lifeline services to and within the Isles of Scilly. These services are deemed to be of critical need, to deliver vital freight and provide the means of accessing key life support facilities.

This bespoke package of support is in addition to the £330 billion package of financial support the Government provided to all sectors to support them through the pandemic.

We are working closely with the Council of the Isles of Scilly to administer the funding and to monitor the impact of the pandemic to ensure that these lifeline services are maintained.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the task group, announced on 15 June 2019, intended to improve the consistency of council enforcement to tackle fraud and misuse, and to improve awareness of which groups are eligible for Blue Badges was set up; who are the members of that group; when they estimate it will report; and what plans they have to publish its findings.

Work to improve consistency of local authority enforcement, to tackle fraud and misuse of the Blue Badge Scheme and to improve awareness of eligibility, has now been incorporated into the scope of a wider, longer-term project to identify potential improvements to the Blue Badge Scheme as a whole.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by Transport Focus Fairer fares: the future of rail commuting published on 18 August 2020, in particular the recommendation to trial flexi-season tickets and other marketing initiatives to encourage rail travel as COVID-19 restrictions are lifted; and what discussions they have had with railway operators about conducting such trials.

The Department welcomes the Transport Focus report on the future of rail commuting post-Covid and considered it together with a range of surveys and evidence on expected future commuting patterns.

We are working closely with industry to develop a solution that offers better value and convenience for those who commute flexibly and will provide further details in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much HS2 Ltd spent on consultancy services in each financial year since 2015/16.

As HS2 do not categorise consultancy spend within their contracts this information is not easily available and could only be compiled at disproportionate cost.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much they have spent on the purchase of land and property in connection with (1) HS2 Phase 1, and (2) HS2 Phase 2A.

At November 2020, some £3.642bn has been spent or committed on the three phases of the HS2 property programme. The breakdown is: Phase One - £3.314bn; Phase 2a - £100m; and, Phase 2b - £228m.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made, if any, of the resale value of land and property sales purchased in connection with (1) HS2 Phase 1 and (2) HS2 Phase 2A, in the event that part or all of these projects are cancelled.

At November 2020, £3.414bn has been spent and committed on the property acquisition programme for Phase One and Phase 2a. No detailed estimates have been produced on the resale value of the property acquired to date on those phases in the event of project cancellation. Subject to wider property disposal rules, the Government’s policy is to sell any land and property not needed for the HS2 programme for its full, unblighted open-market value. The HS2 property disposal policy is kept under review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why they have reduced Network Rail’s enhancement budget for the current five year Control Period whilst increasing spending on trunk road schemes; and what assessment they have made of how such a change in spending will contribute to their net-zero carbon emissions target.

The Spending Review confirmed increasing investment in rail infrastructure in England and Wales, committing over £40bn. This sees over £2 billion of funding confirmed in 2021-22 for rail services, building on the estimated £12.8 billion of support for transport services that the Government has already committed to provide in 2020-21.

It remains the case that no schemes have been cancelled nor formal investment decisions taken as a result of the Spending Review. We are committed to building a railway that is greener and fit for the future and that is why we continue to look at ways to decarbonise our network in a way that makes best use of taxpayers funding. As part of this settlement we have committed to funding the Transpennine Route upgrade, including its full electrification.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the funding allocation in the 2020 Spending Review for (1) enhancements and (2) new works, in the next five years for (a) Network Rail, (b) HS2, and c) Highways England; and for each (i) when such enhancements or works are planned to be complete for the use of the public, and (ii) how such enhancements or works contribute to the net-zero carbon emissions target.

The Department for Transport received a significant multi-year settlement as a result of last month’s Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR 20), including funding for our major rail and road programmes, underlining this Government’s commitment to long term investment in infrastructure.

The responses to points (1) and (2), are summarised in the table below. For reasons of clarity (as there is potential overlap between 'enhancements' and 'new works'), we have defined “enhancements” as works to increase the capacity of the transport network, and “renewals” as works which replace existing infrastructure with modern equivalent.

Network Rail

High Speed Rail (HS) 2

Highways England (RIS2)

Enhancements

£17.5bn (in respect of both Enhancements and Renewals)

£22.6bn

£13bn

Renewals

N/A (this programme is identified as an enhancement)

£5bn

With regards to completion dates, taken together these programmes represent a wide range of individual projects and milestones.

In respect of HS2 Phase One, the Delivery into Service (DIS) range for initial services from Old Oak Common to Birmingham Curzon Street remains 2029 to 2033. The range for initial opening of services from Euston remains 2031-2036, subject to further work on the study of design and delivery options.

Network Rail’s operations, maintenance and renewals budgets have not been changed as a result of Spending Review 2020 and workbanks will continue to be based on the five-year regulatory funding settlement for 2019-2024. The Spending Review confirmed that the Government will continue to support the railway, investing in ambitious improvements to modernise the rail network. In terms of impacts on individual schemes, it remains the case that no schemes have been cancelled nor formal investment decisions taken as a result of the Spending Review. We are currently working with Network Rail and Ministers to agree a new baseline for the portfolio that fits with the new funding envelope. Furthermore, schemes will be regularly published as part of the enhancement delivery plan by Network Rail.

Highways England published its Delivery Plan for RIS2 in August, setting out the planned “start of works” and “open for traffic” dates for each enhancement scheme. The Delivery Plan is available on the Highways England website.

The Government is committed to building a transport network that is greener and fit for the future and we continue to look at ways to decarbonise our network in a way that makes best use of taxpayers’ funding.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton 9 October (HL8505), what procedure was used to change the location of the Chiltern Tunnel North Portal at Frith Hill in South Heath on the HS2 Phase One line of route; and whether the move was authorised by a Transport and Works Act 1992 Order or another procedure.

As set out in my written answer of 9 October, the location of the Chiltern Tunnel North Portal was changed by means of an Additional Provision (known as AP4) to the then HS2 Phase One Bill, introduced on 12 October 2015. The changes brought about by AP4 are part of the Phase One Act which subsequently received Royal Assent in 2017. The change does not therefore require a Transport and Works Act Order and none has been sought.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a Transport and Works Act 1992 Order can be used to grant a tunnel at Wendover for HS2.

Transport and Works Act Orders are one way of securing the necessary powers for railway infrastructure works. Other ways include securing a Development Consent Order, seeking local planning permission or setting out the intended works in dedicated primary legislation. The powers to construct HS2 are set out in primary legislation (the Phase One Act) and are permissive.

If the Government were minded to deliver infrastructure which went beyond that permitted by the Phase One Act then a Transport and Works Act Order would be one way of securing the necessary powers. However, there are no plans to change the consented scheme at Wendover and this means that no new powers are being sought there.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the current estimated cost of the tunnel proposal at Bromford on the HS2 Phase One route; and whether they expect that the Transport and Works Act 1992 Order procedure used for its construction will delay the introduction of HS2 Phase One services.

The proposed tunnel extension at Bromford does not result in additional cost to the HS2 Phase One route. The changes to the civil works for the extension of the tunnel are estimated to result in a net saving of £70 million (base date 2018) compared to the original surface route. Additional consent for the tunnel extension is being sought via a Transport and Works Act Order. The design changes for the tunnel extension were initiated following contract award for the Main Works Civil Contractor in the area (BBV) in 2017 and public consultation on the proposed order has now completed. The current schedule for finalising the proposed order is not expected to have any adverse impact on the introduction of HS2 Phase One services.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the HS2 Phase One main works contractor for the section of the line past Wendover has produced an assessment of the Wendover Short Mined Tunnel Proposal and, if so, whether they will place a copy in the Library of the House.

The proposal for a short-mined tunnel at Wendover has not been formally assessed by the main works civil contractor for the area (EKFB). Following initial assessment by HS2 Ltd, the Government does not consider the proposal to be viable in value for money terms and judges any further assessment by contractors to not be an efficient use of taxpayers’ money. The contractor has however been consulted and engaged on the proposals in order to inform the content of Ministerial correspondence on this issue.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Dec 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the limits of horizontal displacements within the defined limits of deviation which do not require Parliamentary approval for the starts or ends of works listed in the Schedules to the High Speed Rail (West Midlands–Crewe) Bill.

The parliamentary plans deposited with the High Speed Rail (West Midlands-Crewe) Bill show the Limits of Deviation (LoD) for the Scheduled Works (works which are listed in Schedule 1 of the Bill). A Scheduled Work can be constructed anywhere within their specific LoD. A Scheduled Work cannot be constructed outside of its LoD.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
26th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their announcement of financial support for airports and other air infrastructure on 25 November, what plans they have to provide similar support to HS1 and Eurostar.

The Government recognises that the international rail sector, as with other transport sectors, has been significantly impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. The Government has been working closely with both HS1 Ltd and Eurostar since the outbreak of the pandemic to monitor its impact on passenger numbers and services, as well as to provide support, particularly through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Department for Transport officials?have?also been?actively participating?in discussions with Eurostar and?HS1?Ltd?to?consider and?address the?longer-term?challenges facing the HS1 system?as a result of?reduced demand for international rail services. The Government?will continue to engage in these?discussions to identify?appropriate solutions to these challenges, as well as to keep under review the ongoing impact of Covid-19 on the international rail sector.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 9 November (HL9507), which destinations the "six trains per hour that can be reliably operated from Old Oak Common within the existing station design" are planned to serve; and at what frequency.

No decisions have been made on the exact HS2 train service that will operate to and from Old Oak Common. The Department for Transport has appointed West Coast Partnership Development to analyse passenger demand and present options for train service patterns that best allow this demand to be met with the available infrastructure. The Secretary of State will decide on the preferred option, once it has been subject to a consultation, nearer to the time that HS2 opens.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why there is no mention of (1) the rail passenger, or (2) the rail freight, sector in their The ten point plan for a green industrial revolution, published on 18 November.

We are already investing tens of billions of pounds in enhancements and renewals in our rail network and electrifying more railway lines. This will enable more passengers and freight to use the railway, supporting the Green Industrial Revolution and the 10-point plan.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to review and update the document 'Mobility scooters and powered wheelchairs: the rules' (1) to permit all classes of invalid carriage to use bus lanes and cycle-only lanes on roads, (2) to permit all classes of invalid carriage to use cycle-only tracks and paths, and (3) to replace the term 'invalid carriage' with a different description.

Mobility scooters can be used on footways, footpaths, bridleways or pedestrianised areas, provided that they are used in accordance with prescribed requirements. Larger mobility scooters, capable of going up to 8mph, are permitted to use the road. The Government does not have any current plans to review and update the places where mobility scooters are permitted to be used.

The term ‘invalid carriage’ is the legal definition of a mobility scooter as laid out in the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970. It means a vehicle, whether mechanically propelled or not, constructed or adapted for use for the carriage of one person, being a person suffering from some physical defect or disability.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that their net zero transport policies are informed by an assessment of the comparable costs of using road and rail, in particular the impact of road user charging.

The Department is developing a bold and ambitious Transport Decarbonisation Plan to achieve net zero emissions across all modes of transport by 2050, including road and rail. As we move forward with the transition away from petrol and diesel cars and vans, the Government will need to ensure that the tax system encourages the uptake of electric vehicles and that revenue from motoring taxes keeps pace with this change, to ensure we can continue to fund the first class public services and infrastructure that people and families across the UK expect.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
16th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish the results of the evaluation questions answered by individuals when applying for a Fix Your Bike Voucher.

There are no current plans to publish in full the results of the evaluation questions answered by individuals applying for Fix Your Bike vouchers. The information will be used by the Department for its own evaluation of the scheme and to inform future decisions on scheme design.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) Eurostar International Ltd, and (2) HS1 Ltd, about the impact of reduced passenger demand caused by the current travel restrictions on thos companies' ability to continue to provide a service in the future.

The international rail sector, as with the rest of the international travel sector, has been significantly impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. The Government has been engaging extensively with Eurostar since the outbreak of Covid-19 earlier this year, closely monitoring the ongoing impact of Covid-19 on demand for international rail services and working with Eurostar to provide support, particularly through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Department for Transport officials have also been actively participating in trilateral discussions with Eurostar and HS1 Ltd to consider and address the longer-term challenges facing the HS1 system as a result of reduced demand for international rail services. The Rail Minister has also recently met with both Eurostar and HS1 to discuss these challenges. The Government will continue to engage in these discussions to identify workable, appropriate solutions to these challenges.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to establish a review of the HS2 Ltd. property portfolio in London; and if so, (1) who will be appointed to conduct the review, and (2) when they estimate such a review will be (i) completed, and (ii) published.

HS2 Ltd continues to acquire land and property needed for, or impacted by, HS2 across all phases of the route, including around Euston, under a range of statutory and non-statutory property compensation schemes. Once the programme’s land requirements have been finalised, it is anticipated that surplus land and property will be offered for sale in accordance with established rules and on the open market when the effects of property blight have sufficiently diminished. The Government keeps the property acquisition programme and potential disposal options under continual internal review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what provision has been made to facilitate the interchanges at Old Oak Common station between (1) HS2, (2) Crossrail, and (3) Great Western Railway, services; what are the estimated costs and sources of funding for those provisions; and how long they estimate any (a) closures, and (b) disruptions, of (i) Crossrail, and (ii) Great Western Railway, services to last during construction.

The proposal for Old Oak Common is for an integrated station consisting of six HS2 platforms and eight platforms for the existing rail network, providing passengers with a direct interchange between high speed and conventional rail services. The estimated costs of delivering the station are contained within the reset Phase One estimate, which forms the basis of the Full Business Case for HS2 Phase One which was approved in April of this year.

The final design and precise construction programme for the station, which will determine the impact of Old Oak Common construction on existing services, is still being developed by HS2 Ltd and the Old Oak Common Station Construction Partner, Balfour Beatty Vinci Systra (BBVS). The construction programme is being developed in consultation with the wider rail industry and every effort is being made to minimise disruption to services on the Great Western main and relief lines.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Statement by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 13 October (HLWS503), what plans they have to produce a revised plan for the remainder of HS2 encompassing (1) a revised estimated total cost, (2) revised estimated passenger demand reflecting changes in travel behaviour due to COVID-19, (3) a revised design for Euston Station reflecting maximum number of trains per hour, (4) an option for the permanent termination of HS2 at Old Oak Common, and (5) a revised cost-benefit analysis.

The Full Business Case for Phase One was approved in April this year and included a robust cost-benefit analysis using the latest cost and schedule estimates. The Government has also committed to keeping Parliament regularly updated on HS2 delivery against those cost and schedule estimates, and the first Parliamentary Report published in October provides the latest figures.

The Department is working with colleagues across Government to understand and assess the pandemic’s impact on transport demand and on the wider economy, and how this will affect existing and future business cases for transport infrastructure investment.

In response to the Oakervee Review conclusions, the Department for Transport has commissioned a study looking into the design and construction efficiency of the future Euston station as a whole. A further update on the outcomes of this work will be reported in the next HS2 Parliamentary Report.

There are no current plans to permanently terminate HS2 services at Old Oak Common. HS2 Ltd’s latest advice indicates that no more than 6 trains per hour can reliably be operated from Old Oak Common as a temporary terminus, whilst Euston is being completed, under the current Old Oak Common station design.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their latest funding envelope for HS2, broken down by (1) Phase 1 (Euston to Old Oak Common), (2) Phase 1 (Old Oak Common to the West Midlands), (3) Phase 2a, (4) Phase 2b Western Leg, and (5) Phase 2b Eastern Leg.

In April, the Government approved the Full Business Case for Phase One and set the funding envelope at £44.6 billion (2019 prices), including Euston. The overall Phase 2a estimated cost is ranged between £5-7 billion (2019 prices). Updated cost estimates will be provided for the Phase 2b links to Manchester and Leeds once the Integrated Rail Plan is concluded. The Government has committed to keeping Parliament regularly updated on the latest cost estimates of the scheme via twice yearly reporting. The first of these was published in October.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they commissioned the Institution of Civil Engineers to independently review the options for the HS2 tunnel approaches to Euston; if so, when they will publish the report of that review; and where that review will be published.

In response to the Oakervee Review conclusions, the Department for Transport has commissioned a study looking into the design and construction efficiency of the future Euston station as a whole including considering options to simplify the HS2 approaches into the station.

As part of the study, an independent panel of experts was convened with the support of the Institution of Civil Engineers to consider the proposed design of the HS2 approach tunnels into the station. The study is ongoing and the selection of an optimised design and delivery strategy will include consideration of the work carried out by the Institution of Civil Engineers and all relevant engineering and operational factors. A further update on the outcomes of this work will be reported in the next HS2 Parliamentary Report.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of their decision to conduct a one-year spending review on investment in maritime decarbonisation.

The Government has decided to conduct a one-year spending review, prioritising its response to Covid-19 and focusing on supporting jobs.

The Clean Maritime Plan, published in July 2019, outlines the UK’s pathway to zero carbon emissions in domestic maritime. Further plans on the decarbonisation of the maritime sector will be included in the Transport Decarbonisation Plan.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
26th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the decision to pause the development of HS2 Phase 2B East and to reduce the maximum number of trains on Phase 1 from a planned 18 to 10, what plans they have to review (1) the design of the approaches to Euston station, and (2) the option of terminating all 10 HS2 services at the Old Oak Common station.

The Phase One trunk section is being constructed with the capability to operate up to 18 trains per hour and the Government remains committed to bringing the benefits of high speed rail to the East Midlands, Yorkshire and beyond. The Integrated Rail Plan will consider how Phase 2b of HS2 can be delivered with other major rail investments in the North and Midlands to ensure these are scoped and designed as part of an integrated network, and to make sure people see the benefits of better services more quickly.

In response to the Oakervee Review conclusions, the Department for Transport has commissioned a study looking into the design and construction efficiency of the future Euston station as a whole, including considering options to simplify the HS2 approaches into the station. The study is ongoing and the selection of an optimised design and delivery strategy, will include consideration of all relevant engineering and operational factors.

Advice from HS2 Ltd is that no more than 6 trains per hour can reliably be operated from Old Oak Common within the existing station design. There are no current plans to consider terminating all HS2 services at Old Oak Common.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the actions of HS2 Ltd in the Jones’ Hill Wood area on protected species in that area; what discussions they have had with HS2 Ltd about ceasing any such further actions until a full presence and absence survey of all moderate and high potential bat roost trees at the site has been (1) undertaken, and (2) published for peer review; and what plans they have to ensure that work on HS2 in the Jones’ Hill Wood area complies with guidance issued by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on bat protection and licences.

HS2 Ltd has not commenced works in Jones Hill Wood, and to date no bat roosts (breeding, resting or sheltering places) have been confirmed within the trees in the area.

The presence of illegal trespassers on HS2 Ltd land in recent weeks at Jones Hill Wood has meant that HS2 Ltd has not been able to undertake comprehensive bat surveys in order to confirm whether bats are present. With the trespassers now evicted, HS2 Ltd has commenced bat surveys, and should they be identified, then HS2 Ltd will apply for the appropriate licences and put mitigation measures in place.

HS2 Ltd undertook an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) to support the production of the Phase One Environmental Statement. The EIA was also supported by ecological/ environmental information obtained from local environment records centres (and local groups). The EIA accompanied the High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) Bill which Parliament considered in detail and gave its consent, with Royal Assent granted on 23 February 2017.

HS2 Ltd is currently undertaking ecological surveys at many locations, including Jones Hill Wood. Where protected species are identified from such surveys, specific mitigation measures will be implemented, which are covered under a licence from Natural England, where required. Works which are relevant to requiring licence will only take place when those licenses and permissions have been provided.

HS2 Ltd takes its legal obligations seriously, and all its ecology work is carried out in accordance with the law. Licenses from Natural England ensure that HS2 Ltd has the right safeguarding in place to protect wildlife species, including bats, and that all protections are met.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much was spent on consultancy services by the Department for Transport and its related agencies in the 2019/20 financial year; and what was the (1) cost of, and (2) reason for, each such contract.

The Department for Transport and its Executive Agencies spent £77.5m in the financial year 2019/20 on consultancy services.

The Department publishes details of all spend above £25000 on Gov.uk and this includes details of consultancy contracts. The main areas for spend for consultancy were within rail, covering rail operations and upgrading rail infrastructure.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
8th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to ban all hand-held phone use while driving; and what research they have undertaken, if any, on the impact of hands-free phone usage on the safety of driving.

The Government has recently published a consultation which proposes broadening the offence of using a hand-held mobile phone while driving so that it covers “standalone” or “flight mode” functions as well as the interactive communication functions captured at the moment. The consultation ends on 17 January 2021.

We published, at the same time, a report of analysis of data from the U-Drive naturalistic driving project, exploring mobile phone use whilst driving more broadly, both hand-held and hands-free. This qualitative research helps us to understand both the nature and extent of distraction from mobile phone use while driving. Tightening up the offence of using a hand-held mobile phone while driving is one way of addressing the challenge we face.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what procedure was used to change the location of the Chiltern Tunnel North Portal at Frith Hill in South Heath on the HS2 Phase One route; why the change was authorised; and who authorised that change.

The location of the Chiltern Tunnel North Portal was changed by means of an Additional Provision (known as AP4) to the then HS2 Phase One Bill, introduced on 12 October 2015. The changes brought about by AP4 are therefore part of the Act which subsequently received Royal Assent in 2017.

The change was authorised by the Transport Ministers at the time, following a recommendation by the hybrid Bill Select Committee which was established to scrutinise such proposals. The changes aimed to reduce the scale and duration of local construction activity as well as preserve a section of nearby woodland. Further information can be found in the non-technical summary of AP4 available online on the gov.uk website.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they plan to use the Transport and Works Act 1992 order procedure in support of the development of the HS2 Phase One route between London and Birmingham.

The vast majority of the powers needed to build Phase One of HS2 are provided by the High Speed Rail (London to West Midlands) Act 2017. However, it is on occasion necessary to supplement those powers, for example, to resolve an issue that was not anticipated during the period that the Phase One Bill was being scrutinised by Parliament. A means of doing this is to use an Order under the Transport and Works Act 1992 (the TWA).

The ‘High Speed Rail (London – West Midlands) (Greatmoor Railway Sidings Etc.) Order 2018’ is an example of such an Order which has already been used on the Phase One scheme between London and Birmingham. HS2 Ltd are currently considering an application for a TWA Order relating to the Bromford Tunnel, though no formal application has yet been submitted. The Government does not rule out the use of further TWA Orders in support of Phase One of HS2 where additional authorisation might be considered necessary. Such applications will only be considered where they are deemed to be in the wider public and taxpayer interest, where the amendment provides cost and/or schedule benefits, and where there is sufficient time within the construction programme to accommodate the required process.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Civil Aviation Authority has the power to remove the costs of refurbishment of road tunnels at Heathrow Airport from the Regulated Asset Base of Heathrow Airport Limited.

The Civil Aviation Authority, as an independent economic regulator, will consider the efficiency and reasonableness of all capital expenditure which is added to Heathrow Airport Ltd’s Regulated Asset Base. It can make ex-post decisions to remove expenditure which does not meet efficiency tests. The Civil Aviation Authority’s primary duty is to the consumer and its secondary duty is to ensure Heathrow Airport Ltd can finance its operation.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken, if any, to develop a process to select a partner for a Southern Railway link to Heathrow Airport following the recommendation in the report by Nichols and Agilia Southern Railway Link to Heathrow: market sounding, published on 19 December 2018; and what plans they have to establish a timescale for this process.

The Market Sounding Findings Report was published in December 2018, indicating significant interest for development and financing of Southern Access to Heathrow, the scheme formerly known as Southern Rail Link to Heathrow (SRLtH).

However, the responses to the Market Sounding did not build a feasible case for a Market Led approach to a Southern Access to Heathrow which could progress without government support such as direct subsidy or infrastructure usage guarantees.

Following the publication of this report, Government has undertaken work to fulfil the recommendations set out in the report. The recommendations were that the Department should provide greater detail on minimum requirements and objectives for a SAtH scheme and that the Department should consider an appropriate commercial model for early market involvement.

In November 2019, following extensive stakeholder engagement, the Department published eight Strategic Objectives for SAtH, setting out a narrative and minimum requirements for each.

The Department has also been working alongside external commercial advisers to develop an appropriate ‘market involved’ commercial model for the delivery of this scheme. We remain committed that a Southern Access to Heathrow should be a ‘Pathfinder Project’ with increased levels of market involvement and that this approach will likely be in the form of a development partner or development manager.

Following Ministerial approval and alignment to the anticipated HM Treasury Infrastructure Finance Review, the Department intends to provide further guidance regarding the commercial approach for SAtH in early 2021.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking, if any, to progress the development of a privately financed Southern Railway link to Heathrow Airport.

This government has committed to building a Britain with world class infrastructure. SAtH would be part of the Government’s plan to build back better, greener and faster. We remain committed that a Southern Access to Heathrow should be a ‘Pathfinder Project’ working with the private sector to harness new and innovative ideas while reducing the burden on fare and taxpayers.

The Department has undertaken extensive stakeholder engagement to develop a set of strategic objectives for the Southern Access to Heathrow scheme. Throughout this process the Department has remained ‘outcome-focused’ and mode-agnostic allowing space for private sector innovation and ideas. It is not a detailed specification for the scheme at this stage.

Since the publication of these Strategic Objectives in November 2019, the Department has worked to finalise a ‘Pre-Strategic Outline Business Case’, to outline the case for change and need for a scheme such as this, setting out practically how this scheme should be taken forwards.

The Department is developing commercial and financial models for working alongside the private sector to fund, finance, and deliver this scheme.

Following Ministerial approval and alignment to the upcoming HM Treasury Infrastructure Finance Review, the Department intends to provide further guidance regarding the commercial approach in early 2021.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the investment required to ensure that an increase in the number of air passenger numbers at Heathrow Airport following the COVID-19 pandemic does not correspond with a rise in (1) road congestion, (2) excessive carbon emissions, and (3) falling local air quality.

The Government’s clear focus at this time is responding to COVID-19 and working with the aviation industry to support recovery of the sector. Heathrow Airport will need to comply with existing air quality, carbon and other environmental requirements as passenger numbers recover. DfT is working with transport operators to ensure that public transport facilities will be available as passenger numbers return to normal. We expect environmental considerations to be a key element of the recovery. The new Jet Zero Council jointly chaired with the Secretary of State was created as a partnership between UK industry and government to drive high ambition in the delivery of new technologies and innovative ways to cut aviation emissions. It has been set up to develop new ways to tackle zero emission aviation from multiple perspectives with bold, new thinking.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in assessing the Outline Business Case for a southern rail link to Heathrow Airport submitted by Heathrow Southern Railway Limited to the Department for Transport in September 2016.

In September 2016, the Department received an unsolicited Outline Business Case for a rail link to Heathrow Airport from Heathrow Southern Railway Limited. Subsequently, two processes were undertaken regarding the development of a Southern Rail Link to Heathrow, forming the project now known as Southern Access to Heathrow (SAtH). The Market Led Proposals Call for Ideas, and the Southern Rail Link to Heathrow Market Sounding.

The market sounding process undertaken in 2018 did not ask for detailed specific schemes to be submitted, and no procurement process has been undertaken to select a preferred scheme for Southern Access to Heathrow.

The Department is working to develop an appropriate ‘market involved’ commercial model for the delivery of this scheme. This is an exciting opportunity to harness new and innovative ideas from the private sector while reducing the burden on fare and taxpayers.

The Department has continued to work closely with a range of interested stakeholders on the development of SAtH, including with Heathrow Southern Rail Limited.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many proposals for southern rail access to Heathrow were received in response to the Department for Transport’s call for market-led proposals, issued on 20 March 2018; what the names of such respondents were; and how many respondents have (1) contacted, and (2) been contacted by, the Department for Transport about those proposals since 13 December 2019.

There were two processes carried out concurrently. The first was the Call for Ideas as part of the Market Led Proposals workstream, which was carried out by the Department to explore numerous scheme proposals across a broad range of transport regions and routes; the second was a Market Sounding process that focussed specifically on Southern Access to Heathrow (SAtH) (formerly Southern Rail Link to Heathrow).

There were twenty-seven contributors to the Southern Rail Link to Heathrow Market Sounding response. The Market Sounding Findings Report was published by Nichols and Agilia in October 2018, which includes the list of contributors to the Market Sounding questionnaire. The responses provided as part of the process were done under commercial confidentiality provisions.

The market sounding exercise did not call for specific proposals but sought to explore opportunities to access significant private sector funding sources beyond just rail passenger revenues, including those derived from wider non-rail benefits, and to understand the appetite of the private sector to share the risk of developing the Southern Access scheme.

Following the Market Sounding exercise, in November 2019 the Department published eight Strategic Objectives for the Southern Access scheme and is working to develop a commercial model to bring a private sector partner into the design and delivery of the project. Throughout this process, we have engaged significantly with stakeholders, including a number of those who responded to the market sounding exercise.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many proposals for rail investment other than for southern rail access to Heathrow were received in response to the Department for Transport’s call for market-led proposals, issued on 20 March 2018; what the names of such respondents were; and how many respondents have (1) contacted, and (2) been contacted by, the Department for Transport about those proposals since 13 December 2019.

The Department for Transport received a total of twenty-nine proposals to the call for market-led proposals, excluding those relating to southern rail access to Heathrow. Due to commercial confidentiality we are unable to provide details of the respondents. All respondents were contacted at the time of their proposals. The Department has provided assistance to sponsors to develop their proposals and remain available to all sponsors who responded to the call for ideas. Since 13 December 2019 we are aware of engagement with one proposer.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much civil service time is currently allocated by the Department for Transport (1) for the evaluation of market-led proposals for new railway infrastructure, and (2) for the development of processes for selecting preferred developers for any such infrastructure.

Responsibility for the work relating to market-led proposals is part of the day to day duties undertaken by the Private Investment team within the Rail Strategy and Analysis Directorate.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
17th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by Network Rail on 16 September that they are reviewing every scheme in the rail network enhancements pipeline to test their viability and business case, whether they are subjecting HS2 to the same review process.

The programme was comprehensively reset in February 2020 with a revised budget and schedule. The Department published the Full Business Case for Phase One in April and authorised the start of construction.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
7th Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in considering the Strategic Outline Business Case submitted by the Isles of Scilly Transport Board to the Department for Transport for improved services and investment in new craft; and what plans they have to place an early order for such craft for the Isles of Scilly with the Appledore Shipyard.

The Government’s focus during the current pandemic has been on ensuring that the transport providers which serve the Isles of Scilly stay operational throughout the Covid-19 outbreak and continue to provide vital services. In April 2020, Government provided up to £10.5 million for lifeline ferry and freight service operators to the Isle of Wight and the Isles of Scilly and continues to work closely with the operators, local stakeholders and other Departments to provide clarity over support for autumn, winter and beyond.

We are aware that the Isles of Scilly Transport Board are working on proposals to improve transport services. We look forward to discussing these proposals with the Isles of Scilly Transport Board in due course.

The procurement of any new craft would be subject to competitive tender in accordance with the applicable rules.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the response on 13 July to the Freedom of Information request to HS2 Ltd (FOI-19-3289), whether they (1) informed the committees in both Houses of Parliament which considered the petitions in relation to the High Speed Rail (London - West Midlands) Act 2017 to the High Speed Rail (West Midlands - Crewe) Bill, and (2) have informed, or intend to inform, the committee in the House of Lords which is considering the petitions in relation to the High Speed Rail (West Midlands - Crewe) Bill, that any petitioner who had signed a non-disclosure agreement with HS2 Ltd had signed such an agreement; if so, which petitioners; and if not, why not.

The Promoter’s evidence to the Select Committee only includes information relevant to the matters raised by each petitioner. The Promoter was not asked about NDAs, and so did not mention them to the Select Committees that considered petitions against the High Speed Rail (London - West Midlands) Bill in either House whether any of the petitioners against the Bill had entered into a NDA (or confidentiality agreement) with HS2 Ltd. Nor has the Promoter done so for petitioners against the High Speed Rail (West Midlands - Crewe) Bill. The Select Committees are not inquiries into HS2 or HS2 Ltd – they are a quasi-judicial process that considers requests for changes to the scheme, made by petitioners.

Confidentiality agreements preserve confidentiality when two or more parties exchange sensitive information. These agreements offer protection when parties want to share confidential or commercially sensitive information with each other but need to make sure that the information is not shared more widely. Like any contract, these agreements are entered into by mutual consent, and are utilised to protect not just HS2 Ltd’s confidential information but the confidential information of the third party/ies involved. They provide value to the taxpayer by reducing uncertainty and by helping to reduce generalised blight.

A confidentiality agreement would not prevent a signatory from petitioning against the Bill or appearing before a Select Committee in either House to raise the issues in its petition. It simply seeks to ensure that any confidential information shared between the parties under the terms of the agreement is not disclosed.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, how many (1) road accidents, (2) injuries, and (3) fatalities, of (a) pedestrians, (b) cyclists, and (c) vehicle occupants, were attributed to vehicle drivers using their mobile telephones in the last year for which figures are available.

There were 423 reported accidents in 2018 where a police officer allocated the contributory factor ‘driver using mobile phone’ to at least one of the drivers/riders involved in the accident.

The numbers of fatalities and injuries of road users involved in these accidents are shown in the attached table.

Detailed final statistics on reported personal injury road accidents in Great Britain for 2019 will be published on 30 September 2020. The latest annual published statistics are for 2018.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the suspension of most transport services to, from, and within, the Isles of Scilly during the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent partial reintroduction of services, what action they are taking to ensure the survival of such services and the Islands’ economy into the autumn and beyond the winter period; and whether any such action will be (1) financially commensurate with their plans to keep the railways and bus services operational, and (2) in accordance with their policies of enabling the restoration of the Islands’ economy.

In April 2020, the Government announced emergency funding of up to £10.5 million for lifeline ferry and freight service operators to the Isle of Wight and the Isles of Scilly. This bespoke package of support was in addition to the £330bn package of financial support the Government provided to all sectors to support them through the pandemic.

This support has allowed the transport providers which serve the Isles of Scilly to stay operational throughout the Covid-19 outbreak and continue to provide vital services. More recently, it has also helped to facilitate the return of tourists to the islands which has helped to kickstart the local economy.

Nevertheless, the Government recognises the significant impact Covid-19 will continue to have on the economy of the Isles of Scilly. That is why support for the Isles operators continues to be in place, subject to need. And we are working closely with the operators, local stakeholders and other Departments to provide clarity over support for autumn, winter and beyond.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when the Department for Transport plans to update the data on (1) public experiences of, and attitudes towards, air travel, (2) public attitudes to climate change and the impact of transport, and (3) aviation statistics information; and when each of these were last updated.

The Department for Transport has previously published a statistical publication entitled “Public experiences of, and attitudes towards air travel”, last released in 2014. This presented analyses of a short set of questions relating to air travel that were placed into the Office for National Statistics’ Opinions and Lifestyle Survey. These questions have since been suspended. Information about UK consumers’ behaviour and attitudes towards commercial aviation can now be found in the Civil Aviation Authority’s (CAA) Aviation Consumer Survey and the corresponding reports are published on the CAA website.

The Department for Transport published the National Travel Attitudes Study: Wave 3 in August 2020 which included information around attitudes to climate change. The National Travel Attitudes Study is a bi-annual survey used to collect information on public attitudes towards travel and transport.

The Department for Transport’s compilation of aviation statistics is released annually in the AVI tables series alongside the release of the Department’s annual statistical compendium entitled “Transport Statistics Great Britain”. These aviation statistics were last released in December 2019, and are currently scheduled to be updated in December 2020. Information relating to statistics for UK airports is also available directly from the CAA website.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much HS2 Limited has paid to police forces along the HS2 route; and for what services any such payments were made.

HS2 Ltd only has an Enhanced Police Service Agreement (EPSA) with the British Transport Police for a National Police Liaison Officer, an Analyst and an Intelligence Researcher. This function supports strategic and tactical coordination across all forces that the route will pass through. The costs for the EPSA so far are as follows:

· 2016/17: £31,261.26

· 2017/18: £100,185.95

· 2018/19: £104,803.18

· 2019/20: £125,782

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Sep 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) HS2 Limited has signed, or has incorporated into contracts with, (1) consultancy firms, (2) senior staff of HS2 Limited leaving the organisation, (3) landowners negotiating compulsory purchase orders, and (4) police forces; how many contracts between HS2 Limited and those groups did not include NDAs or similar clauses; and further to the remarks by Nusrat Ghani MP on 15 July 2019 (HC Deb, col 651), how many NDAs signed by HS2 Limited were deemed "competitive and sensitive".

HS2 Ltd uses NDAs to enable the exchange of confidential information with individuals and organisations, who do so on a willing and consensual basis. As Nusrat Ghani MP made clear on 15 July 2019, HS2 Ltd takes its responsibilities on the use of NDAs seriously. While HS2 Ltd holds information on the parties it has signed NDAs with, it is not held in a format that can be disaggregated by category and as such it is unable to provide information on: the number of NDAs with consultancy firms; landowners negotiating compulsory purchase orders; and the number that were deemed "confidential and sensitive".

I can confirm that no NDAs have been signed by HS2 Ltd with police forces or with senior staff who have left the organisation; though a small number of Settlement Agreements have been signed with former staff which contain a confidentiality clause.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 28 July (HL6830), whether in their response to this question they will now provide figures for the amount of funding by way of loans or guarantees they have provided under COVID-19 assistance schemes (1) to international airline operators, (2) to international rail operators, and (3) to international shipping operators.

Please refer to the previous reply provided on 28 July. Government are unable to publish further details due to the sensitive commercial nature of this information.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will place (1) the external consultant review report, and (2) the Infrastructure and Projects Authority review report, on the Wendover Short-Mined Tunnel proposal, in the Library of the House.

The Government will not be placing copies of the reports referred to in the Libraries of either House. These reports are internal to the Department for Transport and are not intended for publication.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a full and independent engineering review has been carried out to assess the (1) construction, and (2) whole life costs, of the (a) Wendover Short Mined Tunnel proposal, and (b) current HS2 Phase One above surface route proposals at Wendover.

I refer to my answer to Lord Berkeley’s question on 30 June. In spring 2018, the Department instructed KPMG to undertake an independent review of the presented options for the Wendover area, both from HS2 Ltd (surface route) and from mbpc Ltd (mined tunnel proposal). The Department asked the review to examine and consider both options, including a comparative assessment of their relative cost, schedule and constructability. The review did not consider whole life costs.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much funding by way of loans or guarantees they have provided under COVID-19 assistance schemes (1) to international airline operators, (2) to international rail operators, and (3) to international shipping operators.

Her Majesty’s Treasury has been releasing weekly figures since 12 May for the three Covid-19 business lending schemes which show continued support for thousands of businesses. The Government is considering what further data can be made available in the future, while balancing the sensitive commercial nature of this information for lenders.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the updated design of the Lower Thames Crossing allows for the Tilbury link road; and whether they have established a timeline for the design, business and funding cases for the Tilbury link road in the Road Investment Strategy 2.

Highways England has designed the Lower Thames Crossing route so that a Tilbury Link Road can, subject to funding and planning permission, be built in the future as a single carriageway connection to Tilbury.

The second Road Investment Strategy (RIS2) identifies the Tilbury Link Road as a proposal to be developed for potential inclusion in RIS3. Highways England’s Delivery Plan and Strategic Business Plan, which include plans for taking forward the RIS3 pipeline proposals, will be published shortly.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to provide companies operating international rail services that are affected by travel restrictions with comparable financial support to that provided to businesses operating international air services.

The Government recognises the significant financial challenges facing companies operating international transport services, including aviation and international rail, as a result of Covid-19.

The Government has therefore announced a broad range of significant measures to assist UK businesses across all sectors in distress, including the Job Retention Scheme. The Department has engaged with operators across transport sectors, including international rail, to support access to these schemes where appropriate.

The Government has also now announced measures to exempt countries from self-isolation requirements, which will open up opportunities for international travel, help the travel sector’s recovery and protect jobs.

The Government will continue to engage closely with transport operators, including those in the international rail sector, as we move towards the next phase of our Covid-19 response, and in particular as we look to safely restart our travel sectors.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they plan to take to in response to the report by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority Annual Report on Major Projects 2019–20, published on 9 July, and its finding that in relation to the HS2 programme, the "successful delivery of the project appears to be unachievable".

The IPA’s report refers to the status of the HS2 project in September 2019. This was before the project was comprehensively reset in February 2020 with a revised budget and schedule, and provision of adequate contingency. Steps have also been taken to ensure the project is delivered in a more disciplined and transparent manner with, for example, a dedicated HS2 Minister appointed and bi-annual updates to be provided to Parliament. As a result, we are confident HS2 is being delivered with the strict oversight needed.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government who are the members of the HS2 land and property acquisition programme review, announced in May; what are the review's terms of reference; and whether external independent inputs will be taken into account as part of the review.

The review commissioned by the Minister for HS2, Andrew Stephenson MP, in May is being undertaken by officials in the Department for Transport supported by their counterparts in High Speed Two Limited. A single external consultant has also provided support to the review.

The terms of reference were intentionally wide-ranging, and required the review team to examine HS2 Ltd’s land and property acquisition processes and, where the evidence demonstrates it, associated wider-government policies.

The review team has considered evidence from numerous independent external sources, both written and through stakeholder interviews. Discussions with practitioners in the land and property field possessing direct personal knowledge of HS2 transactions were a particular source of insight for the review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why they have taken the decision to proceed with the A27 Lewes–Polegate improvement project; what is the project's latest benefit-cost ratio; what environmental impact assessments have been (1) completed, and (2) published; and what consideration they have given to upgrading the East Coastway rail line as an alternative to this project.

No decision has been taken on whether to fund further enhancements to the A27 between Lewes and Polegate beyond those already in construction. The second Road Investment Strategy, published in March, commissioned Highways England to develop proposals for this route for possible delivery after 2025. This work is expected to explore potential options and their benefits and costs, including environmental impacts, as appropriate.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
6th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will place in the Library of the House copies of all reports required to be produced under section 2 of the High Speed Rail (Preparation) Act 2013; and, if so, to include the dates on which those reports were presented to Parliament.

There have been four reports published under the High-Speed (Preparation) Act 2013, covering the periods from:

  • 21 November 2013 - 31 March 2015, published in November 2015

  • 1 April 2015 – 31 March 2016, published in October 2016

  • 1 April 2016 - 31 March 2017, published in October 2017

  • 1 April 2017 - 31 March 2018, published in March 2019

    The expenditure report of 1 April 2015 – 31 March 2016, was placed in the libraries of both Houses in October 2016.

    We will place the other copies of the published reports in the libraries of both Houses, as well as the upcoming report covering the period 1 April 2018 – 31 March 2019, once published.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why privately owned e-scooters have not been included in the trial of legalising selected rental e-scooters.

E-scooter trials will include only rental scooters. This allows trials to take place in a controlled manner while we assess their safety and other impacts. There are a wide range of e-scooters available, built to differing standards. Limiting trials to rental scooters ensures that only approved scooters are used, and that they can meet legal requirements. It will also improve the quality of the evidence we gather, that will inform whether e-scooters should be fully legalised.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether HS2 Ltd used the same methodology to estimate costs on the (1) Area South, (2) Area Central, and (3) Area North, sections of the HS2 Phase One line of route.

HS2 Ltd has utilised a number of methodologies to ensure that its cost estimates are robust, consistent, and appropriate These principles are put in place to enable a common approach for benchmarking across the three Areas of the Phase One line of route, and in order to demonstrate value for money.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
30th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what methodology they use to estimate the costs of high-speed rail projects in the UK.

The Department for Transport looks to its Arm’s Length Body, HS2 Ltd and its consultants to estimate the cost of High-Speed Rail Projects in the UK, including the Rail Method of Measurement (RMM) and Civil Engineering Standard Method of Measurement (CESMM). The estimates are tested through benchmarking both nationally and internationally and are ultimately validated through the contracted prices HS2 Ltd secures with suppliers.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what methodology was used by HS2 Ltd to estimate the costs of the HS2 Phase One line of route between London and the West Midlands.

HS2 Ltd has used a range of methodologies to estimate the cost of Phase 1 including New Rules of Measurement (NRM), Rail Method of Measurement (RMM), and Civil Engineering Standard Method of Measurement (CESMM). The estimates are tested through benchmarking techniques and ultimately validated through the contracted prices secured with suppliers.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what methodology was used by KPMG during the independent external consultant review of the Wendover Short Mined tunnel proposal on the HS2 proposal on the HS2 Phase One line of route.

In spring 2018, the Department instructed KPMG to undertake an independent review of the presented options, both from HS2 Ltd and from mbpc Ltd (on behalf of Wendover Parish Council) for the route of the railway in the Wendover area. The Department asked the review to examine and consider both options, and to consider whether the information provided by mbpc Ltd was sufficient to justify a re-evaluation of the consented scheme. The review included a comparative assessment of the cost, schedule and technical viability of both presented options.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what analysis was carried out to determine the potential long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HS2 passenger demand before the Notice to Proceed for HS2 Phase One was published.

The long-term impact of COVID-19 on rail demand will not become clear for some time. The Notice to Proceed decision for HS2 Ltd was supported by the published Full Business Case which included tests of resilience against a range of demand scenarios encompassing plausible impacts of COVID-19 on passenger demand.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why a decision was made to delay the Williams Review of rail services to assess the impact of COVID-19 on the rail sector, when the Notice to Proceed for HS2 Phase One was published without any such assessment.

Our wider ambitions for rail reform across the industry are unchanged, and the Department is committed to delivering on the detailed, evidence-based priorities which were established as part of the Williams Rail Review. However, in light of the current impact of COVID-19 and its potential consequences, we need to look again at how best to deliver these ambitions: to create a railway where passengers know who is in charge, that delivers value for money and that the UK can be proud of.

Following the decision to proceed with HS2 Phase One in in February, continuing with the technical step of ‘Notice-to-Proceed’ remains the right course of action. Issuing Notice to Proceed provided much-needed certainty for the construction industry and wider supply chain during the current uncertainty and allows construction of this transformational scheme to truly begin.

Work on HS2 is only taking place where it is practical and safe to do so and construction activity remains consistent with Public Health England’s guidance. We are continuing to work closely with HS2 Ltd and its contractors to assess the impact of COVID-19 on the scheme as the situation develops.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
23rd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which consultants have been commissioned to study the efficiency of the proposed HS2 Euston station, including the station approaches.

In response to the Oakervee Review, the Department has commissioned a study looking into the efficiency of the future Euston station, including the station approaches. The study is being supported by Arup, KPMG, Lendlease, Mace-Dragados and WSP, along with the Institution of Civil Engineers who facilitated an expert panel to review the tunnelling proposals.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many times alternative dispute resolution has been used to seek settlements with HS2 landowners.

HS2 Ltd routinely offers Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) to affected parties to resolve disputes in cases where it is not possible to reach agreement by direct negotiation.

Referrals to ADR require the agreement of both HS2 Ltd and the affected party. To date, three statutory blight cases have been determined through ADR. Guidance on ADR was published by HS2 Ltd on 30 May 2018.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton (HL3110), what plans they have to (1) publish a schedule of HS2 work in the Euston area that will be required regardless of design changes that may arise from the Oakervee Review, and (2) ensure that public consultation takes place on this schedule.

There is a programme of engagement in place for the Camden area that provides the opportunity to share updates on works as they become available. This includes community meetings and working groups (currently taking place virtually), the HS2inCamden commonplace website and works notifications. A 12 month forward look summary of works and progress updates are provided at the Euston Community Representatives Group meeting which takes place quarterly and this will include any updates on developments following the Oakervee recommendations as they become available.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton (HL3110), what discussions they have had with HS2 Ltd about halting the installation of ground anchors from Parkway to the DB Cargo Shed area until a comprehensive and independent risk analysis has been completed and published; and whether or not these works are considered to be required regardless of design changes that may arise from the Oakervee Review.

In response to the Oakervee Review, the Department has commissioned a study looking into the efficiency of the future Euston station, including the station approaches. The outcomes of this study will inform the development of the designs of the HS2 Euston station and approaches. Implementation of the selected designs, including the installation of any ground anchors required in the Parkway to the DG Cargo Shed area, will be subject to full risk analysis as they are progressed.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with HS2 Ltd about (1) delaying work on the Adelaide Road Vent Shaft until it is necessary for construction purposes, and (2) conducting a full biodiversity and tree survey in that area.

The Department has held no specific discussions with HS2 Ltd about delaying work on the Adelaide Road Vent Shaft. It is for HS2 Ltd to manage its construction programme and to ensure that works proceed as planned in order to avoid further delays and additional costs to the taxpayer.

HS2 Ltd has undertaken detailed ecological surveys within this area. The results from these surveys were used to inform the environmental impact assessment, as described in the Phase One Environmental Statement, and subsequent surveys have further informed design and any licensing requirements. HS2 Ltd’s local work also included a successful and beneficial outcome for the nearby Adelaide Nature Reserve and public access to it.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
11th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the reasons for delaying the incorporation of amendments to regulations arising from international conventions and obligations into the draft Merchant Shipping (Life Saving Appliances and Arrangements) Regulations 2020; how many such amendments relating to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea are outstanding; and what plans they have to rectify this delay.

The global nature of the maritime sector results in an extensive set of international obligations and amendments, emanating predominantly from the International Maritime Organization and the International Labour Organization, which means that UK domestic legislation is having to be constantly updated. The diverse nature of the obligations means that some conventions are implemented in multiple instruments.

The Department for Transport, including the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, identified the need for 30 separate Statutory Instruments (SIs) related to international obligations, to be delivered on an ongoing basis between 2019 and 2022. Of those, four SIs have been completed, with a further six planned to be laid by the end of 2020. 13 are expected to be completed in 2021, with the remaining seven expected to be completed by the end of 2022. 13 of the 30 SIs relate to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea.

Since 2016, when updating secondary legislation to implement international maritime obligations, where appropriate, the Department for Transport has included ambulatory references; these will allow future changes to technical requirements and associated provisions to be brought into force domestically quicker, without the need for further legislative action.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they plan to publish their response to the Oakervee Review of HS2.

Government received the Oakervee Review on 6 February 2020. The Prime Minister then updated the House shortly afterwards on 11 February, where he set out Government’s response to and position on the Review’s key recommendations, including a commitment to HS2. This was followed by Notice to Proceed in April, marking the formal approval for the project to begin the construction phase. The Department for Transport intends to address the other recommendations in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
9th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 24 February (HL1714) and 9 March (HL1715), whether the HS2-related works at Euston Station that are required irrespective of any design changes, include ground anchors to sustain the wall and structures at Park Village East and other works necessary to accommodate a three-tunnel design; and whether all design options have been subject to a full risk analysis.

The provision of works to specifically accommodate a three-tunnel design do not form part of the current early HS2 works being undertaken at Euston.

In response to the Oakervee Review, the Department has commissioned a study looking into the efficiency of the future Euston station, including the station approaches. The outcomes of this study will inform the development of the designs of HS2 Euston station and approaches. The selected designs taken forward will be subject to full risk analysis as they are progressed.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
19th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government (1) what are the respective responsibilities of (a) the permanent secretary at the Department for Transport, and (b) the chief executive of HS2 Ltd, as accounting officers for HS2, and (2) on what occasions, if any, either accounting officer has sought a direction from ministers to deviate from approved budgets.

The Permanent Secretary of the Department for Transport is the Department’s principal accounting officer. The responsibilities of accounting officers are set out in Chapter 3 of Managing Public Money.

The Chief Executive Officer of HS2 Ltd has been designated as the company’s accounting officer. Additional information on responsibilities with respect to HS2 can be found in the HS2 Ltd Framework Document.

No Ministerial Directions have been sought by either accounting officer with respect to HS2.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following their announcement of a £2 billion funding package to support alternative ways to travel, how this funding will be distributed to local authorities; whether smaller councils such as district councils and London borough councils will be able to access the funding; and what is their expected timeframe for allocating and distributing this funding.

On 23 May, the Secretary of State announced that local authorities would be allocated a share of £225 million to create ‘pop up’ and permanent cycle lanes and reallocate road space. The funding is being released in two phases. The first tranche of £45 million will be released as soon as possible subject to Local Transport Authorities (LTAs) submitting suitably ambitious plans to the Department. London boroughs and Transport for London (TfL) are also eligible for funding. The Department wrote to LTAs, London boroughs and TfL on 27 and 28 May respectively detailing how they should apply for funding. The deadline for LTAs to submit their plans for tranche one is 5 June 2020.

The second tranche of £180m will be released later in the summer, again, subject to LTAs submitting ambitious plans.

Indicative allocations for LTAs, including London can be found on GOV.UK

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
14th May 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of properties required for the development of HS2 Phase 1 have received full compensation in accordance with the Compensation Code.

To date, HS2 Ltd, acting as agents for the Secretary of State, has taken possession of nearly 60sq km of land and paid £1.74 billion for acquisitions in Phase One.

Where land is being acquired under statutory blight provisions, 216 of blight cases (86%) have a ‘full and final’ settlement.

Where land has been acquired through compulsory purchase, compensation claims have been submitted in 460 cases. Many claimants have not requested full and final payment. As of 4 May 2020, HS2 Ltd has received Advance Payment Requests on 313 cases and further compensation claims (in addition to Advance Payment Requests) on 147 cases. Of these 147 cases, 15 (10%) have been settled as a ‘full and final’ settlement. In the other 132 cases, claimants have either reserved the right to make further compensation claims or negotiation continues.

For payments where HS2 Ltd has possessed land temporarily, 246 claims have been submitted. Of those, 136 (55%) have either been paid, or are ready to be paid but rest with the claimants’ solicitors; 31 (13%) cases are going through HS2 Ltd governance in order to make the payment, and 79 (32%) payments are being negotiated between the claimants and HS2 Ltd.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the announcement on 24 April of an emergency fund to support transport links to the Isle of Wight and the Isles of Scilly, how much of the £10.5 million has been allocated to (1) passenger ferries to and from the Isle of Wight, (2) passenger ferries to and from the Isles of Scilly, (3) fixed wing air services, (4) helicopter services, (5) St Mary’s Airport, (6) inter-island passenger ferries, and (7) freight transport links.

On Friday 24 April the Government announced up to £10.5 million for lifeline ferry and freight services to the Isle of Wight and the Scilly Isles as part of a multimillion support package for essential freight services. This fund will help ensure these communities continue to have access to vital medical services on the mainland while protecting the flow of supplies to these regions.

Grants will be provided over a period of three months. Two grants of £1.5m each have already been provided to operators in the Isles of Wight and the Isles of Scilly for the month of April. Subsequent monthly grants are subject to joint approval from my Department and HM Treasury. The allocation of funding between operators, which remain confidential for commercial reasons, is based on each service provider’s needs so that they can continue operating minimum service levels connecting the Isles to the UK mainland.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the publication of their Full Business Case – High Speed 2 Phase One, published on 15 April, why “spend up to the end of 2019 has been treated as sunk and excluded from the appraisal”; whether they have written off such costs in any other major projects previously; if so, which; and whether the exclusion of such costs is compliant with the guidance issued in The Green Book.

The spend to date on HS2 up to the end of 2019 was £7.5bn (2015Q1 prices, excluding VAT). However not all of this is treated as sunk costs in the economic case as the land and property costs could be recoverable were HS2 not to go ahead.

what would the benefit-cost ratio figures be if those costs had been included;

The benefit cost ratio figures including sunk costs are as follows:

Full Network

Statement of Intent

Parliamentary Powers

BCR without WEIs

1.1

0.8

0.8

BCR with WEIs

1.3

1.0

1.0

whether the writing off of development costs up to the time of Notice to Proceed is in compliance with the HM Treasury's Green Book;

The appraisal of HS2 has been undertaken in compliance with HM Treasury’s Green Book. The Green Book states that “[w]hat matters are costs and benefits affected by decisions still to be made.”

what other Government-funded projects have had the development costs written off; and whether any such costs were written off in order to improve the benefit-cost ratio figures.

Costs have not been written off in the approval of HS2, HS2 Ltd’s delegated Funding Envelope (the “Target Cost”) for Phase One is £40bn (2019 prices). This Target Cost includes the costs already spent on the project.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support they are providing to UK ports who have experienced a loss of income due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government announced an unprecedented package of financial measures to support businesses through these trying times, worth £350 billion. My Department’s officials and I have been working closely with operators across the maritime sector, including our Ports, to understand how these measures can be applied.

These support packages will safeguard jobs and protect our industries and have already been taken up by businesses across the country, including by Ports. We will continue to liaise with HM Treasury and the maritime industry, including with our Ports, to ensure that these support packages continue to reflect their needs and to address any other issue they have.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking to support rail freight through the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Government has worked closely with the rail freight industry since the onset of the pandemic to provide support and assistance, particularly to support their excellent efforts to keep freight moving around our country.

At an operational level, the Government has supported Freight Operating Companies (FOCs) by supporting the work to prioritise freight in the revised rail timetable and ensuring its workforce is recognised as critical workers.

To help mitigate the impacts of lower than normal rail freight volumes, the Department has agreed temporary changes to the Mode Shift Revenue Support grant scheme by changing rates to help partially loaded trains to continue to operate. To provide immediate financial support, the Department has supported Network Rail (NR) in setting out a package of measures which include short term deferral of track access charge payments and making immediate payments to FOCs for services they provide to NR. In addition, the Government has put in place a broad package of substantial support for businesses throughout the economy, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme, helping rail freight to trade at this challenging time.

Rail freight will have a key role to play in the recovery from the crisis. We continue to work closely with the industry to support its future growth, so it can continue to deliver significant economic and environmental benefits to the UK.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what precautions are in place to check whether passengers on (1) private, (2)  charter, and (3) scheduled, incoming flights may carry COVID-19; and what are the criteria for requiring the passengers of any such flights be quarantined in the UK.

Targeted screening measures were carried out at UK airports for inbound passengers during the containment phase of the pandemic when the aim was to prevent the virus coming in to the UK. Whilst there is community transmission within the UK, the role played by imported cases is less significant and so our focus in the current delay phase has not been on screening measures at the border. However, as you would expect our approach is being kept under review as the pandemic develops. This may mean that measures and procedures change as we control the spread of, and understand more about, the virus. Any changes to our approach will be led by advice from SAGE and the Chief Medical Officer. Protecting the health of the UK public will always come first.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they invited open access rail passenger operators to operate reduced services alongside franchised operators to deliver (1) an agreed, and (2) a reduced, service on railway lines by both; and if so, how they are ensuring fair competition between franchised and open access operators.

Government has put in place Emergency Measures Agreements with franchised train operators to ensure the railway is able to provide critical services as part of the response to COVID-19. As they do not have a direct contractual relationship with Government, open access passenger operators are not eligible for these agreements. Two open access operators, Grand Central and Hull Trains, have temporarily ceased services and will draw upon the Government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to assist with their costs during the outbreak. Government looks forward to their return to the network once they are able to do so.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to Full business case High Speed 2 Phase One, published on 15 April, what is the total amount of the ‘sunk costs’; what costs incurred before December 2019 were not included in the economic appraisal; what would the benefit-cost ratio figures be if those costs had been included; whether the writing off of development costs up to the time of Notice to Proceed is in compliance with the HM Treasury's Green Book; what other Government-funded projects have had the development costs written off; and whether any such costs were written off in order to improve the benefit-cost ratio figures.

The spend to date on HS2 up to the end of 2019 was £7.5bn (2015Q1 prices, excluding VAT). However not all of this is treated as sunk costs in the economic case as the land and property costs could be recoverable were HS2 not to go ahead.

what would the benefit-cost ratio figures be if those costs had been included;

The benefit cost ratio figures including sunk costs are as follows:

Full Network

Statement of Intent

Parliamentary Powers

BCR without WEIs

1.1

0.8

0.8

BCR with WEIs

1.3

1.0

1.0

whether the writing off of development costs up to the time of Notice to Proceed is in compliance with the HM Treasury's Green Book;

The appraisal of HS2 has been undertaken in compliance with HM Treasury’s Green Book. The Green Book states that “what matters are costs and benefits affected by decisions still to be made.”

what other Government-funded projects have had the development costs written off; and whether any such costs were written off in order to improve the benefit-cost ratio figures.

Costs have not been written off in the approval of HS2. HS2 Ltd’s delegated Funding Envelope (the “Target Cost”) for Phase One is £40bn (2019 prices). This Target Cost includes the costs already spent on the project.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking to advise potential recipients of state aid in the transport sector of recipients' obligations to ensure (1) compliance with (a) EU, and (b) UK, legislation on state aid; (2) compliance (a) within a transport mode, and (b) between modes; and (3) repayment of any aid found to be in contravention of those rules.

The Department has designed any support for the transport sector to be compliant with all relevant legislation and international obligations, which place requirements on authorities rather than recipients. Relevant obligations will be imposed on recipients as condition of support where necessary. Officials also work closely with recipients of aid to make them aware of their contractual responsibilities, which are designed to ensure that the UK is compliant with its obligations.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which projects HS2 are continuing construction work on during the COVID-19 pandemic; and what assessment they have made of the impact of such continuation on the construction workers on those sites.

The Government’s current policy is that construction activity should continue where it can be undertaken in accordance with the Public Health England guidance and industry best practice. The Department has asked HS2 Ltd to work closely with their construction partners to ensure compliance with these guidelines in order to protect their workforce and local communities. Sites will not operate where this cannot be achieved. Around 25 sites are now closed where the guidance cannot be met. Work at the remaining sites is either paused, whilst contractors review whether operations can continue, or is proceeding where sites can continue to operate in accordance with the guidance.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to Conclusion 21 of the Oakervee Review of HS2, published on 11 February, whether a revised funding envelope has been set for Phase 1 of HS2 before issuing the Notice to Proceed; whether that envelope adheres to the Conclusion’s recommendation that it should have “appropriate levels of contingency, to be held by the Department for Transport and the Treasury, and which is realistic”; and if not, when the revised funding envelope will be set.

A revised funding envelope has been set for HS2 Phase 1 in line with the Prime Minister’s statement in February and as set out in the Full Business Case that has been recently published alongside the Notice to Proceed decision. This includes provision for schedule and cost contingency.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 9 March (HL 1714 and 1715) and 11 March (HL1912) on the HS2 plans for Euston, whether any work on the proposed HS2 tunnels between Old Oak Common and Euston will be commenced before a complete review of the Euston proposals, including the tunnelling plans in the Euston area, has been undertaken and the findings published.

In relation to the proposed HS2 tunnels between Old Oak Common (OOC) and Euston, in order to avoid further delays to implementation of the HS2 project, HS2 Ltd and its contractors will continue with the current programme of works, where such works will be required regardless of design changes that may arise in response to the outcomes of the Oakervee Review.

The Tunnel Boring Machines (TBMs) that will tunnel most of the OOC to Euston tunnels, will start from OOC, where space and facilities are available to build the TBM launch site and manage efficiently the disposal of materials excavated from construction of the tunnels. Tunnel construction work will commence shortly, including building the subsurface TBM launch pits and commissioning the TBMs, which will then tunnel to Euston. These works will take a number of years to complete, which will allow time to complete the review of the HS2 scheme at Euston recommended in the Oakervee Review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following their announcement to provide up to £167 million to bus operators under the COVID-19 Bus Services Support Grant on 3 April, what plans they have to provide funding to the (1) light rail and tram, and (2) passenger and freight shipping, and (3) ferry, sectors.

The Government announced a multi-million-pound support package on 24 April, including support for the light rail systems in Sheffield, Manchester, West Midlands, Nottingham, and Tyne and Wear, and is working with local authorities to identify what support is needed to allow essential services to continue. The support package also included up to £17 million for critical freight services routes between Northern Ireland and Great Britain, up to £10.5 million for lifeline ferry and freight services to the Isle of Wight and the Scilly Isles, and further support for critical routes between Britain and the European mainland.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure the continuity of (1) essential transport services, consistently across, and within, modes, and (2) viable services after the removal of COVID-19 movement restrictions; why competition law has been temporarily suspended for Isle of Wight ferry services; and what plans they have to suspend such law for other transport providers and modes, in particular open access rail operators.

The Department recognises that the COVID-19 outbreak has had unprecedented effects across the transport sector and the Government has provided comprehensive support packages across the transport sector, to ensure vital routes for supplies and people kept open.

The Government announced a multi-million-pound support package on 24 April, including support for the light rail systems in Sheffield, Manchester, West Midlands, Nottingham, and Tyne and Wear, and is working with local authorities to identify what support is needed to allow essential services to continue. The support package also included up to £17 million for critical freight services routes between Northern Ireland and Great Britain, up to £10.5 million for lifeline ferry and freight services to the Isle of Wight and the Scilly Isles, and further support for critical routes between Britain and the European mainland.

The Government also announced, on Friday 3 April, a funding boost totalling £397 million for vital bus operators, to help keep bus routes running during the coronavirus pandemic.

To help keep the railways open, the Government has provided train operators (on franchises let by the Department) the opportunity to temporarily transition onto Emergency Measures Agreement, which suspend the normal financial mechanisms of franchise agreements, transferring all revenue and cost risk to the government.

The Government has also provided a comprehensive support package for businesses, which includes measures to support workers through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, and support to businesses through the COVID Corporate Financing Facility, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme.

The Department is engaging with the transport sector on a regular basis to understand the impacts of COVID-19 on their businesses and providing guidance on how to access the government's business support schemes.

The Government has already set out five clear tests to consider before making any adjustment to its approach. Work is underway across government and working closely with transport providers to consider how the transport system could be restarted safely and reliably once these conditions have been met

Competition law has been temporarily suspended for Isle of Wight ferry services to allow the Isle’s lifeline operators to maintain a crucial lifeline between the island and the mainland. With the exception of the Solent Maritime Crossings, the Government has no current plans to grant further exclusion orders for transport providers during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
21st Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support they are providing to domestic air travel service providers; whether they offer support to more than one such provider operating on each route; and if not, how they decide which provider to support.

The aviation sector is important to the UK economy and the Government recognises the challenging times facing the sector as a result of COVID-19.

The aviation sector, including those operating domestic air services, will be able to draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including a Bank of England scheme for firms to raise capital, Time to Pay flexibilities with tax bills, financial support for employees and VAT deferrals.

We are continuing to work closely with the sector and are willing to consider the situation of individual providers, so long as all other Government schemes have been explored and all commercial options exhausted, including raising capital from existing investors.

These measures have been designed to ensure that companies of any size receive the help they need to get through this difficult time.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Oakervee Review of HS2, published on 11 February, and before they issue a Notice to Proceed for Phase 1 of HS2, what plans they have to ensure that HS2 Ltd achieves a satisfactory position with each of the Main Works Civils contractors in order to obtain acceptable Stage 2 prices and a reasonable level of value engineering; and where HS2 Ltd cannot achieve a satisfactory position with each of the Main Works Civils contractors, whether they will re-procure any such contracts before a Notice to Proceed is issued.

Notice-to-Proceed is a contractual step between HS2 Ltd and its Main Works Civils contractors. The Government will provide an update in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to Conclusion 59 of the Oakervee Review of HS2, published on 11 February, whether the Department for Transport will update and publish a revised business case for the whole HS2 project, including the latest costs and benefits for the project, before a Notice to Proceed on Phase 1 is issued.

The Government has committed to publish the Full Business Case for HS2 Phase One, to set out the evidence underpinning this element of the scheme. The Government will provide an update in due course.

HS2 is a crucial investment, not just in our transport network but in the wider UK economy. It will provide thousands of extra seats, help level up our country and play a key role in helping government reach its 2050 carbon net zero objective.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
25th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that HS2 Ltd deliver the required improvements in its capability before a Notice to Proceed is issued for HS2 Phase 1 in line with the assurance given by HS2 Ltd to the Oakervee Review of HS2, published on 11 February.

As the Prime Minister made clear in his statement to Parliament on 11 February, changes are needed to be made to ensure that HS2 is properly managed and its potential fully realised. In line with this, HS2 Ltd has and continues to take steps to enhance its organisational capability. The Government will provide an update in due course.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, what steps they are taking to ensure the continued operation of open-access passenger operators following the reduction in the number of rail passengers as a result of COVID-19; whether such steps include financial support to such operators; and if so, how much funding they intend to provide.

The Government fully understands that open-access passenger operators are suffering from significant financial pressures as a result in the decline of passenger numbers in recent weeks. The Government has already made available a wide range of substantial measures to support businesses across the economy. The Government is continuing to actively engage with open-access passenger operators on the specifics of their situations.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Highways England plans to use any smart motorway infrastructure to promote the Great British Spring Clean.

This will be the fifth year that Highways England has taken part in Keep Britain Tidy’s Great British Spring Clean, with this campaign now rescheduled to 11 – 27 September 2020. As in previous years, they will promote the campaign and their involvement through a variety of media channels.

Highways England use variable message signs to provide immediate safety advice or information that helps motorists with their journeys and have no plans to use variable message signs to promote the Great British Spring Clean.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much funding they have allocated to the collection and clearance of roadside litter in their Road Investment Strategy 2 (RIS2): 2020 to 2025 policy paper.

On the areas of the Strategic Road Network where Highways England bears direct responsibility for litter clearance, Highways England’s agreements with its maintenance contractors requires them to carry out litter picking as a core contractual requirement. As a result, it is not possible to specify how much funding provided for road maintenance is allocated specifically to litter clearance. RIS2 introduces a performance indicator measuring the percentage of the SRN where litter is graded at B or above under the Litter Code of Practice, a widely-used definition of litter condition. Further detail of the metric scope will be laid out in Highways England’s Operational Metrics Manual, which is due to be published later in the Spring.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their current planned date to stop the sale of new petrol, diesel and plug-in hybrid cars; and whether they intend to bring that date forward.

On 4 February, the Prime Minister announced that the Government is consulting on bringing forward an end to the sale of new petrol, diesel and hybrid cars and vans from 2040 to 2035, or earlier if a faster transition appears feasible. This follows our manifesto commitment and reflects the independent Committee on Climate Change (CCC) advice that the phase out date should be 2035 or ideally 2030, and that only battery electric or other low-carbon alternative vehicles, such as hydrogen powered vehicles, should be permitted to be sold after this point.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of the central government car fleet is currently (1) electric powered, or (2) hybrid; and by what date they expect to have phased out all petrol, diesel and plug-in hybrid vehicles in that fleet.

Currently battery electric vehicles and plug in hybrid vehicles make up 2.25% of the central government car fleet. A breakdown of numbers between electric powered and plug-in hybrid cars is not available at this time. Budget 2017 included a commitment to electrify 25% of cars in central Government department fleets by 2022, and as part of the Road to Zero Strategy published in July 2018, the Government announced a further commitment to make 100% of the central Government car fleet ultra low emission (i.e. zero emission or plug in hybrid) by 2030.

Regarding Ministerial cars provided by the Government Car Service (GCS), with the support of the Department, the Government Car Service is replacing its fleet with ultra low emission vehicles as cars become due for replacement. Currently, 48% of the GCS fleet is either battery electric, petrol electric hybrid or hydrogen electric (compared to only 17% in 2016), and they are actively looking at options to accelerate this transition.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 19 February (HL1348), whether they intend to require that the line is (1) designed to accommodate rail freight, (2) to be electrified, and (3) to be provided with suitable rail freight terminal facilities to serve the freight logisitics facilities along the route of the line; what is the latest business case for East West Rail; and whether that business case includes consideration of any environmental benefits of rail freight use of that network.

The strategic scope for East West Rail is currently being developed, including options for depots. Electrification is being reconsidered after previously being descoped to reduce capital costs. At a minimum, passive provision is being provided in construction so that electrification may be implemented in the future subject to value for money and affordability. EWR Co. are considering provision for freight, ensuring the route will support existing freight, and are currently undertaking a study to understand potential freight use. The Western Section of East West Rail is moving towards its Full Business Case, whilst the Central Section is at SOBC stage. As the business cases continue to develop, they will consider the benefits of freight.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the latest cost estimate for Crossrail 2; and what proportion of its revenue is expected to come from passengers using HS2 at Euston.

Crossrail 2 is at an early stage of scheme development. The Government, Transport for London and Network Rail are currently working to refine the cost estimates for Crossrail 2, to reflect the findings of the Independent Affordability Review, ahead of a Spending Review. Cost estimates will become available once that work is completed and scheme development has reached an appropriate level of maturity. Revenue numbers at this level of detail are not available at this stage.

However, current analysis estimates that 50,000 passengers in total would board and alight Crossrail 2 services at Euston in the 2041 morning peak period (0700 to 1000). This represents approximately 10% of the total Crossrail 2 demand and around a fifth of Crossrail 2 passengers at Euston are expected to be using HS2 services.

These projections are regularly updated as part of ongoing updates to TfL’s forecasting models, and Crossrail 2’s business case analysis.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by the Prime Minister on 11 February with reference to HS2 that they will "take proper control of what is happening at Euston which…has been a shambles" (HC Deb, col 729) and comments in the Oakervee Review of HS2, published on 11 February, that the existing planned construction of the approach in the form of a tunnelled dive-under is "expensive and exposes major risks to the existing railway and services during construction", whether they will instruct HS2 to cease all further temporary works in the area around Euston to avoid possible unnecessary destruction until the new control and management is in place with an agreed design and method of construction.

In a statement to Parliament on 11 February, the Prime Minister set out that after careful consideration of the independent Oakervee review, the decision has been taken to proceed with HS2. The Government published the Independent Oakervee Review on 11 February and it is now considering its formal response to the review conclusions and recommendations, including those in relation to Euston.

In relation to HS2 works in the area around Euston, in order to avoid further delays to implementation of the HS2 project, HS2 Ltd and its contractors will continue with the current programme of enabling and early works; only where such works will be required regardless of design changes that may arise in response to the outcomes of the Oakervee Review.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
26th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government who within the government will be principally responsible for delivering the Integrated Rail Plan described in the Terms of reference for an integrated rail plan for the north and midlands, published on 21 February; and whether, in "working with HS2", they will take into account the recommendations of the Oakervee Review of HS2, published on 11 February, which found that "HS2 Ltd technical assurance or challenge panels which are made up of experts, some previously involved with the design of the scheme, should be refreshed and reconstituted".

As set out in his speech to the New Statesman's Northern Powerhouse conference on 27 February 2020, the HS2 Minister will lead the development of the Integrated Rail Plan (IRP). The Government agrees with the Oakervee review that we need to strengthen HS2 Ltd’s governance and capability, and we are taking decisive action to do just that. The IRP is to review arrangements for sponsorship and delivery.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the statement by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 11 February (HL Deb, col 2153), whether the projected cost for the first phase of HS2 includes the capital cost of rolling stock, provision of power supply, and infrastructure and rolling stock maintenance facilities.

The projected costs for HS2 (phase 1) are inclusive of the design and build of the rolling stock, the connections to the national grid for power supplies, and the infrastructure and rolling stock maintenance facility.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the forthcoming cost benefit analysis for the first phase of HS2 will (1) include the construction of Euston station and approaches and, if so, for which design; (2) include consideration of the impact of adopting different design speeds; and (3) be based on (a) 14, or (b) 18, trains per hour in each direction.

The forthcoming cost-benefit analysis which will inform the HS2 Phase One Full Business Case includes the construction of Euston station and its approaches based on the baseline design plans developed by HS2 Ltd. Government published the recommendations of the Independent ‘Oakervee’ Review on 11 February and it is now considering its formal response to these recommendations. Any decisions on the impact of different designs speeds and the number of trains that operate on the High Speed network will be reflected within the Business case.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether their plans for new delivery arrangements for the Euston terminus for HS2 will affect their plans to publish a notice to proceed for Phase 1.

Euston is a highly complex major programme in its own right, with a number of projects being developed within a confined space. Greater integration between the projects at Euston, via the establishment of a single plan and the establishment of a dedicated delivery vehicle for the Euston project, is essential to delivering the full benefits of the scheme. The new delivery arrangements which are being considered for the Euston terminus will not impact a decision on whether to issue a Notice to Proceed.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what further steps need to be taken before they will issue a notice to proceed for the first phase of HS2; and (1) where, and (2) when, they expect construction to start.

Following the Prime Minister’s announcement on 11 February that the Government will proceed with HS2, the Final Business Case for the first phase of the scheme, between Birmingham and London, must now be formally approved ahead of the intended start of main construction works along the route in April 2020. The business case will set out the strategic importance of the scheme and allow a final decision by Government on its viability, affordability, achievability, deliverability and value for money. Approval of the case is as a pre-condition of HS2 Ltd issuing Notice-to-Proceed to its supply chain.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the (1) scope, and (2) timescale, of the assessment to be conducted by the National Infrastructure Commission on integrated rail services for the north of England; and whether that assessment will include consideration of HS2 phase 2A.

As set out in the Integrated Rail Plan for the Midlands and the North terms of reference, the National Infrastructure Commission will be looking at rail needs for the Midlands and North. As part of their assessment, the evidence base on what can be provided by Northern Powerhouse Rail, HS2 Phase 2b, Midlands Rail Hub and other major Network Rail projects will be examined.

The Secretary of State for Transport intends to publish the Integrated Rail Plan, which will be informed by the NIC assessment, by the end of the year.

Lessons learnt from Phase 1 and Phase 2a will be incorporated into the plan, but it will not reconsider Phase 2a.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the decision by the Upper Tribunal (Land Chamber) on 10 February, that owners of land and property being purchased by HS2 Ltd can apply for a Certificate of Appropriate Alternative Development, on the (1) capital cost, and (2) construction programme, of HS2.

Certificates of Appropriate Alternative Development (‘CAADs’) are an existing mechanism enshrined in the Compensation Code that can assist in establishing the level of compensation payable to affected parties and have no impact on the construction schedule.

The property cost estimate anticipates that some claimants will seek a CAAD and be issued with a positive certificate by the local planning authority or award of the Upper Tribunal.

On the substance of this case, there is an on-going legal process and we do not provide commentary on live litigation.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
5th Feb 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what provision for rail freight is contained in Network Rail’s Transport and Works Act order application for East West Rail, approved on 5 February.

Article 37(1) of the Network Rail (East West Rail) (Bicester to Bedford Improvements) Order 2020 provides that “Network Rail may operate and use the railway and other authorised works as a system, or part of a system, of transport for the carriage of passengers and goods.” Article 37(1) therefore provides that the railway (and other authorised works) may be used for the purposes of rail freight.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
27th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government why works in connection with HS2 and Granby Terrace bridge were transferred from the scope of the work being undertaken by Skanska Costain Strabag JV, as the main works contractors, to that of Costain Skanska JV, as the enabling works contractor.

The HS2 works to Granby Terrace bridge, which include the partial demolition of the existing bridge and the construction of a new extension over the HS2 alignment, was scope originally allocated to the Early Works Contractor Costain Skanska JV (CSJV). To enable the efficient delivery of the HS2 works, HS2 Ltd reviews which of its Contractors is best placed to deliver specific scope items where there is an opportunity to deliver cost savings, schedule benefits or reduce interface risks. Following careful consideration, HS2 Ltd concluded that the Main Works Civils Contractor (Skanska Costain Strabag JV) is better placed to undertake the works because of the benefits to the overall HS2 programme and therefore decided to transfer the scope.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
20th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to comply with International Maritime Organisation protocols that require ships to purify their ballast water to prevent the arrival of invasive species, including (1) Chinese mitten crabs, (2) Portuguese oysters, and (3) zebra mussels, in ships’ ballast tanks.

The Department for Transport is currently developing the UK legislative package to enable the UK to accede to the International Convention on the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments by Summer 2020 with implementing legislation in place by Autumn 2020.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that Flybe flights between Newquay and London which are operated under a public service obligation are maintained in the event of Flybe ceasing operations.

The Government recognises the important role that Flybe plays in the UK’s connectivity by flying many of the regional routes that other providers do not operate. Flybe has now confirmed that they will continue to operate as normal, preserving flights to airports such as Southampton, Belfast and Birmingham, as well as the Newquay to London public service obligation.

Baroness Vere of Norbiton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
28th Apr 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish data on the number of deaths per 100,000 of the population from COVID-19 on a regular basis for each (1) region, and (2) nation, in (a) the UK, and (b) other countries.

Statistics on deaths involving COVID-19 are available from a range of sources. The Department publishes a daily count, covering the whole of the United Kingdom, and showing how many people have died following a positive test. That source does not provide a breakdown by region or other factors, but it is sourced directly from data published separately by Public Health organisations in each of the four nations of the UK, and each of those provides a detailed count by region, local authority or health board. Data from Public Health England, for example, provides both a trend series and a breakdown by local authority.

Separately, the Office for National Statistics now publishes very detailed data each week, drawing on data from death registration systems. Those statistics include a breakdown by region, age and gender for England and Wales and also provides direct links to equivalent sources for Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Our current best source of international comparisons is the daily tracker published by Johns Hopkins University in the United States, and that is the source used to inform the daily Downing Street press briefings.

12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much was spent on consultancy services by the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office and its related agencies in the 2019/20 financial year; and what was the (1) cost of, and (2) reason for, each such contract.

FCDO's consultancy spend in 2019/20 was £2.96m.

Fiscal Year

FCO

DFID

2019/20

£2,936,902

£24,609

Legacy DFID's current system does not allow a breakdown of consultancy spend per contract type, this information is not held centrally but at country office level. Below is a breakdown of consultancy spend for legacy FCO:

FCO Consultancy Spend 2019-20

Amount (£)

Strategic planning consultation services

39,508

Finance Consultancy

39,933

IT/IS Consultancy

469,123

Legal Consultancy

761,088

Marketing and Communications Consultancy

5,000

PPM Consultancy

41,223

Procurement Consultancy

149,901

Property and Construction Consultancy

186,840

Strategy Consultancy

327,415

Technical Consultancy

509,360

Org and Change Management Consultancy

407,510

Grand Total

2,936,902

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Jul 2020
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker why Queen's Consent was required in respect of the Pensions Schemes Bill.

Queen’s Consent is required for provisions affecting the Royal Prerogative, and the hereditary revenues, the Duchy of Lancaster or the Duchy of Cornwall, and the personal property or personal interests of the Crown. Queen’s Consent was sought for the Pension Schemes Bill as it affected the interests of the Crown in relation to the pensions of Royal Household employees.

20th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they funded the return charter flight for the Duke of Sussex from the United States to the UK for the Queen's Jubilee celebrations.

No public money was used for the charter flight for the Duke of Sussex from the United States to the UK.

The Government provides financial support to the Queen known as the Sovereign Grant, to fund The Queen's official duties and maintain the Occupied Royal Palaces. Funding from the Sovereign Grant only covers expenses incurred by other Members of the Royal Family when they undertake official duties on behalf of Her Majesty.
Baroness Penn
Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip)
6th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much taxation revenue was collected from each of the three cross-Solent ferry operators in each of the last five years.

HMRC is bound by a strict duty of confidentiality, as laid down in the Commissioners for Revenue & Customs Act 2005, with respect to all the information it holds. Therefore, HMRC is unable to provide identifiable customer information in connection with its functions.

19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Annual Report on Major Projects 2020–21 by from the Infrastructure and Projects Authority, published on 15 July, (1) why historical data of eight years of 'amber/red' or 'red' colour ratings has been deleted, (2) why the HS2 project has been separated into Phases 1, 2a and 2b, and (3) on what (a) costs, (b) benefits, and (c) timetable, are the revised assessments of Phases 1 and 2b made; and what steps they plan to take to ensure these are assessed as 'amber' or 'green' in the 2021–22 report.

The IPA is not responsible for the individual GMPP projects, and the decisions to re-assess, or cancel a project belong to the relevant Departmental Accounting Officer.

The previous Delivery Confidence Assessment (DCA) rating colours for HS2 are not shown as this is the first time that the individual phases of the project have been presented in the IPA’s Annual Report, previously HS2 has been presented as a single project.

The IPA will continue to work closely with all departments and delivery bodies, including the Department for Transport and HS2 Ltd to ensure efficient and effective delivery to drive construction innovation and capture and share lessons learned.

19th Jul 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Annual Report on Major Projects 2020–21 by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority, published on 15 July, in respect of the projects categorised 'red', what plans they have (1) to reassess the need for these projects, and (2) to cancel these projects; and what estimate they have made of the savings that would result from cancelling these projects.

The IPA is not responsible for the individual GMPP projects, and the decisions to re-assess, or cancel a project belong to the relevant Departmental Accounting Officer.

The previous Delivery Confidence Assessment (DCA) rating colours for HS2 are not shown as this is the first time that the individual phases of the project have been presented in the IPA’s Annual Report, previously HS2 has been presented as a single project.

The IPA will continue to work closely with all departments and delivery bodies, including the Department for Transport and HS2 Ltd to ensure efficient and effective delivery to drive construction innovation and capture and share lessons learned.

16th Jun 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what categories of persons are exempt from the normal application of death duties and under what circumstances; and which legislation enables any such exemptions.

The normal application of death duties is set out in the Inheritance Tax Act 1984 (IHTA 1984) which includes a number of exemptions for specific categories of persons. For example, Armed Forces personnel who die in active service are exempt from inheritance tax under section 154(1)(a) IHTA 1984. IHTA 1984 does not apply in respect of the Sovereign who is not legally liable to pay inheritance tax. The Memorandum of Understanding on Royal Taxation sets out the tax position for the Sovereign and The Prince of Wales.

12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what new customs IT systems have been identified by the Border and Protocol Delivery Group as being required from the end of the Brexit transition period; and if any such systems are required, (1) how many of those systems they expect to be fully operational and tested (a) now, (b) from 1 January 2021, and (c) after 1 January 2021; (2) when these systems will be available to businesses for training purposes, and (3) what contingency arrangements they have put in place to deal with any delays in the roll out of those systems.

The following systems are expected to be fully operational and tested (a) now, (b) from 1 January 2021, and (c) after 1 January 2021

New IT System

Fully Operational and Tested Now

To Be Fully Operational against the January requirements, and Tested From Jan 2021

To Be Fully Operational and Tested After Jan 2021

NCTS

Y

Y

GB S&S (ICS 2.0)

Y

Y

GVMS

y

It is expected that businesses will be fully operational for testing purposes to the time scales set out below:

IT System

Date Operational for Testing Purposes? DD/MM

NCTS

02/12/20

GB S&S (ICS 2.0)

26/10/20

GVMS

12/12/20

These systems will be fully operational against the January requirements.

The Government is ensuring that it is able to operate a model that fulfils its obligations and is working through contingency or fallback solutions in case of non-delivery of systems and lack of external readiness.

13th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to set out further details of their planned review of The Green Book; and what steps they are taking to ensure (1) that they effectively consider their target to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 in undertaking that review, and (2) that all Government departments treat reaching that target as a priority.

The Government’s review of the Green Book - the government’s core guidance on how to develop and appraise schemes against government objectives – is currently ongoing.

An updated Green Book will be published later in the year, and early findings will inform the allocations process at the Spending Review in Autumn.

The review is focused on ensuring that the guidance is consistent with the Government’s ambition to level-up opportunity across the country, and it is also considering more broadly how project approval decisions are being made and looking at what clearer guidance and support to practitioners can be provided.

.

The Green Book currently provides a framework for valuing the costs and benefits of interventions, including with regards to climate change mitigation and other environmental impacts. The guidance requires that environmental impacts for projects and programmes are assessed and that legal commitments such as net-zero must be considered as part of appraisal.

Tackling climate change is a priority for the Government. The UK was the first major economy in the world to legislate for net zero, increasing the ambition of our commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions under the Climate Change Act 2008. The Government is committed to meeting that challenge.

10th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority Annual Report on Major Projects 2019–20, published on 9 July, which shows that the successful delivery (1) of 32 projects were in doubt and categorised as amber-red risk, and (2) 11 projects appeared to be unachievable and categorised as a red risk, what cross-departmental steps they are taking to improve the (a) performance, (b) delivery, and (c) cost control, of major projects.

The Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) has a number of cross-departmental measures currently under way to improve the Government's delivery of major projects.

These include a new, more rigorous approach to accreditation for Government project delivery professionals, in order to drive skills in this area at all levels across Government.

The IPA is also strengthening the Government’s assurance regime, to ensure that processes are followed with rigour and improve quality across all departments and projects.

Finally, the IPA is working across Government to ensure better estimation of costs and timescales, better benchmarking capability and more consistent application of key principles of cost estimation as part of the Treasury’s ‘Green Book’ methodology.

29th Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what criteria they intend to adopt in assessing the possible awards for financial rescue under Project Birch; whether their preference is for a loan or equity; and how they will ensure that any such award does not create a dominant position in the sector concerned.

As part of its normal operations the government has always considered providing support?to strategically important companies that can reasonably be expected to have a long-term viable future, and whose failure or distress could cause disproportionate harm to the UK economy or society. Companies must have exhausted all other options before being considered, and any support given will be on terms that protect the taxpayer, with existing lenders and shareholders expected to contribute meaningfully to and share in the financial burden.

All interventions will be, by definition, bespoke. As appropriate, the Government will include provisions to allow the taxpayer to share in the benefits of a company’s recovery, including through equity, equity-like and hybrid instruments. Any intervention will be designed to minimise economic distortion and be on commercial, or close to commercial terms, as far as is practicable.

30th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Earl of Courtown on 28 January (HL444), how much money each member of the Royal family received from the Duchy of Lancaster in the last financial year; whether any such money was for Royal or private purposes; and whether any such funds are tax deductible.

The Government does not hold this information as income from the Duchy of Lancaster forms part of The Queen's private income. It is largely used to meet official expenditure incurred by Her Majesty and other members of the Royal Family which is not met by the Sovereign Grant, and is taxed to the extent that the income is not used for official purposes.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
30th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Earl of Courtown on 28 January (HL443), how much of funding provided by the Sovereign Grant was spent on official trips by helicopter between royal residences.

A list of journeys undertaken by members of the Royal Family and their staff during 2018-19 which had travel costs of £15,000 or more, met from the Sovereign Grant, is available on the Monarchy website – in the Royal Travel Appendix[1]. The Royal Travel Appendix also sets out that a further 204 journeys were undertaken by helicopter at a total cost of £688,845. Details of journeys below the £15,000 threshold are not published.

[1] https://www.royal.uk/sites/default/files/media/royal_travel_-_journeys_costing_ps15000_or_more_final.pdf

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
30th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any travel costs for the Royal family funded by the Duchy of Cornwall can be claimed as an allowable business expense.

Appendix B of the Memorandum of Understanding on Royal Taxation [1] sets out the rules for determining the income of the Duchy of Cornwall on which tax is to be paid.

Among the expenses to be taken into account are payments made to meet official expenses incurred by The Prince of Wales and any members of his family in assisting The Queen in carrying out Her official duties.

[1] https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/208633/mou_royal_taxation.pdf

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
30th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by the Earl of Courtown on 21 January (HL288), what advice they have given to the Royal Household about the relative environmental impact of chartering planes for long distance flights when scheduled services are available for the same, or similar, routes.

I refer the Noble Lord to the answer I gave him on 21 January 2020 to Question HL288.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
30th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, in light of the fact that the Duchy of Cornwall operates in the private sector, how much (1) capital gains, and (2) corporation, tax has been paid by the Duchy in each of the past five years.

The Duchy of Cornwall is a private estate and is not subject to corporation tax. The Duke of Cornwall (The Prince of Wales) pays tax as agreed in the Memorandum of Understanding on Royal Taxation [1]. He does not pay capital gains tax since he does not receive the Duchy’s capital gains. The Duke pays income tax voluntarily on his income from the Duchy of Cornwall to the extent that is not used to meet official expenditure.

There is no requirement placed upon private individuals to disclose their accounts or tax to public scrutiny. However, it should be noted that HRH The Prince of Wales does publish an Annual Review [2].

[1] https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/208633/mou_royal_taxation.pdf

[2] https://www.princeofwales.gov.uk/annual-review/2018-2019

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the use of publicly funded helicopters and charter planes by the Royal family is restricted to use for official engagements; and if so, which members of the Royal family are permitted to use such transport.

The Sovereign Grant meets the cost of official journeys undertaken by or in support of The Queen and other members of the Royal Family. Travel by The Queen, The Duke of Edinburgh, The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall and The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge between residences is categorised as official.

The Sovereign Grant does not fund any private travel costs. The cost of any private use by the Royal Family of Sovereign Grant facilities is fully reimbursed.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether data is available on how the Sovereign Grant is spent; and if so, where that data is available.

Each year the Royal Household publishes the Sovereign Grant and Sovereign Grant Reserve Annual Report and Accounts, a full report on Royal public finances. The 2018-19 report was published on 25th June 2019, and can be found on the Monarchy website [1].

[1] https://www.royal.uk/sites/default/files/media/final_sovereign_grant_for_website.pdf

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much money was raised by the Crown Estates in each of the last five years; and how any such money was spent.

The Crown Estate publishes its Integrated Annual Report and Accounts each year. The latest Report for the year 2018-19 is available on The Crown Estate’s website.[1].

As set out in the 2018-19 Report, the net revenue profit The Crown Estate has generated in each of the past five years, are as follows:

2018-19 = £343.5 million;

2017-18 = £329.4 million;

2016-17 = £328.8 million;

2015-16 = £304.1 million; and

2014-15 = £285.1 million.

The Crown Estate generates valuable revenue for the Exchequer, and over the past ten years, the business has returned a total of £2.8 billion into the Consolidated Fund, contributing to vital public services such as the NHS and policing.

[1] https://www.thecrownestate.co.uk/en-gb/our-business/2019-annual-report/

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
15th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which members of the Royal family are in receipt of funds from the Sovereign Grant; and how much each such individual receives annually.

No member of the Royal Family receives an allowance from the Sovereign Grant. The Sovereign Grant Act 2011 came into effect from 1 April 2012 and consolidated the funding provided to support the official duties of The Queen and maintain the Occupied Royal Palaces. Until 31 March 2012, funding had been provided under the Civil List and the Grants-in-aid for the Maintenance of the Occupied Royal Palaces, Royal Travel and Communications and Information.

The Court Circular, available on the Monarchy website[1] is the official record of past royal engagements, detailing engagements undertaken by all members of the Royal Family.

[1] https://www.royal.uk/court-circular

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consideration is given to the level of carbon emissions to the mode of transport made available from public funds to any member of the Royal Family.

The Royal Household recognises that its operations and activities have an impact on the environment (including travel). When deciding on the most appropriate means of travel – the following factors are taken into account: safety, security, dignity, the need to minimise disruption for others, the effective use of time, environmental impact, and cost.

The programme of overseas visits which is funded by the Sovereign Grant is determined by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and approved by the Royal Visits Committee according to agreed priorities.

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
13th Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government which members of the Royal family receive free travel in connection with (1) their royal duties, and (2) for private purposes; what was the source of the funding for any such travel; and what was the cost in 2018/19 for such travel for (a) royal duties, and (b) private purposes.

The Sovereign Grant meets the cost of official journeys undertaken by or in support of The Queen and other members of the Royal Family. As set out in the Sovereign Grant and Sovereign Grant Reserve: Annual Report and Accounts 2018-19, available on the Monarchy website[1] the cost of travel funded by the Sovereign Grant for the financial year ending 31 March 2019 was £4.6 million.

A list of journeys undertaken by members of the Royal Family and their staff during 2018-19 which had travel costs of £15,000 or more, met from the Sovereign Grant, is also available on the Monarchy website [2]. The travel costs for the tours also include the costs associated with staff undertaking visits in advance in order to plan the tour programmes.

No public money is provided to fund travel of members of the Royal Family for private purposes.

[1] https://www.royal.uk/sites/default/files/media/final_sovereign_grant_for_website.pdf

[2] https://www.royal.uk/sites/default/files/media/royal_travel_-_journeys_costing_ps15000_or_more_final.pdf

Earl of Courtown
Captain of the Queen's Bodyguard of the Yeomen of the Guard (HM Household) (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Lords)
9th Jun 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Harrington of Watford on 1 June (HL337), and his remarks on 7 June in relation to Ukraine that “visas take between two and three days" and that "the number of applications awaiting conclusions is about 19,000" (HL Deb col 1088), how many of those applicants have been waiting for clearance for (1) one, (2) two, (3) five, and (4) more than 10, weeks; and what are the reasons for the longer delays.

Information on the number of visas granted under these schemes can be on the GOV.UK webpage: Ukraine Family Scheme and Ukraine Sponsorship Scheme (Homes for Ukraine) visa data - GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

Applications are normally processed in date order from when documents were uploaded, or after an appointment at a Visa Application Centre (VAC). We are working seven days a week to process applications.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
18th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they will respond to the email from Lord Berkeley to Lord Harrington of Watford sent on 22 April concerning the visa applications GWF064118049 and GWF064118784.

The Lord Harrington responded to the Lord Berkeley’s correspondence on 19 May 2022.

Lord Harrington of Watford
Minister of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
10th May 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what evidence they hold, or what estimates they have made, of the numbers of drivers (1) arrested for motoring offences, or (2) who are involved in (a) collisions, (b) serious collisions, or (c) fatal collisions, who were using hands-free mobile phone devices at the time of the offence or collision.

The information requested is not available.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on arrests for notifiable offences on Gov.uk. Motoring offences are non-notifiable unless they involve death by dangerous driving, these would be recorded under violence against the person offences, more detailed breakdowns are not held centrally. Furthermore, information on whether a hands-free device was involved, is not collected.

The Home Office also publishes data on Fixed Penalty Notices and other outcomes for motoring offences, by broader offence group. However, data is not held centrally on whether a hands-free device was involved or if a collision occurred. The most recent data can be found on Gov.uk.

The Department for Transport publish data on road casualties, which can be found on Gov.uk. This data provide information on the severity of the accident however they do not include information on whether a hands-free device was involved.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2022
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their estimate of the number of uninsured motor vehicles on UK roads; what they are doing to support police in removing uninsured vehicles from the roads; and what other measures they have considered to reduce this crime, including the use of automatic number plate recognition at petrol stations.

There are an estimated one million uninsured motor vehicles on UK roads each day.

Operation Tutelage is a national policing initiative where police forces issue advisory letters to drivers who appear to have no motor insurance. The letter encourages the registered keeper to identify if there is a problem with the insurance for the vehicle, and to put things right. The initiative which is led by the NPCC and supported by the Motor Insurers’ Bureau (MIB), was introduced in January 2020 to help reduce uninsured driving levels across the UK.

The Government has established a Roads Policing Review (RPR), consisting of the Department for Transport, Home Office and the National Police Chiefs’ Council, to understand what can be done better to tackle road crime and improve roads safety. The review brings together partners from several agencies including the DVLA, DVSA, and Highways England and is the most comprehensive examination of roads policing ever conducted.

The Government will continue to support the police to ensure that they have the tools needed to enforce road traffic legislation. This includes the continued investment in ANPR technology to tackle crime.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
15th Dec 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the European Commission’s proposed regulation 2021/0387 on measures against transport operators that facilitate or engage in trafficking in persons or smuggling of migrants, what assessment they have made of the effect the regulations could have on (1) air, (2) sea, (3) road, and (4) rail operators between the UK and the EU, particularly on the island of Ireland.

There is a high level of cooperation on border security between both the UK and Irish Governments to ensure we are taking all the necessary measures to protect and secure the Common Travel Area, this includes people travelling from Ireland to the UK.

The Home Office, Ireland’s Garda National Immigration Bureau and Border Management Unit, the Police Service of Northern Ireland and other police forces work together to tackle abuse of the CTA by conducting intelligence-led checks and enforcement operations.

We continue to take a whole route approach in pursuing the crime groups who facilitate people smuggling to the UK and who exploit vulnerable migrants, knowingly putting people in life-threatening situations.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to Written Answer by Lord Greenhalgh on 24 March (HL14079), prior to the Fire Safety Bill being introduced to Parliament, what changes were made to the draft text of the Bill to satisfy representations made by (1) Her Majesty The Queen, (2) His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, or (3) their representatives; and what plans they have to publish their correspondence with (a) Her Majesty The Queen, (b) His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, or (c) their representatives, related to draft text of the Fire Safety Bill.

There were no changes made or requested to the text of the Fire Safety Bill by any member of the Royal Household, therefore, the government has no plans to publish any correspondence.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
10th Mar 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Greenhalgh on 9 March (HL13562), what changes, if any, they made to the Fire Safety Bill after discussions with the Royal Estate following their request for Queen's Consent; for what purpose any such changes were made; and with whom the discussions were held.

The Home Office sought Queen’s Consent for the Fire Safety Bill on 20 February 2020. This was obtained by the Royal Estate on 9 March 2020 and there were no changes to the Bill.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with (1) Her Majesty The Queen, (2) His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, or (3) their representatives, relating to their Consent to the Fire Safety Bill; what changes, if any, were made to the Bill as a result of any such discussions; and for what purpose were such changes made.

Obtaining Queen’s Consent is a normal procedure before the introduction of Bills which may affect the Royal Estate. The rationale for seeking this for the Fire Safety Bill was that parts of the Royal Estate may need to have their fire risk assessments updated following the passage of the Bill. The Home Office sought this on 20 February 2020 and obtained Queen’s Consent on 9 March 2020.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
8th Feb 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the current costs of obtaining (1) short-term work visas, and (2) certificates of sponsorship, for EU citizens seeking to work in the UK; why there are different charges for citizens of different EU member states; and whether this policy reflects the UK’s commitment in the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement to treat the EU as a bloc for short-term visit visas.

Details of all Immigration and Nationality Fees are published on gov.uk at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/visa-regulations-revised-table/home-office-immigration-and-nationality-fees-31-january-2021.

The UK has long standing arrangements in its legislation for the nationals of countries which have ratified the 1961 Council of Europe’s Social Charter (CESC) to qualify for a fee reduction for visa applications to come to work in the UK.

Nationals of the 26 countries which have signed and ratified the CESC are eligible for a reduction of £55 to their application fee if they are applying for a visa under a work route. Where the applicant is required to have a Certificate of Sponsorship (CoS) from their employer, the CoS can be issued free of charge.

Details of the routes which qualify for a reduced fee are published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/fee-arrangements-for-cesc-nationals/fee-arrangements-for-cesc-nationals.

The fee reduction of £55 only applies to the main applicant, it does not apply to dependants.

There is no visa requirement for EU, EEA and Swiss citizens visiting the UK for up to 180 days. The UK-EU TCA obliges the UK to treat all EU citizens as a bloc for the purposes of imposing any short term visit visa requirement.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Jan 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 19 January (HL12090), how many drivers in vehicles with non-UK number plates were identified as committing a speeding offence in the 2019/20 financial year; and how many of those drivers were fined.

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of fixed penalty notices (FPNs) issued for speed limit offences. These data can be found in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin, which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales

Information on the nationality of number plates connected to speeding offences is not collected or held by the Home Office.

Lord Greenhalgh
Minister of State (Home Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much was spent on consultancy services by the Home Office and its related agencies in the 2019/20 financial year; and what was the (1) cost of, and (2) reason for, each such contract.

The 2019/20 Home of Annual Report and Accounts (page 89) shows spend on consultancy services, as set out in the table attached.

The Information on cost and reason for each such contract could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the scientific evidence behind the decision that certain groups of incoming travellers from abroad, including (1) healthcare, (2) agriculture, (3) transport, and (4) other business, workers should not be subject to a 14 day quarantine, depending on the purpose of their visit and the country of the start of their journey.

From 8 June, all passengers arriving in the UK without having travelled through another part of the Common Travel Area are required to self-isolate for 14 days, apart from those on a short list of exemptions. Scientific advice and other considerations suggest that imported cases matter most when the UK has a low level of infection. Self isolation of those arriving in the UK helps to reduce the risk of imported cases forming a higher proportion of overall infections.

A small group of arrivals to the UK will be exempt from the self-isolation measure, in order to allow the UK to maintain essential supply chains and infrastructure and respect our international obligations.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what basis the National Counter Terrorism Policing Network included Critical Mass on their list of Left Wing and Associated Single Issues organisations in June 2019.

Counter-Terrorism Policing produce a range of guidance documents designed to assist frontline officers and counter terrorism colleagues in making informed decisions.

The document in question clearly says that it was produced to help police and close partners identify and understand signs and symbols they may come across in their day-to-day work.

As both Government and the police have said, protest groups are not extremist groups and membership of a protest organisation is not an indicator that an individual is vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism.

Clearly, the inclusion of protest groups in documents like these without context can be concerning, which is why the police’s swift response in clarifying their position is welcome.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
22nd Jan 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government on what basis the National Counter Terrorism Policing Network included Greenpeace in their 'Signs and Symbols' document, published in June 2019.

Counter-Terrorism Policing produce a range of guidance documents designed to assist frontline officers and counter terrorism colleagues in making informed decisions.

The document in question clearly says that it was produced to help police and close partners identify and understand signs and symbols they may come across in their day-to-day work.

As both Government and the police have said, protest groups are not extremist groups and membership of a protest organisation is not an indicator that an individual is vulnerable to being drawn into terrorism.

Clearly, the inclusion of protest groups in documents like these without context can be concerning, which is why the police’s swift response in clarifying their position is welcome.

Baroness Williams of Trafford
Minister of State (Home Office)
20th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Goldie on 20 October (HL2896), whether the Ministry of Defence is responsible for the proposed New Shipbuilding Strategy; and if so, will Ministry of Defence have responsibility for any (1) commercial shipbuilding, or (2) repairs for the maritime sector in (a) Cornwall, and (b) any other areas in the UK.

The National Shipbuilding Office (NSO) is responsible for the National Shipbuilding Strategy Refresh. The NSO is a cross-Government office hosted within the Ministry Of Defence reporting directly to the Secretary of State for Defence in his role as Shipbuilding Tsar. The NSO was formally announced during London International Shipping Week in September 2021 and will work across Government to align Departmental activity with the vision, endorsed by both Government and industry, to create a globally successful, innovative and sustainable shipbuilding enterprise that works for all parts of the UK.

The NSO's remit spans the entire shipbuilding enterprise, including commercial shipbuilding and repair. However, the relevant Departments remain responsible for the procurement and delivery of their own shipbuilding and through-life support programmes.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
11th Oct 2021
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support they are providing for the development of the maritime sector in respect of ship building or repair in Cornwall to service offshore or transport requirements.

The refreshed National Shipbuilding Strategy, to be published later this year, will set out how this Government will support the entire UK shipbuilding enterprise. The scope of this strategy has been broadened from the previous naval-focussed 2017 strategy, to set the conditions for success across the entire shipbuilding enterprise, including repair.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
24th Jul 2020
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the report by the Marine Accident Investigation Branch Accident Investigation Report 13/2020: Stena Superfast VII and Royal Navy submarine, published on 16 July, what steps they are taking to improve the training of the Royal Navy Submarine Service on the identification of higher speed passenger vessels.

Ensuring safety at sea is a top priority for the Royal Navy. The Marine Accident Investigation Branch's (MAIB) report is welcomed and the Royal Navy fully accepts their recommendation.

All training is continually reviewed to ensure that safety lessons from incidents such as this are rapidly incorporated into command team shore and sea training to ensure that Service personnel are rigorously trained, tested and assessed on its execution. Such training specifically includes operating in the vicinity of high speed vessels including ferries.

Baroness Goldie
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)