Kate Hollern Portrait

Kate Hollern

Labour - Blackburn

First elected: 7th May 2015


1 APPG membership (as of 24 Jan 2024)
Ethnic Minority Business Owners
2 Former APPG memberships
Governance and Inclusive Leadership, Lower Carbon Construction Vehicles
Justice Committee
13th Jul 2021 - 28th Mar 2023
Powers of Attorney Bill
22nd Feb 2023 - 1st Mar 2023
Pension Dashboards (Prohibition of Indemnification) Bill
19th Oct 2022 - 26th Oct 2022
Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure Bill
2nd Mar 2022 - 22nd Mar 2022
Elections Bill
15th Sep 2021 - 26th Oct 2021
Shadow Minister (Housing, Communities and Local Government)
9th Jan 2018 - 13th May 2021
Procedure Committee
2nd Mar 2020 - 15th Jun 2020
Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government)
9th Oct 2016 - 9th Jan 2018
Shadow Minister (Defence)
7th Jan 2016 - 9th Oct 2016
Education, Skills and the Economy Sub-Committee
25th Nov 2015 - 1st Feb 2016
Education Committee
6th Jul 2015 - 1st Feb 2016
Armed Forces Bill Committee
26th Oct 2015 - 24th Nov 2015


Department Event
Monday 4th March 2024
14:30
Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities
Oral questions - Main Chamber
4 Mar 2024, 2:30 p.m.
Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Monday 4th March 2024
18:00
Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities
First Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
4 Mar 2024, 6 p.m.
The draft Social Housing (Regulation) Act 2023 (Consequential and Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2024
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Monday 4th March 2024
18:00
Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities
First Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - Select & Joint Committees
4 Mar 2024, 6 p.m.
The draft Social Housing (Regulation) Act 2023 (Consequential and Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2024
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 5th March 2024
14:30
Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities
Third Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - General Committee
5 Mar 2024, 2:30 p.m.
The draft Representation of the People (Variation of Election Expenses and Exclusions) Regulations 2024
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Tuesday 5th March 2024
14:30
Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities
Third Delegated Legislation Committee - Debate - Select & Joint Committees
5 Mar 2024, 2:30 p.m.
The draft Representation of the People (Variation of Election Expenses and Exclusions) Regulations 2024
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Department Event
Monday 22nd April 2024
14:30
Department for Levelling Up, Housing & Communities
Oral questions - Main Chamber
22 Apr 2024, 2:30 p.m.
Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (including Topical Questions)
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Note: This event involves a Department with which this person is linked, and does not guarantee their actual attendance.
Division Votes
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Leasehold and Freehold Reform Bill
voted Aye - in line with the party majority
One of 150 Labour Aye votes vs 0 Labour No votes
Tally: Ayes - 179 Noes - 294
Speeches
Tuesday 27th February 2024
Oral Answers to Questions
2. What estimate she has made of the number of households in fuel poverty in winter 2023-24.
Written Answers
Thursday 29th February 2024
Disabled Facilities Grants
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether it remains his Department's policy to increase the …
Early Day Motions
Wednesday 13th July 2022
Child poverty in the North West
That this House is alarmed by the increase in level of child poverty in the North West, with research from …
Bills
None available
MP Financial Interests
Monday 30th October 2023
3. Gifts, benefits and hospitality from UK sources
Name of donor: Blackburn Rovers F&A Ltd
Address of donor: Ewood Park, Blackburn BB2 4JF
Amount of donation or nature …
EDM signed
Thursday 29th February 2024
Administration of SSB Law
That this House notes with concern the collapse of SSB Law that has left hundreds across the country facing demands …
Supported Legislation
Wednesday 18th March 2020
Children (Access to Treatment) Bill 2019-21
A Bill to make provision about children’s access to medical treatment; and for connected purposes.

Division Voting information

During the current Parliament, Kate Hollern has voted in 740 divisions, and 2 times against the majority of their Party.

10 Jan 2022 - Charter for Budget Responsibility and Welfare Cap - View Vote Context
Kate Hollern voted No - against a party majority - in line with the party majority and against the House
One of 14 Labour No votes vs 1 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 306 Noes - 54
30 Mar 2022 - Health and Care Bill - View Vote Context
Kate Hollern voted No - against a party majority and against the House
One of 4 Labour No votes vs 125 Labour Aye votes
Tally: Ayes - 215 Noes - 188
View All Kate Hollern Division Votes

Debates during the 2019 Parliament

Speeches made during Parliamentary debates are recorded in Hansard. For ease of browsing we have grouped debates into individual, departmental and legislative categories.

Sparring Partners
Luke Hall (Conservative)
(9 debate interactions)
Steve Barclay (Conservative)
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
(9 debate interactions)
Simon Clarke (Conservative)
(7 debate interactions)
View All Sparring Partners
Department Debates
Cabinet Office
(15 debate contributions)
Department of Health and Social Care
(14 debate contributions)
Department for Work and Pensions
(12 debate contributions)
View All Department Debates
Legislation Debates
Elections Act 2022
(2,124 words contributed)
Non-Domestic Rating (Lists) Act 2021
(1,415 words contributed)
View All Legislation Debates
View all Kate Hollern's debates

Blackburn Petitions

e-Petitions are administered by Parliament and allow members of the public to express support for a particular issue.

If an e-petition reaches 10,000 signatures the Government will issue a written response.

If an e-petition reaches 100,000 signatures the petition becomes eligible for a Parliamentary debate (usually Monday 4.30pm in Westminster Hall).

Petition Debates Contributed

We want the UK to be neutral in the conflict between Israel and Palestine, and withdraw offers of support for Israel.

We want the Government to seek a ceasefire and also seek to address the root cause of the current conflict by promoting dialogue and advocating for the end of Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

The UK Government should urge the Israeli Government to stop the blockade of Food, Fuel and Electricity to the already impoverished city of Gaza


Latest EDMs signed by Kate Hollern

23rd February 2024
Kate Hollern signed this EDM on Thursday 29th February 2024

Administration of SSB Law

Tabled by: Imran Hussain (Labour - Bradford East)
That this House notes with concern the collapse of SSB Law that has left hundreds across the country facing demands for payment stretching into thousands of pounds; stresses that a number of those affected by SSB Law’s collapse cannot meet the large demands for payment and will face significant consequences, …
18 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 14
Independent: 2
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
20th February 2024
Kate Hollern signed this EDM on Monday 26th February 2024

Household Support Fund (No. 2)

Tabled by: Ian Byrne (Labour - Liverpool, West Derby)
That this House expresses deep concern that the UK Government has not committed to extending the Household Support Fund (HSF) beyond March 2024; notes that via this fund the Government has invested significantly in local crisis support as a response to the cost-of-living crisis; further notes that more than £2 …
34 signatures
(Most recent: 29 Feb 2024)
Signatures by party:
Labour: 27
Independent: 4
Democratic Unionist Party: 1
Green Party: 1
Scottish National Party: 1
View All Kate Hollern's signed Early Day Motions

Commons initiatives

These initiatives were driven by Kate Hollern, and are more likely to reflect personal policy preferences.

MPs who are act as Ministers or Shadow Ministers are generally restricted from performing Commons initiatives other than Urgent Questions.


Kate Hollern has not been granted any Urgent Questions

Kate Hollern has not been granted any Adjournment Debates

Kate Hollern has not introduced any legislation before Parliament

1 Bill co-sponsored by Kate Hollern

Children (Access to Treatment) Bill 2019-21
Sponsor - Bambos Charalambous (Ind)


101 Written Questions in the current parliament

(View all written questions)
Written Questions can be tabled by MPs and Lords to request specific information information on the work, policy and activities of a Government Department
1 Other Department Questions
25th Jan 2023
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, whether the Government plans to bring forward a health disparities white paper in 2023.

The Major Conditions White Paper, that we announced on Tuesday, will apply a geographical lens to address disparities in outcomes. This will support the levelling up mission to extend healthy life expectancy by five years by 2035 and narrow the gap between areas by 2030.

As the Major Conditions White Paper will therefore cover many of the same areas as a document focused on health disparities, we will no longer be publishing a separate White Paper.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
21st Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on food prices of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report entitled, Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change, published in April 2022, which said that widespread use of bioenergy with carbon capture and storage could use up to 46 per cent of the world’s arable land; and if he will make a statement.

The Government’s Biomass Strategy, which will be published later this year, will establish the role which Bioenergy with Carbon Capture & Storage (BECCS) can play in reducing carbon emissions across the economy and set out how the technology could be deployed. No decision has been made on future BECCS deployment.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
28th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the names of the forests from which Drax sources its wood pellets.

The Government does not hold this information.

Information on country and region of sourcing of generators is publicly available at https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/publications/biomass-sustainability-dataset-2019-20.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effect of rising fuel prices on household finances in Blackburn constituency.

The Government is conscious of the impact of fuel prices on household finances across the country.

That is why we have kept fuel duty frozen. This is the twelfth consecutive freeze, saving the average UK car driver a cumulative £1,900, compared to the plans set out by the previous government in 2010.

Greg Hands
Minister of State (Department for Business and Trade)
25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the list of projects that have been allocated European Structural and Investment Funding in (a) 2021-22 and (b) 2022-23.

The UK will remain in European Structural & Investment (ESI) Fund programmes (ERDF, ESF, EAFRD and EMFF) until the end of December 2023, and after this they will be closed. Allocations are published in the Operational Programmes for each fund. These allocations need to be spent within three years of being allocated or by 31st December 2023.

Published information on all ESI funds can be accessed from the ESIF Home Page on GOV.UK at https://www.gov.uk/european-structural-investment-funds, through which links to the websites of the Devolved Administrations can also be accessed.

Published information on ESI funding (ERDF and ESF) in Gibraltar can be found at www.eufunding.gi.

National authorities responsible for managing each Operational Programme will report progress against these allocations in their Annual Implementation Reports to the European Commission. For ESI funds in England the Annual Implementation Reports are available on GOV.UK. Annual Implementation Reports for ESI funds in the Devolved Administrations are available on their respective websites.

25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will publish the amount of European Structural and Investment Funding that is (a) unallocated and (b) allocated but yet to be spent in the next three years.

The UK will remain in European Structural & Investment (ESI) Fund programmes (ERDF, ESF, EAFRD and EMFF) until the end of December 2023, and after this they will be closed. Allocations are published in the Operational Programmes for each fund. These allocations need to be spent within three years of being allocated or by 31st December 2023.

Published information on all ESI funds can be accessed from the ESIF Home Page on GOV.UK at https://www.gov.uk/european-structural-investment-funds, through which links to the websites of the Devolved Administrations can also be accessed.

Published information on ESI funding (ERDF and ESF) in Gibraltar can be found at www.eufunding.gi.

National authorities responsible for managing each Operational Programme will report progress against these allocations in their Annual Implementation Reports to the European Commission. For ESI funds in England the Annual Implementation Reports are available on GOV.UK. Annual Implementation Reports for ESI funds in the Devolved Administrations are available on their respective websites.

1st Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to support Business Improvement Districts with their operational costs.

BIDs are a proven and effective vehicle for leveraging private investment and have a significant role to play in high street regeneration: in 2019, 259 BIDs across England raised over £106.7 million through levy payments to invest back into their respective towns and cities. Their role will be even more important in the recovery phase from the current crisis.

During 2020, the Government paid £5.8m of support funding to 260 BIDs in England to assist with their core running costs. The funding was delivered through non-ringfenced section 31 grants to Local Authorities, who distributed this to the BID bodies in their area.

The Government included provisions within the Coronavirus Act 2020 that enables BIDs to delay any renewal ballots due to take place before 31 December 2020, until 31 March 2021. This is to allow businesses to focus on recovery from the effects of the Coronavirus pandemic before deciding whether to participate in future BID arrangements. While this extension will come to an end on 31 March 2021, we have heard many positive examples of BIDs who have undertaken successful renewal ballots. We also know that many are also seeing the BID levy continuing to be paid by members.

21st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment she has made of the merits of COPA90's recommendations on issues of fan behaviour and engagement as part of the Fan Led Review of Football Governance.

We thank all those organisations and individuals who gave and submitted evidence to the Fan Led Review of Football Governance, including COPA90. All submissions were assessed by the Independent Fan Led Review.

The Government has welcomed the Fan Led Review and has endorsed in principle the primary recommendation of the review, that football requires a strong, independent regulator to secure the future of our national game.

The Government is working at pace to review the report in full, including detailed consideration of the recommendations made on improving fan engagement and accountability across the game.

The Government will continue to engage with stakeholders as we work towards issuing a full response to the report in the Spring.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
10th Dec 2020
What recent assessment he has made of the effect of tier 3 covid-19 restrictions on Championship football.

As well as the Government’s unprecedented financial support for business, which many football clubs have accessed, we ensured that elite sport could continue throughout the November national restrictions, and in every covid tier going forward. Spectators at elite sport are also now permitted in Tiers 1 and 2 - a crucial step for sport’s recovery.

I welcomed the deal agreed between the Premier League and EFL to provide up to £250m of support to EFL clubs, including the Championship - to ensure that no EFL club goes under due to the pandemic.

Nigel Huddleston
Financial Secretary (HM Treasury)
29th Jan 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if she will make it her policy to allow parents to claim funded hours for their child if they are cared for by a registered childminder who is also a member of their extended family.

Childminders are a key part of the childcare market and they will play a significant part in the government’s increased early years entitlements offer.

Funding made available in the dedicated schools grant (DSG) for the entitlements to early education for two, three and four-year-olds cannot be claimed by, or spent on, childminders providing childcare for related children. This restriction is placed on local authorities funding relatives and is set out in the Childcare Act 2006 (the 2006 Act) Section 18(4)(c). The 2006 Act specifically excludes care provided for a child by a parent or other relative, and section 18(8)(c) of the 2006 Act states that a relative, in relation to a child, means ‘a grandparent, aunt, uncle, brother or sister, whether of the full blood or half blood or by marriage or civil partnership’.

This approach avoids creating an incentive for adults to register to become childminders and being paid to look after related children that they are already looking after on an informal basis.

A local authority can choose to fund a childminder providing care for a related child. However, this would have to be from the local authority funds that are independent of the DSG.

In the case of a nursery or pre-school, the funding is not necessarily paid to an individual who is caring for a relative, but to the setting which provides early education to a group of children, which may include a child related to a member of staff.

David Johnston
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education)
14th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many school classrooms were closed due to maintenance and structural issues in the most recent 12-month period for which data are available.

Nothing is more important than the safety of children and staff. It has always been the case that where we are made aware of a building that may pose an immediate risk, immediate action is taken.

It is the responsibility of those who run schools – academy trusts, Local Authorities, and voluntary aided school bodies – who work with their schools on a day to day basis, to manage the maintenance of their schools. The Department does not therefore hold information on the number of buildings closed due to maintenance and structural issues.

The Department will always put the safety and wellbeing of children and staff in schools and colleges at the heart of its policy decisions. The Government has taken more proactive action to identify and mitigate RAAC in education settings than the devolved administrations in the UK, or indeed, governments overseas.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how much funding has been provided through the National Tutoring Programme in Blackburn in each month since it that programme was launched.

The Department does not hold information on Tuition Partners or Academic Mentors in the required format at constituency level.

School-led tutoring grant allocations by school and local authority for the academic year 2021 to 2022 have been published at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/1071234/School_Led_Funding_Publication_File_flat_values_v1.ods

Payment information relating to School-Led Tutoring for the academic year 2021 to 2022 will be published by the Education and Skills Funding Agency once the reconciliation process has been completed for that period.

School-led tutoring grant allocations for the academic year 2022 to 2023 have been published at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-tutoring-programme-ntp-allocations-for-2022-to-2023-academic-year.

Between November 2020 and June 2022, over two million tuition courses were started. The Government has committed more than £1 billion to support tutoring over academic years 2020 to 2023/24, during which we aim to offer up to six million tutoring courses.

24th Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has for the allocation of funding resulting from the forecast underspend for the National Tutoring Programme.

The department will continue to support the progress of tutoring through the three flexible routes to high-quality tutoring (school-led tutoring, tuition partners and academic mentors) and will consider in-year adjustments to ensure schools continue offering the type of tutoring that best suits their pupils to maximise the benefits of the programme.

21st Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment he has made of the budgetary pressures on schools in Lancashire.

This government continues to deliver, year on year, real terms per pupil increases to school funding with the total core schools budget increasing to £56.8 billion by financial year 2024-25 (compared to £49.8 billion in the 2021-22 financial year).

Future increases in funding have been frontloaded to rapidly get money to schools. In the financial year 2022-23 alone, core schools funding will increase nationally by £4 billion compared to 2021-22, a 5% real terms per pupil boost. This includes an additional £1.2 billion for schools in the new schools supplementary grant for financial year 2022-23.

In Lancashire, funding through the dedicated schools grant and the indicative figures for the schools supplementary grant for mainstream schools combined, is forecast to see an extra £53.6 million for schools in financial year 2022-23, an increase of 5.6% per pupil. This per pupil funding increase excludes “growth” funding, which is additional funding provided for schools seeing significant increases in pupil numbers. This takes total funding for 2022–23 in Lancashire to over £903 million. This will help schools rise to the challenges of COVID-19, increase teacher pay, and meet the cost of the Health and Social Care Levy, while continuing their work to raise attainment.

On top of the core funding uplift for schools, at Spending Review 2021 the department has announced a further £1.8 billion of new funding nationally, specifically for recovery for those the department knows will need it most. This takes overall investment specifically dedicated towards pupils’ recovery to almost £5 billion.

The department pays close attention to the financial health of the sector. The latest published data on schools’ revenue reserves shows schools on average have been able to add to their reserves in the 2020-21 financial year. At the end of the 2020-21 financial year, 92% of maintained schools were in cumulative surplus or breaking even, compared to 88% the previous year. The percentage of maintained schools in Lancashire operating with a cumulative surplus by the end of 2020-21 increased to 95%, compared to 92% at the end of financial year 2019-20. All schools continue to be able to access a wide range of school resource management tools. Schools in serious financial difficulty should contact their local authority or the Education and Skills Funding Agency.

The department’s analysis of the cost pressures schools face are published annually in the schools’ costs technical note which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/schools-costs-technical-note.

Analysis for financial year 2021-22 will be published shortly.

21st Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the impact of Russia's invasion of Ukraine on the UK's food supply and security.

The UK has a highly resilient food supply chain that has coped well in responding to unprecedented challenges.

Our food import dependency on the Eastern Europe region is very low. We do not expect any significant direct impact on overall UK food supply as a result of the conflict in Ukraine. Food imports from Ukraine and Russia comprise a relatively small amount of cereals and oilseeds - such as wheat, maize, rapeseed and sunflower oil - and vodka. We have strong domestic production on many of the same products. We speak regularly with food industry figures, who remain confident in the food supply chain.

Food prices depend on a range of factors including agri-food import prices, domestic agricultural prices, domestic labour, exchange rates and manufacturing costs. The war in Ukraine is another factor which will have an impact on food prices. We are working with major food retailers to understand the effect on individual industries and supply chains in Defra’s sectors, and any resulting impacts on price.

Victoria Prentis
Attorney General
21st Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, when he plans to respond to the correspondence of 22 March 2021 from the hon. Member for Blackburn on the abandoned waste programme.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Rebecca Pow
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport on average, how many daily services does he expect Avanti West Coast to run in (a) August and (b) September.

Avanti West Coast run a seven train per hour timetable which equates to 264 weekday services, 244 on Saturdays, and 202 on Sundays. However, from 24 July to 8 September, Avanti has removed 20 trains a day from its weekday timetable, to enable it to run a more reliable service for its customers, minimising unplanned, short-term cancellations. This is a temporary measure and from 9 September it will return to current levels. The base position is subject to change as Avanti agrees plans to mitigate the impact of strikes and Network Rail engineering works, particularly on weekends.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many daily services Avanti West Coast runs under its current timetable.

Avanti West Coast run a seven train per hour timetable which equates to 264 weekday services, 244 on Saturdays, and 202 on Sundays. However, from 24 July to 8 September, Avanti has removed 20 trains a day from its weekday timetable, to enable it to run a more reliable service for its customers, minimising unplanned, short-term cancellations. This is a temporary measure and from 9 September it will return to current levels. The base position is subject to change as Avanti agrees plans to mitigate the impact of strikes and Network Rail engineering works, particularly on weekends.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with Avanti West Coast on possible alterations to planned services in (a) August and (b) September 2023.

Avanti West Coast weekday timetables for August and September 2023 are publicly available on the Avanti website. Department officials routinely engage with Avanti and its Owning Group, including on all significant timetabling and performance decisions. We are holding them to account for matters within their control and will continue to use all contractual levers to drive the best outcomes for passengers.

As previously advised to line-of-route MPs, to help maintain the progress it has made so far, Avanti has been taking steps to build in greater resilience in key periods. Given the continued disruption arising from a greatly increased annual leave burden, Avanti is temporarily suspending a limited number of targeted services between 24 July and 9 September 2023. These temporary reductions, spread across its routes and targeted at times of least impact, will help prevent short notice cancellations for passengers, giving them confidence that what they see in the timetable will run reliably. It’s important to note that, throughout this period, Avanti will continue running more services than last year.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
17th Jul 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent discussions he has had with Avanti West Coast on possible service reductions in (a) August and (b) September; and if he will make a statement.

Avanti West Coast weekday timetables for August and September 2023 are publicly available on the Avanti website. Department officials routinely engage with Avanti and its Owning Group, including on all significant timetabling and performance decisions. We are holding them to account for matters within their control and will continue to use all contractual levers to drive the best outcomes for passengers.

As previously advised to line-of-route MPs, to help maintain the progress it has made so far, Avanti has been taking steps to build in greater resilience in key periods. Given the continued disruption arising from a greatly increased annual leave burden, Avanti is temporarily suspending a limited number of targeted services between 24 July and 9 September 2023. These temporary reductions, spread across its routes and targeted at times of least impact, will help prevent short notice cancellations for passengers, giving them confidence that what they see in the timetable will run reliably. It’s important to note that, throughout this period, Avanti will continue running more services than last year.

Huw Merriman
Minister of State (Department for Transport)
5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the National Disability Strategy, what progress his Department has made with Network Rail in accelerating the upgrade of rail station platforms with tactile paving.

Network Rail has received an initial £10 million to install tactile paving at priority stations not already funded. I will make further announcements on future rounds of funding in due course.

Chris Heaton-Harris
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including suicides as reportable incidents under the RIDDOR process.

The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013 (RIDDOR) are made under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 and apply to all sectors and workplaces in Great Britain.

Under RIDDOR, at Regulation 6, requires the responsible person to report:

  • Any death as a result of a work-related accident;
  • Any death resulting from occupational exposure to a biological agent; and
  • Any death caused by a reportable injury where death occurs within a year of the accident.

A suicide would not meet the criteria for reporting under RIDDOR as it is not a death resulting from a work related accident or occupational exposure. An ‘accident’ is defined under RIDDOR as an unforeseen and unintentional incident.

Suicides will be considered in an Inquest conducted by a Coroner or Procurator Fiscal (in Scotland) who will make the decision whether the death was ‘suicide’. The Coroner/Procurator Fiscal can refer cases to the HSE, or other public body, if they consider there is an ongoing risk to others.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
20th Jun 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what the percentage change to Discretionary Housing Payments funding to local authorities in England and Wales will be as a result of the most recent flat rate reduction in allocation.

Overall Discretionary Housing Payments funding is £100m in 2022/23, which is 29% less than the £140m that was available in 2020/21.

In addition to the central government contribution, English and Welsh Local Authorities can top up DHP funding up to a maximum of two and a half times this figure using their own funds.

Since 2011, the Government has provided almost £1.5 billion in DHPs to LAs to help support claimants who require further financial assistance with housing costs. In addition, the Government has made a further £2 billion available over the next three years to tackle and help prevent homelessness and rough sleeping.

David Rutley
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office)
17th Jan 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate she has made of the number of people who have been affected by the underpayment of benefits after transitioning from incapacity benefit to employment and support allowance in Blackburn.

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 19th January to question number 104377.

14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans her Department has to support employment projects for disabled people through the UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

We recognise the barriers some disabled people face to employment, and my department provides a range of support including the Work and Health programme and Intensive Personalised Employment Support.

The Chancellor announced at the November 2020 Spending Review that one portion the UK Shared Prosperity Fund will target places most in need across the UK, whilst a second portion of the Fund will target people most in need through bespoke employment and skills programmes for those who face labour market barriers. Final decisions regarding the design of the Fund will be published later this year.

The UK Government will publish a UK-wide investment framework later in 2021, which will outline the priorities of the fund, and confirm multi-year funding profiles at the next Spending Review.

Mims Davies
Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)
26th Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether it remains his Department's policy to increase the total sum of money eligible per person via the disabled facilities grant.

Local areas already have the discretion to make grants above the current upper limit on a case-by-case basis, or in line with a locally published housing assistance policy. As with all aspects of the Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG), the Government will continue to keep the upper limit under review.

The Next steps to put People at the Heart of Care plan announced a further £102 million for housing adaptation support, £50 million in 2023/24 and £52 million in 2024/25. This is in addition to the £573 million per year which is already available for the DFG. The increase will enable local areas to fund minor home adaptations and other supplementary services that will help people stay independent, and support hospital discharge.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of radiotherapy linear accelerator (LINAC) machines will be over their recommended lifespan by the end of (a) 2023, (b) 2024 and (c) 2025.

Since April 2022, the responsibility for investing in new radiotherapy machines sits with local systems. This is supported by the 2021 Spending Review, which set aside £12 billion in operational capital for the NHS (2022-25).

Recent Capital Planning Guidance sets out the expectation that the majority of radiotherapy equipment, particularly linear accelerator (LINAC) machines, will need to be replaced at ten years of age, to make progress on Long Term Plan priorities. The guidance states that Integrated Care Systems (ICSs) need to develop replacement plans as part of their multi-year capital plans, in partnership with specialised commissioners, Cancer Alliances and Radiotherapy Operational Delivery Networks, based on an assessment of equipment age, capacity and demand, opportunities to improve access, and service risk.

5th Sep 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the time between an urgent GP referral and the commencement of treatment for cancer for patients in Blackburn constituency.

The Department is already taking steps to reduce cancer treatment waiting times across England. Reducing the time between an urgent general practitioner referral and the commencement of treatment for cancer for patients is a priority for this Government. The Department is working jointly with NHS England on implementing the ‘Delivery plan for tackling the COVID-19 backlogs in elective care’. The Government plans to spend more than £8 billion from 2022/23 to 2024/25 to help drive up and protect elective activity, including cancer diagnosis and treatment activity.

In the 2023/24 Operational Planning Guidance, NHS England announced that it is providing over £390 million in cancer service development funding to Cancer Alliances in each of the next two years to support delivery of the strategy and the operational priorities for cancer, which includes increasing and prioritising diagnostic and treatment capacity for cancer.

Additionally, the Government recently published the ‘Major conditions strategy: case for change and our strategic framework’ on 14 August 2023, which sets out our approach to making the choices over the next five years that will deliver the most value in facing the health challenges of today and of the decades ahead, including cancer.

12th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many GP Speciality Trainees have been recruited in East Lancashire as part of Targeted Enhanced Recruitment Scheme 2021-2022 and what recent assessment she has made of the adequacy of the numbers recruited to that scheme to meet local demand.

No trainees were recruited as part of the Targeted Enhanced Recruitment Scheme in 2021/2022 in East Lancashire. In the 2022/2023 scheme, 38 training places have been offered in East Lancashire.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps her Department is taking to help support the (a) recruitment and (b) retention of GPs in Blackburn.

We are working with NHS England, Health Education England and the profession to increase the general practice workforce in England, including in Blackburn. This includes measures to improve recruitment, address the reasons why doctors leave the profession and encourage them to return to practice.

The updated GP Contract Framework announced a number of new schemes, alongside continued support for existing recruitment and retention schemes for the general practice workforce. This includes the GP Retention Scheme, the GP Retention Fund, the National GP Induction and Refresher, the Locum Support Scheme, the New to Partnership Payment and the Supporting Mentors Scheme. General practitioners in Lancashire and South Cumbria also have access to the national GP Career Support Hub. It provides information, guidance and support on career development, learning, mentoring, appraisals, career options and flexibility, wellbeing, pay and pensions.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many GP practices were open in Blackburn in September 2022; and how many there were in September 2013.

In September 2013 there were 23 practices registered in Blackburn, with 18 practices registered in September 2022.

Practices close for a variety of reasons, including practice mergers or retirement. A reduction in practice numbers does not mean a reduction in the quality of care. When a practice does close, patients are informed and advised to register at another local practice of their choice. Practices and commissioners must put in place appropriate measures to ensure that the affected patients have access to general practice services.

11th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many full time equivalent fully qualified GPs (excluding GPs in training grade) were practicing in Blackburn in September 2022; and how many there were in September 2013.

The information is not held in the format requested.

10th Oct 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment she has made on (a) podiatry vacancy rates in the NHS in Blackburn constituency and (b) the impact these vacancies will have on patient treatment for diabetic foot complications.

The information requested is not held centrally.

23rd May 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to ensure adequate support is provided to people who live with severe chronic pain.

The majority of routine treatment and support for people with chronic pain is provided by local primary, community and secondary care services and commissioned via clinical commissioning groups. For patients with severe and complex pain, NHS England commissions specialised care. Upon referral to specialist centres, patients can access a range of health professionals, including consultant specialists, clinical nurse specialists, psychologists and physiotherapists and receive specialised treatment.

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence published its guidance on chronic pain in April 2021, which includes recommendations on how chronic pain can be managed through pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches, such as exercise programmes, acupuncture and psychological therapy. NHS England has established a task and finish group to produce guidance on the provision of high-quality services for people living with long-term pain conditions by September 2022. The guidance is aimed at integrated care systems, to provide core principles which can be used to inform the development of local models of care to support people living with chronic pain.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the (a) accessibility and (b) quality of child and adolescent mental health services in Lancashire.

No specific assessment has been made. However, in 2020/21 42% of children and young people with a probable mental health condition in the Healthier Lancashire and South Cumbria Sustainability and Transformation Partnership area received at least two contacts with National Health Service-funded mental health services. The percentage of children and young people with a probable mental health condition is based on 2004 prevalence from the Office of National Statistics. The Care Quality Commission’s inspection report published in September 2019 found that the quality of child and adolescent mental health services at Lancashire and South Cumbria NHS Foundation Trust was rated as good.

Gillian Keegan
Secretary of State for Education
22nd Feb 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the impact of the removal of domestic covid-19 restrictions on the health and wellbeing of clinically vulnerable and immunocompromised people.

No specific assessment has been made. However, we have made antiviral and other therapeutic treatments available for the most vulnerable patients and a targeted vaccination programme. On 1 April 2022, we issued updated guidance for those most at risk from serious illness as a result of COVID-19 infection, including those previously considered as clinically extremely vulnerable and the immunocompromised. We are also continuing to engage with patients and relevant stakeholder groups to review the impact of these measures.

5th Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to monitor the effects and prevalence of long covid.

Long COVID is still a new condition and it is vital that our understanding of it grows. We have invested over £50 million in dedicated research to improve the diagnosis and treatment of long COVID.

The Office for National Statistics publishes estimates of self-reported long COVID prevalence on a monthly basis. NHS England and NHS Improvement publish activity data and demographic information for patients who have been referred to a post-COVID assessment clinic.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
15th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he plans to take steps to incentivise new and existing GPs to locate in areas of high deprivation with the lowest numbers of GPs per patient.

The Department continues to work with NHS England and NHS Improvement to consider the best ways to tackle health inequalities within primary care, and to address variation in access to general practice. Since 2016, the Targeted Enhanced Recruitment Scheme has attracted hundreds of doctors to train in hard to recruit areas by providing a one-off financial incentive of £20,000. In 2021, there are 500 places available.

Maria Caulfield
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Business and Trade) (Minister for Women)
27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department is providing to mitigate the (a) financial and (b) educational costs to nursing students who opted in to work in the NHS during the first wave of the covid-19 outbreak.

All nursing students in England who opted in to paid placements during the first wave of COVID-19 maintained their eligibility for relevant student support packages from the Student Loans Company, in addition to non-repayable funding through the NHS Learning Support Fund. Those students also received a salary and automatic National Health Service pension entitlement at the appropriate band.

Health Education England continues to work with system partners to ensure any impact on training and placements is minimised; including supporting universities to rearrange interrupted clinical placements and finding alternatives such as using simulation where that is appropriate. In cases where extensions to students’ courses are unavoidable, the Government will continue to ensure that appropriate financial support is made available to affected students.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
27th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the support available to nursing staff working in the independent sector; and what comparative assessment he has made of the level of access to physical health and mental well-being initiatives between nurses working in the (a) independent sector and (b) NHS.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

26th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many NHS nurses there are in each region; and how many vacancies for NHS nurses there are in each region.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the level of additional funding that the Association of Directors of Adult Social Care has identified that local authorities require to support people with learning disabilities.

Councils are being provided with access to over £1 billion of additional funding for social care in 2021-22. This includes £300 million of new grant funding for social care, on top of the £1 billion social care grant announced last year. Longer term funding decisions on social care beyond 2021-22 will be decided at the next Spending Review.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish the impact assessments carried out on the (a) covid-19 vaccines delivery programme and (b) vaccination sites in (i) Blackburn and (ii) Lancashire.

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before prorogation.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential merits of waiving the repayment of the £370 million allocated to community pharmacies during the covid-19 outbreak.

Discussions are ongoing with the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee (PSNC) on additional funding for costs incurred during the COVID-19 pandemic. The PSNC has proposed that the £370 million increased advance payments are not paid back to cover the COVID-19 costs incurred by community pharmacies. That proposal is being looked at as part of the Government’s ongoing assessment of COVID-19 costs incurred by the sector.

Jo Churchill
Minister of State (Department for Work and Pensions)
19th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support his Department has provided to local authorities to carry out surge covid-19 testing in areas where the South African variant has been detected.

Working in partnership with local authorities, we are targeting areas within specific postcodes where the variant has been found. Mobile testing units will be deployed offering polymerase chain reaction testing to people without symptoms who have to leave their home for work or essential reasons, with local authorities providing additional home test kits.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
26th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, when his Department plans to respond to Questions 135958 and 136535, tabled by the hon. Member for Blackburn.

We take parliamentary scrutiny incredibly seriously and it is fundamentally important that hon. Members are provided with accurate and timely information to enable them to hold the Government to account. We are working rapidly to provide all Members with accurate answers to their questions, as well as supporting the Government’s response to the unprecedented challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The hon. Member’s questions will be answered as soon as possible.

Edward Argar
Minister of State (Ministry of Justice)
14th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the (a) potential effect of long covid on the delivery of local authority services and (b) cost of that disease to local authorities.

The Government has made no specific assessment.
COVID-19 is a new disease and therefore it is not clear what the medical, psychological and rehabilitation needs will be for those experiencing long-term effects of the virus.
The Government will continue to monitor pressures in the National Health Service and local government and will keep future funding under review.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of covid-19 vaccination centres required for every (a) local authority and (b) 100,000 population.

Estimations for the number of vaccination centres required is based on a number of factors and not geographical location or relative population alone. The network of vaccination sites has been designed to scale up and fit the expected vaccine supply, resident priority populations at relevant deployment stage and to and ensure safe and easy access for the whole population.

The programme aims to offer everyone in England a vaccine service within 10 miles, and currently this is applicable for more than 98% of the population. In a small number of highly rural areas, the vaccination centre will be a mobile unit. In England, latest published data from 26 March shows that a total of 1,763 vaccination sites have now been established.

The network will continue to expand and evolve as we progress towards vaccinating all adults by the end of July. Further information on vaccine sites in England can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/publication/vaccination-sites/

11th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what criteria his Department is using to assess the viability of covid-19 vaccination sites.

NHS England and NHS Improvement undertake an assessment of all potential sites which may be considered under the vaccination programme. This will include size, location, availability, suitability and will include an assessment around accessibility aligned to the Equality Act 2010. Where there are running costs to be incurred, the site will also be subject to a value for money assessment. Sites will be secured under formal lease or licence.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to support adult social care providers to prepare for the potential effect of a second wave of covid-19 infections in winter 2020-21.

The recommendations from the Social Care Sector Covid-19 Taskforce will shape our approach to COVID-19 in the adult social care sector and, in particular, the plans we put in place for winter which we will set out in the Adult Social Care Winter Plan. This will be published shortly.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
8th Jun 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of delays to local authorities receiving positive test results on the effectiveness of the NHS Track, Trace and isolate system.

NHS Test and Trace is working closely with local authorities. Every day local authorities receive test, case and contact tracing data, with further data shared with local Directors of Public Health, to help control and manage outbreaks in their area. For week commencing 10 October 2020 67.9% of test results were received the day after the test was taken an increase from 60.8% the previous week.

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
5th May 2020
What assessment he has made of the availability of covid-19 testing for (a) care home residents and (b) home care recipients.

The Government is committed to testing every resident in every care home in England when they need it. Around 30,000 care home residents have already been tested. We have started couriering tests directly to care homes and testing the whole home will now be done when it is needed to prevent outbreaks and control infections. We are offering testing to all social care workers and unpaid carers. We are also making tests available to over 65s and people they live with who show symptoms, which therefore includes many, although not all of those who receive home care

Helen Whately
Minister of State (Department of Health and Social Care)
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the number of entities that have self-reported funds paid out due to fraud or error in relation to the coronavirus support schemes.

HMRC have taken a supportive and reasonable approach where mistakes have been made, giving customers the opportunity to correct them without fear of sanctions. By law, claimants can notify and amend incorrect claims within 90 days without penalty.

Claimants can return monies that they are not entitled to in a number of ways, for example, via an online digital service or by making an entry in their income or corporation tax return. As HMRC does not yet have all the returns for the periods in which the grants were paid, they are not currently able to quantify the numbers of entities who have returned grants.

As set out in the document that accompanied HMRC’s 2020-21 Annual Report & Accounts, claimants have repaid more than £350 million to correct mistakes without HMRC intervention in addition to the compliance results for the schemes. HMRC’s 2020-21 Annual Report & Accounts can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/measuring-error-and-fraud-in-the-covid-19-schemes

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
21st Jan 2022
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate he has made of the funds paid out to dormant companies in relation to the coronavirus support schemes.

The COVID-19 support schemes have helped millions of people and businesses through the pandemic. These schemes are part of the collective national effort to protect jobs. HMRC administered the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS), Self Employed Income Support Scheme (SEISS) and the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme (EOHO)

SEISS was only payable to non-incorporated businesses. CJRS and EOHO was payable to both non-incorporated and incorporated businesses.

HMRC prioritised getting money to those who needed it with the schemes designed to minimise fraud while not unnecessarily delaying payments. The schemes were designed to prevent fraud, both in the eligibility criteria and the claim process itself. However, they could still be attractive to fraudsters.

To qualify for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme employers needed to have a Pay As You Earn (PAYE) scheme and submitted a Real Time Information (RTI) return with details of the employees’ wages. For instance, for claim periods between 1 November 2020 and 30 April 2021 employees included in furlough claims must have been employed on 30 October 2020 and HMRC must have received an RTI submission between 20 March 2020 and 30 October 2020 notifying a payment through PAYE in respect of that employee.

To qualify for the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme, claimants needed to register confirming they met the following criteria:

  • Business sells food for immediate consumption on the premises
  • Business provides its own dining area or shares a dining area with another establishment for eat-in meals
  • Registered as a food business with the relevant local authority on or before 7 July 2020.

The company will have to have been actively trading to make a valid claim.

To ensure quick payment, HMRC undertook pre-payment risk assessments within 72 hours of receipt, blocking those indicating criminal activity.

As businesses were required to be active to make a valid claim, HMRC believes that the risk of funds being paid to dormant companies to be low.

Lucy Frazer
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport
27th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the length of time the bidding process will take from the time of application to the allocation of funding through the Levelling Up Fund.

The Levelling Up Fund will be open to all local areas in England and allocated competitively. This will be a fast, streamlined process to directly fund local priorities. The Spending Review makes available up to £600 million in 2021-22. We will publish a prospectus for the fund and launch the first round of competitions in the New Year. Further funding will be spread over subsequent years up to 2024-25.
Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has made of the effect of the Levelling Up Fund on local economic recovery.

The Levelling Up Fund will invest in high value local projects in England to boost local economic recovery, including bypasses and other local road schemes, bus lanes, rail station upgrades, regenerating eyesores, upgrading town centres and community infrastructure, and local arts and culture. This is about empowering local areas to identify and bring forward genuine local priorities. To support levelling up opportunity across the country, we will prioritise bids to drive growth and regeneration in places in need, those facing particular local challenges, and areas that have received less Government investment in recent years.
Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
26th Nov 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment the Government has made of the effect the Levelling Up Fund will have on national economic recovery.

The Levelling Up Fund will invest in high value local projects in England to boost local economic recovery, including bypasses and other local road schemes, bus lanes, rail station upgrades, regenerating eyesores, upgrading town centres and community infrastructure, and local arts and culture. This is about empowering local areas to identify and bring forward genuine local priorities. To support levelling up opportunity across the country, we will prioritise bids to drive growth and regeneration in places in need, those facing particular local challenges, and areas that have received less Government investment in recent years.
Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
5th Jun 2020
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he plans to extend eligibility for the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant to food and drink wholesalers that supply to care homes, hospitals and schools.

The Government recognises that this is a very challenging time for businesses in a wide variety of sectors. Small businesses occupying properties for retail, hospitality or leisure purposes are likely to be particularly affected by COVID-19 due to their reliance on customer footfall, and the fact that they are less likely than larger businesses to have sufficient cash reserves to meet their high fixed property-related costs. The Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund (RHLGF) is intended to help small businesses in this situation.

Local Authorities (LAs) can choose to make discretionary grants to businesses in supply chains, like the wholesale food and drink sector, if they feel there is a particular local economic need. The Government has allocated up to an additional £617 million to LAs to enable them to give discretionary grants. While food and drink wholesalers are not one of the priority groups which Government has asked LAs to focus on, LAs may choose to make payments to businesses outside of these priority groups if they feel there is a local economic need to do so, so long as the business was trading on 11th March, and has not received any other cash grant funded by central Government (with the exception of grants from the SEISS).

Small businesses which are not eligible for business grants should still be able to benefit from other elements of the Government’s unprecedented package of support. The Business Support website provides further information about how businesses can access the support that has been made available, who is eligible, when the schemes open and how to apply - https://www.gov.uk/business-coronavirus-support-finder.

Kemi Badenoch
President of the Board of Trade
8th Nov 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many serving police officers in each force took their own lives in each of the last eight quarters.

The Home Office does not collect information centrally on how many serving police officers have taken their own lives.

This information is held by individual Police Forces.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan citizens have been referred to Pathway Two of the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme as on 2 September 2022; and how many and what proportion of these have been admitted to the UK.

Operation PITTING took place in August 2021 – it was the largest UK military evacuation since the Second World War, during which we evacuated around 15,000 individuals to the UK. In the year since the evacuation, around 5,000 more individuals have arrived in the UK via neighbouring countries.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) launched in January, and this will provide up to 20,000 women, children, and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle and re-build their lives in the UK over the coming years.

The ACRS is not application-based. Instead, eligible individuals will be prioritised and referred for resettlement to the UK through one of three referral pathways.

Through ACRS Pathway 1, some of those already evacuated to the UK under Op PITTING are being granted a place on the scheme. Those eligible who were called forward during the evacuation, but were not able to board flights, will also be resettled through pathway 1 if they subsequently come to the UK.

Under ACRS Pathway 2, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) will refer refugees - who have already fled Afghanistan - for resettlement to the UK. Those referred will be assessed for resettlement by the UNHCR, using their established processes.

We have now begun to receive the first referrals for resettlement under pathway 2 of the ACRS – which opened in June – from the UNHCR. It is anticipated we will receive referrals for up to 2,000 refugees during the first year of this pathway, although this number will be kept under review – and we look forward to welcoming the first new arrivals under this pathway in due course.

Further information on UNHCR referrals is available at:

UNHCR UK Information and Links on Afghanistan Situation - UNHCR United Kingdom

Under ACRS Pathway 3 eligible British Council and GardaWorld contractors as well as Chevening alumni will be considered for resettlement during the first year of this pathway.

The ACRS is in addition to individuals relocated through the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP). We have relocated around 10,000 eligible Afghan citizens and their family members under the ARAP scheme since it opened it April 2021 – and the scheme remains open.

Work is underway to assure information relating to all the individuals relocated under the ARAP and ACRS on case working systems. Once this work concludes, statistics on both schemes - including the number of people resettled under each - will be included in the published Immigration Statistics.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
2nd Sep 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Afghan citizen refugees have entered the UK since August 2021; and through which schemes or pathways they have been admitted.

Operation PITTING took place in August 2021 – it was the largest UK military evacuation since the Second World War, during which we evacuated around 15,000 individuals to the UK. In the year since the evacuation, around 5,000 more individuals have arrived in the UK via neighbouring countries.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS) launched in January, and this will provide up to 20,000 women, children, and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle and re-build their lives in the UK over the coming years.

The ACRS is not application-based. Instead, eligible individuals will be prioritised and referred for resettlement to the UK through one of three referral pathways.

Through ACRS Pathway 1, some of those already evacuated to the UK under Op PITTING are being granted a place on the scheme. Those eligible who were called forward during the evacuation, but were not able to board flights, will also be resettled through pathway 1 if they subsequently come to the UK.

Under ACRS Pathway 2, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) will refer refugees - who have already fled Afghanistan - for resettlement to the UK. Those referred will be assessed for resettlement by the UNHCR, using their established processes.

We have now begun to receive the first referrals for resettlement under pathway 2 of the ACRS – which opened in June – from the UNHCR. It is anticipated we will receive referrals for up to 2,000 refugees during the first year of this pathway, although this number will be kept under review – and we look forward to welcoming the first new arrivals under this pathway in due course.

Further information on UNHCR referrals is available at:

UNHCR UK Information and Links on Afghanistan Situation - UNHCR United Kingdom

Under ACRS Pathway 3 eligible British Council and GardaWorld contractors as well as Chevening alumni will be considered for resettlement during the first year of this pathway.

The ACRS is in addition to individuals relocated through the Afghan Relocations and Assistance Policy (ARAP). We have relocated around 10,000 eligible Afghan citizens and their family members under the ARAP scheme since it opened it April 2021 – and the scheme remains open.

Work is underway to assure information relating to all the individuals relocated under the ARAP and ACRS on case working systems. Once this work concludes, statistics on both schemes - including the number of people resettled under each - will be included in the published Immigration Statistics.

Tom Pursglove
Minister of State (Minister for Legal Migration and Delivery)
10th Mar 2022
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the earliest arrival date of Afghan citizens to the UK under the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme.

The Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme commenced on 6th January, providing up to 20,000 women, children and others at risk with a safe and legal route to resettle in the UK


There are around 6,500 people in the UK who have been brought to safety during and after the evacuation and who are eligible for the ACRS. They include women’s rights activists, journalists, and prosecutors, as well as Afghan families of British Nationals. The first Afghan families have already been granted Indefinite Leave to Remain under the scheme.

2nd Nov 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plan her Department has for the delivery of the Afghan citizens' resettlement scheme.

Through the Afghan Citizens Resettlement Scheme (ACRS), the UK will relocate up to 20,000 people at risk, including women and girls and minority groups, so they can rebuild their lives in safety.

The scheme is not yet open. However, we are working urgently to open the scheme, amid the complex and changing picture.

The Home Office will continue to work closely with other Government departments, non-governmental organisations, charities, local authorities and other partners and relevant organisations in the development and implementation of the ACRS.

Further information on the eligibility, prioritisation and referral of people for the ACRS is set out in the policy statement published on gov.uk on 13 September, available at www.gov.uk/government/publications/afghanistan-resettlement-and-immigration-policy-statement.

Victoria Atkins
Secretary of State for Health and Social Care
19th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many immigration cases that have been successfully appealed remain unresolved in (a) England and (b) Blackburn.

Where an appeal has been allowed in favour of the appellant, we take all reasonable steps to implement the allowed appeal accordingly.

The requested information cannot be accurately extracted from our internal systems. To provide this information a manual reconciliation of outstanding appeals implementations work would be required. A manual reconciliation of individual cases would incur a disproportionate cost.

Chris Philp
Minister of State (Home Office)
13th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will take steps to investigate the immigration case of Adeleke Olanrewaju Okunade who successfully appealed in May 2020 against the refusal of his settlement visa application and who has not yet received that visa.

It is not appropriate to comment on individual cases.

21st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how many accessible homes were rented privately last year.

The information requested is not held centrally.

Jacob Young
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
21st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how many (a) people and (b) disabled people were evicted for anti-social behaviour last year.

The Ministry of Justice publishes statistics on the volumes of landlord repossessions which can be found here; however, it is not possible to disaggregate this by the characteristics of the individual(s) being evicted or the grounds of the eviction.

Jacob Young
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
21st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, what data his Department holds on the number of disabled people living in temporary accommodation.

The most recent Statutory homelessness statistics (April- June 2023) is available at Homelessness statistics which includes households that are owed a homelessness duty due to their support needs, including those with a disability.

Felicity Buchan
Parliamentary Under Secretary of State (Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities)
21st Feb 2024
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, how many and what proportion of homes that were planned to be built to meet Requirement M4(2) of the Building Regulations (a) have been completed and (b) did not proceed past the viability stage of planning applications in each of the last two years.

The English Housing Survey collects data on accessibility and adaptations within the home; the most recent report is published online.

New build homes are constructed to meet Building Regulations accessibility standards in force at the time of build; the most recent data on new build home rates was published by Office for National Statistics on 30 January 2024.

The National Planning Policy Framework sets out that local authorities should assess the size, type and tenure of housing needed for different groups in the community. It is for local planning authorities to assess local needs, including needs for older people and people with disabilities, and make provision in their local plans.

Lee Rowley
Minister of State (Minister for Housing)
19th Oct 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities, when he plans to publish the Levelling Up White Paper.

Levelling up is at the heart of the Government's agenda to build back better after the pandemic and to deliver for citizens in every part of the UK. This is a transformative agenda and the Department's priority is to produce a White Paper which matches our ambition and which will drive change for years to come.

The White Paper will build on existing action being taken across Government, setting out bold new policy interventions to improve livelihoods and opportunities in all parts of the UK.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many people there are in out-of-area temporary accommodation.

While local authorities aim to secure permanent accommodation for families, time spent in temporary accommodation means people are getting help and ensures no family is without a roof over their head.

The legislation and guidance set out that in the first instance, local authorities should try to place individuals within their own area, and retain established links with schools, doctors, and other key services and support. However, when this is not possible, they should place the household as near as possible to the original local authority. Placing a household out of the local authority area should be as a last resort and authorities must consider the impact a change in location would have on a household.

If a local authority places a household into accommodation in another local area, they are required by law to notify the local authority of any placement, to ensure there is no disruption to schooling or employment for example.

4th Jun 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to tackle out-of-area temporary accommodation.

While local authorities aim to secure permanent accommodation for families, time spent in temporary accommodation means people are getting help and ensures no family is without a roof over their head.

The legislation and guidance set out that in the first instance, local authorities should try to place individuals within their own area, and retain established links with schools, doctors, and other key services and support. However, when this is not possible, they should place the household as near as possible to the original local authority. Placing a household out of the local authority area should be as a last resort and authorities must consider the impact a change in location would have on a household.

If a local authority places a household into accommodation in another local area, they are required by law to notify the local authority of any placement, to ensure there is no disruption to schooling or employment for example.

20th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the change in the level of the council tax base in 2020-21; and what assessment he has made of the effect of that change on the Government's estimate in the Local Government Financial Settlement for 2021-22.

For the purposes of estimating Core Spending Power in presenting the annual Local Government Finance Settlement, each local authority’s average annual tax setting base over the previous five years is used to project its tax base for the coming financial year. No adjustments were made to this methodology in the 2021-22 settlement to account for the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. This is because the Government is providing additional support to local authorities through the £670 million Local Council Tax Support grant, in recognition of the impact of anticipated increased local council tax support caseloads.

The Government also recognises that council tax yields may have been reduced during 2020-21 as a result of COVID-19. This is why we are compensating councils for 75% of irrecoverable council tax losses from 2020-21 through the tax income guarantee.

15th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much funding each English region will be allocated under UK Shared Prosperity Fund.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK in places most in need, such as ex-industrial areas, deprived towns and rural and coastal communities, and for people who face labour market barriers.

The November 2020 Spending Review set out the main strategic elements of the UKSPF in the Heads of Terms. The Government will publish a UK-wide investment framework later in 2021 and confirm multiyear funding profiles at the next Spending Review.

14th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of social care funding for local authorities.

The Local Government Finance Settlement for 2021/22 confirmed that Core Spending Power is forecast to rise by 4.6% in cash terms - a real terms increase. Within their Core Spending Power, councils will have access to an additional £1 billion for social care this year, made up of a £300 million increase to the social care grant and 3% Adult Social Care precept. The additional £1 billion of grant funding announced at SR19 for Adult and Children’s Social Care will be continuing, along with all other existing social care funding including the improved Better Care Fund.

Complementing this is an unprecedented package of support for local authorities to combat the Covid-19 pandemic, including £4.6 billion of un-ringfenced funding for Covid-19 pressures in 2020/21 and an additional £1.55 billion of un-ringfenced funding for Covid pressures in 2021/22, including social care.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when he plans to respond to the letter of 2 March 2021 from the hon. Member for Blackburn on local authority remote participation.

Luke Hall MP, Minister for Regional Growth and Local Government wrote on 25 March to all Members and leaders of all principal councils in England on the future of regulations introduced during the coronavirus pandemic regarding remote meetings.

The Government is supporting the ongoing legal action for remote meetings to be ruled as permissible under existing legislation. Minster Hall will write again to Members when there is any update on the court case.

12th Apr 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if his Department will publish any impact assessment it has undertaken on councils returning to in-person meetings after the expiry of the Local Authorities and Police and Crime Panels (Coronavirus) (Flexibility of Local Authority and Police and Crime Panel Meetings) (England and Wales) Regulations 2020.

Councils have been able to meet in person throughout the pandemic so long as they follow the relevant Covid-19 guidance on the safe use of council buildings. It is for councils to apply the Covid-19 guidance to ensure meetings take place safely.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what his Department’s policy is on social distancing in council meetings during the covid-19 outbreak; whether local authorities that cannot implement social distancing measures are required to make alternative provisions; and what those alternative provisions should be.

Where local authority meetings take place face-to-face the ‘Working safely during cornavirus’ guidance published on gov.uk should be followed. Ultimately it is for local authorities to carry out their own risk assessments and follow the ‘working safely’ guidance to ensure meetings take place safely. It is for the local authority to decide what is appropriate in their specific circumstances.

The Government keeps all policy under review. To extend the facility for all local authorities to continue to meet remotely or in hybrid form after 7 May 2021 would require primary legislation.

We have received representations from local authorities and sector representative organisations making the case for the continuation of remote meetings beyond 7 May 2021 and are carefully considering next steps in this area.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on public health of ending remote council meetings under section 78 of the Coronavirus Act 2020.

Where local authority meetings take place face-to-face the ‘Working safely during cornavirus’ guidance published on gov.uk should be followed. Ultimately it is for local authorities to carry out their own risk assessments and follow the ‘working safely’ guidance to ensure meetings take place safely. It is for the local authority to decide what is appropriate in their specific circumstances.

The Government keeps all policy under review. To extend the facility for all local authorities to continue to meet remotely or in hybrid form after 7 May 2021 would require primary legislation.

We have received representations from local authorities and sector representative organisations making the case for the continuation of remote meetings beyond 7 May 2021 and are carefully considering next steps in this area.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what discussions officials his Department have had with local authorities on the duration of remote council meetings.

Where local authority meetings take place face-to-face the ‘Working safely during cornavirus’ guidance published on gov.uk should be followed. Ultimately it is for local authorities to carry out their own risk assessments and follow the ‘working safely’ guidance to ensure meetings take place safely. It is for the local authority to decide what is appropriate in their specific circumstances.

The Government keeps all policy under review. To extend the facility for all local authorities to continue to meet remotely or in hybrid form after 7 May 2021 would require primary legislation.

We have received representations from local authorities and sector representative organisations making the case for the continuation of remote meetings beyond 7 May 2021 and are carefully considering next steps in this area.

19th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans his Department has to extend the ability of local authorities to hold meetings remotely through (a) primary and (b) secondary legislation; and if he will publish those plans.

Where local authority meetings take place face-to-face the ‘Working safely during cornavirus’ guidance published on gov.uk should be followed. Ultimately it is for local authorities to carry out their own risk assessments and follow the ‘working safely’ guidance to ensure meetings take place safely. It is for the local authority to decide what is appropriate in their specific circumstances.

The Government keeps all policy under review. To extend the facility for all local authorities to continue to meet remotely or in hybrid form after 7 May 2021 would require primary legislation.

We have received representations from local authorities and sector representative organisations making the case for the continuation of remote meetings beyond 7 May 2021 and are carefully considering next steps in this area.

4th Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what methodology his Department used to the determine the priority areas listed in the (a) UK Community Renewal Fund and (b) UK Shared Prosperity Fund; and if he will publish that methodology.

To ensure the UK Community Renewal Fund funding reaches the most in need, we have identified 100 priority places based on an index of economic resilience across Great Britain which measures productivity, household income, unemployment, skills, and population density. We are committed to transparency and a methodological note will be published explaining how the 100 priority places were selected.

We will publish details on the UK Shared Prosperity Fund in a UK-wide Investment Framework later in 2021. The UK Community Renewal Fund will help inform the design of the UK Shared Prosperity through funding of one-year pilots, but the Funds are distinct in regard to design, eligibility, and duration.

2nd Mar 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many funds his Department is responsible for; how many funds shared with other departments his Department is responsible for; and if he will provide a list of each of those funds and provide details of whether each those funds is allocated (a) competitively or (b) on the basis of need.

All the details of the Department’s funding programmes are set out in the Explanatory Memoranda on our Estimates. The most recent memoranda for our Supplementary Estimate 2020-21 will be published shortly.

The Department’s Main Estimate Explanatory Memorandum for 2020-21 is available here: https://committees.parliament.uk/publications/931/documents/7131/default/.

26th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what methodology his Department used to calculate the £1.5 billion per year that will be required for the UK Shared Prosperity Fund to match EU Structural Funds; and if he will publish that calculation.

The UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) will help to level up and create opportunity across the UK for people and places.  

Funding for the UKSPF will ramp up so that total domestic UK-wide funding will at least match receipts from EU structural funds, on average reaching around £1.5 billion per year. Its funding profile will be set out at the next Spending Review.

£1.5 billion is the average annual investment from EU Structural Funds (including ERDF, ESF and ETC) over the previous EU funding round.

25th Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what criteria his Department uses to assess whether a fund should be (a) competitive or (b) allocated on the basis of need.

In designing funding programmes, MHCLG works closely with a range of stakeholders in and outside government to identify the most appropriate method for distributing funding, considering a wide variety of different approaches. Our focus is on ensuring that public funding gets to where it is needed most, and that it is invested in high quality interventions that maximise value for money for the taxpayer.

2nd Feb 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the ability of parish and town councils to apply for grant funding.

The Government does not have powers to offer Section 31 grants directly to parish and town councils, which are instead often funded in part through a precept collected from within the council tax paid by their residents. The Secretary of State has written to principal authorities and asked them to discuss the funding support for parish councils from within the support we have provided them. We continue to encourage parish and town councils to work with their principal authority (district or unitary council) where they are delivering vital services that have been impacted by COVID-19.

In the expectation that parish and town councils continue to show restraint when setting council tax precept levels, the Government has proposed to continue with no referendum principles for town and parish councils in 2021-22. The Government will take careful account of the increases set by parishes in 2021-22 when reviewing the matter ahead of next year’s settlement.

If a parish or town council operates a leisure facility that is outsourced to an external provider, then the parent local authority was eligible to bid to the Sports England National Leisure Recovery Fund (NLRF) on its behalf. Applications to the fund are currently being assessed and the results should be known by late February.

Parish and town councils are also not excluded from the COVID-19 business grant programme where they operate hereditaments that meet the criteria set out in guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-on-business-support-grant-funding.

12th Jan 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much and what proportion of the Reopening High Streets Safely Fund has been allocated to local authorities to date.

Our £50 million Reopening High Streets Safely Fund (RHSSF) is playing an important role in getting people back to work, supporting our businesses and helping to reinvigorate our local communities.

This funding has been allocated to 314 local authorities in England on a per capita basis with a minimum limit of £30,000. Places have been able to incur expenditure on eligible activity up to the amount of their full allocation from 1 June 2020. Once final contracts have been agreed, local authorities can claim funding from Government in arrears.

More information on the RHSSF criteria, including an Annex detailing local authority funding allocations, can be found in the Fund guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reopening-high-streets-safely-fundguidance.

26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, over what period local areas will be able to bid for funding from the Levelling Up Fund.

The Government is launching a new Levelling Up Fund worth £4 billion for England, that will attract up to £800 million for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in the usual way. This will invest in local infrastructure that has a visible impact on people and their communities and will support economic recovery.

The Fund will be open to all local areas and allocated competitively. In its assessment process, the Fund will adopt the approach in the refreshed Green Book to ensure that investment supports levelling up and spreads opportunity across the UK – with projects assessed on how well they deliver policy aims and their impact on local areas.

We will publish a prospectus for the Fund and launch the first round of competitions in the New Year.

26th Nov 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much funding from the Levelling Up Fund will be available to local areas to bid for in (a) 2022-23, (b) 2023-24 and (c) 2024-25.

The Government is launching a new Levelling Up Fund worth £4 billion for England, that will attract up to £800 million for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in the usual way. This will invest in local infrastructure that has a visible impact on people and their communities and will support economic recovery.

The Fund will be open to all local areas and allocated competitively. In its assessment process, the Fund will adopt the approach in the refreshed Green Book to ensure that investment supports levelling up and spreads opportunity across the UK – with projects assessed on how well they deliver policy aims and their impact on local areas.

We will publish a prospectus for the Fund and launch the first round of competitions in the New Year.

28th Aug 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what the (a) subject, (b) date and (c) reason has been for all Ministerial Directions he has issued since 24 July 2019.

Ministerial directions and rationale for them are available on Gov.uk.

12th Feb 2020
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent assessment he has made of the ability of local authorities to deliver their statutory duties for adult social care.

The Department of Health and Social Care lead the Government’s relationship with local authorities for adult social care, including understanding how they may be meeting their adult social care responsibilities. In recognition of the pressures councils are facing in the area of social care, the Government have given councils access to an additional £1.5 billion of funding for social care in 2020-21.

6th Jan 2023
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made on the availability of prison places in 2023.

The Ministry of Justice continually monitors the availability of prison places and will ensure availability of places sufficient for the requirement.

Following a sharp increase in the adult male prison population in the autumn we formally activated Operation Safeguard, working alongside the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) to provide additional capacity as a precautionary measure as needed, to ensure the smooth running of the prison estate. No police cells have yet been used.

To ensure ongoing availability, we are delivering 20,000 additional, modern prison places, the largest prison build programme in a century. We have already delivered over 3,100 of these additional places to date.

Damian Hinds
Minister of State (Education)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what equality impact assessments HM Courts and Tribunal Service has made of the Common Platform case management system.

HMCTS have undertaken a Workforce Equality Analysis and the Public Sector Equality Analysis for the Common Platform case management system. These were undertaken in 2020 and are currently being reviewed.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)
6th Dec 2021
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what organisational risk assessments HM Courts and Tribunal Service has made of the Common Platform.

The health, safety and wellbeing of all HMCTS colleagues is taken extremely seriously. For our Common Platform programme, we have assessed risk throughout, and continue to keep it under review. At an organisational level, that assessment has been documented through a Change Impact Assessment, Public Sector Equality Analysis and a Workforce Equality Analysis, which remain under regular review. At a local/site level, risk assessments for particular areas of risk are documented using standard organisational templates where required. This meets the obligations we hold, and satisfies us that risks are suitably and sufficiently managed.

James Cartlidge
Minister of State (Ministry of Defence)