Sandy Martin Portrait

Sandy Martin

Labour - Former Member for Ipswich

Sandy Martin is not a member of any APPGs
6 Former APPG memberships
Climate Change, County, East of England, Healthcare Infrastructure, Kurds in Iran, Local Government
Shadow Minister (Waste and Recycling)
25th Oct 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
High Speed Rail (West Midlands - Crewe) Bill Select Committee (Commons)
5th Feb 2018 - 6th Nov 2019
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Public Administration and Constitutional Affairs Committee
11th Sep 2017 - 25th Feb 2019


Division Voting information

Sandy Martin has voted in 428 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

25 Jun 2018 - National Policy Statement: Airports - View Vote Context
Sandy Martin voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 94 Labour No votes vs 119 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 415 Noes - 119
15 Jun 2018 - Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill - View Vote Context
Sandy Martin voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 7 Labour Aye votes vs 10 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 8 Noes - 47
View All Sandy Martin Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
George Eustice (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
(29 debate interactions)
David Drew (Labour (Co-op))
(20 debate interactions)
Nick Hurd (Conservative)
(16 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(54 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(48 debate contributions)
Home Office
(37 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Sandy Martin's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Sandy Martin

4th September 2019
Sandy Martin signed this EDM on Wednesday 2nd October 2019

AMAZON FIRES

Tabled by: Caroline Lucas (Green Party - Brighton, Pavilion)
That this House notes with deep concern the over 90,000 fires recorded in Brazil so far this year, with burning detected inside indigenous lands and nature reserves; notes that the Amazon rainforest is home to over 20 million people including 1 million indigenous people, 10 per cent of the Earth's …
23 signatures
(Most recent: 2 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 15
Plaid Cymru: 3
Independent: 1
Green Party: 1
Liberal Democrat: 1
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
3rd September 2019
Sandy Martin signed this EDM on Wednesday 2nd October 2019

SITUATION IN KASHMIR

Tabled by: Khalid Mahmood (Labour - Birmingham, Perry Barr)
That this House calls on the Government to condemn Indian aggression in Kashmir; further calls on the Indian Government to reinstate the UN Security Council 1948 resolution 47 and Article 35a; calls on the Government in collaboration with the UN Security Council to provide the necessary resolution to stop the …
28 signatures
(Most recent: 2 Oct 2019)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 24
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Independent: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
Conservative: 1
View All Sandy Martin's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Sandy Martin, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Sandy Martin has not been granted any Urgent Questions

2 Adjournment Debates led by Sandy Martin

Tuesday 5th November 2019
Monday 15th October 2018

Sandy Martin has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

Sandy Martin has not co-sponsored any Bills in the current parliamentary sitting


133 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Attorney General what steps his Office is taking to prosecute alleged frauds involving multiple persons who cannot afford to bring civil cases against the alleged perpetrators.

Both the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) and Serious Fraud Office (SFO) are responsible for prosecuting cases of fraud.

They act in the public interest and can prosecute whether or not civil proceedings are in progress.

The government has taken concerted action over recent years to reduce the costs of civil litigation, and that work continues.

Michael Ellis
Paymaster General
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether local authority councillors who are citizens of non-UK EU countries and not UK citizens will be disqualified from office after 1 April 2019.

I refer the Hon Member to the answer given to the Member for Cambridge to PQ129820 on 28 March 2018.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether citizens of non UK EU countries that are not UK citizens will be entitled to stand as candidates in local authority elections after 1 April 2019.

I refer the Hon Member to the answer given to the Member for Cambridge to PQ129820 on 28 March 2018.

Chloe Smith
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
22nd Nov 2017
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what recent discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on bringing forward proposals to end the one per cent cap on pay rises for public sector workers.

As the Chief Secretary to the Treasury said on 12 September, we are moving away from a 1% public sector average award. Pay awards will be informed by a range of factors, including recruitment and retention. The Pay Review Bodies will come forward with their proposals next year.

17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what R&D support his Department provides to small- and medium-sized enterprises for innovation in packaging.

This Government is building a globally competitive sustainable packaging industry through research and innovation. As confirmed on Monday 22 July 2019, the Department will provide up to £60 million, bolstered by an expected £149m investment from the private sector, to establish the UK as the world’s leading innovator in smart sustainable plastic packaging.

17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what funding the Government plans to allocate to the modernisation of the UK steel industry.

The Department commissioned independent research to identify high value opportunities for UK steel, worth up to £3.8 billion a year by 2030. We have made clear to the sector that we are keen to work with them to support their future investment proposals to secure these future opportunities as part of a steel sector deal. We stand ready to work with the sector as soon as their proposals are ready.

In addition to this, we have been encouraging the UK steel sector to submit competitive proposals for UKRI funds, including Transforming Foundation Industries, and work with us to shape future funding programmes, such as the Industrial Energy Transformation Fund, to further improve their efficiency and competitiveness.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
22nd Mar 2018
What steps he plans to take to ensure that social media companies tackle online bullying on their platforms.

We are committed to making the UK the safest place in the world for users to be online. In October last year we published the Internet Safety Strategy green paper. This sets out a range of measures which will ensure social media companies tackle online bullying.

We will also be introducing a social media code of practice, which will address conduct that involves bullying or insulting an individual online, or other behaviour likely to intimidate or humiliate.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps her Department is taking to reduce the prevalence of the resale of tickets at inflated prices for theatrical, musical and other artistic performances.

We are determined to crackdown on unacceptable behaviour and improve fans’ chances of buying tickets at a reasonable price.

The Consumer Rights Act 2015 already includes rules about tickets offered for sale on the secondary market, and the Digital Economy Act passed earlier this year adds an additional requirement for ticket sellers to provide a unique ticket number when reselling a ticket resale, and provides the power to create a specific offence, where tickets are purchased electronically, of purchasing more tickets than the maximum permitted.

We have provided funding for enforcement action to be taken by Trading Standards against sellers who are in breach of consumer law.

The Competition and Markets Authority has also launched an enforcement investigation into suspected breaches of consumer protection law in the online secondary ticketing market which is hoped will drive further transparency in the secondary market.

B

26th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, when her Department plans to make an announcement on its review of fixed odds betting terminals.

A review of gaming machines and social responsibility measures was launched in October 2016, which included a look at the Fix Odds Betting terminals. Purdah interrupted the final stages of our consideration of the evidence received and the subsequent internal, cross government process of approval and sign off. I'm afraid, therefore, that we are back at the start of the process and that as a consequence of it taking at least 12 weeks I would not expect any further announcement until October at the earliest.

1st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department will take to ensure the timely publication of (a) GCSE and (b) other test results by multi-academy-trust run schools.

Results for academies in multi-academy trusts (MATs) are published in the same way as other schools via the school and college performance tables. Results can be found at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/school-performance-tables.

Key stage 4 results – which include GCSEs – will be published in October 2019 (provisional) and January 2020 (revised). Key stage 2 results will be published in December 2019, and 16-18 in October 2019 (provisional), January 2020 (revised) and March 2020 (additional measures).

The Department also publishes MAT performance measures alongside school-level performance measures. MATs must have at least three schools that have been with the MAT for at least three years to be included in the measures. Key stage 2 MAT measures will be published in December 2019, KS4 in January 2020, and 16-18 in March 2020.

1st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has issued to teachers at 6th-form colleges on gaining timely access to pupils' previous school's test results in order to set meaningful targets for pupil improvement.

The government’s response to the Workload Advisory Group report ‘Making Data Work’ provides advice about proportionate use of data for pupil improvement including target setting. The report can be found at the following link: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/754349/Workload_Advisory_Group-report.pdf.

The department already provides digital systems that enable schools and colleges to access pupils’ prior attainment data.

Michelle Donelan
Minister of State (Department for Education) (Higher and Further Education)
11th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to ensure that the provision of free school meals to all infant school aged children does not adversely affect (a) the allocation of and (b) level of registration for pupil premium funding.

We are determined to give every child, regardless of their background, the very best start in life. Free school meals are key to this and we want all parents whose children are entitled to them to apply for them. The continuing provision of free school meals to children from out of work families or those on low incomes is of the utmost importance to this government. We want to make sure as many eligible pupils as possible are claiming their free school meals, and to make it as simple as possible for schools and local authorities to determine eligibility.

To support this, we provide an Eligibility Checking System to make the checking process as quick and straightforward as possible for schools and local authorities. We have developed a model registration form to help schools encourage parents to sign up for free school meals. We also provide guidance to Jobcentre Plus advisers so that they can make Universal Credit recipients aware that they may also be entitled to wider benefits, including free school meals.

We understand there are some concerns that schools could be missing out on valuable pupil premium funding due to under registration for free school meals. However, school census data shows that the introduction of Universal Infant Free School Meals has not adversely affected infant registration rates.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effect of a reduction in the number of children’s centre places in local authorities on the number of children being taken into care in that area.

​The information requested is not held centrally because no such assessment has been made. However, the National Audit Office’s recent report on children’s social care found no support for the hypothesis that a reduction in the number of children’s centre buildings would increase the use of child protection plans. The report can be accessed at: https://www.nao.org.uk/report/pressures-on-childrens-social-care/.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what discussion he has had with representatives of local authorities on the educational value to children of children’s centres.

My right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education meets regularly with representatives of local authorities to discuss various matters related to the Department for Education agenda.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the efficacy of the financial management of Bright Tribe Academy Trust.

Bright Tribe Trust, along with all academy trusts, is subject to a rigorous system of oversight and accountability, allowing us to take action to deal with under-performance, including transferring schools to new trusts when necessary. The Education and Skills Funding Agency has worked with Bright Tribe Trust since 2015 to ensure the best outcomes for their pupils and academies.

More broadly, it is important to place the Bright Tribe case into context and emphasise that the financial health of the academies sector is strong; and in the most recent published financial statements, we found that more than 95% of trusts had no issues.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
14th May 2018
How many schools will not receive a cash terms increase in their budget per pupil in 2018-19.

The Department are spending record sums on school funding, rising from £41 billion to £42.4 billion this year and £43.5 billion next year.

The national funding formula (NFF) gives every local authority more money for every pupil in every school in 2018-19 and 2019-20. To help in transition to the NFF, local authorities have flexibility on how this funding is distributed in their local area.

14th Mar 2018
What assessment he has made of the effect of the Government’s policy on funded childcare on the financial viability of childcare settings.

By 2019-20, we will be spending approximately £6 billion a year on childcare support, including £1 billion to deliver 30 hours of free childcare and pay the higher funding rates that were introduced in April 2017.

These rates were based on our ‘Review of Childcare Costs’, which was described as thorough and wide ranging by the National Audit Office.

We are providing tailored support to providers on business sustainability and continue to monitor the implementation of 30 hours of free childcare.

18th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans his Department has to require all maintained schools to have a medical conditions policy and to display such a policy publicly on their school website; and if he will make statement.

The government recognises the importance of supporting pupils at school with medical conditions. Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014 introduced a duty that requires governing boards to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions. Most schools manage these issues well and take their responsibilities towards pupils with such conditions seriously, making sure that the medical needs of their pupils are being met.

The department works with organisations such as the Health Conditions in Schools Alliance to raise awareness of the duty, and recently promoted it through the department’s social media channels.

Governing boards should ensure that schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions that is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. We keep the guidance under review, including in the context of school awareness, and the role it plays in securing accessibility of school policies.

This guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-pupils-at-school-with-medical-conditions--3.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
18th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department has taken to raise awareness of schools of their duty to protect and enable pupils with medical conditions.

The government recognises the importance of supporting pupils at school with medical conditions. Section 100 of the Children and Families Act 2014 introduced a duty that requires governing boards to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions. Most schools manage these issues well and take their responsibilities towards pupils with such conditions seriously, making sure that the medical needs of their pupils are being met.

The department works with organisations such as the Health Conditions in Schools Alliance to raise awareness of the duty, and recently promoted it through the department’s social media channels.

Governing boards should ensure that schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions that is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. We keep the guidance under review, including in the context of school awareness, and the role it plays in securing accessibility of school policies.

This guidance is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/supporting-pupils-at-school-with-medical-conditions--3.

Nadhim Zahawi
Secretary of State for Education
7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if her Department will issue guidance to schools on reasonable adjustments to school timetables for children with Type 1 diabetes.

School governing boards should ensure that all schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions that is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. The department does not hold information on individual diabetes episodes within schools, nor on the extent to which governing boards are making arrangements within their school policies for the support of pupils with medical conditions to give specific consideration to the needs of pupils with Type 1 Diabetes.

Statutory guidance on supporting pupils at school with medical conditions includes information for schools on developing school policies. We have also provided a collection of links to useful resources to help schools support their pupils with medical conditions. This includes links to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation / East of England Children and Young People Diabetes Network; and to Diabetes UK website, which includes a sample medical conditions policy.

Ofsted’s Common Inspection Framework requires inspectors, in making judgements upon schools, to pay particular attention to the outcomes of a range of groups of pupils, including those with medical needs. Ofsted included guidance to inspectors on this matter in their March 2017 school inspection update, reminding inspectors that they should consider how schools are meeting the needs of pupils with medical conditions. The content of inspection frameworks and training of inspectors are matters for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector.

Governing boards must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that disabled children and young people are not at a substantial disadvantage compared with their peers. This duty is anticipatory: adjustments must be planned and put in place in advance, to prevent that disadvantage.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans her Department has to instruct OFSTED to update its (a) inspection regime and (b) inspector training to include checks for the effective implementation of policies regarding pupils with 1 diabetes.

School governing boards should ensure that all schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions that is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. The department does not hold information on individual diabetes episodes within schools, nor on the extent to which governing boards are making arrangements within their school policies for the support of pupils with medical conditions to give specific consideration to the needs of pupils with Type 1 Diabetes.

Statutory guidance on supporting pupils at school with medical conditions includes information for schools on developing school policies. We have also provided a collection of links to useful resources to help schools support their pupils with medical conditions. This includes links to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation / East of England Children and Young People Diabetes Network; and to Diabetes UK website, which includes a sample medical conditions policy.

Ofsted’s Common Inspection Framework requires inspectors, in making judgements upon schools, to pay particular attention to the outcomes of a range of groups of pupils, including those with medical needs. Ofsted included guidance to inspectors on this matter in their March 2017 school inspection update, reminding inspectors that they should consider how schools are meeting the needs of pupils with medical conditions. The content of inspection frameworks and training of inspectors are matters for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector.

Governing boards must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that disabled children and young people are not at a substantial disadvantage compared with their peers. This duty is anticipatory: adjustments must be planned and put in place in advance, to prevent that disadvantage.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance her Department has issued to schools and governing bodies on developing policies to support pupils with Type 1 Diabetes.

School governing boards should ensure that all schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions that is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. The department does not hold information on individual diabetes episodes within schools, nor on the extent to which governing boards are making arrangements within their school policies for the support of pupils with medical conditions to give specific consideration to the needs of pupils with Type 1 Diabetes.

Statutory guidance on supporting pupils at school with medical conditions includes information for schools on developing school policies. We have also provided a collection of links to useful resources to help schools support their pupils with medical conditions. This includes links to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation / East of England Children and Young People Diabetes Network; and to Diabetes UK website, which includes a sample medical conditions policy.

Ofsted’s Common Inspection Framework requires inspectors, in making judgements upon schools, to pay particular attention to the outcomes of a range of groups of pupils, including those with medical needs. Ofsted included guidance to inspectors on this matter in their March 2017 school inspection update, reminding inspectors that they should consider how schools are meeting the needs of pupils with medical conditions. The content of inspection frameworks and training of inspectors are matters for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector.

Governing boards must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that disabled children and young people are not at a substantial disadvantage compared with their peers. This duty is anticipatory: adjustments must be planned and put in place in advance, to prevent that disadvantage.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many pupils at maintained schools with Type 1 Diabetes have (a) entered a coma and (b) suffered a serious medical episode at school in the last 12 months.

School governing boards should ensure that all schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions that is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. The department does not hold information on individual diabetes episodes within schools, nor on the extent to which governing boards are making arrangements within their school policies for the support of pupils with medical conditions to give specific consideration to the needs of pupils with Type 1 Diabetes.

Statutory guidance on supporting pupils at school with medical conditions includes information for schools on developing school policies. We have also provided a collection of links to useful resources to help schools support their pupils with medical conditions. This includes links to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation / East of England Children and Young People Diabetes Network; and to Diabetes UK website, which includes a sample medical conditions policy.

Ofsted’s Common Inspection Framework requires inspectors, in making judgements upon schools, to pay particular attention to the outcomes of a range of groups of pupils, including those with medical needs. Ofsted included guidance to inspectors on this matter in their March 2017 school inspection update, reminding inspectors that they should consider how schools are meeting the needs of pupils with medical conditions. The content of inspection frameworks and training of inspectors are matters for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector.

Governing boards must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that disabled children and young people are not at a substantial disadvantage compared with their peers. This duty is anticipatory: adjustments must be planned and put in place in advance, to prevent that disadvantage.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information her Department holds on whether school governing bodies are making arrangements within their school policies for the support of pupils with medical conditions to give specific consideration to the needs of pupils with Type 1 Diabetes.

School governing boards should ensure that all schools develop a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions that is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff. The department does not hold information on individual diabetes episodes within schools, nor on the extent to which governing boards are making arrangements within their school policies for the support of pupils with medical conditions to give specific consideration to the needs of pupils with Type 1 Diabetes.

Statutory guidance on supporting pupils at school with medical conditions includes information for schools on developing school policies. We have also provided a collection of links to useful resources to help schools support their pupils with medical conditions. This includes links to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation / East of England Children and Young People Diabetes Network; and to Diabetes UK website, which includes a sample medical conditions policy.

Ofsted’s Common Inspection Framework requires inspectors, in making judgements upon schools, to pay particular attention to the outcomes of a range of groups of pupils, including those with medical needs. Ofsted included guidance to inspectors on this matter in their March 2017 school inspection update, reminding inspectors that they should consider how schools are meeting the needs of pupils with medical conditions. The content of inspection frameworks and training of inspectors are matters for Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector.

Governing boards must make reasonable adjustments to ensure that disabled children and young people are not at a substantial disadvantage compared with their peers. This duty is anticipatory: adjustments must be planned and put in place in advance, to prevent that disadvantage.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that all schools have a policy for the care of pupils with Type 1 diabetes.

We know how important it is that children with medical conditions such as Type 1 diabetes are supported to enjoy a full education. That is why we introduced the duty to require governing bodies to make arrangements to support pupils with medical conditions and have provided statutory guidance outlining schools’ responsibilities in this area.

All governing boards should ensure that their school develops a policy for supporting pupils with medical conditions which is reviewed regularly and is readily accessible to parents and school staff.

We continue to work with organisations such as the Health Conditions in Schools Alliance to help raise further awareness of the duty on schools, and have recently promoted the duty through the department’s social media channels.

22nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to inform local authorities of changes to the financing of waste collection as a result of the policies in Our waste, our resources: a strategy for England published on 18 December 2018.

Earlier this year, the Government published three consultations: ‘consistency in household and business recycling’, ‘reforming the UK packaging producer responsibility system’ and ‘introducing a deposit return scheme for drinks containers’. The consultations sought views on the policies in our Resources and Waste Strategy (RWS) including the financing of waste collections.

During the consultation period, we held events for local authorities where we invited views on the proposals in the consultations. We have also made it clear to local authorities that the Government is committed to funding any additional net costs that the new policies will bring. We have also made local authorities aware that the reform of the packaging regulations will mean that they receive funding to pay for the collection of packaging materials for recycling.

The Environment Bill was introduced on 15 October https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/bills/cbill/2019-2020/0003/20003.pdf. It contains the draft legislation relating to the policies in the RWS. We will continue to have regular discussions as we develop our final proposals which we will consult on in 2020.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the impact assessment entitled, Introducing a deposit return scheme on beverage containers, included an assessment of the changes proposed to the waste regime which were included in the strategy entitled Our waste, our resources: a strategy for England published on 18 December 2018.

We recognise that any potential deposit return scheme would need to work alongside the wider producer responsibility and recycling systems in operation in this country (including any potential changes to them). We have carefully considered the connections between these policy areas and chose to launch the three sets of consultations and impact assessments together to reflect this.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she had made of the implications for her policies of the Impact Assessment entitled, Introducing a Deposit Return Scheme on beverage containers, published on 15 February 2019.

We published an impact assessment that detailed the costs and savings to local authority finances, including possible reduction in litter cleaning costs and loss of material revenues. However, under the reformed packaging producer responsibility system, packaging producers will be responsible for the costs of dealing with the packaging waste they produce, so the identified kerbside costs and benefits are expected to fall to packaging producers, rather than placing a burden on local authorities.

The Government has also committed to funding any additional net costs that the new policies will bring to local authorities.

We will continue to refine our analysis of the costs and benefits as we receive more evidence and as we develop further policy options.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate she has made of the potential annual (a) costs and (b) savings accruing to local authority finances of a deposit return scheme.

The introduction of a Deposit Return Scheme (DRS) is expected to increase recycling and reduce littering of the drinks containers in-scope. The greenhouse gas emissions reduction associated with this is 2.9 metric tonnes of CO2e over the ten-year appraisal period. The Net Present Value of a DRS for drinks containers is estimated in the initial impact assessment to be more than £2 billion over the appraisal period for the ‘all-in’ option, and £250 million for the ‘on-the-go’ option. We will continue to refine our analysis of the costs and benefits as we receive more evidence and develop further policy options.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Impact Assessment entitled, Introducing a deposit return scheme on beverage containers included an assessment of the changes proposed to the waste regime that were included in the strategy entitled, Our waste, our resources.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential (a) costs and (b) benefits to local government finances of the introduction of a deposit return scheme.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps her Department is taking to inform local authorities of changes to financing waste collection as a result of the policies contained in the document entitled, Our Waste, our resources: a strategy for England.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what financial support his Department provides to local authorities for investment in waste and recycling facilities.

The Government has provided local government with over £200 billion for this spending period and while councils make their own spending decisions, we would expect councils to prioritise what they do to deliver what their residents want to see and to invest in waste and recycling facilities as necessary to ensure good waste management practice.

The Government is also investing around £3 billion of grant funding in 24 Private Finance Initiative (PFI) waste infrastructure projects. These grants support infrastructure including material recovery, mechanical biological treatment and anaerobic digestion facilities, as well as implementing and expanding kerbside recycling services.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the cost to the public purse of the introduction of separate food waste collections throughout England.

In the supporting impact assessment to our consultation on consistency in recycling, we modelled three scenarios on how that policy could be delivered, all including separate food waste collection. In the preferred option of that impact assessment (option 3, which for local authorities includes weekly separate food waste, free garden waste, weekly dry multi-stream recycling and fortnightly residual waste collections) the overall cost to the public purse is estimated to be just under £260 million a year between 2023-2035.

This comprises: local authority initial costs and subsequent savings; lost revenue to the Exchequer from local authority and business waste diverted away from landfill; lost garden waste income to local authorities; and policy costs to Government in supporting waste collection changes to municipal business.

The full impact assessment is available from the following link: https://consult.defra.gov.uk/environmental-quality/consultation-on-consistency-in-household-and-busin/supporting_documents/recycleconsistencyconsultia.pdf

We will refine our analysis based on consultation feedback and engagement with the sector.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many local waste collection authorities own arms-length commercial waste collection services.

We do not record this information.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans the Government has to tackle agricultural plastic pollution.

I refer the Hon. Member to the reply given to the Hon. Member for Delyn, David Hanson, on 1 July 2019, PQ 268406.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what funding his Department has made available to waste disposal authorities for the prevention of methane emissions from closed landfill sites.

No funding has been made available by the Department to disposal authorities for the prevention of methane emissions from closed landfill sites.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much has been spent on tackling waste crime in the last five years.

In tackling waste crime the Environment Agency has spent: (in millions)

£13.4m in 2013/14

£11.2m in 2014/15

£11.4m in 2015/16

£10.8m in 2016/17

£10.7m in 2017/18

Data for 2018/19 has not yet been released.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much revenue has been raised from fines for fly-tipping in the last five years.

Over the last five years fines totalling £3,332,214 have been levied by the courts in England on offenders convicted of fly-tipping offences prosecuted by local authorities.

Further detailed data about fly-tipping, including fines, in England is publicly available at: www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fly-tipping-in-england.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
17th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what financial support was available to re-useable nappy schemes in each year since 2005.

The Department does not hold this information.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
26th Jun 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government plans to implement the EU Single-Use Plastics directive in full which includes measures on oxo-degradable plastics; and what plans he has to extend that legislation to include oxo-biodegradable plastics.

In our Resources and Waste Strategy we have committed to match or where economically practicable exceed the ambition of the Single-Use Plastics Directive.

The term oxo-degradable plastics is used in the Directive. The Directive mandates that oxo-degradable plastics shall be restricted from being placed on the market from 3 July 2021. Oxo-degradable plastics are conventional plastics. They include additives which are designed to promote the oxidation of the material to the point where it embrittles and fragments, potentially resulting in risks from micro-plastic particles. The Government remains committed to reducing the health and environmental impacts of certain plastic products, including those made from oxo-degradable plastics, in the marine environment.

The Government is concerned that, in the absence of standards, claims about the biodegradability of plastic based products cannot be verified leading to potential confusion in the market place, possible increased levels of consumption and potential environmental harm at the point of disposal.

As part of the Bioeconomy Strategy published on 5 December last year, the Government committed to work with UK Research and Innovation and industry to seek evidence on the demand, benefits and implications (for example the impact on recycling streams) of a standard for bio-based and biodegradable plastics that would include carrier bags. The call for evidence will seek evidence in relation to labelling and information provision.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
29th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to make an assessment of the effect on babies of (a) glyphosate and (b) other chemicals used in disposable nappies.

The UK’s product safety regimes are among the strongest in the world and we have a robust framework of chemicals regulation in place to protect human health; this includes the restriction of chemicals in certain products. General product safety is regulated by the General Product Safety Regulations 2005. They apply to all products used by consumers and place a duty on producers and distributors to ensure their products are safe in normal or reasonable foreseeable use. We have also committed in our Resources and Waste Strategy to considering how we address the identification and tracking of chemicals in products across supply chains.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
29th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the volume of disposable nappies in household waste; and what assessment he has made of the (a) environmental and (b) financial merits of the introduction of reusable nappy schemes by local authorities.

I met Procter & Gamble who have developed a technology to recycle nappies and I understand they are in discussions with several local authorities to establish a facility in the UK. The Government is committed to eliminating all avoidable waste by 2050, and wants to encourage more recycling and to make it easier for households to recycle. We say more on how we will do this in our Resources and Waste Strategy which was published in December last year.

While reusable nappies may make a valuable contribution to reducing residual waste that has to be disposed of to landfill or incineration, the Government has not made a formal assessment of the environmental or financial merits of the introduction of reusable nappy schemes by local authorities.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
24th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to incorporate incentives to improve the accessibility and upkeep of public rights of way in any future scheme of agricultural payments.

The new environmental land management scheme, underpinned by natural capital principles, will contribute to delivering many of the key outcomes set out in the 25 Year Environment Plan and the Clean Growth Strategy.

As the cornerstone of future agriculture policy the new environmental land management scheme will pay public money for the provision of public goods. As set out in our consultation document Health and Harmony, the public goods incentivised by the scheme could include: biodiversity, which habitat enhancement and maintenance contribute to; cultural heritage, such as the maintenance of heritage buildings and monuments; and public access.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to incorporate incentives to enhance and maintain higher animal welfare standards in any future scheme of agricultural payments.

The UK has some of the highest animal welfare standards in the world and we will maintain these once we leave the EU. We have recently consulted on our future agricultural policy, which included proposing using public money to fund public goods including animal welfare. We are considering the responses and will publish a report of the findings in due course.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to incorporate incentives to enhance and maintain wildlife habitat in any future scheme of agricultural payments.

The new environmental land management scheme, underpinned by natural capital principles, will contribute to delivering many of the key outcomes set out in the 25 Year Environment Plan and the Clean Growth Strategy.

As the cornerstone of future agriculture policy the new environmental land management scheme will pay public money for the provision of public goods. As set out in our consultation document Health and Harmony, the public goods incentivised by the scheme could include: biodiversity, which habitat enhancement and maintenance contribute to; cultural heritage, such as the maintenance of heritage buildings and monuments; and public access.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has plans to incorporate incentives to enhance and maintain (a) heritage buildings, (b) monuments, (c) structures and (d) landscape features in any future scheme of agricultural payments.

The new environmental land management scheme, underpinned by natural capital principles, will contribute to delivering many of the key outcomes set out in the 25 Year Environment Plan and the Clean Growth Strategy.

As the cornerstone of future agriculture policy the new environmental land management scheme will pay public money for the provision of public goods. As set out in our consultation document Health and Harmony, the public goods incentivised by the scheme could include: biodiversity, which habitat enhancement and maintenance contribute to; cultural heritage, such as the maintenance of heritage buildings and monuments; and public access.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to identify environmental protections which may require additional legislation when the UK leaves the EU.

The Withdrawal Bill will make sure the whole body of existing EU environmental law continues to have effect in UK law, providing businesses and stakeholders with maximum certainty as we leave the EU.

Defra has identified where SIs or other legislative action may be needed, but this is contingent on the outcome of negotiations and implementation of legislation.

The Secretary of State has also announced that we will consult on creating a new, statutory, independent body to uphold environmental standards, and a new policy statement setting out environmental principles.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
13th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what estimate his Department has made of the potential effect on sales of insurance products in the EU by UK companies of the UK leaving the EU outside the Customs Union.

Leaving the Customs Union will have no direct impact on sales of insurance products in the EU by UK firms, as the Customs Union only applies to goods.

Financial services is an important sector for the UK and for the EU. The Government’s position remains that we should agree a close future relationship on financial services with the EU that preserves the mutual benefits of our uniquely integrated markets, while protecting financial stability, consumers, businesses and taxpayers across the UK and the EU.

In line with the government’s proposals, the Political Declaration includes commitments to close and structured cooperation on regulatory and supervisory matters in financial services, grounded in the economic partnership.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with First Group UK on (a) the provision of bus transport in the UK and (b) their plans for the divestment of their UK bus division.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has plans to extend the provisions of the Bus Services Act 2017 in respect of franchising bus services to local transport authorities other than Combined Authorities.

The Bus Services Act 2017 provides mayoral combined authorities with automatic access to franchising powers.

Other local authorities may franchise bus services with the consent of the Secretary of State. Guidance on what the Secretary of State will consider in deciding whether to franchise is available at:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/831690/bus-services-act-2017-franchising-scheme-guidance.pdf

We have no plans to change these arrangements at present.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when his Department will review the cost of train fares.

The Government understands the concern about the cost of some rail fares and the impact that this can have on people’s budgets. This is why the Government has ensured that regulated rail fares can rise by no more than inflation for the last six years. The Williams Review is considering how to enable a railway that is able to offer good value fares for passengers, while keeping costs down for taxpayers.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Minister of State (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 1 October 2019 to Question 291482, what the length of time was between the submission of a strategic outline business case by the relevant sub-national transport body and the communication of an initial assessment of the proposed scheme by his Department for the most recent scheme costing over £100 million for which his Department provided such an assessment.

All Strategic Outline Business Cases which were submitted to the Department on 31st July have gone through a robust assessment process over the summer. This followed guidance made available on gov.uk.

The Department has been in contact with Sub-National Transport Bodies (STBs), including Transport East, to discuss the outcomes of the assessment process for all regions’ Strategic Outline Business Cases, including that for the provision of a North Ipswich bypass. Formal advice on the scheme will be sent to Suffolk County Council shortly.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the timeframe is for his Department to (a) consider the strategic outline business case for the provision of a North Ipswich bypass and (b) publish its response to that business case.

All Strategic Outline Business Cases which were submitted to the Department on 31st July have gone through a robust assessment process over the summer. This followed guidance made available on gov.uk.

The Department has been in contact with Sub-National Transport Bodies (STBs), including Transport East, to discuss the outcomes of the assessment process for all regions’ Strategic Outline Business Cases, including that for the provision of a North Ipswich bypass. Formal advice on the scheme will be sent to Suffolk County Council shortly.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
2nd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 1 October 2019 to Question 291480 on A14: Freight, whether Highways England has carried out a formal assessment of disruptions to freight traffic on any of the UK's strategic freight routes.

Highways England assesses the performance of, and constraints on, the Strategic Road Network for all road users in order to compile its route strategies, which help inform decisions on future investment. The most recent strategies were published in 2017. Highways England deals with incidents on the network every day and has robust contingency plans in place to minimise disruption.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what representations he has had from Suffolk County Council on the proposed North Ipswich Route in the last 12 months.

Suffolk County Council has developed a Strategic Outline Business Case for the provision of a North Ipswich bypass. Transport East, the sub-national transport body for the region, submitted this to the Department for consideration under the Major Road Network and Large Local Majors programme in July 2019.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what information his Department holds on disruptions to freight traffic on the A14; and what estimate he has made of the cost of those disruptions to (a) hauliers and (b) other vehicles.

No formal assessment has been made by Highways England into disruptions to freight traffic on the A14 and they do not hold information in this form.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions his Department has had with Suffolk county council on the Ipswich northern route since 1 January 2019.

Department for Transport officials have had regular discussions with Suffolk County Council regarding the Ipswich Northern Route since January 1 2019. As well as regular engagement, the Department has offered analytical support to all scheme promoters as part of the Major Road Network (MRN) and Large Local Majors (LLM) programme.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the average length of time was for his Department to respond to funding requests for new roads from local authorities.

The timing of ministerial decisions on funding, or not, for any particular road scheme depends on a range of factors. With significant funding involved, a key factor will be the assessment of value for money, but also how complex the scheme is and our confidence in it being delivered. It is not possible to give an average length of time for this process since business cases are submitted at different stages of development; some are highly advanced and others are still in their infancy.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
26th Sep 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions his Department has had with Highways England on the Ipswich northern route.

The Department has worked collaboratively with Highways England in assessing the Ipswich Northern Route due to the scheme’s proximity to the A14 which is on the Strategic Road Network. Highways England was actively involved in the assessment of all submitted Major Route Network/ Large Local Major schemes.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
13th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether there is any (a) statutory and (b) contractual obligation on Abellio Greater Anglia Railways to provide shelter for passengers at Derby Road Station in Ipswich.

Greater Anglia is obligated to install at least one shelter per platform at Derby Road station by 31 December 2020. In addition, as the demand for this station by passengers grows, Greater Anglia would have to review whether their current facilities is appropriate for the footfall experienced by the station and make the appropriate changes.

20th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has to review the guidelines on installing charging points for electric vehicles; and if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of allowing a charging point to be installed at a place other than the address at which the vehicle is registered.

The Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme EVHS guidelines do state that the chargepoint must be installed at the address of the driver. The EVHS is periodically reviewed by the Department to consider improvements to the scheme.

19th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he has taken to ensure that the needs of people with various disabilities are represented on the taxi and private hire vehicle working group.

The Task and Finish group on Taxi and Private Hire Vehicles was established by the then Minister of State for Transport, John Hayes, and has received submissions from a number of disability representation organisations. I look forward to receiving the group’s findings soon.

19th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he has taken to secure participation by disabled people on the taxi and private hire vehicle working group.

The Task and Finish group on Taxi and Private Hire Vehicles was established by the then Minister of State for Transport, John Hayes, and has received submissions from a number of disability representation organisations. I look forward to receiving the group’s findings soon.

11th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claimants over the age of 60 in receipt of universal credit have been sanctioned in the last 12 months.

Statistics on Universal Credit sanctions by age are published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance for users is available at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
9th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect on benefit recipients of missed Child Maintenance Service payments where the level of benefit has been reduced due those payments being awarded.

Child Maintenance payments are fully disregarded when assessing entitlement to benefits, as such there is no effect on a person’s benefit payments when Child Maintenance payments are not made.

9th Jan 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of fairness of the decision by the Independent Case Examiner to close individual cases related to the state pension age for women on the basis that there is a judicial review of the way in which her Department handled those changes.

When a department and independent bodies face a legal case, they have to review whether they continue to assess claims or await determination of the legal case. This has been the policy under all governments, Labour, Coalition, and Conservative, for decades.

The Independent Case Examiner (ICE) closed all live cases which concerned complaints about the state pension age for women (WASPI) when they became subject to legal proceedings, as is required under its governance contract. In the event the legal proceedings fall away or there is no determination on the matters which form the basis of the WASPI complaints, the ICE could consider reopening the cases at the request of the Department.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
17th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the cost to the public purse has been of work done so far by the Independent Case Examiner on individual cases brought on the grounds of unjust treatment of women approaching pension age which have now been closed in response to the current Judicial Review of her Department's handling of the changes to women's pension age.

Individual government departments have long established complaints procedures. That approach has not changed under Labour governments 1997-2010 or successive governments. The DWP has a two tier complaints process which considers formal complaints about our service. Once a complainant has exhausted the DWP complaint process they are signposted to the Independent Case Examiner’s Office if they are dissatisfied with the final response to their complaint. The Independent Case Examiner is independent.

The Independent Case Examiner’s Office cost per case, which is currently £2,374, covers the whole process from receipt to investigation conclusion. The information requested relating to the total cost of work done is not collated centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Guy Opperman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
13th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department plans to abolish (a) the £20 referral fee and (b) the 4 per cent collection fee charged to receiving parents who use the Child Maintenance Scheme collect and pay service.

Fees and charges are intended to encourage separated parents to collaborate where possible to achieve the best outcome for their children. The application fee is a one-off payment of £20 and is waived for clients aged 18 or under, or those who have reported domestic abuse. The Direct Pay service does not incur any on-going collection charges. Collection charges only apply when a case is being managed in the Collect and Pay service. The four per cent charge for receiving parents is deducted only when maintenance is paid.

On 03 August 2017, we published the outcome of a review of the impact of fees and charges. The evidence available did not indicate that charges were preventing parents from making an application, and the majority of parents found the fee affordable. Roughly half of parents stated that charges influenced their decision to try a direct pay arrangement first.

We have no plans to abolish the application fee or charges, both of which remain central to our aim of encouraging collaboration and incentivising use of the Direct Pay service.

13th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the frequency with which receiving parents are required to pay the £20 referral fee or the four per cent collect and pay charge when Child Maintenance Payments have not been made.

Fees and charges are intended to encourage separated parents to collaborate where possible to achieve the best outcome for their children. The application fee is a one-off payment of £20 and is waived for clients aged 18 or under, or those who have reported domestic abuse. The Direct Pay service does not incur any on-going collection charges. Collection charges only apply when a case is being managed in the Collect and Pay service. The four per cent charge for receiving parents is deducted only when maintenance is paid.

On 03 August 2017, we published the outcome of a review of the impact of fees and charges. The evidence available did not indicate that charges were preventing parents from making an application, and the majority of parents found the fee affordable. Roughly half of parents stated that charges influenced their decision to try a direct pay arrangement first.

We have no plans to abolish the application fee or charges, both of which remain central to our aim of encouraging collaboration and incentivising use of the Direct Pay service.

13th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the effect of the £20 referral fee and four per cent collect and pay charge levied on people using the collect and pay service for Child Maintenance Service payments.

Fees and charges are intended to encourage separated parents to collaborate where possible to achieve the best outcome for their children. The application fee is a one-off payment of £20 and is waived for clients aged 18 or under, or those who have reported domestic abuse. The Direct Pay service does not incur any on-going collection charges. Collection charges only apply when a case is being managed in the Collect and Pay service. The four per cent charge for receiving parents is deducted only when maintenance is paid.

On 03 August 2017, we published the outcome of a review of the impact of fees and charges. The evidence available did not indicate that charges were preventing parents from making an application, and the majority of parents found the fee affordable. Roughly half of parents stated that charges influenced their decision to try a direct pay arrangement first.

We have no plans to abolish the application fee or charges, both of which remain central to our aim of encouraging collaboration and incentivising use of the Direct Pay service.

6th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has taken steps to ensure that benefits claimants in financial hardship can obtain letters which are required to progress their claims from their GP without having to pay for such letters; and if she will make a statement.

We advise claimants not to seek additional evidence in support of their claim which they may be charged for, such as from GPs. Where an assessment provider determines that additional medical evidence from a GP could prove helpful they will request that evidence from the GP directly.

GPs are obliged through their contract with NHS England to provide the assessment provider with medical evidence for Employment and Support Allowance free-of-charge. For Personal Independence Payment, we pay GPs a standard fee (currently £33.50) for completing a General Practitioner Factual Report.

In the Government’s response to the Work and Pensions Select Committee report on Personal Independence Payment and Employment and Support Allowance Assessments we set out our commitment to continue improving the customer experience for both, including opportunities for better data sharing.

6th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what guidance is provided to Job Centre staff on the Equality Act 2010 duty to make reasonable adjustments to enable disabled people to progress their claims.

Comprehensive guidance for Jobcentre staff about the Equality Act 2010 is included on the Department’s intranet site ‘Equality and You – a guide for employees’. This includes advice for staff on understanding what reasonable adjustments are and why the Department has a duty to provide them for claimants who are disabled.

Where our customers advise us that they need assistance to access our services and information, we make reasonable adjustments to meet their individual needs. This means the Department communicates with customers in a variety of different formats such as Braille, audio, large print, through third party interpreters or by arranging for a member of staff to visit the customer in their home.

Service delivery teams within Jobcentres provide a professional and supportive environment for our customers, providing digital coaching, helping claimants set up their claims and also maintaining them.

Claimants who require additional support to complete a claim form have the option to book a one to one appointment with a member of the Service Delivery team to receive assistance. In addition telephony support is in place for those vulnerable claimants who cannot ‘self-serve’ online and where a claimant is unable to manage their own affairs, an appointee can act on their behalf, taking responsibility for making and maintaining any benefit claim.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that adults with schizophrenia and other permanent mental health conditions are made aware of their entitlement to claim the benefits to which they are entitled and assisted in making that claim.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has an established approach to providing information to all its potential customers through the use of information leaflets, which are widely available and on the Gov.uk website. The National Employer and Partnership Team work with national partners through the Operational Stakeholder Engagement Forum (OSEF). This group consisting of about 40 organisations also attend quarterly meetings to learn more about, and feedback on, current and proposed DWP policies and communication practices. Attendees are encouraged to circulate key messages from the meetings to their many local outlets.

We also, at a local level, work with a wide range of partners and customer advocates in identifying and providing an appropriate level of support to customers who are vulnerable, including those with mental health conditions.

DWP’s definition of vulnerability is “any individual who is identified as having complex needs and/or requires additional support to enable them to access DWP benefits and use our services” as being vulnerable. This definition ensures that we have consistency and continuity in the type and level of service which is being offered and that it supports the customer appropriately whatever their needs. Assistance to make a claim is available, this can be through additional support from our telephony agents, or through face to face support in our network of jobcentres or a home visit.

DWP adopts this approach at all points of contact with the customer and uses its records to ensure, to the best of its abilities, when individuals are identified as being vulnerable we take all reasonable steps to try to mitigate any risks.

When DWP Staff are satisfied the risk to the individual is significant and immediate they are explicitly empowered to act without consent to take all steps felt necessary to address significant and immediate risks to an individual’s welfare or safety.

Where DWP consider that any risk is not significant or immediate we will continue follow our established approach working with the individual and with consent, where necessary, contact any relevant organisations to provide the appropriate levels of support.

15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the merits of (a) splitting Norfolk & Suffolk Foundation Trust into separate trusts and (b) retaining that Trust as a single trust.

No comparative assessment has been made of the merits of splitting Norfolk and Suffolk Foundation Trust into separate trusts and retaining it as a single trust.


Norfolk and Suffolk Foundation Trust is committed to delivering improved services for its patients in Norfolk and Suffolk in line with the agreed local mental health strategies for children, adults and older people in Norfolk and Suffolk. It is working collaboratively with its National Health Service and local authority partners to strengthen the local accountability of services and ensure that they are developed in a more integrated way with other local providers, for the benefit of patients in both Norfolk and Suffolk.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether patient deaths reported to the National Reporting & Learning System by the Norfolk & Suffolk Foundation Trust in 2018-19 included deaths of those using addiction services.

The Trust reports deaths of patients who are accessing their services, or who have been discharged from these services within the last six months if there is evidence of a patient safety incident. This would include patients who are also known to partner services, such as addiction services.

The Trust adheres to the National Reporting and Learning System (NRLS) guidance as outlined within the Degree of Harm document available on the NHS Improvement website which specifically highlights “deaths from drugs and alcohol”. This is available at the following link:

https://improvement.nhs.uk/documents/1673/NRLS_Degree_of_harm_FAQs_-_final_v1.1.pdf

The guidance directs organisations to consider whether there is immediate evidence of a patient safety incident. If not, then no report would be made. However if further evidence comes to light, or post Coroner’s inquest, the cause of death is identified as a patient safety incident, the organisation would at this point make a report to the NRLS.

Nadine Dorries
Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
6th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the workforce implementation plan will include the level of investment required to fund proposed increases in NHS staffing levels.

A final workforce implementation plan will be published later in the year, taking into account the outcomes of the Spending Review.

We recognise the importance of workforce training to underpin effective long-term National Health Service planning. That is why we have already made commitments in this Spending Review into the next Spending Review period – for example on medical training places. At the forthcoming Spending Review, we will consider proposals from the NHS for a multi-year funding plan for clinical training places, based on the workforce requirements of the NHS plan.

6th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions his Department has had with officials from other Departments on the availability and price of fresh fruit and vegetables in UK shops to support its healthy eating policies.

There are ongoing discussions between officials in the Department of Health and Social Care and other Government departments on improving the nation’s health and wellbeing, including improving diets. These include formal monthly and quarterly meetings as part of the governance of the childhood obesity programme.

4th Dec 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason there has been a reduction in the per-placement funding support for the nursing degree course at the University of Suffolk.

Placement funding for nursing degree courses is paid to placement providers by Health Education England in line with a nationally agreed tariff price. The tariff payment rate has not changed since April 2017 and remains fixed at £3,112 per year for each whole time equivalent placement.

Tariff payments also attract a market forces factor payment, an additional payment to compensate for unavoidable cost differences between healthcare providers, based on their geographical location.

6th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department has provided to Clinical Commissioning Groups on charging for letters which patients require in order to progress benefits claims.

Under the terms of their contracts, as set out in National Health Service (General Medical Services (GMS) Contracts) and (Personal Medical Services (PMS) Agreements) Regulations 2015), general practitioners (GPs) must provide medical certificates to prove incapacity to work free of charge and cannot charge their registered patients for anything other than specific items as set out in the PMS Regulations. This includes some letters and medical reports, such as private sick notes or immunisations in connection with travel abroad.

GPs must provide these statements of incapacity to professionals working for the Health Assessment Advisory Service (part of the Department for Work and Pensions) when requested. If other statutory bodies are requesting this information to support a benefits claim, GPs are entitled to charge for this information, but the body requesting it must pay this charge rather than the patient.

6th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his department has made of the (a) level of and (b) reasons for the variation between Clinical Commissioning Groups in the prescription of continuous glucose monitors for young people suffering from type 1 diabetes.

The Department has made no assessment. Ultimately it is for clinical commissioning groups, who are primarily responsible for commissioning diabetes services, to meet the requirements of their population. In doing so, they need to ensure that the services they provide are fit for purpose, reflect the needs of the local population, including young people, are based on the available evidence and take into account national guidelines.

6th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department has taken to ensure that medically unqualified staff do not make additions to patients' medical notes.

In 2016, the Information Governance Alliance published the NHS Records Management Code of Practice which sets out what people working with, or in, National Health Service organisations in England need to do to manage records correctly.

The Code of Practice is based on current legal requirements and professional best practice. It includes advice that each NHS organisation should have an overall policy statement on how it manages all its records, including electronic records.

It is the responsibility of each NHS organisation to ensure that staff are assigned access to patient records based on their role in the organisation and that, where appropriate, they should document their actions and decisions in patients’ records.

6th Nov 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department has issued on which people are authorised to make notes on a patient's medical record.

In 2016, the Information Governance Alliance published the NHS Records Management Code of Practice which sets out what people working with, or in, National Health Service organisations in England need to do to manage records correctly.

The Code of Practice is based on current legal requirements and professional best practice. It includes advice that each NHS organisation should have an overall policy statement on how it manages all its records, including electronic records.

It is the responsibility of each NHS organisation to ensure that staff are assigned access to patient records based on their role in the organisation and that, where appropriate, they should document their actions and decisions in patients’ records.

12th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the (a) effectiveness of local authority health scrutiny committees and (b) ability of those committees to identify decisions and practices in the local health sector which have subsequently been changed.

Local government plays a vital role in planning local health services and in scrutinising the local National Health Service’s plans for the delivery and the improvement of those services. Members are accountable to their electorate for their actions, and guidance and support is available to help them. The Independent Reconfiguration Panel is also available to help scrutiny committee’s oversight of the NHS.

19th Jul 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure that food products which are contaminated with listeria are more easily identified and prevented from being put on sale to the public.

A range of measures operate to minimise the risk of consumers eating food products contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Legislation provides measures to be taken by food manufactures producing specific food products. This includes product safety testing. Local authorities also undertake sampling to detect non-compliant products. Risk assessment and risk management capabilities, including removal of contaminated food products from the market, also operate.

The Food Standards Agency also issues advice to those most at risk from Listeriosis on foods that due to their inherent risk and the probability of contamination with Listeria should be avoided.

27th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the potential benefits to public health of increasing the funding of the NHS above four per cent per annum in real terms.

The Government is committed to supporting the National Health Service. As part of the new long-term plan for the NHS, the Government has announced plans for a five-year budget settlement. By 2023/24, the NHS will receive increased funding of £20.5 billion in real terms per year compared to today – an average increase of 3.4% per year overall.

In relation to public health, the Government recognises the role these services play in managing demand for health services and improving people’s wellbeing, including through action taken by local authorities. Decisions on investment in public health functions from this settlement are subject to the development of the long-term NHS plan, which will be brought forward through close working between the NHS and Government, in consultation with patients and the public.

The Department has not made an assessment of the potential benefits to the health of the public of increasing the funding of the NHS above 4% per year in real terms.

Steve Barclay
Minister for the Cabinet Office and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster
7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, assessment he has made of trends in the level of children with Type 1 diabetes who experience a serious medial episode in a school environment in each of the last five years.

No assessment has taken place, and no data regarding the number of children with Type 1 diabetes experiencing a serious medical episode in a school environment is centrally held.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what research his Department has commissioned on the efficacy of surgically implanted glucose monitoring devices for people with Type 1 diabetes.

The Department, through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), has not commissioned any research on the efficacy of surgically implanted glucose monitoring devices for people with Type 1 diabetes.

The Department’s NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including diabetes; it is not usual practice to ring-fence funds for particular topics or conditions. Applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what assessment he has made of the efficacy of surgically implanted glucose sensors as a method for controlling Type 1 diabetes.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has not undertaken an evaluation of the clinical effectiveness of surgically implanted glucose sensors.

Treatments may be brought into routine use in the National Health Service after their efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness have been appropriately demonstrated. NICE is responsible for assessing new technologies and interventional procedures, as well as producing guidelines for best practice of treatment and care.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to encourage Clinical Commissioning Groups to recommend the prescription of surgically implanted glucose sensors for the management of Type 1 diabetes.

Surgically implanted glucose sensors are not currently available for prescribing in primary care. To be available for prescribing, a medical device must be listed in Part IX of the England and Wales Drug Tariff.

Any device made available for prescribing to patients through listing in Part IX is required to meet set criteria, namely that the product is safe and of good quality, it is appropriate for general practice and, if relevant, non-medical prescribing, and it is cost effective.

The NHS Business Services Authority carries out the assessment of Part IX applications by manufacturers on behalf of the Secretary of State for Health, for prescribing at National Health Service expense by an appropriate practitioner. However, the listing of a medical device in the Drug Tariff should not be interpreted as a recommendation to prescribe a particular product.

Within its financial constraints, the NHS is committed to providing access to new drugs and medical technologies. Ultimately it is for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), who are primarily responsible for commissioning diabetes services, to meet the requirements of their population. In doing so, CCGs need to ensure that the services they provide are fit for purpose, reflect the needs of the local population and are based on the available evidence and take into account national guidelines.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what comparative assessment his Department has made of the cost of treatment for (a) comas and (b) other severe episodes of Type 1 diabetes and the cost of surgically implanted glucose monitoring devices.

There is no comparative assessment on the cost of treatment for either comas or other severe episodes of Type 1 diabetes, or on the cost of surgically implanted glucose monitoring devices.

Treatments may be brought into routine use in the National Health Service after their cost-effectiveness has been appropriately demonstrated. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is responsible for assessing new technologies and interventional procedures.

7th Dec 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what advice his Department has given to the Department for Education on the development of policies in schools to support pupils with Type 1 diabetes.

The Department and its arm’s length bodies maintain a continuous dialogue with colleagues across government on a range of issues, including how best to meet the health needs of schoolchildren.

It is important that children with medical conditions such as diabetes are supported appropriately. Governing bodies of maintained schools and proprietors of academies in England work within the guidance agreed between Department of Health and Department for Education for schools in 2014 (and reviewed since) on their responsibilities for supporting children and young people in school who have a health condition, including managing their access to medicines, and other adjustments necessary to maintain their health and wellbeing while at school. This includes supporting children with diabetes.

16th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to access the potential merit of using deprivation factors in the formula for funding GP surgeries.

The Department recognises the importance of deprivation factors. NHS England is working with the British Medical Association to review the Carr-Hill funding formula and ensure that distribution of funding takes into account, as far as possible, key factors that increase demand for primary medical care services.

Evidence shows that people in deprived communities are likely to have an increased need for primary medical care and this is reflected in the existing formula. This important consideration will continue to be a key factor in any future changes.

7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that people who have been returned to their homes on condition of receiving medication after having been detained under the Mental Health Act 1983 do proceed to take that medication.

Decisions around the continuing treatment of patients who are or who have been subject to the Mental Health Act 1983 are a matter for clinicians.

Community Treatment Orders (CTOs), introduced by The Mental Health Act 2007, may be used in certain circumstances when a patient’s responsible clinician and an Approved Mental Health Professional agree that the risk of harm arising from the patient’s disorder is sufficiently serious to justify having the power to recall the person to hospital. These Orders may include a condition that a patient complies with arrangements made to ensure that he or she continues to receive medical treatment for their mental illness.

The responsible clinician may recall a patient on a CTO to hospital for treatment if the patient needs to receive treatment for mental disorder in hospital; or if there would be a risk of harm to the health or safety of the patient or to other persons if the patient were not recalled. The fact that the patient has failed to comply with a treatment condition can be taken into account when deciding whether to recall the patient.

Restricted patients are offenders who are detained in hospital for mental health treatment and who are subject to special controls by the Secretary of State for Justice. For these patients, Section 41 of the Mental Health Act 1983 provides for a “restriction order” which operates like a community section. This means that restricted patients who are conditionally discharged can be supervised in the community generally by a psychiatrist and a social worker, with a number of conditions imposed. The Secretary of State for Justice has a broad power of recall that applies to any conditionally discharged restricted patient. A condition of such a discharge may be compliance with treatment, on a voluntary basis, provided the patient has capacity to give consent.

Non-compliance with medication will lead to consideration of recall. Whether a recall takes place will, of course, turn on the circumstances of the particular case.

3rd Oct 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of taxpayers working for a single employer under a Loan Charge scheme who would not have had the choice of being employed directly by that employer.

Disguised remuneration (DR) schemes are contrived arrangements that use loan payments in place of ordinary remuneration, usually through an offshore trust, with the purpose of avoiding income tax and National Insurance contributions. The loans are provided on terms that mean they are not repaid in practice. HM Revenue and Customs’ (HMRC) position is that they are no different to income, and that they are and have always been taxable.

The Government has heard claims that some individuals were compelled to use DR schemes, but HMRC have not seen cases that support this claim.

17th Jul 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential (a) financial and (b) environmental merits of an incineration tax for household waste.

A number of respondents to last year’s call for evidence on single use plastic waste suggested that an incineration tax could discourage incineration and promote more environmentally beneficial forms of waste management.

At Budget 2018, the Chancellor announced that he would not at this point be taking forward a tax on the incineration of waste. However, should wider policies not deliver the government’s waste ambitions, government will consider the introduction of such a tax, in conjunction with landfill tax, taking account of the possible impacts on local authorities.

17th Jul 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on revenue of a tax on virgin materials including on plastics.

At Budget 2018, the government announced its intention to tackle the scourge of single-use plastic waste through the introduction of a new tax on plastic packaging which does not contain a sufficient amount of recycled content, taking effect from April 2022. This world-leading new tax will provide a clear economic incentive for businesses to use more recycled material in the production of packaging, instead of using virgin plastic. It will achieve similar objectives to a tax on virgin plastics, but in a more targeted and effective way.

Earlier this year, the government launched a consultation seeking views on the initial proposed design for the tax. This closed in May and the government intends to publish a summary of responses in due course.

10th Jul 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps have been taken to ensure customers of Ariste Holding Ltd trading as Cash Genie are able to receive the compensation awarded by the Financial Conduct Authority following the company's voluntary liquidation.

This is a matter for the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which is operationally independent from Government. The question has been passed on to the FCA. The FCA will reply directly to the member for Ipswich by letter. A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Jul 2019
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to ensure that compensation awarded by the FCA from a financial company to their customers cannot be avoided by the company entering voluntary insolvency.

This is a matter for the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which is operationally independent from Government. The question has been passed on to the FCA. The FCA will reply directly to the member for Ipswich by letter. A copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

John Glen
Economic Secretary (HM Treasury)
3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that local businesses remain tax compliant after Ipswich compliance staff have been moved to Stratford.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is transforming into a tax authority fit for the future. It will be located in every region and country of the UK in 13 regional centres, five specialist sites, a head office in London and eight transitional sites.

HMRC has announced its clear intention to retain Haven House, Ipswich, as one of these transitional sites until 2027-28. From 2028, it will remain open as a long-term specialist site for HMRC’s Risk and Intelligence Service. Workforce plans continue to evolve but HMRC will retain a significant presence in Ipswich.

Moving to regional centres will save around £300 million up to 2025. The Programme will deliver annual cash savings of £74 million in 2025-26, rising to around £90 million from 2028.

HMRC recognises the importance of continuity of services to the taxpayer as it moves to the regional centre model. It is minimising disruption by spreading the changes over a number of years. Moves will be phased, avoiding business peaks, and supported with carefully considered migration paths for staff.

Regional centres underpin HMRC’s wider transformation plans. Co-locating teams in large, modern offices will allow it to manage its workforce more flexibly making it easier to share resources and work collaboratively. Compliance teams will be able to work together to tackle fraud and evasion irrespective of where it occurs. Mobile compliance taskforces operate throughout the UK, visiting customers wherever they are located.

HMRC’s People Equality Impact Assessment, published in June, explains the support HMRC has put in place to minimise the potential impacts of its location strategy on staff, including those with protected characteristics, and makes it clear which risks it needs to monitor most closely.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of whether there will be any disruption to the collection of taxes as a result of the translocation of staff from Ipswich to Stratford.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is transforming into a tax authority fit for the future. It will be located in every region and country of the UK in 13 regional centres, five specialist sites, a head office in London and eight transitional sites.

HMRC has announced its clear intention to retain Haven House, Ipswich, as one of these transitional sites until 2027-28. From 2028, it will remain open as a long-term specialist site for HMRC’s Risk and Intelligence Service. Workforce plans continue to evolve but HMRC will retain a significant presence in Ipswich.

Moving to regional centres will save around £300 million up to 2025. The Programme will deliver annual cash savings of £74 million in 2025-26, rising to around £90 million from 2028.

HMRC recognises the importance of continuity of services to the taxpayer as it moves to the regional centre model. It is minimising disruption by spreading the changes over a number of years. Moves will be phased, avoiding business peaks, and supported with carefully considered migration paths for staff.

Regional centres underpin HMRC’s wider transformation plans. Co-locating teams in large, modern offices will allow it to manage its workforce more flexibly making it easier to share resources and work collaboratively. Compliance teams will be able to work together to tackle fraud and evasion irrespective of where it occurs. Mobile compliance taskforces operate throughout the UK, visiting customers wherever they are located.

HMRC’s People Equality Impact Assessment, published in June, explains the support HMRC has put in place to minimise the potential impacts of its location strategy on staff, including those with protected characteristics, and makes it clear which risks it needs to monitor most closely.

3rd Sep 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what additional costs will accrue to HMRC as a result of locating staff in Stratford and not Ipswich.

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) is transforming into a tax authority fit for the future. It will be located in every region and country of the UK in 13 regional centres, five specialist sites, a head office in London and eight transitional sites.

HMRC has announced its clear intention to retain Haven House, Ipswich, as one of these transitional sites until 2027-28. From 2028, it will remain open as a long-term specialist site for HMRC’s Risk and Intelligence Service. Workforce plans continue to evolve but HMRC will retain a significant presence in Ipswich.

Moving to regional centres will save around £300 million up to 2025. The Programme will deliver annual cash savings of £74 million in 2025-26, rising to around £90 million from 2028.

HMRC recognises the importance of continuity of services to the taxpayer as it moves to the regional centre model. It is minimising disruption by spreading the changes over a number of years. Moves will be phased, avoiding business peaks, and supported with carefully considered migration paths for staff.

Regional centres underpin HMRC’s wider transformation plans. Co-locating teams in large, modern offices will allow it to manage its workforce more flexibly making it easier to share resources and work collaboratively. Compliance teams will be able to work together to tackle fraud and evasion irrespective of where it occurs. Mobile compliance taskforces operate throughout the UK, visiting customers wherever they are located.

HMRC’s People Equality Impact Assessment, published in June, explains the support HMRC has put in place to minimise the potential impacts of its location strategy on staff, including those with protected characteristics, and makes it clear which risks it needs to monitor most closely.

6th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of 6 February 2019 by the hon. Member for Ipswich, whether the Home Office guidance in respect of the EEA E10 residence card will be altered to allow spouses of British citizens who obtained their E10 card in other EEA countries to benefit from the tenancy of properties in the UK.

Article 10 residence cards issued by other EEA member states help to demonstrate a right of entry into the UK for a third country national family member of an EEA citizen, or the family member of a British citizen who has previously been exercising EU Treaty rights in another EEA member state. However, these cards do not provide conclusive evidence that the person has a right to reside in the UK for the purpose of statutory eligibility checks within the UK, including those conducted by landlords and lettings agents. We will review our guidance to landlords and lettings agents to ensure they have clarity on how to establish the status of prospective tenants in these circumstances.

The simplest and most effective way for a non-EEA family member to demonstrate their entitlement to a wide range of services and benefits when they are resident in the UK is to apply for a UK residence card. Once a residence card application is submitted to the Home Office, a landlord or employer can confirm the person’s right to rent or work in the UK by using the Home Office Checking Service, whilst the application is pending; confirmation is provided within two working days enabling landlords or employers to comply with statutory checks required by immigration law.

24th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people who were resident in Ipswich constituency have been deported from the UK since 2011.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The Home Secretary has committed to regularly updating the Home Affairs Select Committee on the results of the Department's review of all removals and immigration detentions, dating back to 2002, of Caribbean nationals now aged over 45 (i.e. born before 1.1.73), to establish whether any could have entered the UK prior to 1973 and therefore might be protected by the 1971 Act.

24th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of the people deported from Ipswich constituency since 2011 were deemed to be citizens of other Commonwealth countries.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The Home Secretary has committed to regularly updating the Home Affairs Select Committee on the results of the Department's review of all removals and immigration detentions, dating back to 2002, of Caribbean nationals now aged over 45 (i.e. born before 1.1.73), to establish whether any could have entered the UK prior to 1973 and therefore might be protected by the 1971 Act.

24th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many of those Commonwealth citizens deported from Ipswich constituency since 2011 are now covered by the Government’s assurances in respect of the Windrush generation.

The information requested is not readily available and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The Home Secretary has committed to regularly updating the Home Affairs Select Committee on the results of the Department's review of all removals and immigration detentions, dating back to 2002, of Caribbean nationals now aged over 45 (i.e. born before 1.1.73), to establish whether any could have entered the UK prior to 1973 and therefore might be protected by the 1971 Act.

24th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the Government plans to review its policy on compensation for war widows who have already surrendered a pension on remarriage or cohabitation; and if she will make a statement.

We recognise the unique commitment that Service families make to our country and remain sympathetic to the circumstances of this group of widows. The case for the reinstatement of War Widows' Pensions for those widows who had remarried or cohabited before 1 April 2015 is being considered.

15th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department plans to take to ensure that (a) charities and (b) community interest companies that have contracts with local authorities have an adequate level of unrestricted funding to continue to fulfill their core functions.

Local authorities have been outsourcing and using shared service arrangements for many decades. Almost all councils have some service areas provided externally, with varying contract management arrangements.

Local authorities are accountable to local people, and it is for them to determine how best to deliver effective services for their communities. Decisions over tendering and contracts are for councils to make, following their own due diligence process.

Next year’s settlement for local government responds to the pressures councils are facing by providing access to the largest increase Core Spending Power since 2015, an estimated 4.3 per cent real terms increase of £2.9 billion.

3rd Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department will take steps to ensure that people who present as homeless to a local authority are found accommodation in that local authority area.

We are clear that local authorities should, as far as possible, avoid placing households out of their borough. However, in some areas where there is a limited supply of suitable accommodation, we are aware that it is sometimes necessary to place households in accommodation outside of the local area. This is set out in legislation and guidance which local authorities must have regard to.

The guidance is clear that where possible the authority should seek to retain established links with schools, doctors, social workers and other key services and support.

If a local authority places a household into accommodation in another local area, they are required by law to notify the local authority of any placement, to minimise disruption to schooling, healthcare and other support. In July the previous Homelessness Minister, Heather Wheeler MP, wrote to all local authorities to remind them of the need to send notifications when placing families out of their area.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many dwellings in planning class C3 have been converted to houses of multiple occupancy class C4 without a planning application since the change to regulations on 1 October 2010.

The Government has no plans to remove the permitted development rights that allow for change of use between class C(3) dwelling houses and a class C(4) houses in multiple occupation. We do not hold data on the number of dwelling houses that have converted to houses in multiple occupation since 1 October 2010. Paragraph 53 of the National Planning Policy Framework confirms that the use of Article 4 directions to remove national permitted development rights should be limited to situations where it is necessary to protect local amenity or the well-being of the area.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department has any plans to revert to the regulatory regime for planning consent for small houses of multiple occupancy that pertained from 6 April 2010 to 30 September 2010.

The Government has no plans to remove the permitted development rights that allow for change of use between class C(3) dwelling houses and a class C(4) houses in multiple occupation. We do not hold data on the number of dwelling houses that have converted to houses in multiple occupation since 1 October 2010. Paragraph 53 of the National Planning Policy Framework confirms that the use of Article 4 directions to remove national permitted development rights should be limited to situations where it is necessary to protect local amenity or the well-being of the area.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to enable and encourage local authorities to adopt article 4 directions in respect of houses of multiple occupation by making that process more efficient.

The Government has no plans to remove the permitted development rights that allow for change of use between class C(3) dwelling houses and a class C(4) houses in multiple occupation. We do not hold data on the number of dwelling houses that have converted to houses in multiple occupation since 1 October 2010. Paragraph 53 of the National Planning Policy Framework confirms that the use of Article 4 directions to remove national permitted development rights should be limited to situations where it is necessary to protect local amenity or the well-being of the area.

Kit Malthouse
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice) (jointly with Home Office)
7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to provide supportive housing for adults with learning disabilities whose parents have died or who are unable to care for their children on account of age or infirmity.

Supported housing plays an invaluable role in our society, helping some of our country’s most vulnerable people, including many adults with learning disabilities, to live as independently as possible. Since 2011, we have delivered 27,000 supported housing units for disabled, vulnerable and older people. At the Autumn Statement 2015, we announced £400 million of new specialist affordable homes for the vulnerable, elderly or those with disabilities.

In addition to the work of my Department, the Department of Health has made available, through the Care and Support Specialised (CASSH) Fund, approximately £200 million to fund about 6,000 new homes, including for older people; those with learning and physical disabilities; and mental ill health.

The Department of Health is also working with colleagues in NHS England on the Transforming Care Programme. The programme aims to ensure that people with learning disabilities and/or autism, mental illness or challenging behaviour are not kept in hospitals but are cared for in line with best practice, based on their individual needs. This is in addition to the £25 million capital fund for housing and technology to support people with a learning disability to live independently. Funding has been awarded to 52 separate projects in the 2016/17 and 2017/18 financial years.

Government is also helping older and disabled people to live independently and safely at home through the Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG), which can contribute towards meeting the cost of adapting an older or disabled person's property, including people with learning disabilities. In the 2015 Spending Review DFG funding received year-on-year increases and will more than double from £220 million in 2015-16 to over £500 million by 2020.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to identify the number of private renters who are evicted for rent arrears and in receipt of local housing allowance; and if he will make a statement.

The Department does not hold information on evictions for rent arrears.

Marcus Jones
Comptroller (HM Household) (Whip, House of Commons)
14th Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of the regulation of the bailiff industry, following the call for evidence that the Government announced in Autumn 2018; and what options for regulatory reform the Government is considering in that sector.

In a statement on 22 July, the Government set out its initial response to the call for evidence on the enforcement agent reforms.

We intend to make body-worn cameras mandatory for private enforcement agents and the complaints system more effective. We are also considering strengthening regulation of the industry.

My officials have since met a range of interested parties. We hope to set out our proposals for further reform as soon as possible.

Chris Philp
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport)
18th Apr 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will bring forward legislative proposals for the provision of legal aid for expatriates that have returned to the UK with their children after fleeing domestic abuse from their partners while abroad.

The Government is absolutely clear that victims of domestic abuse must have access to the help that they need, including access to legal aid.

Legal aid remains available for some private family proceedings where there is evidence of domestic abuse. To qualify for legal aid in a private family matter, applicants must provide evidence that they are a victim of, or at risk of being a victim of domestic violence or child abuse as well as meet the means and merits criteria.

The availability of legal aid is dependent on the type of legal proceedings and expatriates are not excluded.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
21st Mar 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will take steps to allocate additional resources to reduce the waiting time for a tribunal hearing for employment and support allowance in Ipswich.

In the last 12 months we have allocated 7 judges to Ipswich as primary or secondary venue, 2 medical members and 2 Disability Qualified Panel Members (DQPMs)

In Norfolk and Suffolk there is a pool of 6 staff who are deployed to clerk the SSCS hearing venues which are situated in Ipswich, Kings Lynn and Norwich. An additional member of staff will be joining this team from the 1st April 2019 to facilitate additional hearings to be held in Norfolk and Suffolk, subject to judicial availability.

The Ministry of Justice recognises there are delays in the system and it is in the process of recruiting more Judicial office holders in order to increase capacity and help to reduce waiting times for appellants. In the Social Security and Child Support (SSCS) jurisdiction, 225 new medical members have already been appointed and 119 disability qualified members have recently been recruited. The SSCS jurisdiction will also benefit from the fact that 250 fee-paid judges and 100 salaried judges are being recruited across tribunals more widely. In addition, we have recently launched a new digital service to enable speedier processing of appeals and provide a better service for all parties to the proceedings. Information on the new digital service can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-online-service-launched-for-pip-appeal

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to ensure an adequate level of legal support and advice to provide for the projected increase in unaccompanied child asylum seekers dispersed to Ipswich under the National Transfer Scheme.

The LAA will shortly complete the procurement process for new civil legal contracts which included immigration advice. The majority of contracts commenced on 1 September 2018 however there are still a small number of contracts that have not yet commenced.

Once the procurement process is completed the LAA will assess whether there are any gaps in provision and what steps need to be taken to fill the gaps. We are aware of the concerns raised in relation to access in the East of England and have had this under review for some time. This is one of the first areas that we will consider once all the contracts have started.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the Legal Aid Agency plans to provide contracts for immigration legal aid to advisers in Ipswich.

The LAA will shortly complete the procurement process for new civil legal contracts which included immigration advice. The majority of contracts commenced on 1 September 2018 however there are still a small number of contracts that have not yet commenced.

Once the procurement process is completed the LAA will assess whether there are any gaps in provision and what steps need to be taken to fill the gaps. We are aware of the concerns raised in relation to access in the East of England and have had this under review for some time. This is one of the first areas that we will consider once all the contracts have started.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Sep 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has plans to introduce independent regulation for the bailiff industry in order to prevent the use of aggressive and intimidating behaviour.

The Government intends to launch a call for evidence in the Autumn, to evaluate the enforcement agent reforms introduced by the Tribunals, Court and Enforcement Act 2007. Evidence received from the call for evidence will be used to inform our assessment of the current regulation of the industry, and options for further reform.

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
24th May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will review funding for rape crisis centres and make an assessment implications for (a) the perceived independence and (b) the advocacy role of those centres of financial dependence on police and crime commissioners.

The Government is committed to ensuring that victims of crime get the support they need to cope with and, as far as possible, recover from the effects of crime. Under the 2016-2020 Violence Against Women and Girls strategy, the Government made a commitment to maintain funding for rape support services at 2016/17 levels for the remainder of the spending review period and we continue to meet that commitment.

In 2017/18 we allocated around £7.2m to 99 independent Rape Support services across England and Wales to provide specialist support to female and male victims of sexual violence, including victims of child sexual abuse.

In 2017/18 we allocated Police and Crime Commissioners around £68m funding to commission or provide support services to meet the needs of victims of crime in their local areas, including victims of sexual violence.

Rape Support Centres receive funding from a range of sources, including the government, Police and Crime Commissioners, charitable trusts and foundations, and the National Health Service.

5th Mar 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate his Department has made of the number of child custody cases heard in court (a) prior to and (b) since the removal of legal aid for early advice per year.

The Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO) came into force in April 2013.

A new form of child arrangements order was introduced on 22 April 2014 to replace the former separate contact and residence orders (formerly known as “access” and “custody” respectively).

The number of applications made for a residence order, or a child arrangements order making provision for a child’s residence in England Wales, since 2011 is shown in the table below.

Number of private law applications for a residence order or child arrangements order making provision for a child’s residence in England and Wales since 2011

Year

Number of applications

2011

23, 187

2012

23, 838

2013

23, 568

2014

17, 820

2015

15, 766

2016

17, 552

Lucy Frazer
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
7th Nov 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2017 to Question 7534, on legal aid scheme, whether he has looked more widely at the impact of recent policy changes on access to legal aid; and whether his Department will be taking steps to ensure that people in all regions can access legal aid providers.

On 30 October, the Lord Chancellor announced the commencement of the post-implementation review of the legal aid changes made by, and following, the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012. The review will look at the impact of recent policy changes on access to legal aid.

The Legal Aid Agency regularly review the capacity of the legal aid market to cope with demand for legal aid and take action where a regional shortfall develops.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
4th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that people in all regions can access legal aid providers.

The Legal Aid Agency regularly review the capacity of the legal aid market to cope with demand for legal aid and take urgent action where a regional shortfall develops.

I also intend to look more widely at the impact of recent policy changes on access to legal aid as part of a forthcoming post-implementation review, on which I hope to say more shortly.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
3rd Oct 2019
To ask the Leader of the House, which of the 48 remaining orders and notices listed on the Order Paper for Monday 30 September 2019 will be carried over into a subsequent session of Parliament following any prorogation of the current session.

I refer the Hon member to paragraph 8.6 of Erskine May, which sets out the effect of prorogation on business. Erskine May is now available online and paragraph 8.6 can be viewed at https://erskinemay.parliament.uk/section/6499/effect-of-prorogation/. Any primary legislation that has been subject to a carry-over motion agreed by the House will be carried over into the second session.

Jacob Rees-Mogg
Lord President of the Council and Leader of the House of Commons