Neil Parish Portrait

Neil Parish

Conservative - Former Member for Tiverton and Honiton

Neil Parish is not a member of any APPGs
8 Former APPG memberships
Cider, Energy Studies, Global Deforestation, Rural Services, Swimming, Water, Wood Panel Industry, Zimbabwe
Liaison Committee (Commons)
20th May 2020 - 5th May 2022
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
27th Jan 2020 - 4th May 2022
Liaison Committee Sub-committee on the effectiveness and influence of the select committee system
13th Feb 2019 - 6th Nov 2019
National Policy Statements Sub-Committee
13th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Policy Statements Sub-Committee 2017-19
13th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Liaison Committee (Commons)
6th Nov 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2017 - 6th Nov 2019
National Policy Statements Sub-Committee
20th Feb 2017 - 3rd May 2017
Liaison Committee (Commons)
10th Sep 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
18th Jun 2015 - 3rd May 2017
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Sub-Committee
14th Oct 2015 - 22nd Mar 2017
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee
12th Jul 2010 - 30th Mar 2015


Division Voting information

Neil Parish has voted in 2298 divisions, and 27 times against the majority of their Party.

9 Feb 2021 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 13 Conservative No votes vs 341 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 351 Noes - 276
12 Oct 2020 - Agriculture Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 14 Conservative No votes vs 327 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 332 Noes - 279
20 Jul 2020 - Trade Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative Aye votes vs 323 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 263 Noes - 326
13 May 2020 - Remote Division result: New Clause 2 - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 22 Conservative Aye votes vs 326 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 277 Noes - 328
9 Apr 2019 - Section 1 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019 - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 97 Conservative No votes vs 131 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 420 Noes - 110
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 110 Conservative Aye votes vs 190 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 123 Noes - 488
3 Apr 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 95 Conservative Aye votes vs 203 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 105 Noes - 509
27 Mar 2019 - EU: Withdrawal and Future Relationship Votes - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 59 Conservative Aye votes vs 200 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 65 Noes - 377
14 Mar 2019 - UK’s Withdrawal from the European Union - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 112 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 412 Noes - 202
15 Jan 2019 - European Union (Withdrawal) Act - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 23 Conservative Aye votes vs 282 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 24 Noes - 600
11 Mar 2015 - Ark Pension Schemes - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 103 Conservative No votes vs 122 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 113
23 Feb 2015 - Serious Crime Bill [Lords] - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 78 Conservative No votes vs 151 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 201 Noes - 292
24 Nov 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 47 Conservative Aye votes vs 117 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 204 Noes - 125
24 Nov 2014 - Recall of MPs Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 71 Conservative Aye votes vs 85 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 119 Noes - 193
18 Nov 2014 - Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 18 Conservative Aye votes vs 235 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 284 Noes - 269
5 Mar 2014 - Judgments - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 360 Noes - 104
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of Births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative No votes vs 124 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 363 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Registration of births, deaths and marriages etc - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 83 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 366 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 367 Noes - 100
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 84 Conservative No votes vs 123 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 365 Noes - 103
5 Mar 2014 - Marriage - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 79 Conservative No votes vs 126 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 368 Noes - 98
26 Jun 2013 - High Speed Rail (Preparation) Bill - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 20 Conservative Aye votes vs 197 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 37 Noes - 325
11 Jul 2012 - Sittings of the House - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 39 Conservative Aye votes vs 167 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 205 Noes - 228
24 Oct 2011 - National Referendum on the European Union - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 81 Conservative Aye votes vs 209 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 111 Noes - 483
22 Jun 2011 - Smoking in Private Vehicles - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and in line with the House
One of 13 Conservative Aye votes vs 53 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 78 Noes - 66
15 Dec 2010 - Loans to Ireland Bill (Allocation of Time) - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 12 Conservative No votes vs 246 Conservative Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 293 Noes - 22
15 Jun 2010 - Backbench Business Committee - View Vote Context
Neil Parish voted Aye - against a party majority and against the House
One of 75 Conservative Aye votes vs 188 Conservative No votes
Tally: Ayes - 171 Noes - 263
View All Neil Parish Division Votes

All Debates

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
George Eustice (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
(69 debate interactions)
David Rutley (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
(25 debate interactions)
Rebecca Pow (Conservative)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
(24 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
HM Treasury
(109 debate contributions)
Department for Transport
(91 debate contributions)
Cabinet Office
(60 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
View all Neil Parish's debates

Latest EDMs signed by Neil Parish

25th February 2022
Neil Parish signed this EDM on Wednesday 16th March 2022

Support for the pig farming industry

Tabled by: Helen Morgan (Liberal Democrat - North Shropshire)
That this House recognises the huge benefits the domestic pig farming industry brings to the United Kingdom; celebrates that the industry is worth £655 million to the British economy; acknowledges that farmers have been paying the price for problems in the supply chain; further notes that these problems are avoidable; …
9 signatures
(Most recent: 27 Apr 2022)
Signatures by party:
Liberal Democrat: 5
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
Conservative: 2
25th November 2021
Neil Parish signed this EDM on Thursday 2nd December 2021

Conduct of councillors towards town and parish council clerks

Tabled by: Julian Lewis (Conservative - New Forest East)
That this House notes with deep concern convincing evidence collected by the Association of Local Council Clerks showing that, far from being untypical, the toxic behaviour by Parish Councillors in Cheshire exposed online in December 2020, is endemic in a significant minority of Town and Parish Councils; deplores the departure …
13 signatures
(Most recent: 25 Apr 2022)
Signatures by party:
Conservative: 4
Liberal Democrat: 4
Labour: 3
Democratic Unionist Party: 2
View All Neil Parish's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Neil Parish, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


2 Urgent Questions tabled by Neil Parish

Tuesday 22nd May 2018
Thursday 22nd February 2018

1 Adjournment Debate led by Neil Parish

Monday 22nd June 2020

Neil Parish has not introduced any legislation before Parliament


126 Written Questions

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
11 Other Department Questions
25th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, whether the Levelling Up White Paper will include plans to take specific and targeted steps to realise the social and economic potential of the countryside.

Levelling up means empowering local leaders and communities to seize their own destiny; boosting living standards, particularly where they are lower; spreading opportunity and improving public services, particularly where they are weak; and restoring local pride across the UK.

The UK Government recognises that each place and geography is different, and is committed through the Levelling Up White Paper to fulfil the social and economic potential of all places and geographies across the UK by building on their individual strengths and opportunities.

More details are set out in the White Paper which was published today.

Neil O'Brien
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the President of COP26, what progress he is making with international partners to (a) ensure that local and international supply chains for foodstuffs and key commodities are environmentally responsible, and (b) increase the alignment of financial flows with net-zero and the Paris Agreement objectives.

As part of the COP26 nature campaign, the UK Government has established the Forests, Agriculture and Commodity Trade (FACT) dialogues to bring together producer and consumer countries to agree collaborative actions which reduce the impact of commodity supply chains on forests and other critical ecosystems.

Increasing the alignment of finance with net zero targets and the Paris Climate Agreement is a core part of our COP26 strategy. I have been engaging with a wide range of international partners to seek increased climate finance commitments from donor countries to meet the critical $100bn goal. We have published our priorities for public finance. Mark Carney is implementing a framework for embedding climate into every financial decision and creating a more sustainable financial system to support the path to net zero. We have seen significant progress so far across financial institutions, central banks, regulators and Multilateral Development Banks.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
1st Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what assessment she has made of the effect of the Renewable Heat Incentive on the UK's decarbonisation targets.

Using less fossil fuel and more renewables to heat our homes and businesses is vital to decarbonising the UK economy. The continued Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) funding (rising to £1.15bn in 2020/21) means that renewable heat will continue to play its part in meeting our binding domestic and international targets on carbon and renewables.

We intend to reform the RHI to improve value for money and reduce costs; improve cost control and budget management; and explore the best way to support less able to pay households and owners of large plants. We plan to consult on the changes shortly; this consultation will provide estimates of the reformed RHI’s contribution towards our carbon targets.

1st Feb 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what recent progress she has made on the implementation of a revised Renewable Heat Incentive Scheme.

Reform of the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) scheme will take place in two stages. I intend that the first stage of reform will take effect from Spring 2016. We will be consulting on our proposals for the second stage of reform shortly.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, when her Department plans to publish the terms of reference for its Renewable Heat Incentive consultation.

To be eligible for Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) support, all biomass combined heat and power (CHP) must be certified by the Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance (CHPQA) scheme, and must demonstrate that they have a valid CHPQA certificate. Any installation claiming the CHP Renewable Obligation Certificate uplift will not be eligible for receiving support under the RHI scheme.


We intend to reform the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) to improve value for money and reduce costs; improve cost control and budget management; and ensure the scheme focuses more on our long-term needs, while contributing to both our carbon and renewable energy targets. We plan to consult on the changes shortly. Therefore, I am unable to make specific commitments as to the future shape of the scheme at this point.

12th Jan 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what support her Department plans to provide to ensure that proposed biomass combined heat and power schemes are not affected by changes to the Renewable Heat Incentive scheme.

To be eligible for Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) support, all biomass combined heat and power (CHP) must be certified by the Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance (CHPQA) scheme, and must demonstrate that they have a valid CHPQA certificate. Any installation claiming the CHP Renewable Obligation Certificate uplift will not be eligible for receiving support under the RHI scheme.


We intend to reform the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) to improve value for money and reduce costs; improve cost control and budget management; and ensure the scheme focuses more on our long-term needs, while contributing to both our carbon and renewable energy targets. We plan to consult on the changes shortly. Therefore, I am unable to make specific commitments as to the future shape of the scheme at this point.

15th Dec 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, if he will estimate the number of postmasters who have been penalised as a result of the Post Office Horizon computer system.


Information on the Post Office Horizon computer system is the operational responsibility of Post Office Limited.


I have therefore asked Paula Vennells, the Chief Executive of Post Office Limited, to write to the Honourable Member on this matter. A copy of her reply will be placed in the libraries of the House.



George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
4th Nov 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, if she will take steps to promote the use of British welded steel instead of imported seamless steel in the shale gas exploration industry.

The Government would like to see UK steel companies take advantage of the commercial opportunities that a shale hydrocarbon exploration and production industry will bring. However, the decision over the use of welded steel tubes will predominantly depend on the design and specification of the well and the geology. Government officials will continue to engage with the steel industry over this large potential opportunity and will encourage it to continue its dialogue with the onshore oil and gas industry.

To ask the Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on community engagement in tidal energy developments.

DECC Ministers meet regularly with Ministers in the Department of Communities and Local Government to discuss a range of issues. As has been the case with successive administrations, it is not the Government's practice to provide details of all such meetings.

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills, what the value of bilateral trade in agricultural goods and services between the UK and Israel was in each year since 2004.

Data on agricultural goods trade between UK and Israel in each year since 2004 is shown in the following table. Data on agriculture services trade is not available from official published sources.

UK trade in agricultural goods with Israel, 2004 to 2013, £ millions:

UK exports to Israel

UK imports from Israel

Total bilateral trade

2004

10

169

179

2005

10

198

208

2006

13

190

203

2007

13

204

217

2008

8

132

140

2009

4

93

97

2010

6

95

101

2011

5

96

101

2012

6

128

134

2013

6

121

127

Source: Eurostat (Comext), based on CPA 2008 (Classification of Products by Activity) code 01 “Products of Agriculture” - values converted from Euros into £ using HMT Pocket Databank exchange rates (27 March 2014)

31st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, which countries have contributed to the $12 billion donor fund announced at COP26 to halt and reverse forest loss and protect land rights; and how much each of those donors has committed.

Over a five-year period between 2021-2025, the $12billion Global Forest Finance Pledge will support forest-related climate action in countries eligible for Official Development Assistance.

The pledge has been supported by 12 public donors: Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, South Korea, the UK, the USA, and the European Commission on behalf of the European Union.

The UK has confirmed to provide at least £1.5 billion to the pledge.

Further details of what the pledge will deliver on can be found at:

https://ukcop26.org/the-global-forest-finance-pledge/

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
12th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of potential contribution of domestic tidal lagoon power to reaching the target of net zero by 2050.

The Government has been clear that tidal range technologies such as tidal lagoons and barrages may have a role to play in the UK’s long term energy mix but only if they can deliver value for money in the context of other renewable technologies.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
10th Mar 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what representations he has made to Cabinet colleagues on the interests of British farming in relation to the Government's (a) forthcoming heat policy roadmap and (b) plans to renew the Renewable Heat Incentive.

The Department engages regularly with the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, at both ministerial and official level, on the interests of British Farming on a range of issues. This includes the biogas and biomethane technologies included under the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI).

The RHI has funding confirmed for new deployment of renewable heat technologies until 31 March 2021. The Budget on 11 March confirmed a new allocation of flexible tariff guarantees on the non-domestic RHI and announced a new support scheme for biomethane production to increase the proportion of green gas in the grid, funded by a Green Gas Levy.

We are planning to publish a Heat and Building Strategy later this year, which will set out the immediate actions we will take for reducing emissions from buildings and an ambitious programme of work required to enable key strategic decisions to set us on a path to Net Zero by 2050. We are currently developing policies to deliver low carbon heating in the 2020s and meet our climate targets which we will consult on with a wider range of stakeholders including British Farmers.

Kwasi Kwarteng
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
30th Jan 2018
What steps he is taking to tackle rising energy prices.

We are bringing forward the Price Cap Bill, an intelligent intervention to protect consumers.

Ofgem is already capping tariffs for 1 million households this year, and consulting on protection for another 2 million next winter. This is in addition to the 4 million households protected under the pre-pay cap.

That is not all, smart meter rollout, focusing of ECO money on fuel poor households and working with Citizens Advice and the Energy Saving Trust to get people switched to better deals.

All this will help keep bills down for households.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if the Government will reconsider including food and drink qualifications in the Lifetime Skills Guarantee.

Through the free courses for jobs offer, we are making courses available that address skills needs in the economy, offer good wage outcomes, and empower adults with the tools they need to secure a better job.

We have identified hundreds of courses that can give adults the skills they need in the labour market. These qualifications include those that can support employers regardless of their sector, including those in the food and drink industry, with courses in business, accountancy, engineering, marketing and a variety of digital qualifications. We are keeping the list of qualifications and the sector subject areas in scope under review and will consider requests for including courses that meet the published criteria. We have already added more qualifications to the original list. Those qualifications met all the criteria published on gov.uk.

Qualifications not included in this offer will still be eligible for Advanced Learner Loans (ALL). ALL are income contingent loans that provide extensive coverage of regulated qualifications from level 3 to level 6, helping to meet the up-front tuition fees. In the 2019/20 academic year there were applications to study at nearly 450 training providers, and over 3000 qualifications are currently in scope.

In addition to this, there a variety of high quality apprenticeship standards in food and drink manufacturing available for employers to use. They include, but are not limited to, food and drink advanced engineer, baker, and senior culinary chef.

Gillian Keegan
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which schools in Devon have (a) applied for and (b) received academy status since 2010.

Since 2010 the Department has received 72 applications from schools in Devon to convert to academy status; 59 have opened as academies. The details of these schools can be found at the following link, which is updated monthly:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/open-academies-and-academy-projects-in-development

15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has an emissions reduction plan.

On 19 October, the Government's Net Zero Strategy was published, setting the UK on the path to deliver on its commitment to reach net zero emissions by 2050. The Net Zero Strategy sets out Government's vision for transitioning to a net zero economy and covers a wide range of actions across different sectors. The Natural Resources, Waste and Fluorinated-Gases (F-Gases) chapter covers Defra related sectors and their emission reductions including agriculture, peat and tree planting.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what are the projected emissions resulting from waste over the period of the 4th, 5th and 6th carbon budget periods.

The Government's Net Zero Strategy sets the UK on the path to deliver on its commitment to reach net zero emissions by 2050. The Net Zero Strategy sets out Government's vision for transitioning to a net zero economy and covers a wide range of actions across different sectors.

Sectoral emissions for Waste and F-gases over forthcoming carbon budget periods are set out in Table 8 of the technical annex to the net zero strategy. These are: Carbon Budget (CB) 4 24-27 MtCO2e; Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) 17-20 MtCO2e and CB6 12-15 MtCO2e.

n.b. NDC is the midpoint of CB5

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what are the projected resulting emissions for Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use over the period of the 4th, 5th and 6th carbon budget periods.

The Government’s Net Zero Strategy sets the UK on the path to deliver on its commitment to reach net zero emissions by 2050. The Net Zero Strategy sets out the Government’s vision for transitioning to a net zero economy and covers a wide range of actions across different sectors.

Sectoral emissions for Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU) over forthcoming carbon budget periods are set out in Table 8 of the technical annex to the Net Zero Strategy. These are Carbon Budget (CB) 4; 51-57 MtCO2e; Nationally Determined Contribution 44-52 MtCo2e and CB6 38-48 MtCO2e.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Sep 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he (a) has made and (b) plans to make an assessment of the potential merits of using powers under The Common Fisheries Policy and Aquaculture (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019 to apply trade sanctions on relevant stocks against a nation State that is overfishing, for the purposes of securing the most advantageous deals for the UK fishing industry.

Powers set out under Retained Regulation (EU) No 1026/2012 on certain measures for the purpose of the conservation of fish stocks in relation to countries allowing non-sustainable fishing. The measures can include targeted trade sanctions on the species that has been caught. Sustainable fishing remains a priority for UK and we continue to consult a range of countries through bilateral and multilateral engagement to agree suitable harvest control rules to prevent overfishing.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department plans to ban the non-commercial importation of pregnant cats as well as pregnant dogs.

The Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill was introduced in Parliament on 8 June. The Bill allows us to protect the welfare of pets by introducing restrictions to crack down on the low welfare movements of pets into Great Britain and includes powers to introduce new restrictions on pet travel and on the commercial import of pets on welfare grounds, via secondary legislation. These restrictions could relate to the movement of pets below a prescribed age and to the movement of heavily pregnant pets under the commercial and non-commercial rules. We will continue to work closely with stakeholders prior to the introduction of the legislation to ensure that our final measures are well considered and are guided by the latest evidence.

The Government is planning to launch a consultation later this year on the proposed restrictions to the commercial and non-commercial movement of pets into Great Britain. The consultation will allow us to refine the scope of the measures, including whether they apply to cats.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will introduce compulsory tick and tapeworm treatments for cats entering the UK non-commercially.

The Pet Travel and Illegal import clauses of the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill focus on measures to improve welfare of pets entering Great Britain. We remain aware of the concerns around ticks and tick-borne disease and tapeworm in cats and our future policy will be guided by risk assessment. Defra also continues to monitor the disease situation through the Tick Surveillance Scheme.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
23rd Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will introduce a requirement for a (a) rabies blood test for cats before entry into the UK and (b) wait period post vaccination which is in line with the incubation period of rabies.

The Pet Travel and Illegal import clauses of the Animal Welfare (Kept Animals) Bill focus on measures to improve welfare of pets entering GB. Recent quantitative risk assessments have concluded that the risk of a pet animal with rabies entering the UK under the pet travel rules is very low. Defra continues to monitor the disease situation.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
21st May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that (a) Government buying standards for food are in line with the UK’s targets for net zero emissions and (b) top-quality British farmers and producers can benefit from public sector contracts.

The Government will always champion greater consumption of our excellent British food and drink, including from British farmers and local producers. The Government Buying Standards for Food (GBSF) encourages the procurement of UK seasonal and locally produced food.

Defra is launching a public consultation this summer to review the GBSF. We want to enhance the GBSF in line with recent Government policy initiatives around promoting local produce, social value and environment and resource management.

The consultation will seek views as to how public sector food procurement can assist the Government in achieving net zero carbon emissions. This will include proposals for procuring from more sustainable farming systems, as well as ensuring caterers use energy efficient equipment and move away from food waste management to waste reduction.

We will also be seeking views on how the standards could be used to promote even greater uptake of locally produced food by public procurers and their suppliers.

In addition, Defra is working closely with the Crown Commercial Service to develop the Future Food Framework in the South West region. The trial will create significant new opportunities for our farmers and local producers to supply regional public sector bodies.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has plans to (a) commission and (b) fund further research to assess animal welfare in transport using modern broiler genotypes and transport systems.

The Government is committed to improving the welfare standards of all animal journeys. We are continuously assessing the available scientific evidence on improving animal welfare during transport and are committed to commissioning new research where it is needed in order to develop the evidence base further.

We launched a Call for Evidence, in 2018, on controlling live exports for slaughter and improving animal welfare during transport and, that same year, commissioned Scotland’s Rural University College and the University of Edinburgh to produce a systematic review of the evidence on welfare aspects of the transport of live animals.

The Government asked the then Farm Animal Welfare Committee (FAWC, now Animal Welfare Committee) to provide an opinion on improving the welfare of animals during transport. FAWC considered the evidence obtained from the Call for Evidence; the report of the systematic review; as well as their engagement with stakeholders before submitting their opinion and recommendations.

We launched a consultation in England and Wales in 2020 on improvements to the domestic welfare in transport regime, informed by the recommendations from FAWC’s report. We will shortly be publishing our response to the consultation and outlining how we will take reforms forward.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that legislative changes on animal welfare in transport are informed by the most up-to-date science and technology.

The Government is committed to improving the welfare standards of all animal journeys. We are continuously assessing the available scientific evidence on improving animal welfare during transport and are committed to commissioning new research where it is needed in order to develop the evidence base further.

We launched a Call for Evidence, in 2018, on controlling live exports for slaughter and improving animal welfare during transport and, that same year, commissioned Scotland’s Rural University College and the University of Edinburgh to produce a systematic review of the evidence on welfare aspects of the transport of live animals.

The Government asked the then Farm Animal Welfare Committee (FAWC, now Animal Welfare Committee) to provide an opinion on improving the welfare of animals during transport. FAWC considered the evidence obtained from the Call for Evidence; the report of the systematic review; as well as their engagement with stakeholders before submitting their opinion and recommendations.

We launched a consultation in England and Wales in 2020 on improvements to the domestic welfare in transport regime, informed by the recommendations from FAWC’s report. We will shortly be publishing our response to the consultation and outlining how we will take reforms forward.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to improve governance of organic certification.

Now that the UK has left the European Union we have the opportunity to chart our own course in organic regulation, setting rules around organic production and certification that suit the needs of our domestic organics industry.

We are working to streamline bureaucratic processes inherited from the EU regulatory system to allow for a more flexible and responsive way to handle our regulatory obligations while reducing costs for producers and the burden on the public purse.

The Agriculture Act 2020 gives us powers to amend the organics regime to support organic farmers further, benefit the environment, maintain consumer confidence, promote research and innovation in the sector, and reflect future trade agreements. In due course we will consult with organic producers and industry bodies on how to boost innovation, improve governance of organic certification, group certification and making entry into organic production appealing for new entrants.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
22nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what discussions he has had with representatives from organic farms during the design of the Environmental Land Management scheme.

We are working closely with a range of environmental and agricultural stakeholders collaboratively to design the new schemes that reward environmental benefits.

The new schemes will fairly compensate farmers for environmental goods generated across all land types and farm management systems, including organic farms.

Several representatives of the organic sector are involved in codesigning the schemes in a variety of ways, including being part of our stakeholder and codesign groups, as well as separate one to one and small group meetings.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
8th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of trends in the number of cases of illegal dog ear cropping in the last six years; and what steps his Department is taking to help (a) halt that practice and (b) prevent the importation of dogs that have had their ears cropped.

The Government has not made a specific assessment on the numbers of dogs with illegally cropped ears but we continue to raise awareness regarding the improper selling of pets by deceitful sellers in the UK and abroad through our ‘Petfished’ campaign. This seeks to educate prospective pet buyers on common tricks and tactics used by deceitful sellers which may result in the purchase of a mistreated or unwell pet, including those that have been subject to cropping. The campaign urges buyers to mitigate risks, for example by buying from trusted sellers such as those under the Kennel Club’s Assured Breeder scheme, viewing puppies with their mothers and siblings, asking questions of the seller and following the Animal Welfare Foundation and RSPCA Puppy Contract to ensure that puppies are in good health when purchased.

The practice of mutilating dogs’ ears is abhorrent and has rightly been banned in the UK for 15 years. The maximum penalty for causing unnecessary suffering to an animal or cropping a dog’s ears in England is six months’ imprisonment and/or an unlimited fine. However, the Government is committed to increasing the maximum custodial penalty for both of these offences from six months to five years. The Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill, currently before Parliament, which will implement this increase, will continue to receive Government support as it completes its passage through Parliament.

We already have some of the world’s highest animal welfare standards. The end of the transition period has opened up new opportunities for managing our own pet travel and commercial importation rules. We are actively listening to the concerns of stakeholders and the Government is considering options regarding the importation and commercial movements of dogs with cropped ears into Great Britain in line with World Trade Organization rules.

Importers of animals must adhere to welfare standards as set out in Council Regulation (EC) 1/2005 on the protection of animals during transport and in domestic legislation, The Welfare of Animals (Transport) (England) Order 2006 (WATEO). This legislation aims to protect the health and welfare of animals during transportation and applies to dogs that are suffering injury as a result of non-exempted mutilations including cropped ears.

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he has made an assessment of the effect on public health of the delays in (a) implementing local Clean Air Zones and (b) achieving compliance with legal limits on air pollution.

Air pollution poses one of the biggest environmental threats to public health. Our ambitious plans to decarbonise transport, improve air quality and support more active forms of travel have not changed, including the £3.8 billion we are already investing to clean up our air.

The 2017 UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) Concentrations sets out how we will achieve compliance with legal NO2 limits in the shortest possible time. We are continuing to work closely with those local authorities identified to assist them in developing local plans to tackle NO2 exceedances. These plans can include charging Clean Air Zones (CAZ) although other measures that are at least as effective are preferred. We rigorously assess local plans to make sure they will deliver reductions in NO2 levels in the shortest possible time.

To help them focus on their response to coronavirus, we agreed with Leeds and Birmingham’s requests to delay the introduction of CAZ until after January 2021. However, CAZ development work is continuing, and we are working to deliver compliance as soon as possible. Our recent rapid call for evidence will ensure we can fully understand the impact that coronavirus is having on changes in air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure. Recent Automatic Urban and Rural Network provisional NO2 data from 23 March to 15 June shows that average NO2 levels decreased by 45%. It is not clear that these reductions will be maintained long term. Improving air quality as soon as possible remains vital and we continue to engage with local authorities and keep plans for all CAZ under constant review.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of (a) Clean Air Zones and (b) other restrictions on the use of vehicles compared with other means of tackling illegal levels of air pollution.

Air pollution poses one of the biggest environmental threats to public health. Our ambitious plans to decarbonise transport, improve air quality and support more active forms of travel have not changed, including the £3.8 billion we are already investing to clean up our air.

The 2017 UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) Concentrations sets out how we will achieve compliance with legal NO2 limits in the shortest possible time. We are continuing to work closely with those local authorities identified to assist them in developing local plans to tackle NO2 exceedances. These plans can include charging Clean Air Zones (CAZ) although other measures that are at least as effective are preferred. We rigorously assess local plans to make sure they will deliver reductions in NO2 levels in the shortest possible time.

To help them focus on their response to coronavirus, we agreed with Leeds and Birmingham’s requests to delay the introduction of CAZ until after January 2021. However, CAZ development work is continuing, and we are working to deliver compliance as soon as possible. Our recent rapid call for evidence will ensure we can fully understand the impact that coronavirus is having on changes in air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure. Recent Automatic Urban and Rural Network provisional NO2 data from 23 March to 15 June shows that average NO2 levels decreased by 45%. It is not clear that these reductions will be maintained long term. Improving air quality as soon as possible remains vital and we continue to engage with local authorities and keep plans for all CAZ under constant review.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that (a) the response to the covid-19 outbreak does not delay the urgent steps required to tackle illegal levels of air pollution and protect people’s health and (b) local authorities deliver their air quality plans as soon as possible.

Air pollution poses one of the biggest environmental threats to public health. Our ambitious plans to decarbonise transport, improve air quality and support more active forms of travel have not changed, including the £3.8 billion we are already investing to clean up our air.

The 2017 UK Plan for Tackling Roadside Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) Concentrations sets out how we will achieve compliance with legal NO2 limits in the shortest possible time. We are continuing to work closely with those local authorities identified to assist them in developing local plans to tackle NO2 exceedances. These plans can include charging Clean Air Zones (CAZ) although other measures that are at least as effective are preferred. We rigorously assess local plans to make sure they will deliver reductions in NO2 levels in the shortest possible time.

To help them focus on their response to coronavirus, we agreed with Leeds and Birmingham’s requests to delay the introduction of CAZ until after January 2021. However, CAZ development work is continuing, and we are working to deliver compliance as soon as possible. Our recent rapid call for evidence will ensure we can fully understand the impact that coronavirus is having on changes in air pollution emissions, concentrations and exposure. Recent Automatic Urban and Rural Network provisional NO2 data from 23 March to 15 June shows that average NO2 levels decreased by 45%. It is not clear that these reductions will be maintained long term. Improving air quality as soon as possible remains vital and we continue to engage with local authorities and keep plans for all CAZ under constant review.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
1st Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if it remains the Government's policy to maintain the October 2022 deadline for (a) air quality, water, (b) biodiversity, (c) resource efficiency and (d) waste reduction targets.

The Government plans to bring forward at least one target in each of the four priority areas by the Environment Bill’s 31 October 2022 deadline. Targets will be developed based on robust, scientifically credible evidence, as well as economic analysis. We want them to be ambitious, credible and supported by society.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
18th May 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to support the UK fishing industry (a) during the covid-19 outbreak and (b) in preparation for the end of the transition period.

The Government remains committed to supporting the long-term profitability of our fishing industry in response to the COVID-19 outbreak. On 17 April 2020 it launched a £10 million financial assistance package for England's fishing and aquaculture businesses which included a £1 million grant scheme to support the sale of fish locally.

We have left the EU, and at the end of the Transition Period will leave the Common Fisheries Policy. We will take back control of our waters to secure a fairer share of fishing opportunities for the UK fishing industry and will develop a world-class fisheries management regime to the benefit of industry. The Fisheries Bill will give us the necessary powers to manage fisheries as an independent coastal State. New, domestic, long-term funding arrangements will support the UK's fishing industry from 2021. We are working closely with the industry and others to ensure that the trade of seafood with the EU can continue after the end of the Transition Period.

A number of schemes are available to support fisheries and aquaculture businesses and a summary can be found via the link below:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/883851/Support_for_fishing_industry_one_stop_shop_v20.pdf

Victoria Prentis
Minister of State (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
25th Jul 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will review the Government's decision not to include eggs and egg products on the proposed tariff list.

The Government will continue to listen to stakeholder views on the temporary tariff policy announced on 13 March. The Government does this through a variety of channels including direct correspondence and meetings with consumer organisations, business and business representative organisations, and other interest groups.

In the short-term, the Government would remain responsive to the needs of UK businesses and consumers as the UK leaves the EU. The temporary tariff will apply for up to 12 months. During this time, the Government would provide a mechanism to hear business and consumer feedback and would consider exceptional changes where clear evidence is provided by stakeholders against the criteria set out in the Taxation (Cross-border Trade) Act. We will provide further details on this mechanism in due course.

The Government has also committed to conducting a public consultation to inform our permanent tariff policy, which will take effect after the temporary period. This will enable the views of a wide range of businesses to be heard. We will provide details of this public consultation in due course.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
8th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether he plans to (a) amend the Clean Air Act 1993 or (b) repeal that Act and include its provisions in the primary legislation proposed in the Government’s Clean Air Strategy.

On 18 July the Prime Minister announced that the Government will bring forward the first Environment Bill in over 20 years. This will incorporate a range of issues including improving air quality and builds on the vision set out in our 25 Year Environment Plan. As we develop these proposals, we will consider the best way to reform the existing legislative framework.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
2nd May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the effect of disease on trees.

Tree health risks are systematically assessed through the publically available UK Plant Risk Register (approximately one third of the nearly 1000 pests and diseases on the register are forestry pests and diseases), risks are reviewed monthly and prioritised for actions such as surveillance. Forestry Commission carry out aerial and ground based surveillance on priority risks to tree health, including Phytophthora ramorum, oak processionary moth, ash dieback and the results are published on the Forestry Commission website.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
27th Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many fly tipping prosecutions there were in (a) 2016 and (b) 2017; and how much was raised in fines from such prosecutions in each of those years.

In 2015-16 there were 2,135 prosecutions by local authorities for fly-tipping offences with a total of £677,000 raised in fines. In 2016-17 the figures were 1,571 prosecutions and £723,000 in fines. 98% of prosecutions result in a conviction. Additionally in 2015-16 there were 36,000 fixed penalty notices issued for fly-tipping offences which increased to 56,000 in 2016-17.

The statistics are published annually by Defra and are available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/fly-tipping-in-england

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
26th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the White Paper on agriculture will contain specific provisions for protecting and supporting British horitculture.

The Environment Secretary has set out his intention to publish a consultation paper on the future of domestic agriculture policy later this spring.

The paper will set out our proposals for the future of agriculture and the opportunities for all sectors, including horticulture. We look forward to receiving consultation responses from across industry in due course.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
18th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress has been made on establishing a Central Equine Database since the closing of his Department's consultation, Consultation on changes to the identification of equines, published in Aril 2017.

Usability testing has been successfully completed. Defra’s supplier is working closely with Passport Issuing Organisations (PIOs) to prepare and import their historical passport records into the Central Equine Database, with two thirds of PIOs having now provided data. Enforcement bodies including Local Authorities and the Food Standards Agency are able to search records and the database will be fully operational for PIOs by Spring.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
6th Sep 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which local authorities breached legal air quality limits in the last year.

Defra assesses compliance against EU air quality limit values for 43 regional zones and agglomerations across the UK. The compliance assessment is contained in the annual compliance reports which are accessible on the UK-AIR website: uk-air.defra.gov.uk. We do not hold compliance data at local authority level.

Air quality data from Defra’s national monitoring network is routinely published on the UK-AIR website and can be searched by location. In addition, many local authorities monitor air quality at local level and make this data available.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
16th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to ensure that the UK complies with the Medium Combustion Plant Directive by December 2017.

We recently consulted on proposals to transpose the Medium Combustion Plant Directive (MCPD). We are proposing to amend the current England and Wales environmental permitting regime to implement the MCPD which will be transposed into law by December 2017.

New plants will be required to comply with the MCPD emission limits by 20 December 2018. Existing plants with a rated thermal input >5MW will be required to comply by 1 January 2025 whilst existing plants with a rated thermal input

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
16th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment she has made of the potential merits of deploying low nitrogen oxide fuel cell generators in inner cities.

While Defra has not carried out a specific assessment regarding the deployment of low nitrogen oxide fuel cell generators in inner cities, the Government welcomes the development of lower emissions technologies and the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy has recently provided innovation funding to a project developing a low temperature solid oxide fuel cell that would be suitable for deployment in cities. Defra has also recently consulted on regulations to reduce emissions from high nitrogen oxide generators.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many additional civil servants her Department has employed since 23 June 2016.

The number of additional staff the Department has employed on both fixed term and a permanent basis since 23 June 2016 until 23 January 2017 is 215.

This figure includes internal transfers and Civil Servants from Other Government Departments.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will take steps to publicise better the 2014 findings of the Committee on Toxicity as far as they relate to the health effects of exposure to organophosphates.

The 2014 findings of the COT review on the health effects of the exposure to organophosphates is in the public domain and can be found on the COT’s website: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20140909095303/http:/cot.food.gov.uk/cotstatements/cotstatementsyrs/cotstatements2014/cotstatorg.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will publish the minutes of the meeting in November 2015 between the Sheep Dip Sufferers Support Group and the Minister of State for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food.

A summary of the meeting I held on 19 November 2015 with the Sheep Dip Sufferers Support Group is publicly available on its web site:

http://www.sheepdipsufferers.uk/campaigning/Summary%20of%20meeting.pdf.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will meet the Sheep Dip Sufferers Support Group to discuss the effects of organophosphates.

My hon. Friend will be aware that I met the Sheep Dip Sufferers Support Group about a year ago and discussed this issue in depth. The Committee on Toxicity has looked at this issue exhaustively, examining 26 different studies over a period of more than a decade, and concluded that in the absence of acute poisoning there would not be meaningful long-term effects.

To the best of my knowledge there is no new scientific evidence available that would alter this conclusion. I am sympathetic to farmers suffering from ill health but at this time I do not feel a further meeting would be beneficial.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will estimate the number of farmers that have reported illnesses relating to exposure to organophosphate sheep dips since 1990.

The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) has recorded the number of reports of suspected adverse reactions in humans to OP dips received each year since records began in 1985. To date this figure is 634. To the best of the VMD’s knowledge this is most comprehensive dataset available.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
30th Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will publish documents held by her Department relating to the reasons for the introduction of the Sheep Scab (Revocation) Order 1992.

The Sheep Scab (Revocation) Order 1992 revoked The Sheep Scab (National Dip) Order 1990, the Sheep Scab (National Dip) (Amendment) Order 1991 and the Sheep Scab Order 1992. This consequently ended the compulsory annual sheep dipping requirement.

The Government released information explaining why the decision was taken to end compulsory dipping, and the conclusions of the VPC reviews of organophosphate sheep dips at the time in May of this year. I sent a letter, explaining this, to the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee and this was copied to Tom Rigby of the Sheep Dip Sufferers Support Group.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
11th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, which local authorities have breached legal air quality limits in the last year.

Defra uses both monitoring and modelling to assess air quality in the UK. Currently, 156 monitoring stations in the national network report near-real-time data on five key pollutants: particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5), sulphur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Information about these sites and modelled data is available on Defra’s UK-Air website.

Latest compliance data show that the UK is meeting the EU limit values for all pollutants covered by the European air quality Directives other than those for NO2.

That is why in December last year, the Government published the national air quality plan for reducing NO2 concentrations through a new programme of Clean Air Zones in five cities in England, including Leeds, Nottingham and Southampton, as well as Birmingham and Derby, along with the Ultra-Low Emission Zone in London. The plan combines targeted local and national measures and continued investment in clean technologies.

The councils which were observed to have exceedances of the annual mean NO2 limit value in 2015 are in the attached table.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
11th Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she has taken to encourage local authorities to implement a voluntary Clean Air Zone; and what estimate she has made of how many will do so within the next 12 months.

As part of the national air quality plan for nitrogen dioxide, we are requiring five cities (Birmingham, Derby, Leeds, Nottingham and Southampton) to implement Clean Air Zones. Other local authorities can introduce Clean Air Zones should they wish to do so using their powers under the Transport Act 2000.

On 13 October we launched a consultation on a framework for Clean Air Zones. This will provide a consistent approach to the implementation of Clean Air Zones. Its use by local authorities will give businesses and individuals a clear understanding of what a Clean Air Zone will deliver, and the impacts and benefits for them. Setting out the principles in this way will support both those authorities required by Government to implement a Clean Air Zone and those who, after analysing their own situation, consider a Clean Air Zone to be an appropriate measure to bring in.

In addition, applications are now open for councils to bid for a share of at least £3 million as part of an Air Quality Grant to help improve air quality in their area. Applications could include activities such as feasibility studies for Clean Air Zones.

Thérèse Coffey
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions
20th Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress the Government has made on implementing the recommendations of the report by Dr Peter Bonfield on a plan for public procurement of food, published in July 2014.

The Government is committed to providing food produced to British standards or their equivalent in all its canteens, restaurants and cafeterias by the end of this Parliament. Defra is working closely with other Departments and businesses to implement the Plan for Public Procurement of Food, including a balanced scorecard. The Ministry of Justice launched a tender for supplying food to prisons earlier this year, worth £500 million, which requires bids to use the balanced scorecard. Their current supplier has agreed that the 30 million portions of UHT milk served in prisons each year will be sourced from UK producers. We are working with the Ministry of Defence to develop the best way to incorporate the balanced scorecard into their forthcoming contracts. We are working with all central government departments to ensure that their food and catering contracts comply with the balanced scorecard approach.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jun 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what her Department's policy is on the appropriateness of the EU sales description of veal as meat of bovine animals aged less than the eight months; and if she will make representations to the EU on changing that description to meat of bovine animals aged less than six months.

The definition of veal as being from bovines aged under eight months is well-established in European marketing and beef labelling regulations and is widely understood by consumers. The Government has not received any representations advocating that this definition should be reviewed or amended, but if the Member for Tiverton and Honiton has information which he thinks we should consider, we shall be happy to do so.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she plans to include the need for longer term farm business tenancies in the Government's proposed long-term economic plan for food and farming.

The Government recognises that longer tenancies for some farm businesses are important to provide tenants with security to invest and grow their businesses. Flexibility to agree contracts that suit a range of business needs is also important to enable a diverse farming sector. We are working closely with industry to develop policy priorities for a 25-year Food and Farming Plan. Agricultural tenancies and other farming business models will be considered as part of these discussions to help deliver a competitive farming sector in future.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make it her policy to explore mechanisms for encouraging longer lengths of term on farm business tenancies.

The Government recognises that longer tenancies for some farm businesses are important to provide tenants with security to invest and grow their businesses. Flexibility to agree contracts that suit a range of business needs is also important to enable a diverse farming sector. We are working closely with industry to develop policy priorities for a 25-year Food and Farming Plan. Agricultural tenancies and other farming business models will be considered as part of these discussions to help deliver a competitive farming sector in future.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
3rd Jul 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when she last met the Tenant Farmer's Association to discuss the future of Farm Business Tenancies.

I met the Tenant Farmers Association on the 23rd June 2015.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
12th Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans she has to accelerate the rate of new woodland planting.

As promised in our manifesto, we have committed to planting 11 million trees during this Parliament, which we plan to do primarily through the Rural Development Programme’s Countryside Stewardship scheme. This scheme aims to invest £18 million on new woodland planting each year.

We are also encouraging more woodland creation in several other ways. For example, our Woodland Carbon Code continues to attract private investment in woodland creation projects. The Forestry Commission is also leading an Environmental Impact Assessment project in Durham to help give clarity to landowners on where a full Environmental Statement may be required for afforestation, which may be deterring some landowners from planting new woodland. We will also help increase demand for wood by supporting forestry businesses to further increase their competitiveness, productivity and innovation, through other schemes under the Rural Development Programme.

We remain strongly supportive of sector-led initiatives, such as Grown in Britain and the Roots to Prosperity strategy, in their work to grow demand for wood by further developing and strengthening the woodland economy from ground level up.

3rd Jun 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many prosecutions were brought forward for (a) the illegal import of pets under the Trade in Animals and Related Products Regulations 2011 and (b) knowingly presenting fraudulent information in relation to the import of pets under the Non-Commercial Movement of Pet Animals Order 2011.

The Non-Commercial Movement of Pet Animals Order 2011 and the Trade in Animals and Related Products Regulation 2011 are enforced by Local Authorities.

In line with obligations under Section 80 of the Animal Health Act 1981 information is provided by Local Authorities to the Animal and Plant Health Agency on proceedings under this Act. This includes information on the number of prosecutions secured under the Trade in Animals and Related Products Regulations 2011 and the Non-Commercial Movement of Pet Animals Order 2011.

Details of the nature of the offences are not recorded centrally.

The number of prosecutions is set out in the table below.

Prosecutions for illegally importing pet animals for sale may also be brought under legislation governing consumer protection, the sale of pet animals and the importation of rabies susceptible animals.

Year

Trade in Animals and Related Products Regulations 2011

Non-Commercial Movement of Pet Animals Order 2011

2011

0

N/A

2012

0

0

2013

1

3

2014

0

2

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the report of the Dogs Trust entitled, The Puppy Smuggling Scandal, published on 16 November 2014, what assessment she has made of the implications for her policies of the recommendations in that report which relate specifically to her Department; and what timetable it has for the implementation of those recommendations.

We take evidence of the illegal importation of pets very seriously. The action we are taking to tackle this trade is focused on three areas.

Firstly, responsibility for stopping the illegal movement of puppies begins in the country where they are born, and my officials continue to raise instances of abuse of the pet travel scheme with the relevant countries.

Secondly, we will maintain effective border controls. The UK carries out more checks on pets at the border than most other EU member states and stringent penalties are in place where people are found to be breaking the rules.

Thirdly, the illegal trade is driven by demand for cheap, pedigree puppies and we have published guidance on the steps pet owners can take to avoid buying an illegally imported pet: https://www.gov.uk/buying-a-cat-or-dog.

The Dogs Trust has been invited to meet with the Minister for animal welfare to discuss their report ‘The Puppy Smuggling Scandal’.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
29th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what progress she has made on implementing the Government's timber procurement policy for central government departments which requires the purchase of only legally felled and sustainably produced timber and wood products.

The Government continues to promote and support the Timber Procurement Policy. This includes the provision of practical advice to public sector procurers and suppliers through the Central Point of Expertise on Timber, which provides guidance and information through a helpdesk and regular, targeted workshops. Central Government Departments report on the application of the policy in construction contracts for the purposes of the Greening Government Commitments. Reports are published annually.

Defra has also contracted the Central Point of Expertise on Timber to conduct a review of the certification schemes that support the Timber Procurement Policy to ensure they are sufficiently robust.

In addition, the EU Timber Regulation (EUTR) entered into force in the UK in March 2013. The EUTR prevents the trade of illegally-harvested timber in the EU by laying down obligations on operators who place timber and timber products on the market, and those who subsequently trade in them.

25th Nov 2014
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to balance the environmental damage caused to agricultural land by solar farm developments with the need to mitigate the effects of climate change when considering whether farm subsidies should be paid on farm land occupied by solar farms.

Agricultural land and soils form an integral part of the natural environment. While the Government recognises that solar power can have a role to play in reducing carbon emissions, the loss of agricultural land to solar arrays constitutes damage to that element of the environment. The Government therefore discourages the construction of solar farms on the best and most versatile agricultural land and has withdrawn farm subsidies from land occupied by solar farms. The Government believes that farm subsidies should be targeted at land used for growing food and crops.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much his Department has spent on flood defences in each county in the south west of England since 2010.

Flood defences spend is recorded on the basis for Regional Flood and Coastal Committee (RFCC) areas, rather than counties. The South West is covered by the Devon and Cornwall RFCC and the Wessex RFCC. RFCC and county boundaries do not align exactly. Wessex includes parts, or all, of Bournemouth Borough Council, Dorset County Council, Hampshire County Council, Poole Borough Council, Somerset County Council, Wiltshire Council, Gloucestershire County Council, Bath & North East Somerset Council, Bristol City Council, North Somerset Council and South Gloucestershire Council.

The total Defra flood and coastal erosion risk management grant in aid spent in each of the areas since 2010 is as follows:

Actual spend (£k)

Budget (£k)

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

Devon & Cornwall RFCC

15,515

16,828

15,729

16,330

11,196

Wessex RFCC

28,368

29,003

20,540

23,119

21,061

These figures include Environment Agency revenue funding and capital grants for Environment Agency, local authority and internal drainage board flood and coastal erosion risk management projects.

Environment Agency spend on national support costs are not included in the above figures.

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what bilateral funding arrangements his Department has with (a) governmental and (b) non-governmental projects and bodies in Argentina.

Defra does not have any funding arrangements with either governmental or non-governmental projects or bodies in Argentina

To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will take steps to publicise better the 2014 findings of the Committee on Toxicity as far as they relate to the health effects of exposure to organophosphates.

The 2014 findings of the COT review on the health effects of the exposure to organophosphates is in the public domain and can be found on the COT’s website: http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20140909095303/http:/cot.food.gov.uk/cotstatements/cotstatementsyrs/cotstatements2014/cotstatorg.

George Eustice
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
24th Apr 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what discussions his Department has had with the Overseas Territories on the implications for those territories of the UK leaving the EU.

The UK Government is committed to involving the Overseas Territories as we prepare to exit the EU, and ensuring their interests are properly taken into account.

UK Ministers and leaders of the Overseas Territories have committed to taking forward future engagement through the creation of the UK – Overseas Territories Joint Ministerial Council (JMC) on European Negotiations.

The JMC met for the first time on 6-7 February 2017, chaired jointly by myself, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State at the Department for Exiting the European Union, and Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anelay, and discussed a range of issues of interest to the Overseas Territories.

Robin Walker
Minister of State (Education)
6th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether the Trade and Agriculture Commission will be involved in the final stages of negotiating the Australia-UK free trade agreement prior to signature.

The Commission will scrutinise the signed Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with Australia to inform Parliamentary scrutiny. The role of the Trade and Agriculture Commission is not to advise on negotiations. Its role will be as debated and approved during the passage of the Trade Act 2021 and the Agriculture Act 2020.

The Department has increased engagement with key agricultural stakeholders during FTA negotiations through its dedicated agri-food Trade Advisory Group, which meets at least three times a year, or as required by developments in the free trade negotiation process.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent assessment the Government has made of the effect on the rights of indigenous peoples in Brazil of British businesses importing resources or products from that country.

The United Kingdom has a strong history of promoting her values globally.

We continue to support work with indigenous communities across Brazil, including in the Amazon region. We are taking steps domestically to tackle illegal deforestation and, through our Partnership for Forests programme, we are supporting almost 2,000 indigenous people to strengthen their livelihoods through sustainable forest management.

Ranil Jayawardena
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for International Trade)
31st Oct 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps his Department is taking to increase food and farming exports.

Increasing food and farming exports is a priority, with products sold in over 200 countries around the world and we are ambitious to do more. My Department is leading 12 food and agricultural technology export campaigns covering 24 key markets We have just launched our International Food and Drink Action Plan setting out how Government and industry will work together to increase exports even further.

13th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he has taken to improve the efficiency of the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

The quickest and easiest way to make an application to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is to use its extensive suite of online services. There are no delays in successful online applications and customers should receive their documents within a few days.

However, many people still choose or have to make a paper application and the DVLA receives around 60,000 items of mail every day. To help reduce waiting times for paper applications, the DVLA has introduced additional online services, recruited more staff, increased overtime working and has secured extra office space in Swansea and Birmingham. The DVLA has reconfigured its accommodation to safely maximise the number of staff on site and is working hard to process paper applications as quickly as possible.

Together with the ending of industrial action, these measures are having a positive impact. The queues are reducing, and customers will continue to see an improving picture in terms of turnaround times.

Trudy Harrison
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Transport)
22nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on the future of UK car mileage in the context of (a) the National Travel Survey finding that 25 per cent of car mileage is for commuting purposes and (b) ONS data from April 2020 showing that 47 per cent of people did some work at home.

There is significant uncertainty about the impact of COVID-19 on road travel demand. The Department continues to closely monitor the impact of the pandemic and to develop tools to understand and present this uncertainty alongside other drivers of future demand such as technological change and population change.

The Department has commissioned a programme of social and behavioural research to understand the impacts of the pandemic on people’s travel behavior. This includes changes in the behaviours that drive travel demand, such as working from home, and a longitudinal survey to track changes in behaviour during the pandemic as well as people’s intentions going forward.

Rachel Maclean
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
25th Oct 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the potential environmental effect of (a) scrubber technology and (b) marine sulphur dumping on UK coastlines.

The Government has not seen any evidence that the use of scrubbing technology would have a significant effect on the marine environment.

All scrubbers must comply with mandatory Guidelines, which were developed by the International Maritime Organization, before they are allowed to become operational. The potential effects of the use of scrubber technologies on the marine environment was taken into consideration when developing the Guidelines. To be compliant, the systems collect and store any sulphur residue and solid particulate matter on-board the vessel, to be deposited at a port waste reception facility.

Some scrubbers discharge treated wash water back into the sea – which is also controlled under the IMO Guidelines. There are ongoing studies which are looking at the impact of wash water discharges within European waters, which we are monitoring. At this stage, we are not aware of any significant issues which have been found. However, we will respond appropriately at international level, if these or any other studies, conclude that further controls are needed.

21st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government has made an assessment of the potential effects on cleanliness of engines of retrofitting cleaner diesel engines into older trains and locomotives.

While the rail sector as a whole is a relatively minor contributor to overall levels of outdoor air pollution, emissions from older diesel trains can contribute to local air quality issues. In February 2018, the Government challenged the rail industry to phase out diesel only trains by 2040.

New diesel rolling stock, including those commissioned for the Greater Anglia, Trans-Pennine, Northern and West Midlands franchises, are required to meet the latest emissions standards. This will replace the oldest trains, built in the 1980s, on the network. Overall this will significantly reduce pollution from the sector.

21st May 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government has carried out any assessment of the effect of emissions from older diesel locomotives on public health.

While the rail sector as a whole is a relatively minor contributor to overall levels of outdoor air pollution, emissions from older diesel trains can contribute to local air quality issues. In February 2018, the Government challenged the rail industry to phase out diesel only trains by 2040.

New diesel rolling stock, including those commissioned for the Greater Anglia, Trans-Pennine, Northern and West Midlands franchises, are required to meet the latest emissions standards. This will replace the oldest trains, built in the 1980s, on the network. Overall this will significantly reduce pollution from the sector.

29th Jun 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the effect of the use of AdBlue in road transport on the (a) carbon footprint of AdBlue production and (b) level of carbon dioxide emissions.

The Government is committed to ensuring that the transport sector plays a full part in delivering the emissions reductions needed to meet the Climate Change Act (2008) target for an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 compared to 1990 levels.

The Department for Transport has made no assessment of the Carbon Dioxide emissions of Adblue production or use. Officials regularly review the emerging evidence on carbon dioxide emissions and, where found to be material, will adjust forecasts and policy to reflect this.

10th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to reduce street clutter.

The Department for Transport (DfT) has always advocated minimising street clutter as it is unsightly, and can cause navigational difficulties for some groups.

Overuse of street furniture can create a cluttered environment, though where it is placed is a matter for local councils. However, the Department has published a range of guidance covering all aspects of street design, which stresses the importance of providing uncluttered environments. These include Inclusive Mobility, Traffic Advisory Leaflet 1/13: Reducing Sign Clutter, and the Manual for Streets.

Traffic signs can also contribute to clutter. In 2016 DfT revised the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions (TSRGD) to give local councils more flexibility in what signs they place and where. The Circular published alongside the TSRGD highlights these changes and makes it clear that the Department expects authorities to make use of these to reduce the amount of clutter on the roads.

Outdoor advertisements, such as ‘A’ boards, are controlled by local planning authorities under the Town and Country Planning (Control of Advertisements) (England) Regulations 2007. Placing ‘A’ boards on highways (including footways) where vehicular traffic is prohibited requires express advertisement consent from the local planning authority, and the consent of the relevant highway authority under section 115E of the Highways Act 1980.

15th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what proportion of vehicles in the Government Car Service are ultra-low emission vehicles.

Ultra low emission vehicles make up 6.3% of the Government Car Service fleet.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government has carried out any assessment of the effect of emissions from older diesel locomotives on public health.

While the rail sector as a whole is a relatively minor contributor to overall levels of outdoor air pollution, emissions from older diesel trains can contribute to local air quality issues. In February 2018, the Government challenged the rail industry to phase out diesel only trains by 2040.

New diesel rolling stock, including those commissioned for the Greater Anglia, Trans-Pennine, Northern and West Midlands franchises, are required to meet the latest emissions standards. This will replace the oldest trains, built in the 1980s, on the network. Overall this will significantly reduce pollution from the sector.

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government has made an assessment of the potential effects on cleanliness of engines of retrofitting cleaner diesel engines into older trains and locomotives.

While the rail sector as a whole is a relatively minor contributor to overall levels of outdoor air pollution, emissions from older diesel trains can contribute to local air quality issues. In February 2018, the Government challenged the rail industry to phase out diesel only trains by 2040.

New diesel rolling stock, including those commissioned for the Greater Anglia, Trans-Pennine, Northern and West Midlands franchises, are required to meet the latest emissions standards. This will replace the oldest trains, built in the 1980s, on the network. Overall this will significantly reduce pollution from the sector.

24th Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what lessons were learned from the universal credit scheme pilot; and what changes have been put in place as a result of those lessons.

The Department published a series of reports on Universal Credit. The latest can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/483029/universal-credit-at-work-december-2015.pdf

Priti Patel
Home Secretary
14th Apr 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve access to NHS dentistry in Devon.

NHS England and NHS Improvement have asked National Health Service dental practices in England to deliver at least 95% of contracted units of dental activity between April and June 2022 to improve access for patients safely. Patients can contact NHS England’s Customer Contact Centre for assistance in finding a local dental practice or NHS 111 if seeking urgent dental care.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are working with Health Education England and Bristol and Peninsula Dental schools as part of the South West Dental Reform programme to address the challenges facing NHS dentistry in the region. We are also currently developing further proposals for dental system reform with the aim of improving access for patients.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department of Health and Social Care)
13th Apr 2021
What plans he has for the future role of community hospitals.

Community hospitals are a hugely valuable and valued part of our health and care system. As we have seen during the pandemic, they have played a vital role in providing intermediate care for patients not yet well enough to return home and play a much broader role year-in year-out to the communities they serve. While it is for local communities to make decisions on specific local services, we are clear that our community hospitals should continue to play a central role in healthcare provision for many years to come.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many reports of mis-stunning before slaughter he has received for each category of animal in each year since 2008.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) can provide recorded data from 2010 onwards detailing the number of instances of inaccurate/ineffective stunning which have occurred in the main categories of animals, in FSA approved slaughter premises in England and Wales. Each instance relates to an event that has been categorised as a serious or critical non-compliance on the welfare reporting systems used at that time. These figures do not reflect the number of animals involved.

Number of inaccurate/ineffective stuns recorded as serious/critical in England and Wales 2010-19

Year

Period

Poultry

Cattle

Pigs

Sheep and Goats

Total

2010

April 2010 to March 2011

17

9

4

9

39

2011

April 2011 to March 2012

6

10

3

4

23

2012

April 2012 to March 2013

9

8

2

6

25

2013

April 2013 to March 2014

6

13

3

2

24

2014

April 2014 to March 2015

11

21

3

3

38

2015

April 2015 to March 2016

4

81

0

3

88

2016

April 2016 to March 2017

2

27

0

1

30

2017

April 2017 to March 2018

4

15

1

10

30

2018

April 2018 to March 2019

2

34

4

6

46

2019

April 2019 to December 2019

0

14

1

6

21

Grand Total

61

232

21

50

364

The figures in the table above for poultry only reflect the data associated with electrical stunning methods as the predominant method used in larger poultry premises is controlled atmosphere stunning (gas) method which is designed to kill rather than stun.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many reports of mis-cutting he received for each category of animal in each year since 2008.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) can provide the recorded data from 2010 onwards detailing the number of instances of mis-cutting which have occurred in the main categories of animals, in FSA approved slaughter premises in England and Wales. Each instance relates to an event that has been categorised as a serious or critical non-compliance on the welfare reporting systems used at that time. These figures do not reflect the number of animals involved.

Year

Period

Poultry

Cattle

Pigs

Sheep and Goats

Total

2010

April 2010 to March 2011

181

0

0

0

181

2011

April 2011 to March 2012

154

0

0

0

154

2012

April 2012 to March 2013

180

0

0

0

180

2013

April 2013 to March 2014

88

0

0

0

88

2014

April 2014 to March 2015

93

0

0

0

93

2015

April 2015 to March 2016

96

0

0

0

96

2016

April 2016 to March 2017

42

0

0

0

42

2017

April 2017 to March 2018

43

0

0

0

43

2018

April 2018 to March 2019

31

0

0

0

31

2019

April 2019 to December 2019

25

0

0

3

28

Grand Total

933

0

0

3

936

As is evident in the data contained in the table the issue is almost exclusively related to poultry processing with an improving trend in recent years. This is due to improvements in business operator practices, technology and enforcement action being taken against operators who do not comply with the legal requirements.

Jo Churchill
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
15th Apr 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, which (a) trade and levy organisations and (b) other members of health, voluntary sector and industry were invited to be part of the external reference group for the formation of the new Eat Well guide.

Public Health England convened an external reference group in July 2014 to inform the refresh of the Eatwell Guide. Members from health, voluntary sector and industry were invited, including trade and levy organisations. Government departments and agencies were observers.

The following organisations were invited and formed the reference group; The Agricultural and Horticultural Development Board, The Association of Directors of Public Health, The Association for Nutrition (chair), The Association of Convenience Stores, The British Dietetic Association, The British Nutrition Foundation, The British Retail Consortium, The Food and Drink Federation, Health Education England, Institute of Grocery Distribution, The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, The Royal College of Nursing and UK Health Forum.

19th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what progress the Government is making in implementing the recommendations in his Department's Innovative Medicines Review.

The Accelerated Access review into innovative medicines and medical technologies was launched on 20 November 2014. On 11 March, the Government published the review’s terms of reference and announced that Sir Hugh Taylor, Chair of Guys and St Thomas’s NHS Foundation Trust, will chair the review. The review will produce an interim report before the autumn.

Work on the review is underway. Background work to map the current development pathways for medicines, devices and diagnostics is ongoing, as is initial work on international comparators. The review has also started to engage with stakeholders from across the landscape, and this dialogue will continue as the review progresses.

George Freeman
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy)
19th Mar 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans the Government has to publish a new dementia strategy.

On 21 February 2015, the Prime Minister launched his new Challenge on Dementia 2020, which builds on the achievements of the Prime Minister’s challenge on dementia 2012-2015, the successor to the National Dementia Strategy 2009-2014. It sets out aspirations for dementia care, support, awareness and research to be transformed by 2020.

What happens from 2015/16 to 2020 will be determined by the next Government in the context of the Spending Review, however the expectation, subject to the outcome of the Spending Review, is to work with key stakeholders on the implementation on the vision to ensure that real and sustainable improvements are delivered for people with dementia, their carers and families.

29th Jan 2015
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what discussions his Department has had with the Food Standards Agency on implementing the recommendations in the efficiency review carried out by the National Audit Office in 2013.

The Food Standards Agency (FSA) is a non-ministerial department and asked the National Audit Office to undertake an efficiency review in order to identify whether it was delivering the official controls required for the United Kingdom meat industry under European and UK legislation as efficiently as possible. The review took place early in 2013 and encompassed both frontline operational and support functions. Findings were presented to the FSA Board in July 2013, and an action plan developed in response.

7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to provide support to NATO countries bordering Ukraine on humanitarian assistance for refugees of the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

The UK has now committed £395 million in aid to the current crisis. This includes £220 million of humanitarian assistance which will be used to save lives, protect vulnerable people inside Ukraine and in neighbouring countries. It will also be used to support refugees fleeing Ukraine through the provision of logistics, advice and analysis of needs on the ground.

We have deployed UK humanitarian experts to support Ukraine's neighbours, including Poland and Romania, who are receiving and supporting the increasing flow of refugees fleeing Ukraine.

James Cleverly
Minister of State (Minister for Europe)
30th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to help protect the rights of indigenous peoples in Brazil.

The UK is committed to promoting and defending the human rights of all individuals, and we continues to support work with indigenous communities across Brazil, including in the Amazon region. UK programmes on building back better after the COVID-19 pandemic include a focus on vulnerable groups, including in the Amazon region, and work on issues such as solar energy, primary health, and skills development. The UK has also supported local and indigenous people in the Amazon through our International Climate Finance Programmes, with nearly £120 million invested since 2012.

Wendy Morton
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
1st Feb 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment his Department has made of Hezbollah's ability to manufacture weapons.

We are aware of reports that Hizballah is manufacturing weapons in Lebanon, which would constitute a direct contravention of UN Security Council Resolutions 1559 and 1701. We condemn the threat that such activity poses to regional stability.

16th Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what proportion of UK High Commissions and embassies serve English or Welsh wine.

A number of our High Commissions and Embassies now do so, but we do not centrally hold details of the wine that is served.

21st Mar 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of recent reports of Iran testing a new long-range ballistic missile.

Reports that Iran carried out ballistic missile tests earlier this month are of great concern. These tests are inconsistent with UN Security Council Resolution 2231, and the UK is raising these concerns in writing with the UN Security Council. The UK continues to urge Iran to refrain from further tests.

10th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of implications for his policies of the conclusions of the Federation of Wholesale Distributors survey that (a) 50 per cent of businesses surveyed that have a turnover of £45 million or lower, are in danger of going into liquidation in the next three months to a year, (b) 70 per cent of respondents supply to schools, care homes, hospitals and (c) £270 million worth of public sector contracts are at risk; and if he will make a statement.

The Government has announced unprecedented support for business and workers to protect them against the current economic emergency including almost £300 billion of guarantees – equivalent to 15% of UK GDP. Local Authorities (LAs) can choose to make discretionary grants to businesses in supply chains, like wholesale distributors, if they feel there is a particular local economic need. The Government has allocated up to £617 million to LAs to enable them to give discretionary grants to businesses in this situation. LAs may choose to focus payments on those priority groups which are most relevant to their local areas or to businesses outside of these priority groups, so long as the business was trading on 11th March, and has not received any other cash grant funded by central Government.

Wholesale distributors can also benefit from other elements of the Government’s unprecedented package of support for business, including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and the four government-backed loan schemes for firms of all sizes. The Business Support website provides further information about how businesses can access the support that has been made available, who is eligible, when the schemes open and how to apply - https://www.gov.uk/business-coronavirus-support-finder.

On 11 May the Government published its COVID-19 recovery strategy which sets out our plan for moving to the next phase of our response. The strategy sets out a cautious roadmap for easing existing measures in a safe and measured way. Our aim is that all non-essential retail will be able to reopen by 15 June if the Government’s five tests are met and they follow the COVID-19 secure guidelines. The roadmap will be kept constantly under review, and we will continue to work hard to support business and workers as the situation evolves. The Department for Transport is engaging with the haulage industry to understand the impact of COVID-19 on the sector.

Kemi Badenoch
Minister for Equalities
9th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend the application of business rates relief to food and drink wholesalers.

The Government has provided enhanced support through business rates relief to businesses occupying properties used for retail, hospitality and leisure given the direct and acute impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on those sectors.

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government has published guidance for local authorities on eligible properties. As set out in the guidance, support is targeted at premises that are wholly or mainly being used as shops, restaurants, cafes, drinking establishments, cinemas and live music venues; for assembly and leisure; or as hotels, guest and boarding premises, and self-catering accommodation. It is for local authorities to determine eligibility for reliefs, having regard to guidance issued by the Government.

A range of further measures to support all businesses, including those not eligible for the business rates holiday, such as wholesalers, has also been made available.

22nd Oct 2018
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the merits of a potential role for the vehicle rental and leasing sector in increasing uptake of electric vehicles; and if he will bring forward the 2 per cent company car tax rate to April 2019 to help achieve that.

The vehicle rental and leasing sector has an important role to play in helping to achieve the government’s ambition for the majority of new cars to be zero emission by 2040.

The vehicle tax system incentivises the uptake of cars with low CO2 emissions with favourable rates of Vehicle Excise Duty and company car tax.

21st May 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to publish the benefit-in-kind bands for after 2021.

The government normally announces changes to the details of the banding for calculating the value of the benefit-in-kind for company cars three years in advance of implementation.

21st May 2018
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons the benefit-in-kind surcharge for diesel has been increased from three per cent to four per cent; and what assessment he has made of the effect of this increase on leases which were agreed on the basis of a three per cent supplement.

Road transport is responsible for 80% of nitrogen dioxide emissions in roadside tests. Even the latest diesel models produce, on average, six times more nitrogen oxide (NOx) in real-world tests compared to lab tests.

The diesel supplement for company car tax aims to encourage manufacturers to bring forward next-generation clean diesels sooner. Cars which meet the Real Driving Emissions Step 2 standard are not liable to pay the supplement.

Each year, 350,000 company car drivers replace their vehicle. This means that, within a few years, most affected drivers will have the opportunity to choose cleaner models.

4th Jul 2017
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of how much will be raised for the public purse in fuel duty in each year to 2029-30.

According to the latest provisional statistics released by HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC), fuel duties raised £27.9bn in the 2016-17 tax year. Forecasts for fuel duty revenues in future years are provided by the independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) in their ‘Economic and Fiscal Outlook’. For the latest fuel duty revenue forecast, please see Table 4.6 on page 104:

http://budgetresponsibility.org.uk/efo/economic-fiscal-outlook-march-2017/

The OBR do not publish forecasts of tax receipts past the five-year ‘scorecard’ period (currently ending in 2021-22). However, in their 2014 ‘Fiscal Sustainability Report’ they did assess the sustainability of fuel duty revenues over a longer period. Please see Chapter 4 (page 123) of the report for more information:

http://cdn.budgetresponsibility.org.uk/41298-OBR-accessible.pdf

27th Apr 2016
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what proportion of fruit juice a drink must contain to be considered a pure fruit juice for the purposes of the sugar levy.

The levy will apply to soft drinks with added sugar. This will include any fruit or vegetable juice drinks that contain added sugar. Pure fruit and vegetable juices, and other juice drinks that do not have added sugar will not be liable.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Home Office) (Security)
21st Jul 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will meet the Tenant Farmers' Association to discuss its proposals for taxation of agricultural land to encourage longer term farm business tenancies.

Treasury Ministers and officials have meetings with a wide variety of organisations in the public and private sectors as part of the process of policy development and delivery.

Details of ministerial and permanent secretary meetings with external organisations on departmental business are published on a quarterly basis and are available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hmt-ministers-meetings-hospitality-gifts-and-overseas-travel

3rd Jul 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will review the taxation of rural land and how that taxation effects decisions to let land on farm business tenancies.

The government understands the importance of the agricultural sector to the UK economy. The Government keeps all taxes under review.

3rd Jul 2015
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy to limit Agricultural Property Relief from inheritance tax to encourage longer term farm business tenancies.

The government understands the importance of the agricultural sector to the UK economy. The Government keeps all taxes under review.

7th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to (a) support Ukrainian refugees to escape the conflict zone in Ukraine and (b) expedite asylum applications to the UK for vulnerable people, including the elderly, women and children.

The Government is moving as quickly as possible to ensure those fleeing Ukraine can find safety in the UK through the Ukraine Family Scheme and Homes for Ukraine Scheme, the first of their kind to be operationalised anywhere in the world.

Both of these schemes are free, and people applying under the schemes will be able to live and work in the UK for up to three years. They will have full and unrestricted access to benefits, healthcare, employment, and other support.

The Government has streamlined the process so valid Ukrainian passport holders do not have to attend in-person appointments before arriving in the UK, simplified our forms and boosted caseworker numbers, while ensuring vital security checks are carried out.

Whilst the Government sympathises with people in many difficult situations around the world, there is no provision within the Immigration Rules for someone to be allowed to travel to the UK to seek asylum or temporary refuge.

The Government does though welcome vulnerable people in need of protection to the UK through our resettlement schemes. These schemes have provided safe and legal routes for tens of thousands of people to start new lives in the UK.

Kevin Foster
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Home Office)
4th Jul 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what progress he has made on bringing the Queen Elizabeth class aircraft carriers into service.

HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH sailed from Rosyth on 26 June to commence contractor sea trials off the north-east coast of Scotland. HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH is by far the most powerful warship ever built in Britain enabling us to tackle changing threats around the globe.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what non-lethal military support his Department has provided to Tunisia in each year since 2012.

The UK strongly supportsTunisia's democratic transition and we are working to assist the Tunisian authorities as they deliver change. Since 2012, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) has provided the following support to the Tunisian Armed Forces:

In June 2012 the MOD and Department for Transport delivered Explosive Detection Equipment Training to the Tunisian Armed Forces in Tunisia;

In May 2012, Tunisian military delegates attended an Economic Exclusion Zone course in the UK;

In January 2014, a small team delivered a presentation to the Tunisian Armed Forces on the UK's approach to Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR);

There are currently two Tunisian students enrolled on the International Sub Lieutenant's course in the UK.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what non-lethal military support his Department has provided to Libya in each year since 2012.

Since 2012 the UK has provided advice, training and Defence Education to Libya.

An advisory team was established in Tripoli in 2012 to support the UK / Libya relationship and provide advice through a number of personnel embedded in the Libyan Ministry of Defence, Navy, Air Force, Land Forces and Border Security Force.

In 2013 the advisory team was renamed the Defence Advisory and Training Team (DATT) to reflect the variety of support programmes, including strategic communication, developing explosive ordnance disposal schools, supporting the creation of a joint operational planning staff and naval training. The DATT currently numbers 34 personnel which includes a Senior Disarmament Advisor working with the Government of Libya, the UN and international partners on disarmament issues. The DATT also provides the platform for Short Term Training Team deployments from the UK.

In 2013 HMS Echo surveyed the coast off Tripoli including a number of ports and in February 2014 the Libyans signed a data sharing agreement with the UK Hydrographic Office.

Libyan personnel have undergone defence education and training in the UK including: English Language Training, Initial Officer Training, Economic Exclusion Zone Protection Officers courses and Managing Defence in the Wider Security Context.

In November 2013 the UK also established a Defence Section within the British Embassy, Tripoli with a Defence Attaché.

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what non-lethal military support his Department has provided to Algeria in each year since 2012.

The UK provides military support to the Algerian Armed Forces mainly through the provision of academic and specialised UK based courses. In 2012, 31 Algerian students from the Algerian Armed Forces attended UK military courses, and in 2013 seven students came to the UK for training. The courses attended since 2012 are:

Royal College of Defence Studies

Initial Naval Training (Officers) at BRNC Dartmouth

RAF Initial Officer Training at RAF Cranwell

Economic Exclusion Zone Protection Officer Course (one in 2012 delivered in the UK, one in 2013 delivered in Gibraltar)

Stabilisation and Peace Support Operation

Board and Search Training

English Language Training

HM Common Time course

International Principal Warfare Officers' Course

RIB training

International Air Battle Management Course

Multinational Peace Support Operations Instructor Training Course

Design and Evaluation of Peace Support Operations Training

In addition to this, in 2013, delegations from the Algerian Armed Forces visited the Permanent Joint Headquarters in Northwood, and the Defence Helicopter Flying School at RAF Shawbury. In March 2014, a delegation from the Ministry of Defence's Surgeon General's department visited Algiers to discuss potential areas for cooperation with the Algerian military medical services.

12th Jul 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the Written Statement of 28 June 2021, HCWS128 on Supporting Tourism in England, what recent discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs on (a) facilitating a quick licensing process and (b) expediting new applications for camping licences to provide certainty for applicants of temporary campsites.

As the Written Statement made clear, the Government wants local authorities to expedite new applications for licenses for temporary campsites, where they are needed, to provide certainty for applicants.

Under the campsite licensing legislation, if a local authority fails to meet this expectation for a fast decision and does not respond to a licensing application within a month, the operator can continue without a license.

My Department and DEFRA will continue to work together with local authorities to ensure licensing does not become a barrier to increased temporary campsite capacity over the Summer.

Christopher Pincher
Treasurer of HM Household (Deputy Chief Whip, House of Commons)
29th Jan 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what progress has been made towards establishing a code of practice under the Parking (Code of Practice) Act 2019.

On 3 November 2019, we announced we were contracting with the British Standards Institution (BSI) to develop the Code of Practice as British Standard, to ensure the new regulation will be robust and of the highest quality.

The government’s choice of BSI delivers on our promise to listen to industry and consumers and involve them in the design of the new regulation.

Work with BSI commenced in December 2019, and they are now convening a group of key stakeholders to write the Code. The stakeholder group will comprise representatives from the parking industry, consumer groups, standards bodies and, recognising the key role that parking plays in supporting our high streets, the retail sector.

A full public consultation will take place within six months, to give the parking industry, the public, and other interested parties the opportunity to have a say.

We have committed to developing the final Code this year.

21st Oct 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the timeframe is for (a) his Department to issue guidance on the (i) operation and (ii) management of private parking facilities and (b) the appointment of an independent office to deal with parking appeals under the Parking (Code of Practice) Act 2019.

The government is committed enacting the Parking (Code of Practice) Act 2019 as soon as possible. It will lead to the creation of an independent code of practice for private parking companies and, if the Code requires it, a single independent service for parking appeals. We are currently considering the options for the delivery of the Code, including the design of the levy on industry, as well as the format for stakeholder engagement. We will make an announcement in due course. We are also committed to carrying out a public consultation on the draft Code of Practice, allowing all interested parties to directly respond to the proposals.

18th Feb 2019
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that local authorities receive adequate funding to ensure that public toilets are sufficiently accessible for people with disabilities.

Local authorities have discretion over the range of services they provide and will see their core spending power increase to £46.4 billion in 2019-20, a cash-increase of 2.8 per cent. To support the running of all public toilets, the Chancellor announced at Autumn Budget a new 100 per cent business rates relief for standalone public lavatories in England.

Rishi Sunak
Chancellor of the Exchequer
26th Jun 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether a local authority should consider its housing need when assessing a proposed Neighbourhood Plan and its proposals to build new local homes; and if he will make a statement.

Government wants to ensure that plans start from an honest assessment of need for new homes, the draft revised National Planning Policy Framework proposes that local authorities provide designated neighbourhood planning areas with a housing requirement figure.

Our guidance is also clear that local planning authorities should provide constructive comments on an emerging neighbourhood plan before it is submitted for examination. Following examination a Local Planning Authority is required to decide whether a plan meets the basic conditions, which include whether the making of the neighbourhood plan is in general conformity with the strategic policies contained in the development plan for the area.

Dominic Raab
Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice
9th Jan 2018
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will ensure that the Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Reduction Taskforce considers the matter of rural homelessness.

Tackling homelessness is a complex issue with no single solution, but we are determined to help the most vulnerable in society whether they live in towns, cities or rural areas. I can assure you that the Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Reduction Taskforce will consider homelessness in both urban and rural areas.

Heather Wheeler
Assistant Whip
19th Oct 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to take steps to mitigate the adverse effects of the practice of gazumping in the housing market.

On 22 October my Department launched a Call for Evidence on the home buying and selling process. We have asked how we should best tackle gazumping, and will develop plans in the light of this feedback.

Alok Sharma
COP26 President (Cabinet Office)
23rd Jan 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what support his Department provides to help develop and implement local authorities' design codes.

The National Planning Policy Framework and supporting planning guidance asks local planning authorities to consider using design codes where they could help deliver high quality outcomes. The Framework states that design policies should avoid unnecessary prescription or detail and should concentrate on guiding the overall scale, density, massing, height, landscape, layout, materials and access of new development in relation to neighbouring buildings and the local area more generally.

In addition the Homes and Communities Agency has published a number of guidance documents around design and sustainability providing practical, delivery related knowledge, research findings and good practice.

https://www.gov.uk/topic/housing/design-and-sustainability

20th Dec 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to support the creation of traditional, street-based, high-density designs in new housing developments.

The Government is very clear that good design is a key aspect of sustainable development, is indivisible from good planning, and should contribute positively to making places better for people. We want to see new developments that function well and add to the overall quality of the area, that establish a strong sense of place by using streetscapes and buildings to create attractive and comfortable places to live, work and visit. Our planning guidance reinforces this strong focus on design, and provides advice on tools for delivery - including design codes. However, it is for local authorities and their communities, through their Local Plans and Neighbourhood plans, to set out the quality of design that they wish to see in their area.

22nd Nov 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what steps he is taking to support the role of local communities in the design of new housing developments.

We have introduced reforms to enable local communities to produce statutory Neighbourhood Plans. These Plans empower communities to shape the areas in which they live and future developments.

19th May 2016
To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making superfast broadband a planning obligation on all new build properties

We have worked with BT Openreach and the Home Builders Federation on an agreement, announced earlier this year, which aims to deliver superfast broadband connectivity to new build properties in the UK. We have also recently introduced a requirement for all new buildings and major renovations to include in-building physical infrastructure to support connections to superfast broadband. In addition, the National Planning Policy Framework places the provision of superfast broadband alongside other strategic infrastructure and requires local planning authorities to consult providers as part of the Local Plan.

Brandon Lewis
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
7th Mar 2017
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, what proportion of exports from Northern Ireland are sold in the Republic of Ireland.

HM Revenue and Customs Regional Trade Statistics show exports to Ireland accounted for 33 per cent of Northern Ireland’s total exports in 2015.