Stephen Farry Portrait

Stephen Farry

Alliance - North Down

Stephen Farry has no previous appointments


Select Committee Meeting
Wednesday 19th May 2021
09:00
Select Committee Meeting
Thursday 20th May 2021
13:25
Northern Ireland Affairs Committee - Oral evidence
Subject: The Dunlop Review and the UK Government’s union capability
20 May 2021, 1:25 p.m.
At 1.45pm: Oral evidence
The Lord Dunlop
At 2.30pm: Oral evidence
Rt Hon Michael Gove MP - Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
View calendar
Division Votes
Wednesday 28th April 2021
Immigration
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 1 Alliance Aye votes vs 0 Alliance No votes
Tally: Ayes - 270 Noes - 358
Speeches
Tuesday 11th May 2021
Debate on the Address

I want to start with the topic of legacy and, in doing so, reference the outcome of the inquest into …

Written Answers
Thursday 29th April 2021
Immigration: EU Nationals
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of applications to the EU Settlement Scheme had …
Early Day Motions
Tuesday 11th May 2021
UK-EU veterinary agreement
That this House recognises that the absence of a UK-EU veterinary agreement on sanitary and phytosanitary rules on movements of …
Bills
None available
Tweets
None available
MP Financial Interests
Saturday 11th January 2020
1. Employment and earnings
20 December 2019, received £394 as an outgoing Member of Northern Ireland Assembly, Parliament Buildings, Belfast BT4 3XX. Hours: 16 …
EDM signed
Wednesday 12th May 2021
Record breaking achievement of Northern Ireland footballer Steven Davis
That this House notes the phenomenal achievements of Northern Ireland and Glasgow Rangers footballer Steven Davis MBE, given that he …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 5th February 2020
Trade Agreements (Exclusion of National Health Services) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to exclude requirements relating to National Health Services procurement, delivery or commissioning from international trade agreements; to require …

Division Voting information

During the current Parliamentary Session, Stephen Farry has voted in 239 divisions, and never against the majority of their Party.
View All Stephen Farry Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Michael Gove (Conservative)
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
(25 debate interactions)
Brandon Lewis (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
(21 debate interactions)
Boris Johnson (Conservative)
Prime Minister, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, and Minister for the Union
(16 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(38 debate contributions)
HM Treasury
(18 debate contributions)
Scotland Office
(12 debate contributions)
Northern Ireland Office
(11 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Stephen Farry's debates

North Down Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Stephen Farry has not participated in any petition debates

Latest EDMs signed by Stephen Farry

11th May 2021
Stephen Farry signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 12th May 2021

Record breaking achievement of Northern Ireland footballer Steven Davis

Tabled by: Gregory Campbell (Democratic Unionist Party - East Londonderry)
That this House notes the phenomenal achievements of Northern Ireland and Glasgow Rangers footballer Steven Davis MBE, given that he has become the most capped UK male player in the history of football having played 126 times for his country; and recognises that aged 36 and still playing at the …
8 signatures
(Most recent: 12 May 2021)
Signatures by party:
Democratic Unionist Party: 5
Alliance: 1
Labour: 1
Independent: 1
11th May 2021
Stephen Farry signed this EDM as a sponsor on Wednesday 12th May 2021

Undocumented migrants

Tabled by: Bell Ribeiro-Addy (Labour - Streatham)
That this House recognises that there are many barriers that prevent people from accessing and maintaining stable immigration status even when they were either born in the UK or have lived in the UK for many years; further recognises that the majority of undocumented migrants have lost their status through …
13 signatures
(Most recent: 12 May 2021)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 9
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Alliance: 1
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
View All Stephen Farry's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Stephen Farry, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Stephen Farry has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Stephen Farry has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Stephen Farry has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


232 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Explanation of written questions
1 Other Department Questions
28th Sep 2020
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, pursuant to her oral contribution of 24 September 2020, Official Report, column 1137, on the Gender Recognition Act Consultation, where she stated that We have met 140 representative organisations, including LGBT and women’s organisations, if she will publish a list of those organisations with whom she and the Government Equalities Office met to discuss reform of the Gender Recognition Act 2004.

During the Gender Recognition Act consultation process, the Government met with approximately 140 organisations. The list, which was previously published via a Freedom of Information request in 2019, is provided as an annex to this answer.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that the EU27 states are aware that there is no requirement for CN22 customers labels on parcels or packets being directly sent from Northern Ireland.

We have set out through clear guidance the temporary arrangements that apply for movements between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. It is for the European Union to ensure that it and Member States are upholding their obligations in full, including with regard to the fact that movements from Northern Ireland into the EU should not be subject to any controls that do not otherwise apply to movements within the EU.

We also engage regularly with operators regarding these arrangements, during which we have underlined the fact that parcel movements from Northern Ireland directly to the EU should be treated on the same basis as movements within the EU. However it is for the European Union to ensure that the rights of Northern Ireland operators are given full effect in EU Member States. We have and will continue to raise any issues in that regard with the Commission.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, if he will publish the attendance of the Joint Consultative Working Group on 29 January 2021; and how membership of that group was determined.

Article 15(2) of the Northern Ireland Protocol establishes that the Joint Consultative Working Group shall be composed of representatives of the United Kingdom and the European Union. The Government has committed to including representatives of the Northern Ireland Executive as part of the UK delegation to meetings. The JCWG briefly convened for a very short period on 29 January to adopt the Rules of Procedure. This was not a full meeting so was attended by limited delegations of only three officials from each side.

The Rules of Procedure adopted by that Working Group were those included as an Annex to the EU’s Council Decision 2020/1599 adopted on 23 October 2020; and no amendments were made.

The Working Group will continue to meet at dates decided by the co-chairs.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that recruitment to public service and non-public service posts are open to (a) people from Northern Ireland with an Irish identity and (b) EU/EEA nationals and others with indefinite right to remain.

The UK Government is working to increase the interchange and rotation of officials between posts within the Civil Service, including those working for the UK Government, agencies and public bodies, and the devolved administrations, as well as with the Northern Ireland Civil Service.

Northern Ireland civil servants who were originally appointed on merit through fair and open competition may freely transfer to posts in UK Government Departments. Appointments to the Northern Ireland Civil Service are regulated by the Northern Ireland Civil Service Commissioners.

With regards to working in the Civil Service, as set out previously, there is no change to the eligibility requirements for individuals who are Irish nationals following the UK’s exit from the EU, and they are eligible for all non-reserved posts. The Government has committed to maintaining the rights and opportunities of those with status under the EU Settlement Scheme to be eligible for employment in non-reserved posts within the Civil Service.

Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the implications for equality of not allowing transfers from the Northern Ireland civil service to the UK civil service.

The UK Government is working to increase the interchange and rotation of officials between posts within the Civil Service, including those working for the UK Government, agencies and public bodies, and the devolved administrations, as well as with the Northern Ireland Civil Service.

Northern Ireland civil servants who were originally appointed on merit through fair and open competition may freely transfer to posts in UK Government Departments. Appointments to the Northern Ireland Civil Service are regulated by the Northern Ireland Civil Service Commissioners.

With regards to working in the Civil Service, as set out previously, there is no change to the eligibility requirements for individuals who are Irish nationals following the UK’s exit from the EU, and they are eligible for all non-reserved posts. The Government has committed to maintaining the rights and opportunities of those with status under the EU Settlement Scheme to be eligible for employment in non-reserved posts within the Civil Service.

Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure that employees can transfer from the UK civil service to the Northern Ireland civil service.

The UK Government is working to increase the interchange and rotation of officials between posts within the Civil Service, including those working for the UK Government, agencies and public bodies, and the devolved administrations, as well as with the Northern Ireland Civil Service.

Northern Ireland civil servants who were originally appointed on merit through fair and open competition may freely transfer to posts in UK Government Departments. Appointments to the Northern Ireland Civil Service are regulated by the Northern Ireland Civil Service Commissioners.

With regards to working in the Civil Service, as set out previously, there is no change to the eligibility requirements for individuals who are Irish nationals following the UK’s exit from the EU, and they are eligible for all non-reserved posts. The Government has committed to maintaining the rights and opportunities of those with status under the EU Settlement Scheme to be eligible for employment in non-reserved posts within the Civil Service.

Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of implementing a bespoke mechanism to facilitate the timely passage of guide dog puppies from Great Britain to Northern Ireland with an agreed derogation from the Northern Ireland Protocol.

I refer the hon. Member to the response by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster to the urgent question on 2 February 2021, and the letter by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster to the European Commission Vice-President. Further steps are necessary to address regulatory barriers and provide time for a light-touch long-term approach to be codified.

The Government is engaging with the Northern Ireland Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) and Ireland’s Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) to explore means to streamline pet travel between the UK and Ireland, recognising the high standards of animal health that the UK and Ireland share.

In the meantime, DAERA have confirmed that there will be no routine compliance checks on pets/assistance dogs entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain until 1 July 2021. NI-based pets/assistance dogs returning to Northern Ireland from Great Britain can continue to use an NI-issued EU Pet Passport to re-enter Northern Ireland, and will not need an animal health certificate. Further guidance is set out here: https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/articles/travelling-pets

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps the Government is taking to ensure the continued flow of parcels and other deliveries from Great Britain to Northern Ireland in light of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

I refer the hon. Member to the response by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster to the urgent question on 2 February 2021, and the letter by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster to the European Commission Vice-President. Further steps are necessary to address regulatory barriers and provide time for a light-touch long-term approach to be codified.

The Government is engaging with the Northern Ireland Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) and Ireland’s Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) to explore means to streamline pet travel between the UK and Ireland, recognising the high standards of animal health that the UK and Ireland share.

In the meantime, DAERA have confirmed that there will be no routine compliance checks on pets/assistance dogs entering Northern Ireland from Great Britain until 1 July 2021. NI-based pets/assistance dogs returning to Northern Ireland from Great Britain can continue to use an NI-issued EU Pet Passport to re-enter Northern Ireland, and will not need an animal health certificate. Further guidance is set out here: https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/articles/travelling-pets

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Draft unilateral declarations by the European Union and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee on human and veterinary medicines cover medical devices.

The Unilateral Declaration on Medicines (available on gov.uk) allows for the phased implementation in Northern Ireland of relevant medicines regulation, and in particular the Falsified Medicines Directive. Medical devices are not subject to the Falsified Medicines Directive and are not in scope of the declaration. Businesses and authorities moving medical devices can make use of the Trade Support Service and the UK Trader Scheme. Full guidance on the regulatory requirements for medical devices are set out on gov.uk. Medical devices will be able to be moved smoothly between Great Britain and Northern Ireland from 1 January 2021.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to ensure UK access to warnings from the EU Safety Gate site with respect to goods placed on the market in (a) Northern Ireland and (b) Great Britain.

Alerts under the EU Safety Gate system are publicly available, the UK will continue to monitor and assess relevant public notifications.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the agreement reached at the fourth meeting of the Specialised Committee on the Northern Ireland Protocol on medicines covers all medicines entering Great Britain that may subsequently transit to Northern Ireland or all medicines entering the UK.

The UK and EU agreed, at the Ireland/Northern Ireland Specialised Committee on 5 November, to a pragmatic approach to implementing medicines regulations which ensures no disruption to the flow of medicines to Northern Ireland. This includes a one year time-limited approach to the application of the regulatory requirements for imports from other parts of the United Kingdom into Northern Ireland and the ‘safety feature’ elements of the Falsified Medicines Directive. Further guidance will be published shortly setting out the arrangements in detail.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
16th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of commissioning a memorial to remember the victims of the Transatlantic slave trade and slavery.

May I apologise for the delay in answering this question. The UK deplores the human suffering caused by slavery and the slave trade. They are among the most dishonourable and abhorrent chapters in the history of humanity.

Public and private organisations are able to propose, fund, develop and deliver memorials marking incidents and historical moments.

Julia Lopez
Parliamentary Secretary (Cabinet Office)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the planned timescale is for a system of rebates to be (a) designed and (b) implemented for goods that remain in Northern Ireland from Great Britain that do not enter the Republic of Ireland.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to enable the Trader Support Service to support businesses moving goods from Great Britain to Northern Ireland via the Holyhead to Dublin route.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the labelling requirements will be for businesses that move goods from Great Britain to Northern Ireland.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress has been made on ensuring the continued supply of medicines from Great Britain to Northern Ireland in the event that a UK-EU mutual recognition agreement is not reached before the end of the transition period.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the potential merits are of an Australia-style future relationship with the EU.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to facilitate inward processing relief for goods at risk of moving into the EU on Great Britain to Northern Ireland trade routes.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, pursuant to the Answer of 14 October 2020 to Question 99785, how the (a) membership and (b) rules of procedure will be determined for the Joint Consultative Working Group in relation to the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps are being taken to accommodate intermediate processing of goods in Northern Ireland without those goods being deemed at risk.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the Border Operating Model for the Great Britain and Northern Ireland interface be released.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what contingency plans the Government is making to manage trade between Great Britain and Northern Ireland in the event that a trade deal is not agreed with the EU by 31 December 2020.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, what checks will be in place to ensure that only goods from Northern Ireland receive unfettered access to the UK internal market.

Further to the statement by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 19 October, the approach outlined in the Command Paper in May, and the guidance published on 7 August regarding the operation of the Northern Ireland protocol, the UK Government has been unequivocal in its commitment to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods to the rest of the UK market. This is a clear commitment of the Withdrawal Agreement, and the UK will guarantee it in legislation before the end of the year.

The Definition of Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods (EU Exit) Regulations 2020 sets out the goods that will benefit from unfettered access in the first instance. This initial approach will be replaced by a longer-lasting regime during 2021 that will be developed alongside Northern Ireland businesses, and the Northern Ireland Executive. Further details will be set out in due course but our approach will ensure that, at all stages, Northern Ireland businesses will continue to enjoy unfettered access to the whole of the UK market from 1 January 2021.

The Protocol applies whether or not the UK and EU reach agreement on a free trade agreement.

The Government has no plans to publish a Border Operating Model for goods' movement between Great Britain and Northern Ireland for the simple reason that - as the Withdrawal Agreement makes clear - there is no border within the UK, and the UK as a whole will be leaving the EU's customs territory at the end of the transition period. The Government has however committed to publishing further detailed information and guidance as soon as possible when relevant details are resolved, including where matters depend on discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee. This is the case on the question of goods 'at risk', as well as further detail on labelling requirements for agrifood goods.

Further to Article 15 (2) of the Protocol and my answer to PQ 99785, the membership of the Joint Consultative Working Group will be composed of representatives of the UK, including the Northern Ireland Executive, and the EU. The Group will meet shortly.

Regarding the supply of medicines, discussions in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee are ongoing.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
6th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, for what reason meetings of the Joint Consultative Working Group in relation to the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol have not taken place.

The Joint Consultative Working Group, established under Article 15 of the Northern Ireland Protocol, will meet once the Rules of Procedure have been agreed.

Once agreed, we will arrange a date for the first meeting.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the UK Government’s response to each of the proposed amendments to the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol made by the European Commission on 12 June 2020.

The Government is not seeking to renegotiate the Protocol, which depends on the consent of the elected representatives of the people of Northern Ireland. The Protocol must be implemented in a way that upholds the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement and respects the unique circumstances of Northern Ireland.

In terms of the proposed amendments, we will provide a fuller response once further discussions have taken place.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
19th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the date is of the next scheduled meeting of the Specialised Committee on the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster updated the House on the second meeting of the UK-EU Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee in a Written Statement of 15 June (HCWS291).

Further to that update, the specialised committee will meet in the coming weeks. As with the Specialised Committee, the Working Group will be co-chaired by the UK and EU and made up of officials from both sides.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
19th Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when the first meeting of the Joint Consultative Working Group on the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol will take place; and who will be invited to attend that meeting.

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster updated the House on the second meeting of the UK-EU Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee in a Written Statement of 15 June (HCWS291).

Further to that update, the specialised committee will meet in the coming weeks. As with the Specialised Committee, the Working Group will be co-chaired by the UK and EU and made up of officials from both sides.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
3rd Jun 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, to whom did Dominic Cummings report to in his role as Special Adviser during the period when the Prime Minister was incapacitated with covid-19.

The Prime Minister was still in office; special advisers stayed in post, and remained accountable to their appointing Minister.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
4th May 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the implications for the (a) ministerial, (b) special adviser and (c) civil service (i) codes and (ii) operational practice of the final report and recommendations of the Renewable Heat Initiative inquiry in Northern Ireland.

The recommendations of the Renewable Heat Initiative inquiry were aimed principally at the devolved administration in Northern Ireland, which operates its own Codes. The Government maintains awareness of relevant lessons learned in the devolved administrations, including from the inquiry, and keeps under review the Codes and operational practices that apply within the UK Government.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Cabinet Office)
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, which (a) members of the UK delegation and (b) other participants excluding civil servants were present at (i) the first meeting and (ii) any subsequent meetings of the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee.

The first Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee meeting was co-chaired by the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, Rt Hon Michael Gove MP. I accompanied him, as alternate co-chair. The meeting was attended by a small UK delegation, which included two ministers from the Northern Ireland Executive.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, who the proposed participants are who are not civil servants for the meeting of the Specialised Committee on the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol scheduled for 30 April 2020.

As set out in the New Decade, New Approach deal, the Government will ensure that representatives from the Northern Ireland Executive are invited to be part of the UK delegation in any meetings of the UK-EU Specialised or Joint Committees discussing Northern Ireland specific matters which are also being attended by the Irish Government as part of the European Union’s delegation. This applied to the meeting on the 30 April 2020.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
19th Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how many civil servants are working on the (a) negotiations for and (b) planning of the future relationship with the EU, broken by down (a) department and (b) grade.

The Task Force Europe team in No 10 consists of 48 civil servants (as at 20 March) across all civil service grades. The Unit works closely with colleagues from across Whitehall on negotiations on our future relationship with the EU.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to his oral contribution of 27 February 2020, Official Report, column 484, what his definition is of appropriately implemented in relation to the Northern Ireland/Ireland Protocol.

I refer the Hon. Member to the oral statement made by my Rt Hon friend the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672 Col.467-470)

The Government will ensure that representatives from the Northern Ireland Executive are invited to be part of the UK delegation in meetings of the UK-EU Specialised or Joint Committees discussing Northern Ireland specific matters which are also being attended by the Irish Government as part of the European Union’s delegation.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister has been clear in his statement given on 19 October 2019 (Official Record, Vol. 666, Col. 570-572) that Northern Ireland remains part of the UK customs territory.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, with reference to the document entitled Future relationship with the European Union, published February 2020, what additional checks across the Irish Sea arising from the Northern Ireland/Ireland Protocol will be required.

I refer the Hon. Member to the oral statement made by my Rt Hon friend the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672 Col.467-470)

The Government will ensure that representatives from the Northern Ireland Executive are invited to be part of the UK delegation in meetings of the UK-EU Specialised or Joint Committees discussing Northern Ireland specific matters which are also being attended by the Irish Government as part of the European Union’s delegation.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister has been clear in his statement given on 19 October 2019 (Official Record, Vol. 666, Col. 570-572) that Northern Ireland remains part of the UK customs territory.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what progress the Government has made on preparations for the implementation of the Northern Ireland/Ireland Protocol.

I refer the Hon. Member to the oral statement made by my Rt Hon friend the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672 Col.467-470)

The Government will ensure that representatives from the Northern Ireland Executive are invited to be part of the UK delegation in meetings of the UK-EU Specialised or Joint Committees discussing Northern Ireland specific matters which are also being attended by the Irish Government as part of the European Union’s delegation.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister has been clear in his statement given on 19 October 2019 (Official Record, Vol. 666, Col. 570-572) that Northern Ireland remains part of the UK customs territory.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, how the Northern Ireland executive will be represented on the (a) Joint Committee and (b) Specialised Committee with regard to implementation of the Northern Ireland/Ireland Protocol.

I refer the Hon. Member to the oral statement made by my Rt Hon friend the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster on 27 February 2020 (Official Record, Vol.672 Col.467-470)

The Government will ensure that representatives from the Northern Ireland Executive are invited to be part of the UK delegation in meetings of the UK-EU Specialised or Joint Committees discussing Northern Ireland specific matters which are also being attended by the Irish Government as part of the European Union’s delegation.

My Rt. Hon. Friend the Prime Minister has been clear in his statement given on 19 October 2019 (Official Record, Vol. 666, Col. 570-572) that Northern Ireland remains part of the UK customs territory.

Penny Mordaunt
Paymaster General
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 15 December 2020 to Question 126183 on Consumer Goods: Safety, whether the UK plans to provide information to the European Safety Gate portal.

Products placed on the market before 1 January 2021 that have been found to present a serious risk to the health and safety of consumers, or that are non-compliant, will be notified to the European Commission as part of the Withdrawal Agreement. Additionally, the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement commits the UK and the EU to use best endeavours to establish arrangements for the exchange of certain information, between the UK’s Product Safety Database and the EU’s Safety Gate RAPEX database, on unsafe products.

The UK in respect of Northern Ireland market surveillance authorities and enforcement authorities will also continue to notify unsafe products to the European Commission via Safety Gate RAPEX in line with the Northern Ireland Protocol, information from which the European Commission will subsequently make available on their Safety Gate website.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure the mutual recognition of qualifications between the UK and Ireland to enable British and Irish citizens to exercise their rights and privileges under the Common Travel Area.

If no immediately effective arrangements relating to professional qualifications are agreed with the EU this year, on 1 January 2021 the Government will put in place a temporary system of recognition that allows holders of EU qualifications, including Irish qualifications, to seek recognition of their qualifications in the UK. This will ensure that the UK meets its commitments under the Common Travel Area.

The Government published a Call for Evidence on the recognition of professional qualifications and regulation of professions in August 2020. As it takes forward this work, the Government will ensure that individuals with Irish professional qualifications continue to have a means of applying for recognition in the UK.

Paul Scully
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, for what reason the Government has not ratified the UNESCO Convention on Intangible Cultural Heritage.

The Government values the profound contribution of the UK’s craft workers, artisans and artists to the preservation of our unique intangible heritage. We are exploring the merits of ratifying the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, as a potential addition to the broad range of support measures which already exist for this vital aspect of our nation’s life.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to ratify the UNESCO Convention on Intangible Cultural Heritage.

The Government values the profound contribution of the UK’s craft workers, artisans and artists to the preservation of our unique intangible heritage. We are exploring the merits of ratifying the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, as a potential addition to the broad range of support measures which already exist for this vital aspect of our nation’s life.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to introduce proposals on the regulation of people who act as advisers to professional boxers.

While fit and proper persons tests do exist within other sports to ensure propriety of ownership in club structure, these are a matter for the national governing bodies, concerning corporate ownership, and in line with company law.

We do not intend to intervene in this autonomy at this time but we expect national governing bodies and competition structures to put adequate levels of protections in place.

This Government takes the matter of tackling corruption in sport seriously, and this is why we have played a leading role in developing the International Partnership against Corruption in Sport.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to introduce a fit and proper person test for those involved in professional boxing consistent with such tests used in other professional sports.

While fit and proper persons tests do exist within other sports to ensure propriety of ownership in club structure, these are a matter for the national governing bodies, concerning corporate ownership, and in line with company law.

We do not intend to intervene in this autonomy at this time but we expect national governing bodies and competition structures to put adequate levels of protections in place.

This Government takes the matter of tackling corruption in sport seriously, and this is why we have played a leading role in developing the International Partnership against Corruption in Sport.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what plans the Government has to bring forward legislative proposals on improving the regulation of professional boxing in the UK or associated with the UK.

While fit and proper persons tests do exist within other sports to ensure propriety of ownership in club structure, these are a matter for the national governing bodies, concerning corporate ownership, and in line with company law.

We do not intend to intervene in this autonomy at this time but we expect national governing bodies and competition structures to put adequate levels of protections in place.

This Government takes the matter of tackling corruption in sport seriously, and this is why we have played a leading role in developing the International Partnership against Corruption in Sport.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
8th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies on the regulation of the sport of boxing of the allegations made in the BBC's Panorama programme on the role of Daniel Kinahan in that sport, broadcast on 1 February 2021.

While fit and proper persons tests do exist within other sports to ensure propriety of ownership in club structure, these are a matter for the national governing bodies, concerning corporate ownership, and in line with company law.

We do not intend to intervene in this autonomy at this time but we expect national governing bodies and competition structures to put adequate levels of protections in place.

This Government takes the matter of tackling corruption in sport seriously, and this is why we have played a leading role in developing the International Partnership against Corruption in Sport.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what further steps the Government needs to take to achieve data adequacy recognition from the EU.

We continue to talk to the Commission about their plans to finalise their adequacy assessment of the UK.

Once draft decisions are published by the Commission, the process will then move into an EU procedural phase before they are adopted. The European Data Protection Board of Member State regulators will issue a non-binding opinion on the decisions, and the European Parliament also has the right to scrutinise them. The draft decisions will then be subject to approval by the relevant EU Council working group (the Article 93 Committee) and the College of Commissioners. The UK will continue to engage constructively where necessary throughout the process until it reaches its conclusion.

The EU’s adequacy assessments, underway since March 2020, ascertain whether UK data protection standards are ‘essentially equivalent’ to the EU’s. Given we have an existing data protection framework that is equivalent to the EU’s, we see no reason why the UK should not be awarded adequacy and we expect the process to be concluded promptly.

The EU left insufficient time to adopt data adequacy decisions for the UK before the end of the transition period. We have therefore agreed with the EU a time-limited ‘bridging mechanism’ which will allow personal data to continue to flow as it did previously whilst EU adequacy decisions for the UK are adopted.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps the Government is taking to secure Data Adequacy recognition from the EU before the end of the transition period.

Continuing the free flow of personal data is an important objective for both the UK and the EU.

We have been in formal talks with the Commission since March 2020 to secure data adequacy decisions under both the General Data Protection Regulation and the Law Enforcement Directive.

Adequacy decisions would allow personal data to continue to flow freely from the EU/EEA to the UK. We have already legislated to enable, on a transitional basis, the free flow of UK personal data to Europe.

The EU’s adequacy assessments ascertain whether UK data protection standards are ‘essentially equivalent’ to the EU’s. Given we have an existing data protection framework that is equivalent to the EU’s, we see no reason why the UK should not be awarded adequacy.

Throughout the adequacy assessment we have engaged proactively and constructively, doing all we can to expedite our assessment. This included preparation of a technical pack of explanatory materials, which was shared formally with the Commission at the start of the adequacy assessment in March 2020 and published on GOV.UK.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what progress is being made on the repatriation from the UK to Zimbabwe of the remains of (a) Mbuya Nehanda, (b) Sekuru Kaguvi and (c) the 25 First Chimurenga fighters.

It is not confirmed that the remains of Mbuya Nehanda, Sekuru Kaguve and the 25 First Chimurenga fighters are held in an UK institution. If it was determined that they were in the UK, and a request for their return was received, the decision to do so would be a matter for that institution to consider.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
22nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what processes his Department has in place to respond to requests for repatriations of colonial artefacts and human remains from UK museums, universities and other institutions; and what plans the Government has for an audit to be undertaken of such items.

Decisions relating to museum collections are a matter for the trustees of each museum, who operate independently of the government. This includes the institutions’ responses to requests for repatriation or restitution for colonial artefacts and human remains.


The Department is committed to supporting museums in dealing confidently with all aspects of restitution. This includes supporting ongoing work led by Arts Council England on creating new guidance for the museum sector. This will create a comprehensive and practical resource for museums to support them in dealing with all aspects of restitution.

Caroline Dinenage
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
16th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential risks to UK boxing of the announcement of the role of Daniel Kinahan in organising a fight between Anthony Joshua and Tyson Fury; and what steps he is taking to raise concerns on that matter with UK based broadcasters.

The arrangements for sporting competitions are a matter for the relevant sporting bodies, and it is up to broadcasters to make decisions about which events they wish to cover.

Nigel Huddleston
Assistant Whip
16th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the Government's policy is on negotiating future participation in the European Solidarity Corps.

The UK’s document setting out our Future Relationship with the European Union, which can be found here https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/our-approach-to-the-future-relationship-with-the-eu, states that the UK is ready to consider participation in certain EU programmes where it is in the UK’s and the EU’s interest that we do so. These programmes represent a real benefit to British people and industry. The Government will not be seeking participation in the next European Solidarity Corps programme from 2021-2027.

Under the Withdrawal Agreement negotiated with the EU, the UK will continue to participate fully in the current (2014-2020) ESC programme. This means that the projects successfully bid for during the current programmes until the end of the Transition period, will continue to receive funding for the full duration of the project, including those where funding runs beyond 2020 and the end of the transition period.

John Whittingdale
Minister of State (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to tackle the risks to the existing honey bee population in Great Britain from the importation of honey bees from the EU via Northern Ireland.

The Government recognises that some beekeepers are concerned about the new trading arrangements and the risks of exotic pests entering Great Britain, in particular Small hive beetle.

Small hive beetle would present a serious threat to our honey bees if it were to arrive in the UK. This invasive pest has only been detected in one part of Europe, namely southern Italy, and exports of bees from the affected region into either Great Britain or Northern Ireland are not permitted.

Imports of honey bees into any part of the UK are only accepted from approved countries, and are subject to rules relating to notification and health certification to ensure that imports are free of key pests and diseases.

Movements of honey bee queens, packages and colonies from Northern Ireland to Great Britain remain permitted. There is, and will remain, unfettered access for Northern Ireland goods including honey bees to the rest of the UK market.

We continue to work with colleagues in the Devolved Administrations as part of our monitoring of the new trading arrangements.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
5th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to publish a timetable for implementing legislative proposals on the use of forest risk commodities in commercial activity.

We recently introduced legislation to the Environment Bill to help to ensure that key forest risk commodities used in the UK are not contributing to illegal deforestation or habitat conversion. This initiative is in line with the recommendations of the Global Resource Initiative taskforce, widely supportive feedback to our public consultation on the proposal, as well as our international objectives at the upcoming Glasgow United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26).

We are the first country to introduce such legislation. We intend to move swiftly to lay the necessary secondary legislation. Subject to the passage of the Environment Bill and consultation, our aim is to do so shortly after the November COP26 Climate conference where we will be convening a global dialogue on trade in forest and agricultural commodities that we will draw on as we finalise our approach.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions are taking place with the Irish Government and the European Commission to enable pet and guide/assistance dog movements between Great Britain, Northern Ireland and Ireland.

The health and documentary requirements for pet travel to the EU are set out under the EU Pet Travel Regulations. Under the Northern Ireland Protocol, EU rules also apply to the non-commercial movements of pets into Northern Ireland from Great Britain. There are no derogations for assistance dogs under the legal framework of the EU Pet Travel Regulations.

We will continue to press the European Commission in relation to securing Part 1 listed status, recognising that achieving this would alleviate some of the new requirements for pet owners and assistance dog users travelling to the EU and to Northern Ireland. We are clear that we meet all the animal health requirements for this, and we have one of the most rigorous pet checking regimes in Europe to protect our biosecurity.

The Government is engaging with the Northern Ireland Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) and Ireland’s Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM) to explore means to streamline pet travel between Great Britain, Northern Ireland and Ireland, recognising the high standards of animal health that the Great Britain, Northern Ireland and Ireland share. The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster has also written to the European Vice-President seeking to ensure that an agreement can be made to address the barriers imposed on pet travel between Great Britain, Northern Ireland and Ireland. Current guidance on pet travel to Northern Ireland is available on DAERA’s NIDirect website, and to Ireland on DAFMs website.

In the meantime, the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) in Northern Ireland have recently published guidance on a pragmatic enforcement approach to pets entering from Great Britain. NI-based pets/assistance dogs returning to Northern Ireland from Great Britain can continue to use an NI-issued EU Pet Passport to re-enter Northern Ireland and will not need an animal health certificate.

We are proactively engaging with the assistance dog community and relevant stakeholders on the impacts on dog movements from Great Britain to the EU and to Northern Ireland. We will continue to work closely with assistance dog organisations to share the latest advice and guidance (in accessible formats) with their members on pet travel requirements.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
7th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons the UK Government did not meet the 30 June deadline for the submission of proposals for the designation of Border Control Posts in Northern Ireland to the European Commission.

The UK submitted applications to the European Commission on 30 June for approval of facilities to conduct checks on agrifood goods at points of entry to Northern Ireland. These are for the purposes of sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures at Larne and Foyle ports, and for existing SPS inspection posts to be expanded at Belfast and Warrenpoint ports. These applications fulfil our obligations under the Northern Ireland Protocol.

Victoria Prentis
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what the differences are between the UK-Japan and EU-Japan trade deals with regards to the effect on goods imported to and exported from Northern Ireland.

The UK-Japan CEPA (Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement) applies to the whole of the United Kingdom, including Northern Ireland. Northern Ireland stands to benefit and build upon its strong exports to Japan, with Northern Ireland’s agri-food sector potentially benefiting from reduced export burdens. Last year Northern Ireland’s exports of agri-food to Japan were worth £6.5m.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what effect the free trade agreement between the UK and Japan will have on businesses in Northern Ireland.

UK exports to Japan have been growing by an average of 7.6% year-on-year over the previous five years and, with this free trade deal in place, our economic partnership will have even more opportunity. Potential benefits from a deal include better jobs, higher wages, more choice and lower prices for all parts of the UK.

Northern Ireland stands to benefit and build upon its strong exports to Japan, with Northern Ireland’s agri-food sector potentially benefiting from reduced export burdens. Last year Northern Ireland’s exports of agri-food to Japan were worth £6.5m.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
25th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has made representations to the EU on enabling Northern Ireland-origin goods which can freely circulate within the EU single market to access EU trade agreements with third countries.

Northern Ireland is and remains British, so will be part of the United Kingdom’s customs territory. As our recent business guidance makes clear, it will be HM Government - not the EU - that will negotiate and deliver trade deals on behalf of the United Kingdom as a whole. As a result, all British exporters will enjoy the same preferential access we secure with trading partners around the world, whether they are based in England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how much (a) tear gas irritant ammunition, (b) tear gas riot control agents, (c) rubber bullets, and (d) riot shields were exported to the United States in the last year; and what recent assessment he has made of the likelihood of those exports being used in protests against police brutality in that country.

My Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade and I have been sorry to see the violence that has taken place in the United States of America.

All export licence applications are assessed on a case-by-case basis against the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria (‘Consolidated Criteria’). In reaching a decision, the Department for International Trade receives advice from a number of Departments including the Ministry of Defence and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. Together, we draw on all available information, including reports from NGOs and our diplomatic missions. The Consolidated Criteria provides a thorough risk assessment framework and requires us to think hard about the impact of exporting any equipment. These are not decisions my Department takes lightly, and we will not license the export of items where to do so would be inconsistent with the Consolidated Criteria.

Any licence granted by my Rt Hon. Friend the Secretary of State for International Trade may be subject to conditions. In addition, in line with the Consolidated Criteria, my Department is able to review licences – and suspend or revoke as necessary – when circumstances require. There are currently eight extant licences that may be linked to law enforcement agencies. Six are Open Individual Export Licences (‘OIELs’), which have potential end users that include law enforcement agencies. Two are Standard Individual Export Licences (‘SIELs’), which have numerous potential end users that include law enforcement agencies. There are also 15 Open General Licences (‘OGLs’) for which businesses can register that cover the export of anti-riot gear.

Much information is in the public domain already. We publish information on all export licences issued, refused and revoked on a quarterly and annual basis as official statistics on GOV.UK – at: gov.uk/government/collections/strategic-export-controls-licensing-data – and whilst data on actual exports is not required to be centrally held, the licences issued until the end of December 2019 are available.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps she is taking to ensure that a US-UK trade deal is compatible with the provisions of the Good Friday Agreement.

Our top priority remains protecting Northern Ireland’s (NI) place in our United Kingdom and preserving the gains from the peace process and the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement. Economic growth is vital for preserving the peace in Northern Ireland. Hence, the UK Government will guarantee that NI businesses will benefit from the lower tariffs we deliver through a US-UK trade deal.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for International Trade)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 11 March 2021 to Question 164339 on Driving Licences: Reciprocal Arrangements, what recent progress he has made on a UK-France reciprocal agreement.

The Government is committed to establishing reciprocal arrangements with France with the minimum of bureaucracy. The Government has secured interim arrangements with the French authorities which will allow UK licence holders to continue to use their valid UK licence until 1 January 2022. We are working closely with the French government to finalise a permanent arrangement, which we expect to be concluded soon. The Government commits to providing an update as soon as possible.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
13th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the absence of a UK-France reciprocal agreement on driving licences, what plans he has to support UK citizens living in France whose licences have recently expired, or are due to expire soon.

The Government is committed to establishing reciprocal arrangements with France with the minimum of bureaucracy. The Government has secured interim arrangements with the French authorities which will allow UK licence holders to continue to use their valid UK licence until 1 January 2022. These interim arrangements do not extend to UK licences that have expired. We are working closely with the French government to find a solution for those with expired licences as well as to finalise a permanent arrangement. The Government commits to providing an update as soon as possible.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that older high octane fuel will continue to be available in Northern Ireland alongside E5 and E10 fuel after 1 July 2021 in relation to the Northern Ireland Protocol.

The roll out of E10 petrol in the standard 95-octane petrol grade in September 2021 will be preceded by legislation requiring that E5 remains available in the higher 97-octane petrol grade. In line with our obligations under the Northern Ireland Protocol we will notify the European Commission of our intention in advance.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what criteria his Department uses for assessing which countries should be placed on the red list travel ban during the covid-19 pandemic.

The decision to introduce travel bans for countries on the red list is in direct response to scientific and medical data, which represents an increased risk to UK public health and an increased risk of community transmission of the new COVID-19 variants identified in other countries. These are intended to be temporary measures and the government keeps data for countries and territories under constant review.

The government has made it consistently clear that it will take decisive action to contain the virus, including adding further countries to the red list if the public health risk of people returning from a particular country without self-isolating becomes too high.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of TravelUp proposals to (a) utilise trusts to protect customers' funds and (b) bring forward an airline insolvency Bill.

The Department has been clear that airlines and travel agents should not deny consumers their legal right to a refund if it is requested, and that the refund should be processed in a timely manner. COVID-19 has highlighted a number of challenges, and we will be working with the regulator and industry to learn lessons and make changes that are pragmatic and sensible.

Airline insolvency is a highly complex and technical policy area. The Government has considered the recommendations of the Airline Insolvency Review to identify the reforms needed to ensure a strong level of consumer protection and value for money for the taxpayer.

The Government is also mindful of the need to consider the challenges faced by the aviation sector as a result of COVID-19. We are keeping under review the scope and timing of any future reforms in this policy area.

Robert Courts
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to support logistics networks between the UK and Ireland during the covid-19 outbreak; and if he will make a statement.

On 24 April we announced a package of funding to support the movement of critical goods on freight routes between Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Up to £17m of funding will be available to support up to 5 routes over the next 2 months, with the Northern Ireland Executive contributing 40%.

Furthermore, the Governments of Ireland, France and the United Kingdom have committed to supporting the continued movement of freight. Both the Irish and French governments have introduced measures to support freight movements, as we have.

These measures are in addition to the unprecedented support provided to UK companies in all sectors worth £350 billion.

11th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the collapse of Flybe, what steps he is taking to ensure that available slots between London area airports and Belfast are not replaced by flights to other routes.

Her Majesty’s Government recognises that airports are vital for local economies, providing domestic and global connectivity, employment opportunities, and a hub for local transport. We have been working closely with airports and airlines to encourage them to act quickly to fill routes which are vital for local communities and businesses, including those in Belfast.

A review of Regional Air Connectivity was recently announced to ensure all nations and regions of the UK have the domestic transport connections local communities rely on. Her Majesty’s Government plays no part in, and through regulations is legally prevented from intervening in, the airport slot allocation process. Whilst there is no role for Government to play in this matter, it is in the interest of UK consumers that all airport slots are used efficiently.

21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the cost to the public purse has been of assessing the viability of a bridge between Scotland and Northern Ireland to date; and how much funding has been allocated to that work.

The government is committed to upgrading our infrastructure, and we are looking at a range of options to level up the country and support growth and productivity in every region. We will set out more details on our plans to increase investment in infrastructure later this year.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to ensure that pregnant women are not disadvantaged when changing jobs with respect to statutory maternity pay.

To qualify for Statutory Maternity Pay (SMP), a woman must have been continuously employed by the same employer for at least 26 weeks when she enters the 15th week before the week her baby is due. Once a woman has qualified for SMP, her employer must pay it to her even if she subsequently leaves their employment or is made redundant.

These criteria are designed to achieve a balance between the needs of the employer and those of a pregnant employee, ensuring that a woman has made a reasonable contribution towards her employer's business before that employer is required to administer Statutory Maternity Payments, and bear a proportion of the cost.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of increasing the £16,000 savings limit for universal credit entitlement.

No assessment has been made.

The capital limit above which entitlement to Universal Credit ends is £16,000. Claimants have the opportunity to declare what type of capital they have, both when making a claim to Universal Credit and throughout the time they are getting Universal Credit.

The limit strikes a balance between protecting less well-off people and the taxpayer, whilst at the same time recognising the conscientious efforts of people who have built up capital.

This limit also ensures that the help which comes from taxpayers, many of whom are themselves on low incomes and have limited capital, is directed to people who need it most.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps the Government plans to take, other than through free school meal vouchers, to tackle childhood poverty.

Tackling child poverty is a key priority for the Government. Our recent focus has been on supporting people financially during these unprecedented times with an injection of £9.3 billion pounds to strengthen the welfare system in response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Covid Winter Grant Scheme builds on that support with an additional £170m for local authorities in England, to support families with children and other vulnerable people with the cost of food and essential utilities this winter.

Devolved Administrations have received equivalent funding through the upfront funding guarantee, which was recently increased to £16bn for the year.

Our £30bn Plan for Jobs is the first step on the ladder to achieving this and will support economic recovery through new schemes including Kickstart and Job Entry Targeted Support.

The Holiday Activities and Food programme, which has provided healthy food and enriching activities to disadvantaged children since 2018, will also be expanded across England next year. It will cover Easter, Summer and Christmas in 2021, and cost up to £220m. It will be available to children in every local authority in England, building on previous programmes – including this summers, which supported around 50,000 children across 17 local authorities.

Our long-term ambition is to level up across the country and continue to tackle poverty through our reformed welfare system that works with the labour market to encourage people to move into and progress in work wherever possible.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of (a) suspending deductions and (b) implementing a grant in lieu of advances during the five week wait for receipt of universal credit.

Nobody in need has to wait for a payment under Universal Credit (UC). UC New Claim Advances allow eligible claimants to receive up to 100% of their estimated Universal Credit payment upfront. Claimants will receive their annual award over 13 payments during their first year, instead of 12. These upfront payments can be spread across two years instead of one from October 2021, as announced in the 2020 Budget. New Claim Advances are not loans. They are the claimant’s benefit paid early, which is then recovered over an agreed period.

The Department’s deductions policy strikes a fair balance between a claimant’s need to meet their financial obligations and their ability to ensure they can meet their day-to-day needs. Since October 2019, Universal Credit deductions are a maximum of 30% of a claimant’s standard allowance down from 40% previously. We also recognise the importance of safeguarding the welfare of claimants who have incurred debt, so last resort deductions over the 30% cap can be applied to protect vulnerable claimants from eviction and/or having their fuel supply disconnected, by providing a repayment method for arrears of these essential services.

The main aim of the deductions policy in Universal Credit is to safeguard the welfare of claimants who have incurred debt in a cost effective and efficient way. It provides protection for claimants from the consequences of homelessness, imprisonment or having vital utilities disconnected. Regulations protect claimants from excessive deductions and there are no plans to suspend them.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of lifting the benefit cap until adequate employment incentives provide a basis for its reintroduction.

There are currently no plans to make any changes to the benefit cap. The benefit cap provides fairness for taxpaying households, whilst providing a reasonable safety net of support for the most vulnerable. Whilst this means that some claimants will have a limit on the total amount of benefits they can receive, there are a range of exemptions for when the cap should not be applied, including exemptions for the most vulnerable claimants who are entitled to disability benefits and carer benefits.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the Government plans to extend the Minimum Income Floor suspension for six months.

The suspension of the Minimum Income Floor for Universal Credit that was due to expire on 12 November 2020 will be extended to the end of April 2021.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of reforming the welfare system in response to the (a) economic and (b) social challenges arising as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

No such assessment has been made of reforming the Welfare system.

Universal Credit has stood up to the challenge of the COVID-19, whereas the previous legacy benefit system would have buckled under the pressure. Millions more are able to access welfare which is fairer and more generous than the legacy benefit system. It is a modern, flexible, personalised benefit responding effectively to economic conditions. It replaces six outdated and complex benefits with one – helping to simplify the benefits system, providing support in times of need and making work pay.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether redundancy payments with limited tax liability under the Income Tax (Earnings and Pensions) Act 2003 are treated as capital in the assessment period in which they are received, as opposed to income under Regulation 54 of the Universal Credit Regulations 2013; whether those payments are not counted as earnings or surplus earnings for the purposes of a universal credit award; and whether those payments are assessed as capital for that award.

For those who are made redundant and make a claim to Universal Credit (UC), their redundancy payments, with limited tax liability under the Income Tax (earnings and Pensions) Act 2003, are treated as capital. A claimant’s capital is taken into account to determine their entitlement to UC and in the calculation of their UC award.

If capital exceeds £16,000 (after having deducted allowable disregards, such as, personal injury compensation payments) there will be no entitlement to UC.

Redundancy payments treated as capital are therefore not taken into account as earnings, nor would the surplus earnings rules apply to them.

Will Quince
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
28th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has plans to increase the rates of (a) income support and (b) job seekers allowance for (i) all claimants and (ii) claimants with chronic health conditions during the covid-19 outbreak.

There are no current plans to increase the amount of Jobseeker’s Allowance or Income Support due to COVID19. These benefits were increased by 1.7% from 6 April, following the Government announcement to end the benefits freeze in November 2019.

DWP and HMRC are experiencing significant increased demand and the Government has to prioritise the safety and stability of the benefits system overall, announcing measures that can be quickly and effectively operationalised.

Taken together, DWP’s measures represent an injection of over £6.5 billion into the welfare system and, along with the other job and business support programmes announced by the Chancellor, represent one of the most comprehensive packages of support introduced by an advanced economy in response to COVID19.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans she has to bring forward legislative proposals to enshrine the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities into UK domestic law.

The UK is a fully committed party to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities which we ratified in 2009. The UK as a general principle does not incorporate international treaties into domestic law. However, the rights of disabled people under this Convention are largely reflected and given effect in existing domestic policies and legislation.

The Equality Act 2010 provides, in domestic legislation, protections for people in Great Britain against discrimination, harassment or victimisation because of any of the nine protected characteristics set out in the Act – which include disability – as well as the public sector equality duty to promote equality of opportunity for all. Equivalent provisions for Northern Ireland are set out in a range of devolved legislation.

In 2019 we launched a new cross-government approach to disability and we will publish a ‘National Strategy for Disabled People’ in 2020.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans she has to maintain the disability rights of the European Charter of Fundamental Rights after the end of the transition period.

The European Charter of Fundamental Rights was not the source of fundamental rights in EU law and did not create any new rights, freedoms or principles. Rather, it reaffirms fundamental rights which already existed in EU law. The Charter will cease to have effect in UK domestic law at the end of the implementation period. Domestic law which implemented the rights and principles which underpin the Charter will be retained through the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018.

All the protections covered in our domestic legislation including the Equality Act 2010 and equivalent legislation in Northern Ireland, will continue to apply after the end of the implementation period.

In addition, the protections which derive from the European Convention on Human Rights, which have been given further domestic effect by the Human Rights Act 1998, are unaffected by EU exit.

Justin Tomlinson
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government made an assessment of the effect of the introduction of covid-19 hotel quarantine rules on UK citizens with loved ones in red list countries prior to the introduction of those new rules.

People should be staying at home unless they have a valid reason to travel. All of these measures will be kept under constant review, including the impact on individuals with family ties in other countries.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps the Government has taken to ensure that covid-19 hotel quarantine rules are compatible with international health commitments outlawing the levying of charges for quarantine with regard to (a) UK citizens with loved ones overseas and (b) human rights legislation on the right to a family life.

Countries around the world are charging for quarantine costs, including, Australia, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Canada and Singapore. People should stay at home unless they have a valid reason to travel. For those facing significant financial hardship as a result of the managed quarantine charge, there will be an opportunity to apply for a deferred repayment plan when booking. This is available for individuals who already receive income-related benefits and they will be required to pay back the charge in 12 monthly instalments.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the Government's planned timescale is for allowing UK residents to reunite with loved ones in red list countries during the covid-19 pandemic.

People should be staying at home unless they have a valid reason to travel. We keep all our measures under constant review and they will remain in place as long as is required in order to protect public health, reduce transmission of the virus and to reduce the risk posed by new variants. The managed quarantine and testing measures have been introduced in Regulations that have a sunset date of 8 June 2021.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the UK's (a) financial and (b) vaccine transfer commitments are to the World Health Organisation’s COVAX programme.

The United Kingdom remains committed to ensuring equitable access to effective vaccines as demonstrated by our £548 million contribution to the COVAX Advance Market Commitment - the international initiative to support global equitable access to vaccines. Through match funding, the commitment was leveraged to encourage other donors to commit $1 billion in 2020. The COVAX facility will aim to begin delivery by the end of February 2021 and we are working with international partners to support its rollout.

It is too early to determine how many doses of the vaccines that the UK has ordered will not be needed for domestic use. We are working through multilateral institutions, such as the United Nations and G20, as well as the World Health Organization and other international partners like the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness and Gavi the Vaccine Alliance to support vaccine development, manufacturing scale-up and distribution to meet domestic and international needs both now and in the future.

Nadhim Zahawi
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
2nd Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference the findings in the report published by Public Health England on 2 June 2020 entitled Disparities in the risk and outcomes of covid-19, what steps he plans to take to reduce health inequalities for BAME groups.

Racial disparities in the health of the nation are unacceptable. Following the publication of Public Health England (PHE)’s report, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Equalities (Kemi Badenoch MP) has been asked to urgently review the findings and better understand the drivers behind them. As part of this, we will look very closely at the health inequalities aspects of PHE’s report and further action needed to address them.

We remain committed to levelling up and spreading opportunity around this country, which will be an essential part of the economic and social recovery from this crisis.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations his Department (a) has made and (b) plans to make to the Israeli Government on recent trends in the number of demolitions of Palestinian-owned structures in the West Bank.

The UK Ambassador in Tel Aviv raised ongoing demolitions with the Israeli Authorities in a meeting alongside like-minded partners on 25 February 2021. I called on Israel to stop demolitions on 5 February 2021 and raised my concerns about demolitions of Palestinian homes and structures with the Israeli Ambassador on 29 October 2020. UK officials from the British Consulate in Jerusalem have made regular visits to areas at risk of demolition and eviction to reiterate UK support for those communities. The UK is clear that in all but the most exceptional of circumstances, demolitions are contrary to International Humanitarian Law. The practice causes unnecessary suffering to Palestinians and is harmful to the peace process.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he has made to the Israeli Government on reports of the Israeli Army allegedly seizing EU humanitarian aid intended for the Palestinian community of Humsa Al Bqai'a in the Jordan Valley.

I called on Israel to stop demolitions on 5 February 2021. I also raised our concern about demolitions with the Israeli Ambassador to the UK on 29 October 2020, and issued a statement outlining the UK's concern about the demolitions of structures in Humsa Al-Baqai'a on 6 November 2020. Officials from the British Consulate General Jerusalem visited Humsa Al-Baqai'a on 6 November 2020 to reiterate UK support for the community. The UK provides funding to the West Bank Protection Consortium, which is coordinating with the Palestinian Red Cross and the United Nations to provide emergency shelter to the community of Humsa Al-Baqai'a, and determine the community's long-term needs. UK senior officials raised demolitions with the Israeli Ambassador to the UK on 10 November 2020. The UK also urged the Government of Israel to end demolitions of property in the West Bank at the UN Security council on 21 December 2020.

We are focused on preventing demolitions from happening in the first place through our legal aid programme, which supports Bedouin communities and Palestinians facing demolition or home eviction in both the West Bank and East Jerusalem. We continue to urge the Government of Israel to develop improved mechanisms for zoning, planning and permitting in Area C for the benefit of the Palestinian population, including by facilitating local Palestinian participation in such processes.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what plans the Government has to ensure that British citizen frontier workers who work in Northern Ireland and live in the Republic of Ireland are able to secure their rights under Article 30(d) of the EU Withdrawal Agreement in the event that they are not eligible to apply for a frontier worker permit.

The frontier worker permit scheme has been established under Article 26 of the Withdrawal Agreement (and equivalent provisions in the agreements with the EEA EFTA States and Switzerland) to provide EU citizens with a right to be issued with a document certifying their rights as frontier workers in the UK under those agreements. British citizens and dual national British citizens who live outside the UK but who work in the UK are not within the personal scope of the Agreements and therefore are not eligible to apply to the frontier worker permit scheme. British citizens already have right of abode in the UK and do not need permission to work in the UK as that right stems from their British citizenship.

UK nationals who were lawfully resident in Ireland before the transition period ended are covered by the Withdrawal Agreement and do not need to apply for a new residence status in Ireland as their rights are conferred automatically by operation of the law. Under Article 30(d), UK nationals resident in Ireland and subject to the legislation of the UK continue to be covered by the EU social security regulations in full. This means that if the UK is competent, then the UK Government will be responsible for their social security cover in Ireland, including reciprocal healthcare.

Access to these rights will be determined by caseworkers upon application and guidance on evidence requirements has been published on gov.uk. The Withdrawal Agreement is without prejudice to Common Travel Area arrangements between the UK and Ireland and the rights of British and Irish citizens in each other's state. This includes rights under the social security agreement between the two countries.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
16th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps the Government is taking in response to the political situation in Ethiopia.

We are concerned by the ongoing violence in the Tigray region as well as by Amnesty International's report of killings of civilians on 9 November: we call for transparency and accountability to be delivered for such incidents. We have called on all involved to ensure the protection of civilians, and to restore and maintain humanitarian access to allow the delivery of humanitarian assistance and essential services. The Foreign Secretary called Prime Minister Abiy of Ethiopia on 10 November to raise these concerns and stress the urgent need to de-escalate the situation. On 18 November, I reinforced this message with the Ethiopian Ambassador to the UK. The British Ambassador to Ethiopia and other officials also continue to reinforce these messages at the highest levels and we continue to engage regional and wider international partners to push for swift de-escalation of the situation. We are in close contact with UK funded humanitarian agencies working in Tigray to understand humanitarian needs and programme adaptations.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what reports he has received on allegations of police violence towards protestors in the Lekki suburb of Lagos on 20 October 2020; and what assessment he has made of the potential merits of implementing sanctions against the Nigerian Government and officials if they are found to be involved in human rights abuses.

The UK Government is deeply concerned by violence during protests in Lagos and other major cities in Nigeria, including reports of casualties. We offer our condolences to the families of those affected. The Foreign Secretary issued a statement on 21 October calling for an end to the violence and for the Nigerian Government to urgently investigate reports of brutality by its security forces and hold those responsible to account. I reiterated these messages when I spoke to Foreign Minister Onyeama on 23 October. The British High Commissioner in Abuja continues to raise the protests with representatives of the Nigerian Government.

The UK Government has made clear to the Nigerian authorities at the highest levels the importance of protecting human rights for all. We encourage all parties to work together to enable the people of Nigeria to exercise their rights safely, peacefully and in line with the rule of law. On 6 July, the UK Government established the Global Human Rights sanctions regime by laying regulations in Parliament under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018. This sanctions regime gives the UK a powerful new tool to target individuals involved in serious human rights violations or abuses. It is longstanding practice not to speculate on future sanctions designations as to do so could reduce the impact of the designations. We will keep all evidence and potential listings under close review.

James Duddridge
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 1 September 2020 to Question 77846 on Bahrain: Capital punishment, if he will set out the international standards referred to in the Answer

Our support for Bahrain fully complies with our international human rights obligations as it is dependent on a robust assessment under the Overseas Security and Justice Assistance process, which requires that recognised human rights and other risks must be considered prior to providing assistance, including an assessment of the potential impact of any proposed assistance, and the identification of mitigation measures against the risk that assistance might directly or significantly contribute to a violation. Furthermore, our assistance is regularly monitored and evaluated to ensure it continues to deliver against these standards, and is often delivered in cooperation with respected international partners such as the United Nations Development Programme.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, for what reasons the call for evidence on the Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy did not expressly include (a) the promotion of democracy and (b) the protection of human rights.

At the start of the Integrated Review, the Prime Minister said that the Review will set out how the United Kingdom will be a problem-solving and burden-sharing nation. He also highlighted the importance of our values. This includes standing up for democracy and human rights.

The Call for Evidence invites the public to submit evidence to inform the Integrated Review. Its aim is to invite a broad range of submissions without prejudging which themes or issues should receive particular consideration at this stage.

Her Majesty's Government is committed to an open and inclusive review that utilises a wide range of expertise and challenges traditional Whitehall assumptions and thinking.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he has made to the Polish Government in response to Justice Minister Zbigniew Ziobro's recent statements that Poland will withdraw from the Istanbul Convention.

The UK accords a high priority to promoting gender equality and women's rights across the world. Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office officials regularly raise gender issues, including domestic violence, in multilateral fora such as the UN and the Council of Europe. The UK signed the Istanbul Convention in 2012, signalling its strong commitment to tackling violence against women and girls; this Government remains committed to ratifying it. We encourage the Polish Government, too, to maintain its commitment to the Convention. The British Embassy in Warsaw is active on this agenda and supports NGOs working on women's rights. Later this month, the Embassy will be hosting a public webinar with British and Polish experts on lessons learned in dealing with domestic violence during the Covid-19 pandemic and will follow this with smaller group workshops with NGOs from the UK and Poland at which they will share experiences.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what representations he has made to the Government of Belarus on the (a) integrity of its 2020 Presidential election and (b) mistreatment of anti-government protesters since that election.

The Government has been clear in condemning the violent suppression and detention of peaceful protesters, following the recent fraudulent Presidential elections in Belarus. We have been clear that we do not accept the election results. The UK is calling for an independent investigation through the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) into the conduct of the authorities leading up to, during and after the Presidential elections and the subsequent violent crackdown by authorities. We have raised these concerns directly with Belarusian Foreign Minister Makei.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
21st Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if the Government will make its future assistance to Bahrain contingent on a decrease in or end to that country’s use of death penalty.

We continue to believe that Bahrain is taking steps in the right direction to improve its human rights record, in line with the Government's Plan which built on the reform recommendations set out in the 2012 Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry Report. Whilst we and the Government of Bahrain acknowledge this is a work in progress, our support for this Bahrain-led reform is helping to build effective and accountable institutions, strengthen the rule of law and deliver justice reform. All our support is in line with international standards, and aims to share the UK's expertise and experience.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
24th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, with reference to the Answer of 4 July 2019 to Question 270326 on International Decade for People of African Descent, whether he plans to reconsider the decision not to take specific steps to mark the UN International Decade for People of African Descent and its theme of recognition, justice and development following the Black Lives Matter protest.

The UK Government strongly supports the UN International Decade for People of African Descent (2015-2024) and remains committed to combating racism, both domestically and internationally. There are no guidelines setting out how countries should mark the Decade. The UK has chosen to combat racism throughout the lifetime of the Decade by continuing to work to eradicate discrimination and intolerance in our country. The Government is committed to doing this in this decade, and beyond.

At home, our focus is on creating a fair society where all people, regardless of ethnic origin or background, are valued and able to participate fully and realise their own potential. Internationally, we believe that one of the most effective ways to tackle injustices and advocate respect among different ethnic groups is to encourage countries to uphold their human rights obligations, particularly through international institutions such as the United Nations. The UK has participated in and joined consensus on the key 21st century UN events and instruments on racism, and is committed to speaking out against racism and intolerance bilaterally and in multilateral fora. During the 43rd session of the UN Human Rights Council, we delivered two statements on the urgency of dealing with racism, one in the item 9 debate and one in the urgent debate. The Minister of State responsible for Human Rights, Lord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon also discussed the importance of combatting racism during the UK's closing statement which was delivered on 26 June.

Nigel Adams
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to his Hungarian counterpart since legislation was passed by the Hungarian Government on 19 May 2020 that ends the legal recognition of transgender people and wider discrimination against LGBTQ citizens.

The UK is committed to the principle of non-discrimination on all grounds, including on the basis of sexual orientation and/or gender identity. We are concerned by the amendment to Hungary's Registry Act that was passed through by the Hungarian Parliament on 19 May, and the impact this will have on the rights of transgender people.

I raised these concerns with the Hungarian Deputy Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade, Levente Magyar, on 30 April. Officials in our Embassy in Budapest have also discussed the amendment with senior Hungarian officials, as well as with civil society. We will continue to maintain a dialogue with Hungary, both bilaterally and in multilateral fora, on promoting tolerance and non-discrimination towards LGBT people.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, for what reasons he refused a request from the EU to establish an office in Northern Ireland to facilitate the implementation of the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol.

The UK Government considered the EU's request in February and again in March, to establish a Belfast office of the EU Delegation to the UK and responded on both occasions that we cannot agree to a permanent EU presence in Belfast. While Article 12 gives EU officials the right to be present during the activities of UK authorities related to the implementation and application of the Protocol, we do not accept that that necessarily requires an EU Delegation office in Belfast, or indeed any other permanent EU presence in Northern Ireland.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
20th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what the Government's position is on the emergency powers granted to the Prime Minister of Hungary during the covid-19 pandemic; and what representations he has made to his Hungarian counterpart on that matter.

We are committed to working with our international partners, including Hungary, to overcome the global health and economic challenges resulting from the coronavirus pandemic and to set the stage for a strong recovery of sustainable economic growth and prosperity. We remain in close contact with the Hungarian authorities as we coordinate our response.

The UK places great importance on, and has a proud history of respecting, the rule of law and democratic values. We are clear that measures to address the coronavirus pandemic should be targeted, time-limited and subject to regular review. We are closely monitoring the Hungarian government's use of the emergency legislation.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
19th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to international counterparts on tacking the transmission of covid-19 in refugee camps related to the conflict in Syria.

The Foreign Secretary's current priority is to support global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19; he recognises the scale of the threat posed by COVID-19 in Syria and in Syrian refugee camps. The International Development Secretary spoke with Filippo Grandi, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, on 18 March, and agreed to work together to minimise the impact of this crisis on refugees. DFID is leading the humanitarian support for the UK's global efforts to combat the outbreak of COVID-19, including for those in refugee camps. This includes a contribution of £10 million to the World Health Organisation to help prevent the spread of this outbreak. We will continue to monitor the situation in Syria and in Syrian refugee camps very closely.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he is making to his EU member state counterparts to ensure that people originating from Northern Ireland who identify as Irish and retain Irish Citizenship and therefor EU citizenship are not removed from electoral register on the basis that they are only considered as British citizens under the 1981 Nationality Act.

Under the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, the People of Northern Ireland have the right to identify as British, Irish or both; and the right to hold both British and Irish citizenship. Thus, and in line with UK and Irish citizenship laws, the People of Northern Ireland may be solely British citizens, solely Irish citizens, or dual British-Irish citizens. Those people of Northern Ireland who are exercising their free movement rights, as Irish (including dual British-Irish) citizens, to reside in a European Union Member State will continue to be subject to the same rules as other EU citizens residing in that Member State, including with regard to voting rights. People of Northern Ireland, regardless of their citizenship, may also be exercising their free movement rights as family members of EU citizens in a European Union Member State and accordingly will continue to be subject to relevant rules with regard to voting rights. Those who are solely British citizens, and who are not exercising free movement rights as family members of EU citizens, will be subject to the rules applicable to other British citizens in that Member State, including with regard to voting rights.

The right of British citizens to vote and stand in local elections depends on the electoral rules of the Member State in which they live. The UK pushed hard in Withdrawal Agreement negotiations to include the right to vote and stand in local elections, but the EU Commission argued that voting rights were a Member State competence. UK Ministers wrote to all EU Member States in December 2018 to propose bilateral agreements on local voting rights, and we have now signed agreements with Spain, Portugal and Luxembourg. Some Member States have constitutional provisions that prevent third-country nationals from voting in local elections.

Wendy Morton
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending access to the UK Trader Scheme to companies without a formal base in Northern Ireland.

The conditions for authorisation for the UK Trader Scheme (UKTS) are set out in the Withdrawal Agreement Joint Committee’s decision on ‘not at risk’ goods. The Government has already provided an easement to allow GB traders who do not have a fixed place of business in Northern Ireland time to prepare, allowing them to be authorised for the UKTS until 1 November 2021 providing they meet other UKTS eligibility requirements. As part of current discussions to address outstanding issues with the Protocol and ensure it operates in the pragmatic and proportionate way intended, the Government would want to consider flexibilities that could support the streamlined flow of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many licences have been granted in relation to frozen Libyan assets in the UK; and to whom those licences have been granted.

The Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI) releases an annual review each year, which provides information about the number of licences issued. From April 2017 to March 2020, OFSI issued a total of 66 new licences under the Libya regime.

OFSI does not publish details of individual licences granted.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of waiving the limitation on the number of payment holidays to credit providers that people can apply for in response to the prolonged economic effect of the covid-19 outbreak.

In November 2020, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) extended its guidance on mortgage and consumer credit payment holidays. This allows borrowers to apply for up to six months of payment holidays until 31 March 2021, with all payment holidays under this guidance ending by 31 July 2021. These measures have provided consumers with a much-needed respite period, giving time to smooth out finances that may have taken a hit by the pandemic.

The Government and FCA have been clear from the start that this guidance should only be a temporary solution for those borrowers facing short-term financial difficulties as a result of COVID-19. For borrowers needing ongoing support beyond six months, the FCA’s business-as-usual rules require that lenders provide tailored forbearance for the specific needs of the borrower. The tools available to lenders under these rules include suspending, reducing or waiving interest, fees or charges as well as offering further payment holidays if agreed between the borrower and lender.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he received reports of the Ready to Invest scam; and whether his Department was aware that the Financial Conduct Authority had been notified of related fraudulent activities in 2010.

Ready2Invest was an unauthorised firm that went into liquidation in 2013.

The FCA is an independent non-governmental body responsible for regulating and supervising the financial services industry. Matters of fraud are the responsibility of the police, not the FCA. However, it is the responsibility of the FCA, as an independent regulator to investigate and decide upon the appropriate course of action when it identifies potential cases of investment fraud. I understand that this matter has been referred to the relevant law enforcement agencies and it would be inappropriate to comment on an ongoing investigation.

Although the Treasury sets the legal framework for the regulation of financial services, it has strictly limited powers. In particular, the Treasury cannot intervene in individual cases and does not monitor individual financial services firms.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to mitigate the effect on leisure boats moving between Northern Ireland and Great Britain arising from different rules on red diesel from 1 July 2021.

Budget 2021 announced that private pleasure craft users in Northern Ireland will no longer be able to use red diesel to propel their craft. The change will take effect later this year, with the specific date to be confirmed in due course. Red diesel will continue to be used by private pleasure craft in the rest of the UK.

This change will achieve consistency with a 2018 judgment by the  Court of Justice of the European Union, and ensure the UK meets its international obligations under the Northern Ireland  Protocol. It will also align the rules with those governing fuel used by private pleasure craft in the Republic of Ireland, which should make it simpler for craft  users to get the fuel they need if they travel between  Northern Ireland and Ireland.

The Government is engaging with representative groups covering private pleasure craft as well as fuel suppliers over any implementation issues. Further details will be announced in due course, including in relation to craft travelling from Northern Ireland to Great Britain.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps are being taken to ensure effective communication and co-ordination between the Trader Support Service and the Irish Revenue Commissioners.

The Trader Support Service (TSS) has been established to help traders affected by changes due to the Northern Ireland Protocol. For example, the service can submit import and safety and security declarations on behalf of traders moving goods from Great Britain to Northern Ireland without them needing to engage directly with new digital customs systems.

The Government recognises the need to work closely with the Irish authorities regarding customs requirements and the TSS is engaging with these authorities accordingly. As part of the TSS’s educational offering, the service can indicate to traders and hauliers when they will need to interact with Irish systems.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the current staffing level is of the Trader Support Service.

HMRC are working closely with the Fujitsu-led consortium appointed to deliver services offered by the Trader Support Service (TSS). The consortium has expertise across the range of services needed to make the TSS effective, including an existing provider of customs education and an established customs intermediary. It has over 700 contact centre staff on hand to manage trader queries, answering 98% of calls in under 30 seconds.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what representations he has received on allegations of fraud connected to overseas investments; and what steps he is taking to safeguard the interests of UK investors involved in investment scams (a) overseas and (b) in unregulated areas.

The Government takes matters of fraud extremely seriously. We continue to work closely with industry to close down the vulnerabilities that fraudsters exploit and ensure members of the public have the information they need to spot a scam and stand up to fraudsters.

The FCA hold a public record that shows details of firms, individuals and other bodies that are, or have been, regulated by the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) and/or the FCA. Consumers who are considering an investment opportunity are encouraged to use the register to check the regulatory status of the firm in question ahead of transferring any funds. The register can be found here https://register.fca.org.uk/.

Individuals who invest in unregulated products should be aware that they are unlikely to be eligible for FSCS compensation (unless a regulated activity (i.e. financial advice) has been undertaken). Whether an activity is regulated is set out in legislation, and is rightly a matter for government and Parliament. The costs and benefits of bringing activities into the regulatory perimeter can be finely balanced which is why Government is committed to regulating only where there is a clear case for doing so.

Where a member of the public suspects that they have been a victim of a scam they should report the case to Action Fraud, the national reporting point for fraud and cyber crime.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing bridging finance for employers to cover ongoing payment of national insurance contributions and pension costs for employees on furlough during the covid-19 outbreak in order to safeguard jobs during periods of business closure.

Under the extension from November, employer contributions for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) have returned to the level they were in August, which is lower than the previous level in September and October. Employer National Insurance Contributions (NICs) and pension contributions are the only required contributions under the extension to the CJRS. For an average claim, this accounts for just 5 per cent of total employment costs or £70 per employee per month. Many small employers can benefit from the Employment Allowance for support with their NICs bill, allowing eligible employers to reduce their annual National Insurance liability by up to £4,000.

The CJRS is only one element of a comprehensive package of support for businesses. This includes access to affordable, Government backed finance through the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS) and the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CLBLS) for large firms, along with the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBL) for small and micro enterprises. As of 13 December, these schemes have already provided over £68bn in guaranteed loans and provide vital support across all sectors of the UK economy for businesses who have been impacted by coronavirus.

We have guaranteed the devolved administrations an additional £16.8 billion of resource funding this year to help them respond to coronavirus. This means at least £3bn of additional funding for the Northern Ireland Executive.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of how much and what proportion of covid-related rates relief returned by UK supermarkets will be allocated to the Northern Ireland Executive.

The UK Government has been clear throughout the pandemic that businesses should use support appropriately, and welcomes any decision to repay support where it is no longer needed. Any funds returned will support the continuing efforts to protect people’s jobs and incomes.

The UK Government is working with the devolved administrations and will set out details for business on making repayments shortly.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
14th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of extending the Stamp Duty holiday, to (a) mitigate the effect of logistical delays occurring during property transactions as a result of covid-19 restrictions and (b) facilitate full outworking of sales that are underway that may otherwise not complete.

The temporary SDLT relief was designed to stimulate immediate momentum in a property market where property transactions fell by as much as fifty per cent during the COVID-19 lockdown in March. This momentum in the property market will also support the jobs of people whose employment relies on custom from the property industry, such as retailers and tradespeople.

The Government will continue to monitor the market. However, as the relief was designed to provide an immediate stimulus to the property market, the Government does not plan to extend this relief.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has for the UK Infrastructure Bank to open regional offices as part of the levelling up policy.

The new infrastructure bank for the UK will be headquartered in the north of England. Further details on the bank, including location, will be set out at the Spring Budget.

The bank will help to support infrastructure projects across the whole of the UK in order to unleash the power of the Union and promote economic growth.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of permitting the Northern Ireland Executive to carry forward moneys from the 2020-21 financial year as a result of uncertainty about spending profiles arising from the covid-19 outbreak.

As part of our response to coronavirus we have provided the Northern Ireland Executive with upfront certainty that they will receive at least £2.8bn in additional funding this year on top of their Spring Budget funding. This has allowed the Executive to plan and deliver their response to coronavirus.

As set out in the Statement of Funding Policy, the Executive are able to carry forward a certain percentage of their budgets from one year to the next through Budget Exchange. This means the Executive will be able to carry forward a proportion of their overall budget for 2020/21 which includes the £2.8bn additional funding due to coronavirus. As with UK government departments, any excess underspends will be forfeited unless exceptionally agreed otherwise with HM Treasury.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to address the loss of access to the VAT Margin Scheme as a consequence of the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol for (a) cars sourced in Great Britain and sold in Northern Ireland by car dealers and (b) the consequent increase in costs of cars to consumers.

The Northern Ireland Protocol frames the approach to VAT on goods, including the second-hand margin scheme, in Northern Ireland. As is the case for tax policy generally, the Government is keeping this under review.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing support for self-employed people comparable to the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme during the November covid-19 lockdown.

In reaction to the resurgence of COVID-19 and following the extension of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), the Government has increased the level of support available to the self-employed through the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS).

The overall level of the third SEISS grant has been increased to 80 per cent of average trading profits, meaning that the maximum grant available has now increased to £7,500. This provides equivalent support to the self-employed as is being provided to employees through the Government contribution in the CJRS.

The Government will also be paying out the grant more quickly by bringing forward the SEISS 3 claims window from 14 December to 30 November.

This will provide an estimated £7.3bn of support to the self-employed through November to January alone, with a further grant to follow covering February to April. This places the SEISS among the most generous schemes for the self-employed in the world.

The SEISS continues to be just one element of a comprehensive package of support for individuals and businesses. This package includes Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support,?increased levels of Universal Credit, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
2nd Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to provide financial support to employees that were made redundant before the anticipated end of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

On 31 October 2020 the Prime Minister announced that the Government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme has been extended, with employees receiving 80% of their current salary for hours not worked, up to a maximum of £2,500. This will ensure that there is no gap in support. If employees were employed as of 23 September 2020 and were made redundant or stopped working for their employer prior to 30 October 2020, they can qualify for the scheme if their employer re-employs them.

This scheme is just one element of a comprehensive package of support. Where firms make the decision that they cannot retain all of their staff, the Government is ensuring that those looking for work are supported through a package of measures in the Plan for Jobs. This will help people find work by significantly increasing the help offered through Jobcentres and providing individualised advice through the National Careers Service. The Government has also launched the Kickstart Scheme, a £2bn fund to create hundreds of thousands of new, fully subsidised jobs for young people. The temporary welfare measures announced in March also remain available and will benefit new and existing claimants.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the potential merits of reviewing banks' compliance with money laundering regulations.

The UK’s Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing and Transfer of Funds (Information on the Payer) Regulations 2017 (MLRs), set out the high-level requirements on banks to combat money laundering. The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is the Anti-Money Laundering/Counter-Terrorist Financing (AML/CTF) supervisor for over 20,000 financial services firms in the UK and is committed to ensuring the MLRs are fully adhered to and will not hesitate to take action where they are not.

The FCA actively investigates AML breaches in the financial sector and in recent years this has resulted in fining Commerzbank in 2020, Standard Chartered Bank £102.2 million in April 2019, Barclays over £72m in 2015 and Deutsche Bank £163m in 2017 for AML failings. The Deutsche Bank fine is the largest fine for an AML breach ever imposed by the FCA or the Financial Services Authority. The FCA also makes full use of other powers available to it under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
30th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the leak of documents from the US Treasury's Financial Crimes Enforcement Network in September 2020.

The UK is internationally recognised as having some of the strongest controls worldwide for tackling money laundering and terrorist financing. The allegations contained within the leak of documents are largely historic, and in recent years, the Government has taken a number of actions to strengthen the UK’s response to financial crime.

In 2019, the government published the landmark Economic Crime Plan, which brought together the government, law enforcement and the private sector in closer cooperation than ever before to deliver a whole system response to economic crime.

This year, the government has also completed the transposition of the Fifth Anti-Money Laundering Directive into domestic law. This helps to ensure the UK’s AML/CTF regime remains comprehensive, responsive to emerging threats, and in line with evolving international standards set by the Financial Action Task Force.

However, we recognise that there is more to be done and are committed to continuing to build on the progress made so far, as we lead the global fight against illicit financial flows.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of introducing additional lending schemes for (a) hospitality and (b) other businesses experiencing an immediate and open-ended erosion of their business viability as a result of the covid-19 outbreak and associated restrictions.

Through the Chancellor’s Winter Economy Plan, the Government continues to protect jobs and struggling businesses across the most impacted areas of the UK. As part of this plan, the Chancellor announced that we have started work on a new, successor loan scheme, set to begin in January.

The Chancellor also announced an extension to the application deadlines for the Coronavirus Business Interruption Scheme (CBILS), the Coronavirus Large Business Interruption Scheme (CLBILS), the Bounce Back Loan Scheme (BBLS) and the Future Fund to a single date, 30 November. This provides additional time for businesses who need support to apply for government-backed finance.

The Government recognises that the necessary restrictions introduced through the Tier system have been disruptive for businesses. That is why we have set out an expanded package of support for businesses who are legally required to close, as well as for those who are not forced to close, but who face reduced demand due to additional restrictions on socialising.

The Job Support Scheme will now guarantee that most workers working a minimum of 20% of hours receive at least 73% of their usual wages, while workers whose employers have been closed by health restrictions will be guaranteed two thirds of their wages.

Hospitality, leisure and accommodation businesses in Tier 2 and Tier 3 areas will now also be eligible to receive a grant of up to £2,100 and £3,000, respectively, according to the value of their premises. Sufficient funding will be allocated to Local Authorities to distribute.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of expediting the implementation of the enhanced Job Support Scheme in areas where covid-19 restrictions have been escalated and businesses have closed.

Employers can use the furlough scheme until 31 October to help them through this difficult period and can then get support through the new Job Support Scheme from 1 November to ensure there is no gap in support, including in areas where COVID-19 restrictions have been increased and businesses closed. The scale of support that the Job Support Scheme provides has also been increased to reflect the evolving situation. This is just one part of a wider package of support for livelihoods across the UK including rental support, mortgage holidays, and extra funding for the welfare safety net to help those without access to other forms of support.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of subsidising the employers' wage contribution element of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme for businesses unable to trade in Northern Ireland between 17 October and 31 October 2020 before the Job Support Scheme is implemented.

The CJRS employer contributions are small in comparison to employee costs; if an average claim lasted 8 months, the total cost of employer contributions would represent about 5% of the total gross employment costs an employer would have incurred had the employee not been furloughed.

For employers who may need more support, there is a range of continuing support including the Bounce Back Loan Scheme. For employees who may need more support, the Government has introduced temporary welfare measures including a £1,000 a year increase to the Universal Credit standard allowance and Working Tax Credit basic element.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing scaled, automatic additional financial support to regions which move into (a) high and (b) very high covid-19 local alert levels.

As measures to control the virus change, government support has evolved.

The government continues to take a flexible approach and recognises the evolving situation with the pandemic and health restrictions, and the impact this is having on areas. Which is why on 22 October, the Chancellor announced a package specifically for those businesses which are not forced to close, but face reduced demand due to additional social distancing restrictions:

o Two changes to the Job Support Scheme (JSS): there will be a significant reduction in the employer contribution to employee wages. And there will be also a reduction in time required for an employee to be in work. Both changes will benefit employers, provide greater flexibility and help protect more jobs.

o An increase in the generosity of the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme to mirror the new generosity of the JSS for employed workers.

o Additional funding to allow Local Authorities in Tier 2 areas to make cash grants to businesses that can remain open. These grants are primarily aimed at hospitality, leisure and accommodation business premises and are worth 70% of the value of the grants provided to closed businesses in Tier 3.

Moreover, in July we announced an unprecedented guarantee that the devolved administrations would receive at least £12.7 billion in additional resource funding this year to help them respond to Covid-19. As of 9 October, we have now uplifted that by £1.3 billion, to at least £14 billion. This means a total increase this year of at least £2.4 billion for the Northern Ireland Executive, on top of their Spring Budget 20 funding. This is in addition to the UK-wide measures that have directly supported the people and businesses in Northern Ireland. We continue to work with devolved administrations to support them contain the spread of Covid-19.

We continue to review our policies to ensure we are providing the right support to local areas under increased restrictions.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of automatically allocating additional financial and economic support to areas where covid-19 risks and associated restrictions are increased and prolonged relative to the rest of the UK.

As measures to control the virus change, government support has evolved.

The government continues to take a flexible approach and recognises the evolving situation with the pandemic and health restrictions, and the impact this is having on areas. Which is why on 22 October, the Chancellor announced a package specifically for those businesses which are not forced to close, but face reduced demand due to additional social distancing restrictions:

o Two changes to the Job Support Scheme (JSS): there will be a significant reduction in the employer contribution to employee wages. And there will be also a reduction in time required for an employee to be in work. Both changes will benefit employers, provide greater flexibility and help protect more jobs.

o An increase in the generosity of the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme to mirror the new generosity of the JSS for employed workers.

o Additional funding to allow Local Authorities in Tier 2 areas to make cash grants to businesses that can remain open. These grants are primarily aimed at hospitality, leisure and accommodation business premises and are worth 70% of the value of the grants provided to closed businesses in Tier 3.

Moreover, in July we announced an unprecedented guarantee that the devolved administrations would receive at least £12.7 billion in additional resource funding this year to help them respond to Covid-19. As of 9 October, we have now uplifted that by £1.3 billion, to at least £14 billion. This means a total increase this year of at least £2.4 billion for the Northern Ireland Executive, on top of their Spring Budget 20 funding. This is in addition to the UK-wide measures that have directly supported the people and businesses in Northern Ireland. We continue to work with devolved administrations to support them contain the spread of Covid-19.

We continue to review our policies to ensure we are providing the right support to local areas under increased restrictions.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making the proportion of previous earnings in the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme the same as that in the Job Support Scheme.

The Government recognises the impact that the changing path of the virus has had on the self-employed, including those in peripatetic professions, and has taken action to increase the level of support available.

The support given to the self-employed via the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme Grant Extension (SEISS GE) will now be doubled, increasing the amount of profits covered from 20 per cent to 40 per cent. This means the maximum grant available has increased from £1,875 to £3,750. This will provide a further £3.1 billion of support to the self-employed through November to January alone, with a further grant to follow covering February to April. The Government is now providing broadly the same level of support for the self-employed as is being provided to employees through the Job Support Scheme (Open).

For those requiring further assistance, the SEISS continues to be just one element of a comprehensive package of financial support for the self-employed. The Government has temporarily increased the Universal Credit standard allowance for 2020-21 and relaxed the Minimum Income Floor for the duration of the pandemic meaning that where self-employed claimants' earnings have significantly fallen, their Universal Credit award will have increased to reflect their lower earnings. In addition to this, the self-employed also have access to other elements of the package, including Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
19th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the International Monetary Fund’s October 2020 Fiscal Monitor, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of a programme of public investment to help economic recovery from the effects of the covid-19 outbreak.

In responding to the Covid-19 outbreak the government has announced unprecedented support for families, businesses, and self-employed people. The immediate focus for the government’s economic and fiscal strategy continues to be on supporting workers and businesses through the COVID-19 pandemic.

The government is conducting a one-year Spending Review, which will set departmental resource and capital budgets for 2021-22 and Devolved Administrations block grants for the same period. Alongside providing enhanced support for public services and certainty for departments to tackle Covid-19 and deliver our Plan for Jobs to support employment, the SR will invest in infrastructure to keep up the momentum of our ambitious plans to unite and level up, drive our economic recovery and build back better. Multi-year NHS and schools resource settlements will be fully funded, as will priority infrastructure projects. The Spending Review will conclude in late November.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that the Job Support Scheme incentivises employers to maximise the number of jobs retained during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Job Support Scheme (JSS) is designed to protect jobs in businesses which are facing lower demand over the winter months due to COVID-19, and to support jobs where businesses are legally required to close as a result of coronavirus restrictions. This comprehensive package of support will ensure that as many jobs as possible are protected and help keep employees attached to the workforce.

Further incentivising employers to retain employees is the Job Retention Bonus (JRB), which can be claimed alongside the JSS. This is worth £1,000 per employee and is paid to the employer. JSS grants can be used by employers to play an employee’s wages and help meet the JRB Minimum Income Threshold.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
15th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 13 October 2020 to Question 99158, if he will publish the specific Barnett Consequential arising to Northern Ireland from the Kickstart scheme.

Any additional funding provided to DWP for Kickstart will result in Barnett consequentials for the Northern Ireland Executive.

As is the normal process, changes to departmental and devolved administrations’ funding will be confirmed at Supplementary Estimates.

Therefore, to give the Northern Ireland Executive the certainty to plan and deliver their coronavirus response, we have guaranteed they will receive at least £2.4bn in additional funding this year on top of their Spring Budget funding.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to develop the Authorised Economic Order system for trade between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

The Government has been clear that there should be no tariffs on internal UK trade because, as the NI Protocol acknowledges, the UK is a single customs territory.

In addition, processes on goods moving from GB to NI will be kept to an absolute minimum so that the integrity and smooth functioning of the UK internal market are protected. Nothing in the NI Protocol prevents NI businesses from enjoying unfettered access to the rest of the UK internal market. As set out in New Decade, New Approach, the Government will legislate to guarantee unfettered access for NI’s businesses to the whole of the UK internal market, and ensure that this legislation is in force for 1 January 2021.

Authorised Economic Operator (AEO) status will be available in both GB and NI at the end of the transition period, but, to ensure minimal disruption to businesses, the Government has established a new and unprecedented Trader Support Service for businesses moving goods between GB and NI. This will provide an end-to-end service which will guide traders through all import processes, including handling digital import and safety and security declarations on their behalf, at no additional cost.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of applying Modern Monetary Theory principles to his fiscal policies when responding to the covid-19 outbreak.

In responding to Covid-19 outbreak the government has announced unprecedented support for families, businesses, and self-employed people. The actions taken have been necessary to help limit any long-term economic scarring and to ensure the economy can recover quickly once the pandemic is over.

The government is committed to delivering support within the existing macroeconomic framework, which is essential for ensuring the UK’s economic credibility. The government’s immediate response to COVID-19 will continue to be funded by additional borrowing, through the government’s normal debt management operations.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, prior to taking his decision to introduce the Job Retention Bonus, what assessment his Department made of the potential merits of allocating the funding assigned to that Bonus to either (a) reducing the level of employer contribution to the Job Support Scheme or (b) providing sector-specific job support schemes during the covid-19 outbreak.

The combination of the Job Retention Bonus (JRB) and the Job Support Scheme (JSS) will help to protect jobs. The JRB helps with employers' costs: for the average claim, the JRB will subsidise about 20% of the employment costs from November to January. For employees at the lower earnings limit, it will subsidise about 60% of employment costs.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of providing additional financial support for people who are made redundant during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government recognises that many families will have to rely on the safety net of the welfare system as a result of this crisis. That is why we have introduced significant temporary measures to boost its generosity, including a £20 per week increase to the Universal Credit standard allowance, and an increase to the Universal Credit housing element so it covers the lowest third of local rents. The OBR estimates our welfare measures will increase spending by over £9 billion this year.

We are also focussing on getting people back into work. We announced unprecedented support in the Plan for Jobs, including £1.2 billion to significantly expand and enhance work search support, including by doubling the number of work coaches, additional investment into the Flexible Support Fund, and making use of external providers to expand support even further. The Government also launched a new £2 billion Kickstart Scheme, creating hundreds of thousands of new, fully subsidised jobs for young people at risk of long-term unemployment, as well as a guaranteed foundation of support for young people on Universal Credit.

The Plan for Jobs also invested £8.6 billion in infrastructure, decarbonisation and maintenance projects to create jobs.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing additional financial support to people of working age who were employed or self-employed before the start of the covid-19 outbreak but who have since been unable to work as a result of having underlying health conditions that make them vulnerable to covid-19 infection.

Individuals with underlying health conditions have access to the unprecedented package of support for individuals that the Government has introduced. This includes the introduction of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme, the Job Support Scheme, and the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.

For those on low incomes or unable to work, the Government has injected a further £9.3 billion into the welfare system and has made several changes to support the most vulnerable. These changes include: a £20 per week increase to the UC standard allowance and Working Tax Credit basic element, and a relaxation of the UC minimum income floor for all self-employed claimants. In addition, those with a health condition which prevents them from working or preparing for work may be entitled to an extra amount of Universal Credit.

Since 1 August, the Government has relaxed national advice for workers who are clinically extremely vulnerable. The advice is the same as for the clinically vulnerable; to work from home where possible. However, if they are unable to work from home, they will be able to return, provided their workplace is COVID-safe.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
5th Oct 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the the Barnett Consequential is arising to the Northern Ireland Executive from the Kickstart scheme in Great Britain.

On 24th July we made an unprecedented upfront guarantee to the devolved administrations. We guaranteed that they will receive at least £12.7bn in additional funding this year on top of their Spring Budget Funding, including £2.2bn for the Northern Ireland Executive.

This gives the Northern Ireland Executive the certainty to plan and deliver their coronavirus response this year. The guaranteed funding will ensure people, businesses and public services in all three nations get the support they need throughout the pandemic.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
8th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the economic effects of the covid-19 pandemic, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of index-linking devolved Administrations' borrowing limits to reflect cost pressures.

The devolved administrations receive a share of funding from UK Government borrowing through the Barnett formula. This demonstrates the significant benefit derived from pooling and sharing resources across our Union.

The UK Government has guaranteed that the devolved administrations will receive a minimum of £12.7bn of additional resource funding in 2020/21. This is an unprecedented guarantee of additional in-year funding.

The devolved administrations can also augment this funding through their own borrowing powers and Reserves, ensuring they have the tools to deliver their response to COVID-19 this year.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps the Government is taking to monitor the lending practices of banks.

Although the Treasury sets the legal framework for the regulation of financial services, it does not have investigative powers of its own.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) is responsible for the regulation and monitoring of regulated mortgage and consumer lending. The FCA assesses every regulated firm’s fitness to trade as part of the authorisation process, including banks, and it has put in place binding standards on firms. It proactively monitors the market, focusing on the areas most likely to cause consumer harm, and it has various methods to punish breaches of its rules – there is no limit on the fines it can levy and, crucially, it can force firms to compensate consumers. In addition to following FCA rules, banks undertaking regulated consumer credit lending must also comply with relevant parts the Consumer Credit Act 1974.

On business lending, the Government continues to monitor the market and work closely with banks and other finance providers to ensure SMEs can access the finance they need, including through the government-backed loan guarantee schemes.

If, as a result of a bank’s lending practices, an individual or an SME feels they have been treated unfairly they can refer complaints to the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS). The FOS provides a free, independent dispute resolution service for bank customers.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to make housing more affordable for people who have experienced financial hardship as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government has put in place significant measures to help people with their living costs, including housing, by paying up to 80% of their wages, increasing the amount available to welfare claimants and raising the Local Housing Allowance rate to the 30th percentile, supporting tenants who may be struggling with their rent. Also, 1.9 million mortgage payment holidays have been granted, equivalent to 1 in every 6 UK mortgages, and the current stay on lender repossessions of homes will be in place to 31 October 2020.

Furthermore, the Government has committed an additional £9.5 billion for the Affordable Homes Programme at the Budget. This takes funding from 21/22 to £12.2 billion. The £12.2 billion will be spent over five years and this will deliver up to 180,000 new affordable homes

We also introduced a stay on possession proceedings for renters in England and Wales to ensure no one needed to be concerned about the threat of eviction over the summer. From 21 September courts will start to hear possession hearings again and these will be subject to new court processes and procedures, developed by the Judiciary, including prioritisation of the most serious cases.

The Government has changed the law to increase notice periods to six months in all but the most egregious cases. This means that renters now served notice can stay in their homes over winter, with more time to find alternative support or accommodation.

We are also taking steps to ensure that no enforcement of evictions will take place in areas where local lockdown measures are in force which restrict access to premises. There will also be a ‘winter truce’ on the enforcement of evictions, with no evictions permitted in England and Wales in the run up to and over Christmas except in the most serious circumstances, such as cases involving anti-social behaviour or domestic abuse.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
7th Sep 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the implications for his fiscal policy of the May 2020 OECD report entitled Tax and Fiscal Policy in response to the Coronavirus crisis: Strengthening confidence and resilience.

The UK’s fiscal response to COVID-19 has been one of the most generous and comprehensive around the world. It has been the right thing to do to support jobs, livelihoods and the economy, and will ensure stronger public finances over the longer term.

The immediate focus for the Government’s economic and fiscal strategy is now on ensuring that it continues to support workers and businesses as the UK recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic. The Treasury reviews a range of reports from institutions including the OECD in the course of advising ministers. The Government will set out further details on its plans for fiscal policy at the next Budget, as the economic and fiscal outlook becomes clearer.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will list each of the Barnett Consequentials that have arisen for the Northern Ireland Executive since 1 April 2020.

The Barnett consequentials that have been allocated to the Northern Ireland Executive since 1 April 2020 have been set out in the 2020-21 Main Supply Estimates publication and the latest Block Grant Transparency publication.

On 24 July we made an unprecedented upfront guarantee to the Northern Ireland Executive. We guaranteed that they will receive at least £2.2bn in additional Resource DEL funding for this year. This certainty will ensure they can plan a coronavirus response in the months ahead.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
28th Aug 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the Barnett Consequentials arising for the Northern Ireland Executive during the 2020-21 financial year must be spent in-year or may be carried forward into the 2021-22 financial year.

As set out in the Statement of Funding Policy, the Northern Ireland Executive can carry forward up to 0.6% of Resource DEL underspends and 1.5% of Capital DEL underspends in any year.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
13th Jul 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the announcement of a temporary reduction of VAT to five per cent on admission to certain attractions, if he will provide further clarification on what those attractions are.

Admissions to shows, theatres, circuses, fairs, amusement parks, concerts, museums, zoos, cinemas and exhibitions and similar cultural events and facilities will be covered by the new reduced rate of VAT for attractions. This is set out in guidance on VAT on admission charges to attractions published on GOV.UK.

Further detail about the application of the new reduced rate can be found in Revenue and Customs guidance on the temporary reduced rate of VAT for hospitality, holiday accommodation and attractions, also published on GOV.UK.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
12th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential economic merits of a temporary suspension of the apprenticeship levy during the covid-19 outbreak.

The apprenticeship levy is an important part of our aim to raise apprenticeship quality, supporting employers to make a long-term, sustainable investment in training. Only the very largest businesses pay the Levy, which requires only those employers with an annual pay bill of £3 million or more to pay 0.5% on the part of their pay bill exceeding this threshold.

For employers operating in England, levy funds are available for them to invest in the training of their apprentices for 24 months. Given that Education and Skills Policy is devolved, the arrangements for apprenticeship funding elsewhere in the UK are the responsibility of the devolved administrations.

Where apprentices are furloughed, they can continue to train for their apprenticeship as long as it does not provide services to or generate revenue for their employer.

Kemi Badenoch
Exchequer Secretary (HM Treasury)
4th May 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to increase the threshold for stamp duty to help support the property market during the covid-19 outbreak.

There are no plans to change the Stamp Duty Land Tax threshold. However, the Government continues to keep all taxes under constant review as part of the response to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to review the £50,000 trading profit threshold for eligibility for the Self-Employed Income Support Scheme.

The new Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) will help those adversely affected by COVID-19. Some 95% of people who are mainly self-employed could benefit from this scheme, based on 2017-18 data.

The design of the SEISS, including the £50,000 threshold, means it is targeted at those who need it the most, and who are most reliant on their self-employment income. Those who had more than £50,000 from self-employment profits in 2017-18 had an average total income of more than £200,000.

Those with average trading profits above £50,000 could still benefit from other support. Individuals may have access to a range of grants and loans depending on their circumstances, including the Bounce Back Loans Scheme for small businesses, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, and the deferral of tax payments.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department plans to consider dividends in determining income of business owners under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

Those who pay themselves a salary through their own company may be eligible to claim for 80% of usual monthly wages, up to £2,500 a month, through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS). The CJRS is available to employers, including personal service companies, and individuals paying themselves a salary through a PAYE scheme are eligible.

The Government’s priority has been to support as many people as it possibly can, and as quickly as possible. Under current reporting mechanisms it is not possible for HM Revenue and Customs to distinguish between dividends derived from an individual’s own company and dividends from other sources, and between dividends in lieu of employment income and as returns from other corporate activity. Expanding the scope would require HMRC to collect and verify new information and any such proposal would need to be considered against the other schemes which the Government is committed to delivering as quickly as possible.

Those who are not eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme may be able to access other support Government is providing, including the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme, the Bounce Back Loans Scheme for small businesses, and the deferral of tax payments. More information about the full range of business support measures is available at?www.businesssupport.gov.uk/coronavirus-business-support/

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th Apr 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the circumstances in which 2019-20 financial year self-assessment tax returns could be used for the purposes of the self-employed income support scheme.

It has not been possible to include those who began trading after the 2018-19 tax year in the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme. This was a very difficult decision and it was taken for practical reasons. It is correct that individuals can now submit Income Tax Self Assessment returns for 2019-20, but there would be significant risks for the public purse if the Government relied on these returns for the scheme. HMRC would not be able to distinguish genuine self-employed individuals who started trading in 2019-20 from fake applications by fraudulent operators and organised criminal gangs seeking to exploit the SEISS. The Government cannot expose the tax system to these risks.

However, those who entered self-employment after April 2019 will still be eligible for other support. For example, the self-employed can benefit from the Government’s relaxation of the earnings rules (known as the Minimum Income Floor) in Universal Credit. The SEISS supplements the significant support already announced for UK businesses, including the Bounce Back Loans Scheme for small businesses, the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme and the deferral of tax payments. More information about the full range of business support measures is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/financial-support-for-businesses-during-coronavirus-covid-19

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
18th Mar 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of a Government funded universal basic income as an emergency measure to protect incomes and livelihoods during the covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is doing whatever it can to ensure that individuals, families and businesses are supported during the Covid-19 outbreak.

The Government is focusing on measures that can be implemented as quickly as possible. The Government also believes that using existing frameworks for those who need additional support is the quickest and most effective way to do so during the Covid-19 outbreak.

The Government announced at Budget and in recent days, a wide-ranging package of measures to support individuals, families and employees affected by Covid-19. These include:

  • making Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) available for individuals diagnosed with Covid-19 or those unable to work because they are self-isolating in line with government guidance. This is in addition to the change announced by the Prime Minister that SSP will be payable from day one instead of day four for affected individuals.
  • announcing a 3-month “mortgage holiday” for borrowers that are struggling financially with their repayments. This will allow affected borrowers to defer their repayments for up to three months while they get back on their feet.
  • introducing the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme to help firms continue to keep people in employment. Businesses can put workers on temporary leave and the Government will pay them cash grants to cover 80% of their wages up to a cap of £2,500 per month, providing they keep the worker employed.
  • ensuring that those who are not eligible for SSP can now more easily make a claim for Universal Credit or Contributory Employment and Support Allowance.
  • increasing the standard allowance in Universal Credit and the basic element of Working Tax Credit by up to £20 per week.
  • a further temporary relaxation of earnings rules for self-employed Universal Credit claimants.
  • increasing the Local Housing Allowance for Universal Credit and Housing Benefit claimants to the 30th percentile of market rents.
Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate has been made of the quantum of the Barnett consequential for the Northern Ireland Executive announced during the 2019-20 Financial Year subsequent to the detail set out in the Main Estimates memorandum provided by the Northern Ireland Office; and if he will make a statement.

HM Treasury’s Supplementary Estimates 2019-20 document sets out all the changes in the Northern Ireland Executive’s funding since the Main Estimates 2019-20. The Supplementary Estimates 2019-20 publication can be found on the gov.uk website.

Following the Supplementary Estimates 2019-20, the Northern Ireland Executive funding from the UK government has increased by over £380m compared to Main Estimates 2019-20.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of applying the high income child benefit charge to the higher-earning parent regardless of which parent takes main caring responsibility.

The Government introduced the High Income Child Benefit Charge (HICBC) from January 2013 to ensure that support is targeted at those who need it most. The latest published figures on the operation of HICBC can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/high-income-child-benefit-charge-data/high-income-child-benefit-charge.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the operation of the high income child benefit charge.

The Government introduced the High Income Child Benefit Charge (HICBC) from January 2013 to ensure that support is targeted at those who need it most. The latest published figures on the operation of HICBC can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/high-income-child-benefit-charge-data/high-income-child-benefit-charge.

Jesse Norman
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
11th Feb 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the cost to the public purse has been of assessing the viability of a bridge between Scotland and Northern Ireland to date; and what funding has been allocated to that work.

The government is committed to upgrading our infrastructure, and we are looking at a range of options to level up the country and support growth and productivity in every region. We will set out more details on our plans to increase investment in infrastructure at the Budget.

Steve Barclay
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of applications to the EU Settlement Scheme had a processing time of longer than a month.

Our aim is to process all applications to the Scheme as quickly as possible. The majority of applications are concluded within 5 working days, but cases may take longer dependent on the circumstances of the case, for example if the applicant is facing an impending prosecution or has a criminal record.

The following link lists the expected processing times for EU Settlement Scheme applications, based upon current performance:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-settlement-scheme-application-processing-times/eu-settlement-scheme-pilot-current-expected-processing-times-for-applications

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department has (a) recruited additional immigration enforcement officers and (b) allocated additional funding towards immigration enforcement to anticipate potential increases in the number of undocumented EU citizens being in the UK as a result those citizens failing to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by the deadline of 30 June 2021.

Our primary focus is on ensuring all eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme make an application before the 30 June 2021 deadline for the status they deserve under UK law. Those who apply before the deadline, but whose application is not decided until after it, will have their rights protected pending the outcome of their application and of any appeal.

In line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, the UK Government has made clear where a person eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme has reasonable grounds for missing the 30 June 2021 deadline for applications by those resident in the UK by the end of the transition period, they will be given a further opportunity to apply.

Where a person with reasonable grounds for missing the deadline applies to the EU Settlement Scheme after it, including where they do so after being given a 28-day notice, and is granted status under the scheme, they will, consistent with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, enjoy the same rights from the time they are granted status as someone who applied before the deadline.

Where a person does not have reasonable grounds for applying to the EU Settlement Scheme after the deadline or fails to make an application within the 28-day period, any immigration enforcement taken will be based on consideration of the circumstances of their case.

Immigration Enforcement will continue to keep its operational priorities under constant review in the light of the latest intelligence and deploy resources accordingly.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's guidance, EU Settlement Scheme: EU, other EEA and Swiss citizens and their family members, version 11.0, published for Home Office staff on 6 April 2021, what form of immigration status and rights EU citizens and non-EU family members who do not apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by the deadline for receipt of applications to that scheme of 30 June 2021 will have (a) during the 28 day notice period granted to make a late application to that scheme as set out in that guidance and (b) after the 28 day notice period for making a late application to that scheme in the event that those citizens or family members did (i) not make a late application to that scheme during that notice period and (ii) make a late application to that scheme during that notice period and are waiting for the outcome of that late application.

Our primary focus is on ensuring all eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme make an application before the 30 June 2021 deadline for the status they deserve under UK law. Those who apply before the deadline, but whose application is not decided until after it, will have their rights protected pending the outcome of their application and of any appeal.

In line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, the UK Government has made clear where a person eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme has reasonable grounds for missing the 30 June 2021 deadline for applications by those resident in the UK by the end of the transition period, they will be given a further opportunity to apply.

Where a person with reasonable grounds for missing the deadline applies to the EU Settlement Scheme after it, including where they do so after being given a 28-day notice, and is granted status under the scheme, they will, consistent with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, enjoy the same rights from the time they are granted status as someone who applied before the deadline.

Where a person does not have reasonable grounds for applying to the EU Settlement Scheme after the deadline or fails to make an application within the 28-day period, any immigration enforcement taken will be based on consideration of the circumstances of their case.

Immigration Enforcement will continue to keep its operational priorities under constant review in the light of the latest intelligence and deploy resources accordingly.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her Department's guidance, EU Settlement Scheme: EU, other EEA and Swiss citizens and their family members, version 11.0, published for Home Office staff on 6 April 2021, what immigration enforcement steps she plans to take in response EU citizens and non-EU family members who do not apply to the EU Settlement Scheme by the deadline for receipt of applications to that scheme of 30 June 2021 in cases where those citizens or family members (a) are deemed not to have reasonable grounds for a late application to that Scheme and (b) fail to make a late application to that Scheme within the 28 day notice period as set out in that guidance.

Our primary focus is on ensuring all eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme make an application before the 30 June 2021 deadline for the status they deserve under UK law. Those who apply before the deadline, but whose application is not decided until after it, will have their rights protected pending the outcome of their application and of any appeal.

In line with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, the UK Government has made clear where a person eligible for status under the EU Settlement Scheme has reasonable grounds for missing the 30 June 2021 deadline for applications by those resident in the UK by the end of the transition period, they will be given a further opportunity to apply.

Where a person with reasonable grounds for missing the deadline applies to the EU Settlement Scheme after it, including where they do so after being given a 28-day notice, and is granted status under the scheme, they will, consistent with the Citizens’ Rights Agreements, enjoy the same rights from the time they are granted status as someone who applied before the deadline.

Where a person does not have reasonable grounds for applying to the EU Settlement Scheme after the deadline or fails to make an application within the 28-day period, any immigration enforcement taken will be based on consideration of the circumstances of their case.

Immigration Enforcement will continue to keep its operational priorities under constant review in the light of the latest intelligence and deploy resources accordingly.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the spousal visa minimum income requirement in allowing sufficient participation in everyday life to facilitate integration.

The purpose of the minimum income requirement, implemented in July 2012 along with other reforms of the family Immigration Rules, is to ensure family migrants are supported at a reasonable level so they do not become a burden on the taxpayer.

The UK Government is committed to promoting social cohesion, good relations and a sense of belonging for all members of society. The ability to participate in activities and organisations outside the home plays a part in this. The minimum income requirement is not the only factor which promotes the ability to participate, but the level at which it is set can mean one particular barrier is reduced.

The Supreme Court has endorsed our approach in setting an income requirement for family migration which prevents burdens on the taxpayer and promotes integration into our communities. In particular, it strikes a balance between the interests of those wishing to sponsor a partner form overseas and the community in general by ensuring migration to the UK is not based on access to services funded by UK taxpayers.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Frontier Workers Permits have been issued to persons normally resident in the Republic of Ireland.

The Home Office publishes data on Frontier Worker Permits in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’.

Data on applications for Frontier Worker Permits are published in table Vis_D01 of the entry clearance visas applications and outcomes dataset. Data on the number of Frontier Worker Permits issued are included in table Vis_D02. These data may be selected using the ‘Frontier worker’ visa type subgroup.

Data on Frontier Worker Permits issued by nationality can be found in table Vis_D02.

Information on how to use the entry clearance visas applications and outcomes dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to year ending December 2020.

The Home Office does not publish data on Frontier Worker Permits by country of residence, and so data is not available on Frontier Worker Permits issued to persons normally resident in the Republic of Ireland.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications for Frontier Workers Permits her Department has (a) received and (b) issued.

The Home Office publishes data on Frontier Worker Permits in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’.

Data on applications for Frontier Worker Permits are published in table Vis_D01 of the entry clearance visas applications and outcomes dataset. Data on the number of Frontier Worker Permits issued are included in table Vis_D02. These data may be selected using the ‘Frontier worker’ visa type subgroup.

Data on Frontier Worker Permits issued by nationality can be found in table Vis_D02.

Information on how to use the entry clearance visas applications and outcomes dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to year ending December 2020.

The Home Office does not publish data on Frontier Worker Permits by country of residence, and so data is not available on Frontier Worker Permits issued to persons normally resident in the Republic of Ireland.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to extend the powers to use Unexplained Wealth Orders to Northern Ireland.

The Home Office has been working closely with the Department for Justice, Northern Ireland and the Attorney General’s Office to commence the outstanding provisions of the Criminal Finances Act 2017 in Northern Ireland. These provisions include, but are not limited to, unexplained wealth orders.

The first four of the nine statutory instruments required to commence these provisions will be laid in the House on Monday 22nd March.

Should Parliamentary timetables allow, we expect the outstanding provisions in the Criminal Finances Act 2017 to be commenced in Northern Ireland later this year.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
15th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the fiscal merits of minimum income requirements for spouse visas with regard to demand for public services and welfare systems.

The minimum income requirement was set, following advice from the independent Migration Advisory Committee, at £18,600 for sponsoring a partner, rising to £22,400 for also sponsoring a non-qualifying child and an additional £2,400 for each further such child. This reflects the level of income at which a British family or a family settled in the UK generally ceases to be able to access income-related benefits.

The income requirement and the qualifying period over which the requirement must be met ensure family migrants are supported at a reasonable level without reliance on public funds.

The number of partner applications granted permission to come to the UK has reduced since the introduction of the minimum income requirement in 2012, from 36,290 in 2011 to 30,669 in 2019/20, which means a reduction in demand for public services and welfare systems and savings for the taxpayer.

We continue to keep the family Immigration Rules under review and make adjustments should they prove to be necessary. Our overall assessment is the Rules, including the minimum income requirement, are having the right impact by helping to ensure public confidence migration to the UK is not based on access to public services paid for by UK taxpayers.

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Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
5th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will conduct a review of the effect of income requirements for spouse visas, as recommended by the Migration Advisory Committee in its December 2020 Report.

In February 2017 the Supreme Court upheld the lawfulness of the minimum income requirement, which prevents burdens on the taxpayer and promotes integration, ruling it strikes a fair balance between the interests of those wishing to sponsor a partner to settle in the UK and of the community in general.

We continue to keep the family Immigration Rules under review, including taking into account recommendations made by the Migration Advisory Committee, and will make adjustments should these prove necessary. However, our overall assessment is the Rules, including the minimum income requirement, are having the right impact and building public confidence in the immigration system, by ensuring migration to the UK is not based on access to public services and welfare systems paid for by UK taxpayers.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking with stakeholders to approve a tuberculosis testing clinic in Northern Ireland; and what provisions are currently in place for Hong Kong British National (Overseas) visa applicants in Northern Ireland in the context of those people not being able to access approved clinics in Great Britain.

On 31 January 2021 the UK Government launched a new immigration route for British National (Overseas) (BN(O)) status holders, providing the opportunity for them and their eligible family members to live, work and study in the UK.

Having a valid TB test certificate is an essential requirement for the BN(O) route. All those who have been in the UK for less than six months and who have previously travelled from a country with a high incidence of TB will need a certificate confirming they are free of the disease. This is a matter of public health.

There are already eight approved TB test clinics across the UK and we are working hard to get more clinics accredited. In particular, the Home Office is working closely with clinics across Northern Ireland to ensure a clinic can be accredited soon and available for appointments.

TB test clinics are open across the UK. We understand restrictions as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic may impact on an applicant’s ability to travel and we would urge applicants to assess the risk and only travel to a TB test appointment where necessary. Where an applicant’s leave is about to expire and they cannot travel to an approved clinic, we will consider these applications on a case-by-case basis.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans the Government has to enable family members of frontier workers who work in Northern Ireland and reside in the border region of Ireland to continue to access (a) education, (b) healthcare and (c) other services in Northern Ireland.

Non-UK residents’ eligibility for education, healthcare and other services in Northern Ireland is a matter for the relevant UK Government Department in relation to reserved matters and the Northern Ireland Executive where responsibility is devolved.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the 2019-20 financial year can be used instead of the 2020-21 financial year to assess the £18,600 income threshold with regard to self-employed British citizens applying for a spouse visa who have experienced financial disruption due to the covid-19 outbreak.

We have made several relevant adjustments to the Minimum Income Requirement to support those affected by the COVID-19 outbreak, including self-employed British citizens who are sponsoring their spouse or partner under the family Immigration Rules.

A temporary loss of annual income due to COVID-19 between 1 March 2020 and 31 May 2021 will generally be disregarded when assessing self-employment income, along with the impact on income from the same period for any future applications. Income received via the Coronavirus Self-Employment Income Support Scheme will also be taken into account.

These adjustments are among a range of measures put in place by the Home Office to support those affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. These are set out for customers on GOV.UK and are available here:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-advice-for-uk-visa-applicants-and-temporary-uk-residents.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what process of clearance each post for her Department's Twitter account goes through; and what the grade is of the officials who provide sign off on each of those posts.

Tweets are drafted by the Communications Team and signed off by a manager at grade 7 or above.

Tweets containing new or updated messaging or content are then cleared by ministerial private offices and/or special advisers prior to publication.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
12th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the tweet on foreign national offenders published by her Department on 9 October 2020, what representations she has received on the potential conflation of the UK's asylum system and the deportation of offenders from EU countries (a) in that tweet and (b) in her Department's social media strategy.

The Home Office makes no apology for deporting Foreign National Offenders; it is right that we do so.

This tweet referred to two different groups.

The first group were foreign national offenders who broke our laws and abused our values, who we successfully returned to Lithuania. We are grateful for the ongoing close cooperation of our Lithuanian partners in tackling crime, and for their specific cooperation in this instance which was essential for the removal of the foreign national offenders mentioned in the tweet.

The second group was made up of migrants from outside the European Economic Area who had already claimed asylum in Italy, and who we planned to return under the Dublin Regulation. The Italy leg of the flight did not take place and our efforts to return those who arrived on small boats via illegally-facilitated routes were frustrated by legal claims.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the EU Settlement Scheme Family Permit, whether a relevant person from Northern Ireland who has not been residing in the UK for the six months prior to making an application for that permit intends to return to Northern Ireland with their non-EEA family members is eligible for that permit.

The relevant non-EEA national family members of a relevant person of Northern Ireland can apply for an EU Settlement Scheme Family Permit to accompany that person to, or join them in, the UK, where the relevant person of Northern Ireland holds status under the EU Settlement Scheme or (were they not a British citizen, where they are one) would be granted this status if they applied.

The potential eligibility for status under the scheme of the relevant person of Northern Ireland will require they have the requisite continuity of residence in the UK, which generally means they will not have been absent from the UK for more than six months.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
22nd Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to Answers of 8 September 2020 to Questions 83978, 83979, 83980 and 83981, if she will provide bespoke Answers to each of those Questions rather than copying the text of the grouped Questions as an Answer.

An error occurred when uploading the grouped answer to PQs 83978, 83979, 83980 and 83981; this has now been corrected and the correct text is now showing.

I would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what mechanisms are in place to tackle potential breaches of rights under the Common Travel Area.

The Universal Permission to Travel requirement will require everyone wishing to travel to the UK (except British and Irish citizens) to seek permission in advance of travel. We will introduce Electronic Travel Authorisations (ETAs) for visitors and passengers transiting through the UK who do not currently need a visa for short stays or who do not already have an immigration status prior to travelling, which will act as their permission.

As now, the UK will not operate routine immigration controls on journeys from within the Common Travel Area, with no immigration controls whatsoever on the Republic of Ireland-Northern Ireland land border. However, individuals arriving in the UK must continue to enter in line with the UK’s immigration framework including the Universal Permission to Travel requirement.

The CTA has never required the UK and Ireland to have entirely harmonised immigration arrangements for non-British or non-Irish citizens. Key to this is the high level of cooperation on border security to ensure that legitimate travel is facilitated while those who intend to abuse the arrangements are prevented from entering.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to Command Paper 258 entitled UK points-based immigration system: further details, whether passport checks will take place on on (a) air and (b) sea travel between (i) Northern Ireland to Great Britain and (ii) Great Britain to Northern Ireland.

The Universal Permission to Travel requirement will require everyone wishing to travel to the UK (except British and Irish citizens) to seek permission in advance of travel. We will introduce Electronic Travel Authorisations (ETAs) for visitors and passengers transiting through the UK who do not currently need a visa for short stays or who do not already have an immigration status prior to travelling, which will act as their permission.As now, the UK will not operate routine immigration controls on journeys from within the Common Travel Area, with no immigration controls whatsoever on the Republic of Ireland-Northern Ireland land border. However, individuals arriving in the UK must continue to enter in line with the UK’s immigration framework including the Universal Permission to Travel requirement.The CTA has never required the UK and Ireland to have entirely harmonised immigration arrangements for non-British or non-Irish citizens. Key to this is the high level of cooperation on border security to ensure that legitimate travel is facilitated while those who intend to abuse the arrangements are prevented from entering.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the July 2020 Command Paper entitled UK Points Based System Further Details, CP 258, whether she plans to include in a universal permission to travel requirement (a) EU nationals without settled status and (b) other non-visa nationals wishing to travel from the Republic of Ireland to (i) Northern Ireland and (ii) Great Britain.

The Universal Permission to Travel requirement will require everyone wishing to travel to the UK (except British and Irish citizens) to seek permission in advance of travel. We will introduce Electronic Travel Authorisations (ETAs) for visitors and passengers transiting through the UK who do not currently need a visa for short stays or who do not already have an immigration status prior to travelling, which will act as their permission.

As now, the UK will not operate routine immigration controls on journeys from within the Common Travel Area, with no immigration controls whatsoever on the Republic of Ireland-Northern Ireland land border. However, individuals arriving in the UK must continue to enter in line with the UK’s immigration framework including the Universal Permission to Travel requirement.

The CTA has never required the UK and Ireland to have entirely harmonised immigration arrangements for non-British or non-Irish citizens. Key to this is the high level of cooperation on border security to ensure that legitimate travel is facilitated while those who intend to abuse the arrangements are prevented from entering.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
1st Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the July 2020 Command Paper entitled UK Points Based System Further Details, CP 258, what assessment she has made of the implications for her proposals on no routine immigration controls on journeys from within the Common Travel area to the UK and no immigration controls on the Northern Ireland - Ireland land border of her policy on a universal permission to travel requiring everyone wishing to travel to the UK excluding British and Irish nationals to seek permission in advance of travel via a UK Electronic Travel Authorisation.

The Universal Permission to Travel requirement will require everyone wishing to travel to the UK (except British and Irish citizens) to seek permission in advance of travel. We will introduce Electronic Travel Authorisations (ETAs) for visitors and passengers transiting through the UK who do not currently need a visa for short stays or who do not already have an immigration status prior to travelling, which will act as their permission.

As now, the UK will not operate routine immigration controls on journeys from within the Common Travel Area, with no immigration controls whatsoever on the Republic of Ireland-Northern Ireland land border. However, individuals arriving in the UK must continue to enter in line with the UK’s immigration framework including the Universal Permission to Travel requirement.

The CTA has never required the UK and Ireland to have entirely harmonised immigration arrangements for non-British or non-Irish citizens. Key to this is the high level of cooperation on border security to ensure that legitimate travel is facilitated while those who intend to abuse the arrangements are prevented from entering.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
27th Apr 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her Department's policy is on removal visa charges for former Commonwealth UK Armed Forces personnel and their immediate families when applying for Indefinite Leave to Remain.

The Government highly values the service of all members of HM Forces, including Commonwealth nationals.

We are committed to upholding our obligations under the Armed Forces Covenant, to ensure that no one who is serving, or who has served, or their family members are disadvantaged as a result of their service.

The Ministry of Defence make clear to foreign and Commonwealth recruits into the Forces the process by which they and their families can attain settlement in the UK, and the costs involved.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
3rd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many applications to the EU settlement scheme from people in Northern Ireland have been (a) received, (b) accepted and (c) rejected.

The latest published figures show that the total number of applications received up to 31 January 2020 was more than 3.1 million (3,107,900), of which 50,500 were from Northern Ireland.

Published information on EUSS applications and concluded applications by the applicants location in the United Kingdom (up to 31 December 2019), can be found in the Home Office’s ‘EU Settlement Scheme quarterly statistics’, statistics tables, tables EUSS_01 and EUSS_03_NIR respectively, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/eu-settlement-scheme-quarterly-statistics-december-2019.

As at 31 December 2019 a total of 2.8 million (2,756,130) applications had been received and 2.5 million (2,450,220) applications had been concluded, of which 44,860 were from Northern Ireland.

Of the 44,860 applications from Northern Ireland, 38,630 had been concluded, within which 25,830 (67%) were granted settled status and 12,620 (33%) were granted pre-settled status, 130 were withdrawn or void and 50 found to be invalid.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the potential effect of the decision not to seek the UK's ongoing participation in the European Arrest Warrant on the ability of the UK and Ireland to tackle cross-border terrorism and organised crime on the island of Ireland.

The Government stands ready to discuss an agreement with the EU on law enforcement and judicial cooperation in criminal matters.

As set out in our approach to negotiations, the agreement should provide for fast-track extradition arrangements with appropriate further safeguards beyond those provided for in the European Arrest Warrant.

Such an agreement should equip operational partners on both sides with the capabilities that help protect citizens and bring criminals to justice, including in relation to North-South security and criminal justice cooperation.

James Brokenshire
Minister of State (Home Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraphs 13-15 of Annex A of the document entitled New Decade, New Approach, published in January 2020, whether people in Northern Ireland will be able to permanently access rights to family reunification that are broadly equivalent to those available to Irish citizens in the UK under EEA Regulations.

Article 1 (vi) of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement sets out the birthright of all the people of Northern Ireland to identify themselves and be accepted as Irish or British as they may so choose, and confirms their right to hold both British and Irish citizenship. In line with this commitment, the people of Northern Ireland are legally able to hold British or Irish citizenship, or both.

The reciprocal Common Travel Area arrangements between the UK and Ireland ensure the people of Northern Ireland are not required to choose and assert an identity, or to align their citizenship with their choice of identity, in order to access public services and other entitlements in the UK.

As set out in the New Decade, New Approach document published in January 2020, the Home Office intends to change the UK’s Immigration Rules so family members of the people of Northern Ireland can apply for immigration status on broadly the same terms as family members of Irish citizens and will open this route as soon as delivery allows. We aim to do this before the end of the year.

The Rules change will enable the people of Northern Ireland to bring their family members to the UK on broadly the same basis as family members of Irish citizens who have entry and residence rights under the EU Withdrawal Agreement.

Where family members of Irish citizens are not covered by the Withdrawal Agreement (for example, because the Irish citizen moved to the UK after the end of the transition period) they will, as now, be able to apply for immigration status under the UK’s family Immigration Rules. Family members of the people of Northern Ireland in an analogous position will also be subject to those Rules.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraphs 13-15 of Annex A of the document entitled New Decade, New Approach, published in January 2020, what the timeframe is for bringing forward legislative proposals on family migration arrangements for people in Northern Ireland.

Article 1 (vi) of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement sets out the birthright of all the people of Northern Ireland to identify themselves and be accepted as Irish or British as they may so choose, and confirms their right to hold both British and Irish citizenship. In line with this commitment, the people of Northern Ireland are legally able to hold British or Irish citizenship, or both.

The reciprocal Common Travel Area arrangements between the UK and Ireland ensure the people of Northern Ireland are not required to choose and assert an identity, or to align their citizenship with their choice of identity, in order to access public services and other entitlements in the UK.

As set out in the New Decade, New Approach document published in January 2020, the Home Office intends to change the UK’s Immigration Rules so family members of the people of Northern Ireland can apply for immigration status on broadly the same terms as family members of Irish citizens and will open this route as soon as delivery allows. We aim to do this before the end of the year.

The Rules change will enable the people of Northern Ireland to bring their family members to the UK on broadly the same basis as family members of Irish citizens who have entry and residence rights under the EU Withdrawal Agreement.

Where family members of Irish citizens are not covered by the Withdrawal Agreement (for example, because the Irish citizen moved to the UK after the end of the transition period) they will, as now, be able to apply for immigration status under the UK’s family Immigration Rules. Family members of the people of Northern Ireland in an analogous position will also be subject to those Rules.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of Article 1 (vi) of the Good Friday Agreement on (a) the legal status of people in Northern Ireland who identify as (i) Irish, (ii) British and (iii) both and (b) their related entitlement to be recognised as such.

Article 1 (vi) of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement sets out the birthright of all the people of Northern Ireland to identify themselves and be accepted as Irish or British as they may so choose, and confirms their right to hold both British and Irish citizenship. In line with this commitment, the people of Northern Ireland are legally able to hold British or Irish citizenship, or both.

The reciprocal Common Travel Area arrangements between the UK and Ireland ensure the people of Northern Ireland are not required to choose and assert an identity, or to align their citizenship with their choice of identity, in order to access public services and other entitlements in the UK.

As set out in the New Decade, New Approach document published in January 2020, the Home Office intends to change the UK’s Immigration Rules so family members of the people of Northern Ireland can apply for immigration status on broadly the same terms as family members of Irish citizens and will open this route as soon as delivery allows. We aim to do this before the end of the year.

The Rules change will enable the people of Northern Ireland to bring their family members to the UK on broadly the same basis as family members of Irish citizens who have entry and residence rights under the EU Withdrawal Agreement.

Where family members of Irish citizens are not covered by the Withdrawal Agreement (for example, because the Irish citizen moved to the UK after the end of the transition period) they will, as now, be able to apply for immigration status under the UK’s family Immigration Rules. Family members of the people of Northern Ireland in an analogous position will also be subject to those Rules.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how Irish citizens born in Northern Ireland can access their EU entitlement to family reunification.

The Government is firmly committed to upholding the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, which recognises the birthright of all the people of Northern Ireland to identify themselves and to be accepted as Irish, British, or both, as they may so choose, and also confirms their right to hold both British and Irish citizenship.

The Home Office and the Northern Ireland Office have reviewed the consistency of the UK’s family migration arrangements, taking into account the letter and spirit of the Belfast Agreement and recognising that the policy should not create incentives for renunciation of British citizenship by those citizens who may wish to retain it.

As a result of this review, the Government will change the rules governing how the people of Northern Ireland bring their family members to the UK. This change will mean that eligible family members of the people of Northern Ireland will be able to apply for UK immigration status on broadly the same terms as the family members of Irish citizens in the UK.

This immigration status will be available to the family members of all the people of Northern Ireland, no matter whether they hold British or Irish citizenship or both, and no matter how they identify.

Under UK nationality law, most people of Northern Ireland are automatically British from birth. This is consistent with the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, as confirmed by the Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) in its decision of 14 October 2019 in the case of Jake De Souza. As such, there are no plans to amend the British Nationality Act 1981 in this respect.

Until the family migration rules change is implemented, Irish citizens from Northern Ireland who do not hold a British passport or identify as British can sponsor family members under the UK’s domestic route, set out in Appendix FM to the Immigration Rules. These apply to family members of a person who is a British citizen (including where they are a dual British/EU citizen), or is settled in the UK, or is in the UK with limited leave as a refugee or person granted humanitarian protection. Irish citizens are considered to be settled from the day they arrive in the UK which means their family members can use this route.

As Appendix FM applies equally to family members of British citizens, Irish citizens, and dual British/Irish citizens, family members of the people of Northern Ireland can use this route regardless of the person of Northern Ireland’s legal citizenship or choice of identity. This means that a person of Northern Ireland who identifies solely as Irish does not need to provide evidence of British citizenship or to identify as British to facilitate their family member’s application: they need only provide evidence of Irish citizenship.

Where Irish citizens born in Northern Ireland have EU law rights to family reunification, their family member can apply for a document confirming those rights, which are implemented in UK law through the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016. In addition, the EU Settlement Scheme has been established for resident EEA nationals and their family members to implement the UK’s commitments under the EU Withdrawal Agreement.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how an Irish citizen from Northern Ierland who does not hold a British passport or identify as British can sponsor a family member to reside in the UK.

The Government is firmly committed to upholding the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, which recognises the birthright of all the people of Northern Ireland to identify themselves and to be accepted as Irish, British, or both, as they may so choose, and also confirms their right to hold both British and Irish citizenship.

The Home Office and the Northern Ireland Office have reviewed the consistency of the UK’s family migration arrangements, taking into account the letter and spirit of the Belfast Agreement and recognising that the policy should not create incentives for renunciation of British citizenship by those citizens who may wish to retain it.

As a result of this review, the Government will change the rules governing how the people of Northern Ireland bring their family members to the UK. This change will mean that eligible family members of the people of Northern Ireland will be able to apply for UK immigration status on broadly the same terms as the family members of Irish citizens in the UK.

This immigration status will be available to the family members of all the people of Northern Ireland, no matter whether they hold British or Irish citizenship or both, and no matter how they identify.

Under UK nationality law, most people of Northern Ireland are automatically British from birth. This is consistent with the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, as confirmed by the Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) in its decision of 14 October 2019 in the case of Jake De Souza. As such, there are no plans to amend the British Nationality Act 1981 in this respect.

Until the family migration rules change is implemented, Irish citizens from Northern Ireland who do not hold a British passport or identify as British can sponsor family members under the UK’s domestic route, set out in Appendix FM to the Immigration Rules. These apply to family members of a person who is a British citizen (including where they are a dual British/EU citizen), or is settled in the UK, or is in the UK with limited leave as a refugee or person granted humanitarian protection. Irish citizens are considered to be settled from the day they arrive in the UK which means their family members can use this route.

As Appendix FM applies equally to family members of British citizens, Irish citizens, and dual British/Irish citizens, family members of the people of Northern Ireland can use this route regardless of the person of Northern Ireland’s legal citizenship or choice of identity. This means that a person of Northern Ireland who identifies solely as Irish does not need to provide evidence of British citizenship or to identify as British to facilitate their family member’s application: they need only provide evidence of Irish citizenship.

Where Irish citizens born in Northern Ireland have EU law rights to family reunification, their family member can apply for a document confirming those rights, which are implemented in UK law through the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016. In addition, the EU Settlement Scheme has been established for resident EEA nationals and their family members to implement the UK’s commitments under the EU Withdrawal Agreement.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans she has to bring forward proposals to amend the British Nationality Act 1981 to reflect the status of people from Northern Ireland who want to solely identify as Irish and to retain Irish citizenship.

The Government is firmly committed to upholding the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, which recognises the birthright of all the people of Northern Ireland to identify themselves and to be accepted as Irish, British, or both, as they may so choose, and also confirms their right to hold both British and Irish citizenship.

The Home Office and the Northern Ireland Office have reviewed the consistency of the UK’s family migration arrangements, taking into account the letter and spirit of the Belfast Agreement and recognising that the policy should not create incentives for renunciation of British citizenship by those citizens who may wish to retain it.

As a result of this review, the Government will change the rules governing how the people of Northern Ireland bring their family members to the UK. This change will mean that eligible family members of the people of Northern Ireland will be able to apply for UK immigration status on broadly the same terms as the family members of Irish citizens in the UK.

This immigration status will be available to the family members of all the people of Northern Ireland, no matter whether they hold British or Irish citizenship or both, and no matter how they identify.

Under UK nationality law, most people of Northern Ireland are automatically British from birth. This is consistent with the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, as confirmed by the Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) in its decision of 14 October 2019 in the case of Jake De Souza. As such, there are no plans to amend the British Nationality Act 1981 in this respect.

Until the family migration rules change is implemented, Irish citizens from Northern Ireland who do not hold a British passport or identify as British can sponsor family members under the UK’s domestic route, set out in Appendix FM to the Immigration Rules. These apply to family members of a person who is a British citizen (including where they are a dual British/EU citizen), or is settled in the UK, or is in the UK with limited leave as a refugee or person granted humanitarian protection. Irish citizens are considered to be settled from the day they arrive in the UK which means their family members can use this route.

As Appendix FM applies equally to family members of British citizens, Irish citizens, and dual British/Irish citizens, family members of the people of Northern Ireland can use this route regardless of the person of Northern Ireland’s legal citizenship or choice of identity. This means that a person of Northern Ireland who identifies solely as Irish does not need to provide evidence of British citizenship or to identify as British to facilitate their family member’s application: they need only provide evidence of Irish citizenship.

Where Irish citizens born in Northern Ireland have EU law rights to family reunification, their family member can apply for a document confirming those rights, which are implemented in UK law through the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016. In addition, the EU Settlement Scheme has been established for resident EEA nationals and their family members to implement the UK’s commitments under the EU Withdrawal Agreement.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the review announced by former Prime Minister the Rt Hon. Theresa May in Belfast on 5 February 2019, what the terms of reference are of that review; and how many meetings have been held in relation to that review.

The Government is firmly committed to upholding the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, which recognises the birthright of all the people of Northern Ireland to identify themselves and to be accepted as Irish, British, or both, as they may so choose, and also confirms their right to hold both British and Irish citizenship.

The Home Office and the Northern Ireland Office have reviewed the consistency of the UK’s family migration arrangements, taking into account the letter and spirit of the Belfast Agreement and recognising that the policy should not create incentives for renunciation of British citizenship by those citizens who may wish to retain it.

As a result of this review, the Government will change the rules governing how the people of Northern Ireland bring their family members to the UK. This change will mean that eligible family members of the people of Northern Ireland will be able to apply for UK immigration status on broadly the same terms as the family members of Irish citizens in the UK.

This immigration status will be available to the family members of all the people of Northern Ireland, no matter whether they hold British or Irish citizenship or both, and no matter how they identify.

Under UK nationality law, most people of Northern Ireland are automatically British from birth. This is consistent with the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, as confirmed by the Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) in its decision of 14 October 2019 in the case of Jake De Souza. As such, there are no plans to amend the British Nationality Act 1981 in this respect.

Until the family migration rules change is implemented, Irish citizens from Northern Ireland who do not hold a British passport or identify as British can sponsor family members under the UK’s domestic route, set out in Appendix FM to the Immigration Rules. These apply to family members of a person who is a British citizen (including where they are a dual British/EU citizen), or is settled in the UK, or is in the UK with limited leave as a refugee or person granted humanitarian protection. Irish citizens are considered to be settled from the day they arrive in the UK which means their family members can use this route.

As Appendix FM applies equally to family members of British citizens, Irish citizens, and dual British/Irish citizens, family members of the people of Northern Ireland can use this route regardless of the person of Northern Ireland’s legal citizenship or choice of identity. This means that a person of Northern Ireland who identifies solely as Irish does not need to provide evidence of British citizenship or to identify as British to facilitate their family member’s application: they need only provide evidence of Irish citizenship.

Where Irish citizens born in Northern Ireland have EU law rights to family reunification, their family member can apply for a document confirming those rights, which are implemented in UK law through the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016. In addition, the EU Settlement Scheme has been established for resident EEA nationals and their family members to implement the UK’s commitments under the EU Withdrawal Agreement.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the speech of former Prime Minister the Rt Hon. Theresa May, of 5 February 2019, in Belfast, what progress her Department has made in conjunction with the Northern Ireland Office on reviewing how UK immigration rules treat residents in Northern Ireland exercising their rights under the Good Friday Agreement to be Irish.

The Government is firmly committed to upholding the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, which recognises the birthright of all the people of Northern Ireland to identify themselves and to be accepted as Irish, British, or both, as they may so choose, and also confirms their right to hold both British and Irish citizenship.

The Home Office and the Northern Ireland Office have reviewed the consistency of the UK’s family migration arrangements, taking into account the letter and spirit of the Belfast Agreement and recognising that the policy should not create incentives for renunciation of British citizenship by those citizens who may wish to retain it.

As a result of this review, the Government will change the rules governing how the people of Northern Ireland bring their family members to the UK. This change will mean that eligible family members of the people of Northern Ireland will be able to apply for UK immigration status on broadly the same terms as the family members of Irish citizens in the UK.

This immigration status will be available to the family members of all the people of Northern Ireland, no matter whether they hold British or Irish citizenship or both, and no matter how they identify.

Under UK nationality law, most people of Northern Ireland are automatically British from birth. This is consistent with the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, as confirmed by the Upper Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber) in its decision of 14 October 2019 in the case of Jake De Souza. As such, there are no plans to amend the British Nationality Act 1981 in this respect.

Until the family migration rules change is implemented, Irish citizens from Northern Ireland who do not hold a British passport or identify as British can sponsor family members under the UK’s domestic route, set out in Appendix FM to the Immigration Rules. These apply to family members of a person who is a British citizen (including where they are a dual British/EU citizen), or is settled in the UK, or is in the UK with limited leave as a refugee or person granted humanitarian protection. Irish citizens are considered to be settled from the day they arrive in the UK which means their family members can use this route.

As Appendix FM applies equally to family members of British citizens, Irish citizens, and dual British/Irish citizens, family members of the people of Northern Ireland can use this route regardless of the person of Northern Ireland’s legal citizenship or choice of identity. This means that a person of Northern Ireland who identifies solely as Irish does not need to provide evidence of British citizenship or to identify as British to facilitate their family member’s application: they need only provide evidence of Irish citizenship.

Where Irish citizens born in Northern Ireland have EU law rights to family reunification, their family member can apply for a document confirming those rights, which are implemented in UK law through the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016. In addition, the EU Settlement Scheme has been established for resident EEA nationals and their family members to implement the UK’s commitments under the EU Withdrawal Agreement.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the UK's departure from the EU has created obstacles to moving military equipment between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

The Protocol is clear that it respects the essential state functions and territorial integrity of the UK. It therefore places no restrictions on military movements between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

James Heappey
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Defence)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress he has made on plans for the disposal of Kinnegar Logistics Base in Holywood, County Down.

Kinnegar Logistics Base was announced for disposal through 'A Better Defence Estate' in November 2016 with an intended disposal date of 2022. The capabilities in Kinnegar Logistic Base will be re-provided for in Palace Barracks and Flying Station Aldergrove.

Detailed re-location assessment work will now take place over the next 12 to 18 months during which the Department will ensure appropriate levels of engagement will take place with the relevant local authorities.

The disposal will be handled in accordance with the Department's standard disposal process as mandated by the Treasury.

Jeremy Quin
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he has had discussions with the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland on the capacity of the Northern Ireland criminal justice system to address vexatious investigations or prosecutions against veterans of the UK armed forces; and if he will make a statement.

Questions regarding the criminal justice system in Northern Ireland are for the relevant authorities. The Ministry of Defence remains committed to offering comprehensive legal and pastoral support for all veterans facing investigations as a result of their service on Operation Banner.

23rd Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many investigations of veterans in relation to the conflict in Northern Ireland have been found to be vexatious.

Questions about the administration of justice in Northern Ireland are for the relevant authorities. The Ministry of Defence remains committed to offering comprehensive legal and pastoral support for all veterans facing investigations as a result of their service on Operation Banner.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 30 March 2021 to Question 174332 on UK Shared Prosperity Fund: Northern Ireland, if he will publish a list of the community and voluntary groups that the Department has engaged with on the design of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK in places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers. 

Officials have held 25 engagement events across the UK, attended by over five hundred representatives from a breadth of sectors including businesses, public bodies, higher education institutions, voluntary and charity sector and rural partnership groups including many in Northern Ireland. Government officials have been working closely with interested parties and will continue to do so as we develop the fund.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether organisations based in the Republic of Ireland will be permitted to partner with organisations in (a) Northern Ireland and (b) elsewhere in the UK to access funding from the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK in places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers. We will publish further details on the UK Shared Prosperity Fund in a UK-wide Investment Framework later in 2021.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he plans to take to ensure that the branding of UK Shared Prosperity Fund expenditure in Northern Ireland is sensitive to the particular circumstances of the region.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK for places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers. The UK Government has a responsibility to support the economic health of people, businesses and communities across the whole of our United Kingdom. The UK Government is committed to ensuring the fund is delivered in a way that works for the whole of the UK.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment his Department has made of the importance of the interface between the delivery of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund and the EU's INTERREG and PEACE programme funding in Northern Ireland.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK for places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers. The UK Government intends to work with the devolved administrations and other stakeholders to ensure that the UK Shared Prosperity Fund is used to its best effect, including ensuring it works effectively alongside other funding streams, and supports citizens across the UK. Devolved administrations will be represented on the governance structures for the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how section 75 requirements under the Northern Ireland Act 1998 will be taken into account in the design of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK for places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers. We recognise the importance of not only meeting our obligations under the Equality Act 2010 but also giving due regard to the additional equalities considerations that apply in Northern Ireland.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what mapping exercise his Department has undertaken to understand (a) the existing pattern and (b) types of schemes and programmes that have been supported by EU Structural Funds.

The Ministry for Housing, Communities and Local Government maintains a list of those benefiting from the Fund at www.gov.uk/government/publications/european-structural-and-investment-funds-useful-resources . This list includes information on the beneficiary, the type of investment and where the beneficiary is located.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
23rd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what discussions he has had with community and voluntary groups in Northern Ireland on the design of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK in places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers. Officials have held 25 engagement events across the UK, attended by over five hundred representatives from a breadth of sectors including businesses, public bodies, higher education institutions, voluntary and charity sector and rural partnership groups including many in Northern Ireland.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
18th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reasons Northern Ireland is not included in the top 100 priority places identified for the UK Community Renewal Fund.

The UK Government will run a national competition against a fixed national allocation in Northern Ireland, equating to £11 million of funding. Project applicants in Northern Ireland will submit bids directly to the UK Government for assessment and approval. We are taking a different approach to delivering the UK Community Renewal Fund in Northern Ireland, to take account of the different local government landscape in Northern Ireland compared to Great Britain. Treating Northern Ireland as one eligible geographical area will also ensure that all communities across Northern Ireland have equal access in being able to apply for these funds.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to ensure that a proportion of the Shared Prosperity Fund will be ringfenced for spending in each of the devolved regions; and whether such sums will reflect historic allocations of Structural Funds based on relative need rather than the Barnett Formula.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK in places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers.

The November 2020 Spending Review set out the main strategic elements of the UKSPF in the Heads of Terms.  The Government will publish a UK-wide investment framework in 2021 and confirm multiyear funding profiles at the next Spending Review.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how the Shared Prosperity Fund will be allocated across the UK.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK in places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers.

Funding for the UKSPF will ramp up so that total domestic UK-wide funding will?at least match receipts from EU structural funds, on average reaching around £1.5 billion per?year. The Government will publish a UK-wide investment framework in 2021 and will confirm its funding profiles at the next Spending Review.

To help local areas prepare over 2021-22 for the introduction of the UKSPF, the Government will provide?£220 million?additional funding to support our communities to pilot programmes and new approaches. This funding will be delivered UK-wide. Further details will be published in the new year.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
7th Dec 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the devolved Administrations will receive at least the same amount of funding under the Shared Prosperity Fund as they received under the EU Structural Fund.

I refer the hon Member to the answer I gave to PQ UIN 126180 on 15 December 2020.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
8th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has to (a) replace and (b) administer a replacement to the European Social Fund; and what his policy is on the future of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

The Government understands the importance of local growth funding to places and people and is committed to creating the UK Shared Prosperity Fund to succeed European structural funds, providing vital investment in local economies, cutting out bureaucracy and levelling up those parts of the UK whose economies are furthest behind.

Furthermore, the 2019 Conservative Manifesto committed to targeting the UK Shared Prosperity Fund at the UK’s specific needs, at a minimum matching the size of European structural funds in each nation and ensuring that £500 million of the Fund is used to give disadvantaged people the skills they need to make a success of life.

The Government has engaged with key stakeholders on the design and priorities of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund, including holding a series of engagement events across the UK. As we approach the transition from European Social Fund to the UK Shared Prosperity Fund, we will continue to engage with partners in order to aid policy development.

Final decisions on the design of the UK Shared Prosperity Fund will need to be made through a cross-Government Spending Review, and we will set out further plans for the fund in due course.

Luke Hall
Minister of State (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
9th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the timetable is for the consultation with key stakeholders on the UK Shared Prosperity Fund; when he plans to publish further details on the fund; and when the fund will be ready to accept applications.

The Government will set out further plans for the Fund in due course, including at the CSR. The Spending review will create a multi-year, UK-wide Shared Prosperity Fund which will support local economic recovery by driving economic growth and tackling deprivation.

Government?officials have held engagement events with external stakeholders from a variety?of?sectors across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to discuss lessons learnt from past funding?programmes?and potential investment priorities for the?UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

Government?officials have also held talks with their counterparts in the devolved administrations to ensure the fund works for places across the UK.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what allocations have been made from New Deal for Northern Ireland funding to date.

The Government is firmly committed to strengthening the Union, Northern Ireland’s place within it and driving forward economic growth and prosperity into the future.

The £400m New Deal package of funding announced in December 2020, will boost economic growth as well as increasing Northern Ireland’s competitiveness and investment in infrastructure. This builds on the commitment articulated in the Government’s 10 May 2020 Command Paper, The UK’s approach to the Northern Ireland Protocol.

The New Deal funding is additional to Northern Ireland’s Barnett share, demonstrating the Government’s firm commitment to Northern Ireland’s economy, and recognising the unique position of Northern Ireland following the UK’s exit from the European Union and the implementation of the Protocol on the ground in Northern Ireland.

The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland announced on 8 March 2020 that nearly half of the £400m New Deal funding had now been allocated. This includes £23m having been made available to the Northern Ireland Department for the Economy to invest £15m over three years in skills, and £8m over two years to promote trade and investment in Northern Ireland from overseas markets.

The other allocations made so far will develop systems that will support the movement of agrifood products between Great Britain and Northern Ireland, to be delivered by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs; and to build resilience in medicine supply chains, with the Department of Health and Social Care in the lead to deliver on this priority work.

We will continue to work closely with the Northern Ireland Executive to maximise opportunities this funding offers and further decisions will be made in due course on how the remainder of this fund will be allocated.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
23rd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, for what reason his Department has not engaged with Border Communities against Brexit.

Both the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and I have had and will continue to have regular engagement with a range of individuals, businesses and groups in civic society across Northern Ireland, including those in border regions, to discuss the impact and opportunities of the UK’s exit from the European Union. We have engaged recently with a number of civic society representatives, which includes representatives from rural and border community organisations, to discuss their views and concerns around the Northern Ireland Protocol.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, if he will publish a list of the participants from the so-called Loyalist Community Council who met with officials of his Department in a recent Zoom meeting.

The names of the participants that attended this meeting from the Loyalist Communities Council is in the public domain.

The Northern Ireland Office will continue to engage widely to ensure that the UK Government is able to meet its objectives in Northern Ireland.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
25th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what protocols his Department has on holding meetings with people reported to be associated with proscribed organisations.

The names of the participants that attended this meeting from the Loyalist Communities Council is in the public domain.

The Northern Ireland Office will continue to engage widely to ensure that the UK Government is able to meet its objectives in Northern Ireland.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
6th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what plans the Government has to bring forward legislative proposals on its commitments arising from the New Decade, New Approach deal.

Since the New Decade, New Approach (NDNA) deal was reached in January 2020, the UK Government has made good progress on implementing its commitments. For example, regulations to bring Union flag flying days into line with guidance in the rest of the UK came into force in December 2020. We are committed to delivering on other important language, culture and identity commitments in the coming months.

The Government plans to bring forward legislation to address outstanding NDNA commitments when Parliamentary time allows. This will include legislative changes on reforming the Petition of Concern, altering the Codes governing Ministerial accountability and conduct, and establishing certain other provisions to increase the sustainability of the institutions.

Furthermore, the Ministry of Defence is leading on UK-wide legislation to further incorporate the Armed Forces Covenant into law. This legislation is being developed in close consultation with the Northern Ireland Office, other UK Government departments and the devolved administrations.

In addition, in 2020 the UK Government legislated to establish a Victims Payments Scheme, which will provide acknowledgement payments to those permanently injured in Troubles-related incidents through no fault of their own. The UK Government is also committed to bringing forward legislation to address the legacy of the Troubles in a way that focuses on reconciliation, delivers for victims, and ends the cycle of investigations.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
25th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what discussions he has had with the Irish Government on the co-ordination of Christmas 2020 covid-19 restrictions.

The Northern Ireland Executive is leading Northern Ireland’s Covid-19 response, in line with devolution arrangements.

To ensure a joined-up approach in our response, the UK Government, the Northern Ireland Executive and the Irish Government are communicating at all levels. There have been regular discussions between Ministers and officials from the UK and Irish governments and from the Northern Ireland Executive throughout the pandemic and most recently about arrangements over the festive period. The Secretary of State met the Irish Foreign Minister on 23 November to discuss a range of issues, including covid-19 restrictions.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
17th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, to what projects and programmes he has allocated Shared Future funding under the Fresh Start Agreement in (a) 2020-21 and (b) forthcoming financial years.

In 2015, the UK Government provided £60m over five years in support of the Executive’s delivery of confidence and relationship building measures within and between communities, contributing to the conditions that will allow the removal of peace walls and the creation of a shared future.

The UK Government has released £12m in each financial year since 2016-17, with the final £12m being provided to the Executive in 2020-21. The Northern Ireland Budget for the 2020-21 financial year confirmed £12 million of non ring-fenced resource funding for Shared Future projects. The Northern Ireland Executive is responsible for allocating this non ring-fenced spending and has not yet published its decisions for the 2020-21 period.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
5th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what official term is used by his Department to refer to the proposed series of checks on the movement of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland after the transition period.

Safeguarding the free flow of goods within the UK internal market is a priority for this Government. The application of the Northern Ireland Protocol will involve some changes for goods movements into Northern Ireland.

Our unfettered access policy will ensure that businesses and individuals will be able to move goods from Northern Ireland into the rest of the UK on the same basis as now.

The end of the transition period will, however, mean some new arrangements for goods movements into Northern Ireland from Great Britain. Changes will be kept to an absolute minimum - with a new Trader Support Service, available to all traders at no cost, to be established to provide wraparound support, alongside guidance on the processes for food and agricultural products designed to uphold the longstanding status of the island of Ireland as a single epidemiological unit.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
14th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what steps he is taking to ensure that goods produced in Northern Ireland do not face competitive disadvantage when placed on the market in Great Britain.

The UK Government has committed to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland businesses in legislation, including through the UK Internal Market Bill and the Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods Regulations.

The UK Internal Market Bill will prohibit new checks and controls on qualifying Northern Ireland goods, and through the mutual recognition principle will enable qualifying Northern Ireland goods to be placed on the market in Great Britain without additional approvals. This will ensure direct trade from Northern Ireland to Great Britain will continue as it does now.

The non-discrimination principle contained in the bill will also apply fully to qualifying Northern Ireland goods. This principle will apply to certain types of regulatory requirements not captured by mutual recognition, for example on transportation and manner of sale, and will prevent requirements that discriminate against qualifying Northern Ireland goods by putting them at a disadvantage when sold in Great Britain.

Furthermore, through the UK Common frameworks programme we will work with the devolved administrations to ensure that coherent approaches are maintained across the UK in frameworks policy areas from the end of the transition period.


Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
13th Oct 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what provisions he has put in place to ensure that Northern Ireland goods do not face competitive disadvantage or discrimination when placed on the market in Great Britain.

The UK Government has committed to delivering unfettered access for Northern Ireland businesses in legislation, including through the UK Internal Market Bill and the Qualifying Northern Ireland Goods Regulations.

The UK Internal Market Bill will prohibit new checks and controls on qualifying Northern Ireland goods, and through the mutual recognition principle will enable qualifying Northern Ireland goods to be placed on the market in Great Britain without additional approvals. This will ensure direct trade from Northern Ireland to Great Britain will continue as it does now.

The non-discrimination principle contained in the bill will also apply fully to qualifying Northern Ireland goods. This principle will apply to certain types of regulatory requirements not captured by mutual recognition, for example on transportation and manner of sale, and will prevent requirements that discriminate against qualifying Northern Ireland goods by putting them at a disadvantage when sold in Great Britain.

Furthermore, through the UK Common frameworks programme we will work with the devolved administrations to ensure that coherent approaches are maintained across the UK in frameworks policy areas from the end of the transition period.


Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
8th Sep 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department's policies of the 3 September 2020 decision of the Council of Europe's Committee of Ministers on H46-44 McKerr group v the United Kingdom (Application No. 28883/95).

The Government has noted the decision of the Council of Europe’s Committee of Ministers and remains committed to introducing legislation to address the legacy of Northern Ireland’s past as soon as possible.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
2nd Sep 2020
What discussions his Department has had with (a) victims groups and (b) other key stakeholders in Northern Ireland on the development of the Government's proposals on addressing Northern Ireland legacy issues, announced on 18 March 2020.

The Government remains committed to introducing legislation to address the legacy of the past in Northern Ireland.

The Department has held discussions with a number of key stakeholders, including victims groups, the Commissioner for Victims and Survivors, the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission, and a range of individuals from across civic society and academia.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
14th Jul 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, if he will outline the current rules and requirements on the Northern Ireland Executive utilising the Fresh Start Agreement resources allocated for shared and integrated education.

The UK Government, through the Fresh Start and Stormont House Agreements, provided a contribution of up to £500m over 10 years of new capital funding to support shared and integrated education.

The Government remains committed to providing all of this funding for the purposes for which it was originally intended. We will continue to work with the Northern Ireland Executive and HM Treasury to ensure this can be profiled in the most effective way.

This support will help overcome divisions in Northern Ireland and benefit thousands of children through new and better facilities.

The Government is pleased to note that the restored Executive has made progress on delivering this important initiative, with 27 major capital projects being progressed under the Fresh Start programme in the current financial year.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
12th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what plans he has to bring forward regulations under the Northern Ireland (Executive Formation etc) Act 2019 to enable (a) religious marriage for same-sex couples and (b) conversion of Northern Ireland civil partnerships to marriages.

On 13 January 2020, the Marriage (Same-sex Couples) and Civil Partnership (Opposite-sex Couples) (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2019 came into force in Northern Ireland, extending eligibility to same-sex couples to form civil marriages and allowing opposite-sex couples to enter into a civil partnership.

We are committed to delivering on two remaining areas - same-sex religious marriage and conversion entitlements. A consultation on these two issues closed on 23 February 2020, and we are considering all of the submissions received before bringing forward the necessary legislation as soon as possible before the end of 2020.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, on what date the next election to the Northern Ireland Assembly is planned to be held.

The Northern Ireland Act 1998 provides that the next scheduled Northern Ireland Assembly election is due to take place on 5 May 2022.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
2nd Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what plans the Government has for (a) UK participation in the European Convention on Human Rights and (b) maintenance of the Good Friday Agreement after the transition period.

The Government is committed to the European Convention of Human Rights and to protecting human rights and championing them at home and abroad. The Government is also firmly committed to the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, its successor agreements, the constitutional principles it upholds, the institutions it established, and the rights it protects; leaving the EU does not change this position.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what the Government's policy is on the legacy aspects of the Stormont House Agreement.

The Government has always been clear that the Stormont House Agreement will be implemented in a way that provides certainty for veterans and justice for victims. The Secretary of State for Northern Ireland will be working closely with others on the way forward.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
21st Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, whether an assessment has been made of the capacity of the Northern Ireland criminal justice system to address vexatious investigations or prosecutions against veterans of the UK armed forces; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has been clear that the system for investigating incidents that took place during the Troubles must be balanced, proportionate and fair. We are committed to addressing the legacy of the past in Northern Ireland to provide justice for victims and greater certainty for military veterans.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Northern Ireland Office)
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what meetings (a) he and (b) his officials have held with representatives of Border Communities against Brexit.

Neither my officials nor I have met representatives of Border Communities Against Brexit.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
6th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, how much funding will be allocated to the Troubles-related incident Victims Payment Scheme.

In 2014, the NI parties agreed further work would be undertaken to seek an acceptable way forward on the proposal for a pension for severely injured victims in Northern Ireland.

The Executive Formation Act required the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland to lay regulations for a Victims Payment Scheme, which he did on Friday 31 January. The Northern Ireland Civil Service is continuing to work to explore the full costs of the scheme.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
5th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what the Government's policy is on the legacy aspects of the Stormont House Agreement.

The Government is committed to reforming the current legacy system in Northern Ireland in a way which provides reconciliation for victims and greater certainty for veterans. The Government will be working to develop proposals in the coming weeks.

6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, whether he plans to increase the budget of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission in order to reflect its new powers and responsibilities.

The Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and the Equality Commission for Northern Ireland will play key roles in the dedicated mechanism that we are establishing, under the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill, to implement our commitment to no diminution of certain rights, safeguards and equality of opportunity set out in the chapter of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement of the same name.

These new roles will require further resources to cover, inter alia, new policy and research functions and communications and education activities.

Additional resourcing will be confirmed in due course, subject to formal budgetary processes.

6th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what plans he has to increase the resources of the Equality Commission for Northern Ireland in response to the new responsibilities that are set to be granted to it under the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill.

The Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and the Equality Commission for Northern Ireland will play key roles in the dedicated mechanism that we are establishing, under the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill, to implement our commitment to no diminution of certain rights, safeguards and equality of opportunity set out in the chapter of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement of the same name.

These new roles will require further resources to cover, inter alia, new policy and research functions and communications and education activities.

Additional resourcing will be confirmed in due course, subject to formal budgetary processes.